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1.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 6285, 2020 12 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33293549

RESUMO

White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are the most common brain-imaging feature of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), hypertension being the main known risk factor. Here, we identify 27 genome-wide loci for WMH-volume in a cohort of 50,970 older individuals, accounting for modification/confounding by hypertension. Aggregated WMH risk variants were associated with altered white matter integrity (p = 2.5×10-7) in brain images from 1,738 young healthy adults, providing insight into the lifetime impact of SVD genetic risk. Mendelian randomization suggested causal association of increasing WMH-volume with stroke, Alzheimer-type dementia, and of increasing blood pressure (BP) with larger WMH-volume, notably also in persons without clinical hypertension. Transcriptome-wide colocalization analyses showed association of WMH-volume with expression of 39 genes, of which four encode known drug targets. Finally, we provide insight into BP-independent biological pathways underlying SVD and suggest potential for genetic stratification of high-risk individuals and for genetically-informed prioritization of drug targets for prevention trials.

2.
J Affect Disord ; 279: 585-598, 2020 Oct 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33189065

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We examined associations between family status (living with a spouse or partner and number of children) and lifetime depression. METHODS: We used data from the UK Biobank, a large prospective study of middle-aged and older adults. Lifetime depression was assessed as part of a follow-up mental health questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations between family status and depression. We included extensive adjustment for social, demographic and other potential confounders, including depression polygenic risk scores. RESULTS: 52,078 participants (mean age = 63.6, SD = 7.6; 52% female) were included in our analyses. Living with a spouse or partner was associated with substantially lower odds of lifetime depression (OR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.62-0.74). Compared to individuals without children, we found higher odds of lifetime depression for parents of one child (OR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.07-1.27) and parents of three (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20) or four or more children (OR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.14-1.42). Amongst those not cohabiting, having any number of children was associated with higher odds of lifetime depression. Our results were consistent across age groups, the sexes, neighbourhood deprivation and genetic risk for depression. Exploratory Mendelian randomisation analyses suggested a causal effect of number of children on lifetime depression. LIMITATIONS: Our data did not allow distinguishing between non-marital and marital cohabitation. Results may not generalise to all ages or populations. CONCLUSIONS: Living with a spouse or partner was strongly associated with reduced odds of depression. Having one or three or more children was associated with increased odds of depression, especially in individuals not living with a spouse or partner.

3.
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet ; 183(6): 309-330, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32681593

RESUMO

It is imperative to understand the specific and shared etiologies of major depression and cardio-metabolic disease, as both traits are frequently comorbid and each represents a major burden to society. This study examined whether there is a genetic association between major depression and cardio-metabolic traits and if this association is stratified by age at onset for major depression. Polygenic risk scores analysis and linkage disequilibrium score regression was performed to examine whether differences in shared genetic etiology exist between depression case control status (N cases = 40,940, N controls = 67,532), earlier (N = 15,844), and later onset depression (N = 15,800) with body mass index, coronary artery disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes in 11 data sets from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, Generation Scotland, and UK Biobank. All cardio-metabolic polygenic risk scores were associated with depression status. Significant genetic correlations were found between depression and body mass index, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes. Higher polygenic risk for body mass index, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes was associated with both early and later onset depression, while higher polygenic risk for stroke was associated with later onset depression only. Significant genetic correlations were found between body mass index and later onset depression, and between coronary artery disease and both early and late onset depression. The phenotypic associations between major depression and cardio-metabolic traits may partly reflect their overlapping genetic etiology irrespective of the age depression first presents.

4.
Psychol Med ; : 1-11, 2020 Jul 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32624019

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Depression is a highly prevalent and heterogeneous disorder. This study aims to determine whether depression with atypical features shows different heritability and different degree of overlap with polygenic risk for psychiatric and immuno-metabolic traits than other depression subgroups. METHODS: Data included 30 069 European ancestry individuals from the UK Biobank who met criteria for lifetime major depression. Participants reporting both weight gain and hypersomnia were classified as ↑WS depression (N = 1854) and the others as non-↑WS depression (N = 28 215). Cases with non-↑WS depression were further classified as ↓WS depression (i.e. weight loss and insomnia; N = 10 142). Polygenic risk scores (PRS) for 22 traits were generated using genome-wide summary statistics (Bonferroni corrected p = 2.1 × 10-4). Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based heritability of depression subgroups was estimated. RESULTS: ↑WS depression had a higher polygenic risk for BMI [OR = 1.20 (1.15-1.26), p = 2.37 × 10-14] and C-reactive protein [OR = 1.11 (1.06-1.17), p = 8.86 × 10-06] v. non-↑WS depression and ↓WS depression. Leptin PRS was close to the significance threshold (p = 2.99 × 10-04), but the effect disappeared when considering GWAS summary statistics of leptin adjusted for BMI. PRS for daily alcohol use was inversely associated with ↑WS depression [OR = 0.88 (0.83-0.93), p = 1.04 × 10-05] v. non-↑WS depression. SNP-based heritability was not significantly different between ↑WS depression and ↓WS depression (14.3% and 12.2%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: ↑WS depression shows evidence of distinct genetic predisposition to immune-metabolic traits and alcohol consumption. These genetic signals suggest that biological targets including immune-cardio-metabolic pathways may be relevant to therapies in individuals with ↑WS depression.

5.
Psychol Med ; : 1-10, 2020 Jun 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32519625

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Major depression (MD) is often characterised as a categorical disorder; however, observational studies comparing sub-threshold and clinical depression suggest MD is continuous. Many of these studies do not explore the full continuum and are yet to consider genetics as a risk factor. This study sought to understand if polygenic risk for MD could provide insight into the continuous nature of depression. METHODS: Factor analysis on symptom-level data from the UK Biobank (N = 148 957) was used to derive continuous depression phenotypes which were tested for association with polygenic risk scores (PRS) for a categorical definition of MD (N = 119 692). RESULTS: Confirmatory factor analysis showed a five-factor hierarchical model, incorporating 15 of the original 18 items taken from the PHQ-9, GAD-7 and subjective well-being questionnaires, produced good fit to the observed covariance matrix (CFI = 0.992, TLI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.038, SRMR = 0.031). MD PRS associated with each factor score (standardised ß range: 0.057-0.064) and the association remained when the sample was stratified into case- and control-only subsets. The case-only subset had an increased association compared to controls for all factors, shown via a significant interaction between lifetime MD diagnosis and MD PRS (p value range: 2.23 × 10-3-3.94 × 10-7). CONCLUSIONS: An association between MD PRS and a continuous phenotype of depressive symptoms in case- and control-only subsets provides support against a purely categorical phenotype; indicating further insights into MD can be obtained when this within-group variation is considered. The stronger association within cases suggests this variation may be of particular importance.

6.
PLoS Med ; 17(6): e1003137, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32479557

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Identifying causal risk factors for self-harm is essential to inform preventive interventions. Epidemiological studies have identified risk factors associated with self-harm, but these associations can be subject to confounding. By implementing genetically informed methods to better account for confounding, this study aimed to better identify plausible causal risk factors for self-harm. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using summary statistics from 24 genome-wide association studies (GWASs) comprising 16,067 to 322,154 individuals, polygenic scores (PSs) were generated to index 24 possible individual risk factors for self-harm (i.e., mental health vulnerabilities, substance use, cognitive traits, personality traits, and physical traits) among a subset of UK Biobank participants (N = 125,925, 56.2% female) who completed an online mental health questionnaire in the period from 13 July 2016 to 27 July 2017. In total, 5,520 (4.4%) of these participants reported having self-harmed in their lifetime. In binomial regression models, PSs indexing 6 risk factors (major depressive disorder [MDD], attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder [ADHD], bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, alcohol dependence disorder, and lifetime cannabis use) predicted self-harm, with effect sizes ranging from odds ratio (OR) = 1.05 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.07, q = 0.008) for lifetime cannabis use to OR = 1.20 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.23, q = 1.33 × 10-35) for MDD. No systematic differences emerged between suicidal and non-suicidal self-harm. To further probe causal relationships, two-sample Mendelian randomisation (MR) analyses were conducted, with MDD, ADHD, and schizophrenia emerging as the most plausible causal risk factors for self-harm. The genetic liabilities for MDD and schizophrenia were associated with self-harm independently of diagnosis and medication. Main limitations include the lack of representativeness of the UK Biobank sample, that self-harm was self-reported, and the limited power of some of the included GWASs, potentially leading to possible type II error. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to confirming the role of MDD, we demonstrate that ADHD and schizophrenia likely play a role in the aetiology of self-harm using multivariate genetic designs for causal inference. Among the many individual risk factors we simultaneously considered, our findings suggest that systematic detection and treatment of core psychiatric symptoms, including psychotic and impulsivity symptoms, may be beneficial among people at risk for self-harm.


Assuntos
Comportamento Autodestrutivo/genética , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/complicações , Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/genética , Transtorno Bipolar/complicações , Transtorno Bipolar/genética , Bases de Dados como Assunto , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/complicações , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Fatores de Risco , Esquizofrenia , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/epidemiologia , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/etiologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/complicações , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/genética , Inquéritos e Questionários , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
7.
Transl Psychiatry ; 10(1): 163, 2020 05 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32448866

RESUMO

Depression is a common and clinically heterogeneous mental health disorder that is frequently comorbid with other diseases and conditions. Stratification of depression may align sub-diagnoses more closely with their underling aetiology and provide more tractable targets for research and effective treatment. In the current study, we investigated whether genetic data could be used to identify subgroups within people with depression using the UK Biobank. Examination of cross-locus correlations were used to test for evidence of subgroups using genetic data from seven other complex traits and disorders that were genetically correlated with depression and had sufficient power (>0.6) for detection. We found no evidence for subgroups within depression for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, anorexia nervosa, inflammatory bowel disease or obesity. This suggests that for these traits, genetic correlations with depression were driven by pleiotropic genetic variants carried by everyone rather than by a specific subgroup.

8.
Mol Psychiatry ; 25(10): 2584-2598, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30760887

RESUMO

Polygenic scores can be used to distil the knowledge gained in genome-wide association studies for prediction of health, lifestyle, and psychological factors in independent samples. In this preregistered study, we used fourteen polygenic scores to predict variation in cognitive ability level at age 70, and cognitive change from age 70 to age 79, in the longitudinal Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 study. The polygenic scores were created for phenotypes that have been suggested as risk or protective factors for cognitive ageing. Cognitive abilities within older age were indexed using a latent general factor estimated from thirteen varied cognitive tests taken at four waves, each three years apart (initial n = 1091 age 70; final n = 550 age 79). The general factor indexed over two-thirds of the variance in longitudinal cognitive change. We ran additional analyses using an age-11 intelligence test to index cognitive change from age 11 to age 70. Several polygenic scores were associated with the level of cognitive ability at age-70 baseline (range of standardized ß-values = -0.178 to 0.302), and the polygenic score for education was associated with cognitive change from childhood to age 70 (standardized ß = 0.100). No polygenic scores were statistically significantly associated with variation in cognitive change between ages 70 and 79, and effect sizes were small. However, APOE e4 status made a significant prediction of the rate of cognitive decline from age 70 to 79 (standardized ß = -0.319 for carriers vs. non-carriers). The results suggest that the predictive validity for cognitive ageing of polygenic scores derived from genome-wide association study summary statistics is not yet on a par with APOE e4, a better-established predictor.

9.
Addiction ; 115(3): 482-492, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31833150

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The use of cannabis has previously been linked to both depression and self-harm; however, the role of genetics in this relationship is unclear. This study aimed to estimate the phenotypic and genetic associations between cannabis use and depression and self-harm. DESIGN: Cross-sectional data collected through UK Biobank were used to test the phenotypic association between cannabis use, depression and self-harm. UK Biobank genetic data were then combined with consortia genome-wide association study summary statistics to further test the genetic relationships between these traits using LD score regression, polygenic risk scoring and Mendelian randomization methods. SETTING: United Kingdom, with additional international consortia data. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 126 291 British adults aged between 40 and 70 years, recruited into UK Biobank. MEASUREMENTS: Phenotypic outcomes were life-time history of cannabis use (including initial and continued cannabis use), depression (including single-episode and recurrent depression) and self-harm. Genome-wide genetic data were used and assessment centre, batch and the first six principal components were included as key covariates when handling genetic data. FINDINGS: In UK Biobank, cannabis use is associated with an increased likelihood of depression [odds ratio (OR) = 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.59-1.70] and self-harm (OR = 2.85, 95% CI = 2.69-3.01). The strength of this phenotypic association is stronger when more severe trait definitions of cannabis use and depression are considered. Using consortia genome-wide summary statistics, significant genetic correlations are seen between cannabis use and depression [rg = 0.289, standard error (SE) = 0.036]. Polygenic risk scores for cannabis use and depression explain a small but significant proportion of variance in cannabis use, depression and self-harm within a UK Biobank target sample. However, two-sample Mendelian randomization analyses were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Cannabis use appeared to be both phenotypically and genetically associated with depression and self-harm. Limitations in statistical power mean that conclusions could not be made on the direction of causality between these traits.

10.
Alzheimers Dement ; 15(12): 1546-1557, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31619348

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Prospective studies reporting associations between cognitive performance and subsequent incident dementia have been subject to attrition bias. Furthermore, the extent to which established risk factors account for such associations requires further elucidation. METHODS: We used UK Biobank baseline cognitive data (n ≤ 488,130) and electronically linked hospital inpatient and death records during three- to eight-year follow-up, to estimate risk of total dementia (n = 1051), Alzheimer's disease (n = 352), and vascular dementia (n = 169) according to four brief cognitive tasks, with/without adjustment for constitutional and modifiable risk factors. RESULTS: We found associations of cognitive task performance with all-cause and cause-specific dementia (P <  .01); these were not accounted for by established risk factors. Cognitive data added up to 5% to the discriminative accuracy of receiver operating characteristic curve models; areas under the curve ranged from 82% to 86%. DISCUSSION: This study offers robust evidence that brief cognitive testing could be a valuable addition to dementia prediction models.


Assuntos
Demência/diagnóstico , Demência/epidemiologia , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde , Testes Neuropsicológicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Doença de Alzheimer/epidemiologia , Cognição , Demência/mortalidade , Demência Vascular/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Reino Unido
11.
12.
Twin Res Hum Genet ; 22(3): 131-139, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31250787

RESUMO

Higher health literacy is associated with higher cognitive function and better health. Despite its wide use in medical research, no study has investigated the genetic contributions to health literacy. Using 5783 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) participants (mean age = 65.49, SD = 9.55) who had genotyping data and had completed a health literacy test at wave 2 (2004-2005), we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of health literacy. We estimated the proportion of variance in health literacy explained by all common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Polygenic profile scores were calculated using summary statistics from GWAS of 21 cognitive and health measures. Logistic regression was used to test whether polygenic scores for cognitive and health-related traits were associated with having adequate, compared to limited, health literacy. No SNPs achieved genome-wide significance for association with health literacy. The proportion of variance in health literacy accounted for by common SNPs was 8.5% (SE = 7.2%). Greater odds of having adequate health literacy were associated with a 1 standard deviation higher polygenic score for general cognitive ability [OR = 1.34, 95% CI (1.26, 1.42)], verbal-numerical reasoning [OR = 1.30, 95% CI (1.23, 1.39)], and years of schooling [OR = 1.29, 95% CI (1.21, 1.36)]. Reduced odds of having adequate health literacy were associated with higher polygenic profiles for poorer self-rated health [OR = 0.92, 95% CI (0.87, 0.98)] and schizophrenia [OR = 0.91, 95% CI (0.85, 0.96)). The well-documented associations between health literacy, cognitive function and health may partly be due to shared genetic etiology. Larger studies are required to obtain accurate estimates of SNP-based heritability and to discover specific health literacy-associated genetic variants.


Assuntos
Predisposição Genética para Doença , Letramento em Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Idoso , Cognição , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Fenótipo
14.
Nat Neurosci ; 22(3): 343-352, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30718901

RESUMO

Major depression is a debilitating psychiatric illness that is typically associated with low mood and anhedonia. Depression has a heritable component that has remained difficult to elucidate with current sample sizes due to the polygenic nature of the disorder. To maximize sample size, we meta-analyzed data on 807,553 individuals (246,363 cases and 561,190 controls) from the three largest genome-wide association studies of depression. We identified 102 independent variants, 269 genes, and 15 genesets associated with depression, including both genes and gene pathways associated with synaptic structure and neurotransmission. An enrichment analysis provided further evidence of the importance of prefrontal brain regions. In an independent replication sample of 1,306,354 individuals (414,055 cases and 892,299 controls), 87 of the 102 associated variants were significant after multiple testing correction. These findings advance our understanding of the complex genetic architecture of depression and provide several future avenues for understanding etiology and developing new treatment approaches.


Assuntos
Depressão/genética , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/genética , Córtex Pré-Frontal/metabolismo , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Variação Genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Herança Multifatorial , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
15.
Nat Genet ; 51(3): 577, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30696931

RESUMO

In the version of this article initially published, in Table 2, the descriptions of pathways and definitions in the first and last columns did not correctly correspond to the values in the other columns. The error has been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.

17.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 363, 2019 01 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30675005

RESUMO

Evidence suggests that lifestyle factors, e.g. physical activity, moderate the manifestation of genetic susceptibility to obesity. The present study uses UK Biobank data to investigate interaction between polygenic scores (PGS) for two obesity indicators, and lifestyle and psychosocial factors in the prediction of the two indicators, with attention to sex-specific effects. Analyses were of 112 151 participants (58 914 females; 40 to 73 years) whose genetic data passed quality control. Moderation effects were analysed in linear regression models predicting body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), including interaction terms for PGS and each exposure. Greater physical activity, more education, higher income, moderate vs low alcohol consumption, and low material deprivation were each associated with a relatively lower risk for manifestation of genetic susceptibility to obesity (p < 0.001); the moderating effects of physical activity and alcohol consumption were greater in women than men (three-way interaction: p = 0.009 and p = 0.008, respectively). More income and less neuroticism were related to reduced manifestation of genetic susceptibility to high WHR (p = 0.007; p = 0.003); the effect of income was greater in women (three-way interaction: p = 0.001). Lifestyle and psychosocial factors appear to offset genetic risk for adiposity in mid to late adulthood, with some sex-specific associations.


Assuntos
Adiposidade/genética , Suscetibilidade a Doenças , Variação Genética , Estilo de Vida , Saúde Mental , Adulto , Idoso , Índice de Massa Corporal , Feminino , Interação Gene-Ambiente , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Obesidade/etiologia , Sobrepeso/epidemiologia , Sobrepeso/etiologia , Filogenia , Vigilância em Saúde Pública , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
18.
Sleep ; 42(4)2019 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30668819

RESUMO

We examined associations between self-reported sleep measures and cognitive level and change (age 70-76 years) in a longitudinal, same-year-of-birth cohort study (baseline N = 1091; longitudinal N = 664). We also leveraged GWAS summary data to ascertain whether polygenic scores (PGS) of chronotype and sleep duration related to self-reported sleep, and to cognitive level and change. Shorter sleep latency was associated with significantly higher levels of visuospatial ability, processing speed, and verbal memory (ß ≥ |0.184|, SE ≤ 0.075, p ≤ 0.003). Longer daytime sleep duration was significantly associated slower processing speed (ß = -0.085, SE = 0.027, p = 0.001), and with steeper 6-year decline in visuospatial reasoning (ß = -0.009, SE = 0.003, p = 0.008), and processing speed (ß = -0.009, SE = 0.002, p < 0.001). Only longitudinal associations between longer daytime sleeping and steeper cognitive declines survived correction for important health covariates and false discovery rate (FDR). PGS of chronotype and sleep duration were nominally associated with specific self-reported sleep characteristics for most SNP thresholds (standardized ß range = |0.123 to 0.082|, p range = 0.003 to 0.046), but neither PGS predicted cognitive level or change following FDR. Daytime sleep duration is a potentially important correlate of cognitive decline in visuospatial reasoning and processing speed in older age, whereas cross-sectional associations are partially confounded by important health factors. A genetic propensity toward morningness and sleep duration were weakly, but consistently, related to self-reported sleep characteristics, and did not relate to cognitive level or change.


Assuntos
Cognição/fisiologia , Envelhecimento Cognitivo/fisiologia , Disfunção Cognitiva/fisiopatologia , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/fisiopatologia , Sono/fisiologia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Memória/fisiologia , Testes Neuropsicológicos , Autorrelato , Latência do Sono/fisiologia , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/psicologia , Fatores de Tempo
20.
Stroke ; 49(8): 1812-1819, 2018 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30002152

RESUMO

Background and Purpose- White matter hyperintensities (WMH) on brain magnetic resonance imaging are typical signs of cerebral small vessel disease and may indicate various preclinical, age-related neurological disorders, such as stroke. Though WMH are highly heritable, known common variants explain a small proportion of the WMH variance. The contribution of low-frequency/rare coding variants to WMH burden has not been explored. Methods- In the discovery sample we recruited 20 719 stroke/dementia-free adults from 13 population-based cohort studies within the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium, among which 17 790 were of European ancestry and 2929 of African ancestry. We genotyped these participants at ≈250 000 mostly exonic variants with Illumina HumanExome BeadChip arrays. We performed ethnicity-specific linear regression on rank-normalized WMH in each study separately, which were then combined in meta-analyses to test for association with single variants and genes aggregating the effects of putatively functional low-frequency/rare variants. We then sought replication of the top findings in 1192 adults (European ancestry) with whole exome/genome sequencing data from 2 independent studies. Results- At 17q25, we confirmed the association of multiple common variants in TRIM65, FBF1, and ACOX1 ( P<6×10-7). We also identified a novel association with 2 low-frequency nonsynonymous variants in MRPL38 (lead, rs34136221; PEA=4.5×10-8) partially independent of known common signal ( PEA(conditional)=1.4×10-3). We further identified a locus at 2q33 containing common variants in NBEAL1, CARF, and WDR12 (lead, rs2351524; Pall=1.9×10-10). Although our novel findings were not replicated because of limited power and possible differences in study design, meta-analysis of the discovery and replication samples yielded stronger association for the 2 low-frequency MRPL38 variants ( Prs34136221=2.8×10-8). Conclusions- Both common and low-frequency/rare functional variants influence WMH. Larger replication and experimental follow-up are essential to confirm our findings and uncover the biological causal mechanisms of age-related WMH.


Assuntos
Encéfalo/diagnóstico por imagem , Exoma/genética , Variação Genética/genética , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética/métodos , Proteínas Mitocondriais/genética , Substância Branca/diagnóstico por imagem , Estudos de Coortes , Humanos
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