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1.
J Chem Inf Model ; 58(9): 1755-1765, 2018 09 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30059222

RESUMO

The most recent version of the Cahn-Ingold-Prelog rules for the determination of stereodescriptors as described in Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry: IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013 (the "Blue Book"; Favre and Powell. Royal Society of Chemistry, 2014; http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/9781849733069 ) were analyzed by an international team of cheminformatics software developers. Algorithms for machine implementation were designed, tested, and cross-validated. Deficiencies in Sequence Rules 1b and 2 were found, and proposed language for their modification is presented. A concise definition of an additional rule ("Rule 6", below) is proposed, which succinctly covers several cases only tangentially mentioned in the 2013 recommendations. Each rule is discussed from the perspective of machine implementation. The four resultant implementations are supported by a 300-compound validation suite in both 2D and 3D structure data file (SDF) format as well as SMILES ( https://cipvalidationsuite.github.io/ValidationSuite ). The validation suites include all significant examples in Chapter 9 of the Blue Book, as well as several additional structures that highlight more complex aspects of the rules not addressed or not clearly analyzed in that work. These additional structures support a case for the need for modifications to the Sequence Rules.


Assuntos
Algoritmos , Simulação por Computador , Aprendizado de Máquina , Compostos Orgânicos/química , Modelos Moleculares , Estrutura Molecular , Software , Estereoisomerismo , Relação Estrutura-Atividade
3.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 45(W1): W528-W533, 2017 07 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28472503

RESUMO

Sophisticated and interactive visualizations are essential for making sense of the intricate 3D structures of macromolecules. For proteins, secondary structural components are routinely featured in molecular graphics visualizations. However, the field of RNA structural bioinformatics is still lagging behind; for example, current molecular graphics tools lack built-in support even for base pairs, double helices, or hairpin loops. DSSR (Dissecting the Spatial Structure of RNA) is an integrated and automated command-line tool for the analysis and annotation of RNA tertiary structures. It calculates a comprehensive and unique set of features for characterizing RNA, as well as DNA structures. Jmol is a widely used, open-source Java viewer for 3D structures, with a powerful scripting language. JSmol, its reincarnation based on native JavaScript, has a predominant position in the post Java-applet era for web-based visualization of molecular structures. The DSSR-Jmol integration presented here makes salient features of DSSR readily accessible, either via the Java-based Jmol application itself, or its HTML5-based equivalent, JSmol. The DSSR web service accepts 3D coordinate files (in mmCIF or PDB format) initiated from a Jmol or JSmol session and returns DSSR-derived structural features in JSON format. This seamless combination of DSSR and Jmol/JSmol brings the molecular graphics of 3D RNA structures to a similar level as that for proteins, and enables a much deeper analysis of structural characteristics. It fills a gap in RNA structural bioinformatics, and is freely accessible (via the Jmol application or the JSmol-based website http://jmol.x3dna.org).


Assuntos
DNA/química , RNA/química , Software , Gráficos por Computador , Internet , Conformação de Ácido Nucleico , RNA de Transferência de Fenilalanina
4.
J Cheminform ; 8: 66, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27933103

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional (3D) printed crystal structures are useful for chemistry teaching and research. Current manual methods of converting crystal structures into 3D printable files are time-consuming and tedious. To overcome this limitation, we developed a programmatic method that allows for facile conversion of thousands of crystal structures directly into 3D printable files. RESULTS: A collection of over 30,000 crystal structures in crystallographic information file (CIF) format from the Crystallography Open Database (COD) were programmatically converted into 3D printable files (VRML format) using Jmol scripting. The resulting data file conversion of the 30,000 CIFs proceeded as expected, however some inconsistencies and unintended results were observed with co-crystallized structures, racemic mixtures, and structures with large counterions that led to 3D printable files not containing the desired chemical structure. Potential solutions to these challenges are considered and discussed. Further, a searchable Jmol 3D Print website was created that allows users to both discover the 3D file dataset created in this work and create custom 3D printable files for any structure in the COD. CONCLUSIONS: Over 30,000 crystal structures were programmatically converted into 3D printable files, allowing users to have quick access to a sizable collection of 3D printable crystal structures. Further, any crystal structure (>350,000) in the COD can now be conveniently converted into 3D printable file formats using the Jmol 3D Print website created in this work. The 3D Print website also allows users to convert their own CIFs into 3D printable files. 3D file data, scripts, and the Jmol 3D Print website are provided openly to the community in an effort to promote discovery and use of 3D printable crystal structures. The 3D file dataset and Jmol 3D Print website will find wide use with researchers and educators seeking to 3D print chemical structures, while the scripts will be useful for programmatically converting large database collections of crystal structures into 3D printable files.

5.
Solid State Nucl Magn Reson ; 78: 64-70, 2016 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27435606

RESUMO

We introduce two open source tools to aid the processing and visualisation of ab-initio computed solid-state NMR parameters. The Magres file format for computed NMR parameters (as implemented in CASTEP v8.0 and QuantumEspresso v5.0.0) is implemented. MagresView is built upon the widely used Jmol crystal viewer, and provides an intuitive environment to display computed NMR parameters. It can provide simple pictorial representation of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra as well as output a selected spin-system for exact simulations with dedicated spin-dynamics software. MagresPython provides a simple scripting environment to manipulate large numbers of computed NMR parameters to search for structural correlations.

6.
J Cheminform ; 8: 50, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28316648

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: SMILES and SMARTS are two well-defined structure matching languages that have gained wide use in cheminformatics. Jmol is a widely used open-source molecular visualization and analysis tool written in Java and implemented in both Java and JavaScript. Over the past 10 years, from 2007 to 2016, work on Jmol has included the development of dialects of SMILES and SMARTS that incorporate novel aspects that allow new and powerful applications. RESULTS: The specifications of "Jmol SMILES" and "Jmol SMARTS" are described. The dialects most closely resemble OpenSMILES and OpenSMARTS. Jmol SMILES is a superset of OpenSMILES, allowing a freer format, including whitespace and comments, the addition of "processing directives" that modify the meaning of certain aspects of SMILES processing such as aromaticity and stereochemistry, a more extensive treatment of stereochemistry, and several minor additions. Jmol SMARTS similarly adds these same modifications to OpenSMARTS, but also adds a number of additional "primitives" and elements of syntax tuned to matching 3D molecular structures and selecting their atoms. The result is an expansion of the capabilities of SMILES and SMARTS primarily for use in 3D molecular analysis, allowing a broader range of matching involving any combination of 3D molecular structures, SMILES strings, and SMARTS patterns. While developed specifically for Jmol, these dialects of SMILES and SMARTS are independent of the Jmol application itself. CONCLUSIONS: Jmol SMILES and Jmol SMARTS add value to standard SMILES and SMARTS. Together they have proven exceptionally capable in extracting valuable information from 3D structural models, as demonstrated in Jmol. Capabilities in Jmol enabled by Jmol SMILES and Jmol SMARTS include efficient MMFF94 atom typing, conformational identification, SMILES comparisons without canonicalization, identification of stereochemical relationships, quantitative comparison of 3D structures from different sources (including differences in Kekulization), conformational flexible fitting, and atom mapping used to synchronize interactive displays of 2D structures, 3D structures, and spectral correlations, where data are being drawn from multiple sources.

7.
J Cheminform ; 3(1): 37, 2011 Oct 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21999342

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Blue Obelisk movement was established in 2005 as a response to the lack of Open Data, Open Standards and Open Source (ODOSOS) in chemistry. It aims to make it easier to carry out chemistry research by promoting interoperability between chemistry software, encouraging cooperation between Open Source developers, and developing community resources and Open Standards. RESULTS: This contribution looks back on the work carried out by the Blue Obelisk in the past 5 years and surveys progress and remaining challenges in the areas of Open Data, Open Standards, and Open Source in chemistry. CONCLUSIONS: We show that the Blue Obelisk has been very successful in bringing together researchers and developers with common interests in ODOSOS, leading to development of many useful resources freely available to the chemistry community.

8.
Proteins ; 79(7): 2172-80, 2011 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21557319

RESUMO

We describe here definitions of "local helical axis" and "straightness" that are developed using a simple quaternion-based analysis of protein structure without resort to least-squares fitting. As part of this analysis, it is shown how quaternion differences can be visualized to depict accurately the local helical axis relating any two adjacent amino acid residues in standard, nonidealized proteins. Three different options for the definition of amino acid residue orientation in terms of quaternion frames are described. Two of these, the "C(α) frame" and the "P frame," are shown to be correlated strongly with a simple approximate measure derived solely from Ramachandran angles. The relationship between quaternion-based straightness and recognized DSSP-derived secondary structure motifs is discussed.


Assuntos
Estrutura Secundária de Proteína , Proteínas/química , Algoritmos , Bases de Dados de Proteínas , Modelos Moleculares
9.
J Comput Chem ; 32(7): 1488-91, 2011 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21425296

RESUMO

APBS and PDB2PQR are widely utilized free software packages for biomolecular electrostatics calculations. Using the Opal toolkit, we have developed a Web services framework for these software packages that enables the use of APBS and PDB2PQR by users who do not have local access to the necessary amount of computational capabilities. This not only increases accessibility of the software to a wider range of scientists, educators, and students but also increases the availability of electrostatics calculations on portable computing platforms. Users can access this new functionality in two ways. First, an Opal-enabled version of APBS is provided in current distributions, available freely on the web. Second, we have extended the PDB2PQR web server to provide an interface for the setup, execution, and visualization of electrostatic potentials as calculated by APBS. This web interface also uses the Opal framework which ensures the scalability needed to support the large APBS user community. Both of these resources are available from the APBS/PDB2PQR website: http://www.poissonboltzmann.org/.


Assuntos
Simulação por Computador , Internet , Eletricidade Estática , Interface Usuário-Computador , Integração de Sistemas
10.
J Appl Crystallogr ; 41(Pt 4): 811-814, 2008 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19461848

RESUMO

An editing toolkit has been developed to allow authors to create enhanced interactive figures for publication in crystallography journals. The visualization engine is Jmol, a Java program that can be manipulated as an applet in a web browser. The toolkit provides user-friendly widgets to manipulate the graphics state of Jmol, and persistent storage of graphics state, scripts and associated data files.

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