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1.
Reg Anesth Pain Med ; 45(4): 293-300, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31988267

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Self-reported side effects of pain medication are important determinants of treatment course that can affect patient adherence, medication discontinuation and physician decisions. Yet, few studies have investigated patient-level predictors of self-reported pain medication side effects. The present study sought to fill this gap by exploring the impact of physical or sexual abuse history on self-reported pain medication side effects and considered a mediation model in which those effects are transmitted through a centralized pain phenotype and pain catastrophizing. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 3118 patients presenting to a tertiary-care, outpatient pain clinic. RESULTS: Approximately 15% of the sample (n=479) reported a lifetime history of abuse. Patients with a lifetime history of abuse, particularly abuse that occurred in both childhood and adulthood, reported more pain medication side effects compared with patients reporting no abuse history. Furthermore, path analysis showed that a centralized pain phenotype and pain catastrophizing mediated the association between lifetime abuse history and the sum of pain medication side effects. CONCLUSIONS: This suggests that individuals who experience abuse may develop a heightened physiological sensitivity to stimuli, as well as a tendency to interpret stimuli negatively, exaggerate the impact of aversive stimuli and undermine their ability to cope with the stressor. This study highlights the need for physicians to understand patient-level predictors of medication tolerance and to consider a history of abuse and trauma in decisions regarding treatment and medication management.

3.
Reg Anesth Pain Med ; 2019 Dec 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31857372

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Michigan Body Map (MBM) was developed to assess pain location in a reliable and valid manner; however, electronic formats have not been validated. This study had two aims: (1) initial validation of the electronic form of the MBM (eMBM) and (2) preliminary test of assessing pain severity within body zones. METHODS: For the first aim, 68 participants with chronic pain completed paper and electronic forms of the MBM, then underwent scripted interviews to assess preferences among body maps and verbal confirmation of pain locations. For the second aim, a subset of the participants (n=40) completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) pain severity subscale, as well as the eMBM again and endorsed pain severity using additional screens showing body zones that contained areas in which pain was endorsed. RESULTS: There were few discrepancies between MBM, eMBM and verbal report (1.9% and 1.6%, respectively), and no difference between forms in perceived ability to indicate areas of pain or ease of completion. Patients accurately indicated their bodily pain on both maps, with 84% and 87% reporting one or no errors on MBM and eMBM, respectively. Participants also reported no preference for which version best-depicted areas of pain or best distinguished left from right. Lastly, the most preferred measure was eMBM with pain severity zones, followed by eMBM without zones, followed by the BPI pain severity subscale. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the validity of the eMBM for patients with chronic pain. Further, an expanded form of the eMBM that assesses pain severity was preferred by most participants.

4.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 7(10): e15775, 2019 Oct 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31651402

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT), also referred to as blood and marrow transplantation (BMT), is a high-risk, but potentially curative therapy for a number of cancer and noncancer conditions. BMT Roadmap (Roadmap 1.0) is a mobile health app that was developed as a family caregiver-facing tool to provide informational needs about the health status of patients undergoing inpatient HCT. OBJECTIVE: This study explored the views and perceptions of family caregivers of patients undergoing HCT and their input regarding further technology development and expansion of BMT Roadmap into the outpatient setting (referred to as Roadmap 2.0). METHODS: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted among 24 family caregivers. Questions were developed from existing literature coupled with prior in-depth observations and interviews in hospital-based settings to explore the study objectives. Participants were recruited during routine outpatient clinic appointments of HCT patients, and all interviews were conducted in the participants' homes, the setting in which Roadmap 2.0 is intended for use. A thematic analysis was performed using a consistent set of codes derived from our prior research. New emerging codes were also included, and the coding structure was refined with iterative cycles of coding and data collection. RESULTS: Four major themes emerged through our qualitative analysis: (1) stress related to balancing caregiving duties; (2) learning and adapting to new routines (resilience); (3) balancing one's own needs with the patient's needs (insight); and (4) benefits of caregiving. When caregivers were further probed about their views on engagement with positive activity interventions (ie, pleasant activities that promote positive emotions and well-being such as expressing gratitude or engaging in activities that promote positive thoughts, emotions, and behaviors), they preferred a "menu" of positive activities to help support caregiver health and well-being. CONCLUSIONS: This study involved family caregivers as participants in the development of new components for Roadmap 2.0. Our research provided a further understanding of the many priorities that hematopoietic stem cell transplant family caregivers face while maintaining balance in their lives. Their schedules can often be unpredictable, even more so once the patient is discharged from the hospital. Our findings suggest that expanding Roadmap 2.0 into the outpatient setting may provide critical caregiver support and that HCT caregivers are interested in and willing to engage in positive activities that may enhance well-being and attenuate the stress associated with caregiving. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.2196/resprot.4918.

5.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(38): 819-824, 2019 Sep 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31557148

RESUMO

Rheumatic diseases are a leading cause of chronic, noncancer pain. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune rheumatic disease characterized by periodic flares that can result in irreversible target organ damage, including end-stage renal disease. Both intermittent and chronic musculoskeletal pain, as well as fibromyalgia (considered a centralized pain disorder due to dysregulation of pain processing in the central nervous system), are common in SLE. Opioids are generally not indicated for long-term management of musculoskeletal pain or centralized pain (fibromyalgia) because of lack of efficacy, safety issues ranging from adverse medical effects to overdose, and risk for addiction (1,2). In this study of 462 patients with SLE from the population-based Michigan Lupus Epidemiology and Surveillance (MILES) Cohort and 192 frequency-matched persons without SLE, nearly one third (31%) of SLE patients were using prescription opioids during the study period (2014-2015), compared with 8% of persons without SLE (p<0.001). Among the SLE patients using opioids, 97 (68%) were using them for >1 year, and 31 (22%) were concomitantly on two or more opioid medications. Among SLE patients, those using the emergency department (ED) were approximately twice as likely to use prescription opioids (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-3.6; p = 0.004). In SLE, the combined contributions of underlying disease and adverse effects of immunosuppressive and glucocorticoid therapies already put patients at higher risk for some known adverse effects attributed to long-term opioid use. Addressing the widespread and long-term use of opioid therapy in SLE will require strategies aimed at preventing opioid initiation, tapering and discontinuation of opioids among patients who are not achieving treatment goals of reduced pain and increased function, and consideration of nonopioid pain management strategies.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Prescrições de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/tratamento farmacológico , Vigilância da População , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Feminino , Humanos , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/epidemiologia , Masculino , Michigan/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Risco
6.
Ann Surg ; 2019 Aug 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31389832

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine preoperative patient characteristics associated with postoperative outpatient opioid use and assess the frequency of postoperative opioid overprescribing. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Although characteristics associated with inpatient opioid use have been described, data regarding patient factors associated with opioid use after discharge are lacking. This hampers the development of individualized approaches to postoperative prescribing. METHODS: We included opioid-naïve patients undergoing hysterectomy, thoracic surgery, and total knee and hip arthroplasty in a single-center prospective observational cohort study. Preoperative phenotyping included self-report measures to assess pain severity, fibromyalgia survey criteria score, pain catastrophizing, depression, anxiety, functional status, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. Our primary outcome measure was self-reported total opioid use in oral morphine equivalents. We constructed multivariable linear-regression models predicting opioids consumed in the first month following surgery. RESULTS: We enrolled 1181 patients; 1001 had complete primary outcome data and 913 had complete phenotype data. Younger age, non-white race, lack of a college degree, higher anxiety, greater sleep disturbance, heavy alcohol use, current tobacco use, and larger initial opioid prescription size were significantly associated with increased opioid consumption. Median total oral morphine equivalents prescribed was 600 mg (equivalent to one hundred twenty 5-mg hydrocodone pills), whereas median opioid consumption was 188 mg (38 pills). CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective cohort of opioid-naïve patients undergoing major surgery, we found a number of characteristics associated with greater opioid use in the first month after surgery. Future studies should address the use of non-opioid medications and behavioral therapies in the perioperative period for these higher risk patients.

7.
N Engl J Med ; 380(23): 2278-2279, 2019 06 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31167071
8.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31074595

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between dietary intake of omega-3 (n-3; generally anti-inflammatory) and omega-6 (n-6; generally pro-inflammatory) fatty acids and patient-reported outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: This study was based on the population-based Michigan Lupus Epidemiology & Surveillance (MILES) Cohort. Estimates of n-3 and n-6 intake were derived from Diet History Questionnaire II items (DHQ II; past year with portion size version). Patient-reported outcomes included self-reported lupus activity (Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire/SLAQ). Multivariable regression, adjusted for age, sex, race, and body mass index, was used to assess associations between absolute intake of n-3 and n-6, as well as the n-6:n-3 ratio, and patient-reported outcomes. RESULTS: Among 456 SLE cases, 425 (93.2%) were female, 207 (45.4%) were black, and mean age was 52.9±12.3 years. Controlling for potential confounders, the average SLAQ score was significantly higher by 0.3 points [(95% CI 0.1, 0.6); p=0.013] with each unit increase of the n-6:n-3 ratio. Both lupus activity and PROMIS-Sleep Disturbance scores were lower with each 1g/1000 Kcal increase of n-3 fatty acids [SLAQ regression coefficient ß=-0.8 (95% CI -1.6, 0.0), p=0.055; PROMIS-Sleep ß=-1.1 (95% CI -2.0, -0.2), p=0.017]. Higher n-3 intakes were non-significantly associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms and comorbid fibromyalgia, and higher quality of life, whereas results for the n6:n3 ratio trended in the opposite direction. CONCLUSION: This population-based study suggests that higher dietary intake of n-3 fatty acids, and lower n-6:n-3 ratios, are favorably associated with patient-reported outcomes in SLE, particularly self-reported lupus activity and sleep quality. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

9.
Anesth Analg ; 128(6): e93-e96, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31094789

RESUMO

This pilot study investigated the use of virtual reality (VR) in laboring women. Twenty-seven women were observed for equivalent time during unmedicated contractions in the first stage of labor both with and without VR (order balanced and randomized). Numeric rating scale scores were collected after both study conditions. Significant decreases in sensory pain -1.5 (95% CI, -0.8 to -2.2), affective pain -2.5 (95% CI, -1.6 to -3.3), cognitive pain -3.1 (95% CI, -2.4 to -3.8), and anxiety -1.5 (95% CI, -0.8 to -2.3) were observed during VR. Results suggest that VR is a potentially effective technique for improving pain and anxiety during labor.


Assuntos
Analgesia/métodos , Trabalho de Parto , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Medição da Dor/métodos , Terapia de Exposição à Realidade Virtual , Adulto , Estudos Cross-Over , Feminino , Humanos , Dor/psicologia , Percepção da Dor , Projetos Piloto , Gravidez , Estudos Prospectivos , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Adulto Jovem
10.
Reg Anesth Pain Med ; 2019 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31048494

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that patients with characteristics of centralized pain (fibromyalgia (FM)-like phenotype) would be less likely to respond to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), which may explain some of the failures of this peripherally directed therapy. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, observational study of patients undergoing RFA using a number of validated self-report measures of pain, mood and function. The 2011 Fibromyalgia Survey Criteria were used to assess for symptoms of centralized pain and was the primary predictor of interest. We constructed multivariable linear regression models to evaluate covariates independently associated with change in pain 3 months after RFA. RESULTS: 141 patients scheduled for medial branch blocks were enrolled in the study; 55 underwent RFA (51 with complete 3 months' follow-up). Patients with higher FM scores had less improvement in overall body pain; however, this was not statistically significant (adjusted mean change in pain FM+0.41, FM-1.11, p=0.396). In a secondary analysis, the FM score was not associated with change in back pain (p=0.720), with both groups improving equally. This cohort also reported significant improvement in anxiety, physical function, catastrophizing, and sleep disturbance at 3 months after RFA. CONCLUSIONS: Although patients with high baseline centralized pain exhibited less improvement in overall pain, this trend was not statistically significant, possibly due to insufficient power. The same trend was not seen with change in spine pain with both groups improving equally. Centralized pain patients may have less improvement in overall pain but may have equal improvement in their site-specific pain levels after localized interventions.

11.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 33(2): 164-173, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30927986

RESUMO

Early trauma can increase the risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adulthood. Early trauma has also been associated with the dysregulation between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and oxytocin systems and may influence the co-regulation between these two systems. But whether the mutual regulation of the two systems represents a sign of resilience and/or mutual dysregulation could be a sign of vulnerability to PTSD and the dissociative subtype of PTSD (PTSD-D) is unknown. The study aims to synthesize and conduct a preliminary test of a conceptual model of the mutual regulation between these two systems as a marker of resilience. We analyzed a pilot data with 22 pregnant women in 3 groups (PTSD only, PTSD-D, and trauma-exposed resilient controls) and repeated measures of plasma oxytocin and cortisol. Oxytocin and cortisol seemed reciprocal in all three groups, but both levels were relatively high in women with PTSD-D and low in those with PTSD compared with controls. This suggests that both hormones in women with PTSD-D and PTSD only are dysregulated, but not lacking in reciprocity.


Assuntos
Hidrocortisona/sangue , Ocitocina/sangue , Resiliência Psicológica , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/sangue , Adulto , Biomarcadores/sangue , Feminino , Humanos , Hiperêmese Gravídica/sangue , Hiperêmese Gravídica/psicologia , Gravidez , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/psicologia , Fatores de Tempo
12.
Pain ; 160(5): 1131-1145, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30889052

RESUMO

Current guidelines for addressing opioid cessation in the context of chronic pain management recommend that opioids be discontinued if the risks outweigh the benefits. However, few studies have focused on understanding opioid cessation from the perspective of individuals with chronic pain. This mixed-method study included 49 former opioid users with chronic pain and used quantitative survey data and qualitative focus group data to identify themes pertaining to former opioid user's experience before, during, and after opioid cessation. Participants described several reasons for wanting to stop opioids including lack of efficacy, impact on quality of life, and concerns about addiction. Barriers to cessation included concerns about inadequate pain management and concerns about the impact of stopping opioids on mood. After opioid cessation, the sample was mixed regarding the benefit of cessation. Half of the former opioid users reported their pain to be better or the same after stopping opioids; however, 47% of the sample reported feeling worse pain since stopping their opioids. As the pendulum swings from pain control to drug control, we must ensure that the response to the opioid epidemic does not cause harm to individuals with chronic pain. Novel opioid cessation interventions are needed in combination with methods of addressing individual challenges and barriers to adequate pain relief including access to and provision of nonopioid alternatives for pain management.


Assuntos
Dor Crônica/complicações , Dor Crônica/psicologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Ansiedade/etiologia , Depressão/etiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Motivação , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides/complicações , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides/psicologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides/terapia , Medição da Dor , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/etiologia , Estatísticas não Paramétricas , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
13.
JAMA Netw Open ; 2(2): e188076, 2019 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30735237

RESUMO

Importance: Pain after deployment is a major health care concern. While risk factors have been previously studied, few studies have explored protective factors. Objective: To examine the prospective association between predeployment optimism and the onset of new pain after deployment in US Army soldiers. Design, Setting, and Participants: This prospective longitudinal cohort study examined US Army soldiers (active duty, Reserve, and National Guard) who deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq between February 12, 2010, and August 29, 2014, and completed the necessary psychological and health assessments before and after deployment. Analyses were performed in the Person-Event Data Environment between July 2016 and November 2018. This study relied exclusively on existing, secondary Army data. Of the 413 763 Army soldiers who met the specified deployment criteria, 385 925 soldiers were missing 1 or more of the required assessment forms. Of the remaining 27 838 soldiers who were examined for eligibility, 7104 soldiers were excluded because of preexisting back pain, joint pain, or frequent headaches. These exclusions resulted in a final analytic sample of 20 734 eligible soldiers. Main Outcomes and Measures: This study examined new reports of pain after deployment, including new back pain, joint pain, and frequent headaches. Results: Among 20 734 US Army soldiers (87.8% male; mean [SD] age, 29.06 [8.42] years), 37.3% reported pain in at least 1 new area of the body after deployment: 25.3% reported new back pain, 23.1% reported new joint pain, and 12.1% reported new frequent headaches. As a continuous measure, each 1-U increase in optimism was associated with 11% lower odds of reporting any new pain after deployment, even while adjusting for demographic, military, and combat factors (odds ratio, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.86-0.93). Tertile analyses revealed that compared with soldiers with high optimism (lowest odds of new pain) soldiers with low optimism had 35% greater odds of reporting new pain in any of the 3 sites evaluated (odds ratio, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.21-1.50). In addition, a larger increase in risk of new pain was observed when comparing the moderate-optimism and low-optimism groups rather than the high-optimism and moderate-optimism groups. Conclusions and Relevance: Higher levels of optimism were associated with lower odds of reporting new pain after deployment, over and above other common determinants of pain, including demographic and military characteristics and combat experiences. Soldiers with low levels of optimism before deployment could benefit from programs geared toward enhancing optimism.


Assuntos
Militares , Doenças Profissionais/epidemiologia , Otimismo/psicologia , Dor/epidemiologia , Adulto , Campanha Afegã de 2001- , Feminino , Humanos , Guerra do Iraque 2003-2011 , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Militares/psicologia , Militares/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Prospectivos , Adulto Jovem
14.
J Pain ; 20(4): 473-480, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30453108

RESUMO

An important predictor of opioid overdose is co-use of benzodiazepines, which are often prescribed for anxiety. Coping with anxiety may be particularly difficult among individuals with a history of abuse, as it is often linked to higher pain severity and poorer coping skills. We explored whether abuse history moderated the association between anxiety and benzodiazepine use among current opioid users. New patients at a tertiary care, outpatient pain clinic completed self-report measures of medication use, anxiety, and physical and sexual abuse history (child abuse only, adult abuse only, or cumulative abuse). The present study included adult patients reporting current opioid use (n = 1,785). Approximately 16% reported co-use of benzodiazepines, and 17% reported a history of abuse. Patients reporting child abuse only and cumulative abuse reported co-use of benzodiazepines and opioids more often than those denying abuse and patients reporting adult abuse only (P < .001). Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that the probability of benzodiazepine use among patients reporting cumulative abuse increased sharply at high levels of anxiety (P = .003). Cumulative abuse may increase sensitivity to psychological distress and put patients at risk for co-use. Providers should be aware of life history factors, including abuse, that may drive the need for medication. Perspective: This article examines the association between history of abuse victimization and co-use of benzodiazepines among chronic pain patients reporting current opioid use. The findings suggest that cumulative victimization across the lifespan may contribute to co-use by increasing sensitivity to psychological or physical distress or by negatively impacting coping skills.

15.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 77(6): 797-807, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29724726

RESUMO

Pain is the predominant symptom for people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) and osteoarthritis (OA) mandating the development of evidence-based recommendations for the health professional's approach to pain management. A multidisciplinary task force including professionals and patient representatives conducted a systematic literature review of systematic reviews to evaluate evidence regarding effects on pain of multiple treatment modalities. Overarching principles and recommendations regarding assessment and pain treatment were specified on the basis of reviewed evidence and expert opinion. From 2914 review studies initially identified, 186 met inclusion criteria. The task force emphasised the importance for the health professional to adopt a patient-centred framework within a biopsychosocial perspective, to have sufficient knowledge of IA and OA pathogenesis, and to be able to differentiate localised and generalised pain. Treatment is guided by scientific evidence and the assessment of patient needs, preferences and priorities; pain characteristics; previous and ongoing pain treatments; inflammation and joint damage; and psychological and other pain-related factors. Pain treatment options typically include education complemented by physical activity and exercise, orthotics, psychological and social interventions, sleep hygiene education, weight management, pharmacological and joint-specific treatment options, or interdisciplinary pain management. Effects on pain were most uniformly positive for physical activity and exercise interventions, and for psychological interventions. Effects on pain for educational interventions, orthotics, weight management and multidisciplinary treatment were shown for particular disease groups. Underpinned by available systematic reviews and meta-analyses, these recommendations enable health professionals to provide knowledgeable pain-management support for people with IA and OA.


Assuntos
Artrite/terapia , Dor Crônica/terapia , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Artrite/complicações , Artrite Reumatoide/complicações , Artrite Reumatoide/terapia , Dor Crônica/etiologia , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/métodos , Exercício , Terapia por Exercício/métodos , Humanos , Aparelhos Ortopédicos , Osteoartrite/complicações , Osteoartrite/terapia , Autocuidado/métodos
16.
Pain Med ; 19(12): 2515-2527, 2018 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29546348

RESUMO

Objective: Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with improved health outcomes including reduced risk of heart disease; however, less is known regarding alcohol's effects on chronic pain. The aim of this study was to assess associations between pain, fibromyalgia symptoms, and moderate alcohol use in a large chronic pain sample. Methods: A total of 2,583 new chronic pain patients presenting at a university pain clinic reported alcohol use and completed validated measures; 592 (23%) patients reported drinking, with 502 (85%) classified as moderate drinkers (females ≤7 and males ≤14 drinks/wk). General linear models (GLM) assessed the effects of moderate drinking on pain and symptom outcomes. The sample was stratified by gender and fibromyalgia (FM) status in secondary analyses. Results: Moderate alcohol users reported significantly lower FM symptoms (widespread pain and symptom severity), pain severity, interference, anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing, and they reported higher physical function. Similar findings were observed in gender-stratified analysis, minus associations with FM symptom severity in females and anxiety in males. In patients meeting FM criteria, moderate drinking was associated with lower pain severity, interference, and depression, and higher physical function. Results in non-FM patients were similar to the total sample. Conclusions: Moderate alcohol consumption in chronic pain patients was associated with decreased pain severity and interference, fewer painful body areas, lower somatic and mood symptoms, and increased physical function. A similar effect was observed in non-FM patients, but to a lesser extent in FM patients, suggesting chronic pain patients with less centralized forms of pain may benefit most from moderate alcohol consumption.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Transtornos de Ansiedade/etiologia , Dor Crônica/etiologia , Fibromialgia/etiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Ansiedade/diagnóstico , Ansiedade/etiologia , Depressão/diagnóstico , Transtorno Depressivo/etiologia , Feminino , Fibromialgia/diagnóstico , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Medição da Dor/métodos , Índice de Gravidade de Doença
17.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 70(6): 826-831, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29532625

RESUMO

A European League Against Rheumatism-American College of Rheumatology working group consisting of practicing and academic rheumatologists, a rheumatology researcher, and a patient representative created a succinct general statement describing rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) in adults and children in language that can be used in conversations with the lay public, media, healthcare providers, and other stakeholders. Based on the literature review, several elements were deemed important for inclusion in the description of RMDs. First, RMDs encompass many different diseases that can affect individuals at any age, including children. Second, there are various pathophysiological pathways underlying different RMDs. Third, the impact of RMDs on individuals and society should be emphasized. The working group agreed that the language should be comprehensible to the lay public. Thus, the following description of RMDs has been developed: "Rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) are a diverse group of diseases that commonly affect the joints, but can affect any organ of the body. There are more than 200 different RMDs, affecting both children and adults. They are usually caused by problems of the immune system, inflammation, infections, or gradual deterioration of joints, muscles, and bones. Many of these diseases are long term and worsen over time. They are typically painful and limit function. In severe cases, RMDs can result in significant disability, having a major impact on both quality of life and life expectancy." This description can be used by rheumatology groups, researchers, and those who work in advocacy and education related to RMDs.


Assuntos
Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas , Doenças Reumáticas , Reumatologia/normas , Terminologia como Assunto , Adulto , Criança , Europa (Continente) , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Linguagem , Sociedades Médicas , Participação dos Interessados , Estados Unidos
18.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 77(6): 829-832, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29525777

RESUMO

A European League Against Rheumatism-American College of Rheumatology working group consisting of practising and academic rheumatologists, a rheumatology researcher and a patient representative created a succinct general statement describing rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) in adults and children in language that can be used in conversations with the lay public, media, healthcare providers and other stakeholders. Based on the literature review, several elements were deemed important for inclusion in the description of RMDs. First, RMDs encompass many different diseases that can affect individuals at any age, including children. Second, there are various pathophysiological pathways underlying different RMDs. Third, the impact of RMDs on individuals and society should be emphasised. The working group agreed that the language should be comprehensible to the lay public. Thus, the following description of RMDs has been developed: 'Rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) are a diverse group of diseases that commonly affect the joints, but can affect any organ of the body. There are more than 200 different RMDs, affecting both children and adults. They are usually caused by problems of the immune system, inflammation, infections or gradual deterioration of joints, muscles and bones. Many of these diseases are long term and worsen over time. They are typically painful and limit function. In severe cases, RMDs can result in significant disability, having a major impact on both quality of life and life expectancy.' This description can be used by rheumatology groups, researchers and those who work in advocacy and education related to RMDs.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas/diagnóstico , Terminologia como Assunto , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Humanos , Doenças Musculoesqueléticas/fisiopatologia , Doenças Reumáticas/diagnóstico , Doenças Reumáticas/fisiopatologia
20.
Pain Med ; 19(2): 297-306, 2018 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28034978

RESUMO

Objective: There is little empirical evidence supporting the long-term use of opioid therapy for chronic pain, suggesting the need to reevaluate the role of opioids in chronic pain management. Few studies have considered opioid use and opioid cessation from the perspective of the patient. Methods: This prospective structured interview study included 150 new patients seeking treatment for chronic pain at an outpatient tertiary care pain clinic. Results: Of the 150 patients, 56% (N = 84) reported current opioid use. Opioids users reported higher pain severity (t(137) = -3.75, P < 0.001), worse physical functioning (t(136) = -3.82, P < 0.001), and more symptoms of depression (t(136) = -1.98, P = 0.050) than nonusers. Among opioid users, 45.6% reported high pain (>7), 60.8% reported low functioning (>7), and 71.4% reported less than a 30% reduction in pain severity since starting opioids, suggesting that many patients are unlikely to be receiving adequate benefit. Overall, 66.3% of current opioid users reported moderate to high opioid-related difficulties on the prescribed opioids difficulties scale, and patients with depression were more likely to report greater difficulties. There was no association between helpfulness of opioids over the past month and opioid-related difficulties (r(75) = -0.07, P = 0.559), current pain severity (r(72)=0.05, P = 0.705), or current pain interference (r(72) = 0.20, P = 0.095). Conclusions: Despite clinical indicators that question the benefit, patients may continue to report that their opioids are helpful. Such discrepancies in patients' perceptions will likely pose significant barriers for implementing opioid cessation guidelines in clinical practice.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Dor Crônica/tratamento farmacológico , Dor Crônica/epidemiologia , Dor Crônica/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Motivação , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Percepção , Estudos Prospectivos , Autorrelato
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