Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 15 de 15
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
J Oral Rehabil ; 48(8): 891-900, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33983634

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Passive mandibular advancement with functional appliances is commonly used to treat juvenile patients with mandibular retrognathism. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether active repetitive training of the mandible into an anterior position would result in a shift of the habitual mandibular position (HMP). METHODS: Twenty adult healthy subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups: a training group receiving six supervised functional training sessions of 10 min each and a control group without training. Bonded lateral biteplates disengaged occlusion among both groups throughout the 15-day experiment. Customised registration-training appliances consisted of a maxillary component with an anterior plane and a mandibular component with an attached metal sphere. Training sessions consisted of repeated mouth-opening/closing cycles (frequency: 30/min) to hit an anteriorly positioned hemispherical target notch with this metal sphere. The HMP was registered at defined times during the experiment. RESULTS: The HMP in the training group showed a statistically significant anterior shift of 1.6 mm (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.2 mm), compared with a significant posterior shift of -0.8 mm (IQR: 2.8 mm) in the control group (p < .05). Although the anterior shift among the training group showed a partial relapse 4 days after the first training block, it then advanced slightly in the 4-day interval after the second training block, which might indicate neuroplasticity of the masticatory motor system. CONCLUSIONS: Motor learning by repetitive training of the mandible into an anterior position might help to improve the results of functional appliance therapy among patients with mandibular retrognathism.


Assuntos
Má Oclusão , Avanço Mandibular , Adulto , Cefalometria , Oclusão Dentária , Humanos , Mandíbula
2.
J Oral Rehabil ; 48(4): 392-402, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33368502

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Closing movements are among the jaw's basic physiological motor actions. During functional movements, the jaw changes position continually, which requires appropriate proprioception. However, the significance of the various proprioceptive receptors involved and how they interact is not yet fully clear. OBJECTIVES: This study's main objective was to test whether preventing intercuspation (IC) for 1 week would affect the precision of jaw-closing movements into IC and the functional space of habitual chewing movements (HCM). A secondary objective was to compare precision of jaw-closing movements into IC with the precision of movements into a target position (TP) far from IC. METHODS: Fourteen participants' HCM and jaw-closing movements into IC were recorded on two sessions (T1 and T2) 1 week apart. Between sessions, participants wore posterior bite plates to prevent IC. They also received a 10-minute training session at T1 to guide their jaw-closing movements into TP. The precision of the closing movements into IC and TP was analysed. For HCM, the vertical amplitude, lateral width and area of chewing cycles were evaluated. RESULTS: The precision of jaw movements into IC increased as the jaw gap decreased, but precision did not differ significantly between T1 and T2. For HCM, the vertical amplitude and area of chewing cycles increased significantly between T1 and T2. The precision of the closing trajectory into TP increased significantly during the training session. CONCLUSION: Our results confirm the excellent adaptability of the craniomandibular system, controlled by stringent motor programmes that are supported by continuous peripheral sensory input.


Assuntos
Mastigação , Movimento , Humanos , Arcada Osseodentária , Periodicidade
3.
HLA ; 92(3): 154-159, 2018 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30054987

RESUMO

Between 2004 and 2013, 603 patients and their relatives (n = 1297) were typed as part of the search for a suitable HLA-matched donor in their nuclear and extended families at the central service provider for transfusion medicine at the University Hospital of Cologne. The high success rate in finding donors over the years at our center (38.1%) led us to examine our database retrospectively in order to evaluate the donor search and haplotype frequencies (HFs) in the sample. Our goal was to identify the factors contributing to this high success rate and also to compare the HFs we observed with other reported haplotype frequency estimations (HFE) for the Cologne area. Probability estimations for a successful donor search were constructed based on the HFEs for the sample.


Assuntos
Medula Óssea/metabolismo , Antígenos HLA-A/genética , Antígenos HLA-B/genética , Cadeias HLA-DRB1/genética , Haplótipos/genética , Probabilidade , Doadores de Tecidos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
4.
Arch Oral Biol ; 86: 87-93, 2018 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29202311

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Bruxism is discussed as an etiological factor in the pathogenesis of orofacial and cervical pain. As the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) is co-activated during clenching, our aim was to investigate, whether the muscle loading leads to peripheral or central sensitizations. DESIGN: In twenty-one healthy female volunteers, somatosensory profiles of the SCM were recorded according to the test battery of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS) prior to and after an isometric muscle exercise. QST comprised thermal and mechanical stimuli. A submaximal activation of the SCM (15% MVC) was kept for 10min in sitting position. In separate test sessions one month apart, one sham and one verum experiment were conducted in randomized order. During the muscle loading, the parameters cold detection threshold (CDT), mechanical pain sensitivity (MPS) and pressure pain treshold (PPT) were tested and experimental pain recorded by visual analogoue scales (VAS). All test sessions were performed during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (day 5), to avoid effects on pain perception. Data were analyzed with Repeated Measures ANOVA (SPSS 22.0) RESULTS: No significant changes were found during or after (sham) loading except for stimulus-response-function (SR, P=0.01) and PPT (P=0.02) in the sham test. No effect was observed in the verum experiment (P=0.12 up to 1.0). CONCLUSION: Prolonged low level contraction of the SCM does not evoke painful sensitization. In contrast, submaximal muscle activation seems to have a protective effect corresponding to a training effect preventing sensitization.


Assuntos
Bruxismo/fisiopatologia , Dor Facial/fisiopatologia , Músculos do Pescoço/fisiopatologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Contração Muscular/fisiologia , Medição da Dor , Limiar da Dor/fisiologia
5.
Acta Odontol Scand ; 74(6): 480-6, 2016 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27410169

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the short-term effectiveness of three different types of immediate, non-pharmacological intervention for alleviation of the painful symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-six patients (mean age 41.6 ± 16.7 years, 25 females) diagnosed with non-dysfunctional painful TMD received counselling and subsequently were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: patients in Group A received prefabricated oral splints with water-filled elastic pads (Aqualizer(®)), those in Group B were provided with vacuum-formed co-polyester oral splints and those in Group C were given appointments to receive Michigan-type hard splints. Clinical examination was conducted, at baseline and after 2 weeks, by use of the RDC/TMD. Current pain intensity was determined by evaluation of graded chronic pain status (GCPS) on a numerical rating scale (NRS). Active maximum mouth opening without pain (AMMOP) was also measured. Paired sample t-tests and one-way analysis of variance with a significance level of p ≤ 0.05 were conducted. RESULTS: After 2 weeks, overall mean current pain was reduced by 41.95% (p < 0.001). Current pain reduction was significant for Group B (66.6%, p < 0.001) but not for Groups A (37.88%, p = 0.56) and C (22.29%, p = 0.26). After 2 weeks, current pain level for Group B was significantly lower than that for Group C (p = 0.041). Overall, there was a statistically significant increase of AMMOP (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: All therapeutic options were pain-reducing. The results from this study suggest that cost-effective and time-effective intervention of counselling combined with use of a vacuum-formed splint is a favourable option for initial, short-term treatment of painful TMD.


Assuntos
Dor Facial/terapia , Mandíbula/fisiopatologia , Placas Oclusais , Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/terapia , Adulto , Idoso , Dor Facial/etiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Medição da Dor , Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/complicações , Adulto Jovem
6.
Front Psychol ; 7: 291, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27014116

RESUMO

Postural control is crucial for most tasks of daily living, delineating postural orientation and balance, with its main goal of fall prevention. Nevertheless, falls are common events, and have been associated with deficits in muscle strength and dynamic postural stability. Recent studies reported on improvements in rate of force development and static postural control evoked by jaw clenching activities, potentially induced by facilitation of human motor system excitability. However, there are no studies describing the effects on dynamic stability. The present study, therefore, aimed to investigate the effects of submaximum jaw clenching on recovery behavior from forward loss of balance. Participants were 12 healthy young adults, who were instructed to recover balance from a simulated forward fall by taking a single step while either biting at a submaximum force or keeping the mandible at rest. Bite forces were measured by means of hydrostatic splints, whereas a 3D motion capture system was used to analyze spatiotemporal parameters and joint angles, respectively. Additionally, dynamic stability was quantified by the extrapolated CoM concept, designed to determine postural stability in dynamic situations. Paired t-tests revealed that submaximum biting did not significantly influence recovery behavior with respect to any variable under investigation. Therefore, reductions in postural sway evoked by submaximum biting are obviously not transferable to balance recovery as it was assessed in the present study. It is suggested that these contradictions are the result of different motor demands associated with the abovementioned tasks. Furthermore, floor effects and the sample size might be discussed as potential reasons for the absence of significances. Notwithstanding this, the present study also revealed that bite forces under both conditions significantly increased from subjects' release to touchdown of the recovery limb. Clenching the jaw, hence, seems to be part of a common physiological repertoire used to improve motor performance.

7.
Cranio ; 34(5): 316-22, 2016 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26323496

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms among Turks and re-settlers with German origin from Russia and to compare those findings with a German group from the same area. METHOD: Sixty-nine Turkish migrants, 50 re-settlers, and 96 Germans were clinically examined according to a short version of the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC/TMD) protocol. The subjects participated in a feasibility study of the German National Cohort and were recruited from the study center Heidelberg/Mannheim of the cluster Baden-Württemberg/Saarland. RESULTS: Significant differences emerged between the three ethnic groups for unassisted opening without pain, maximum unassisted opening, and overbite, with highest values for the German group. No significant differences were found for muscle pain on palpation or muscle and joint pain during opening. DISCUSSION: As the authors identified significant differences between the different ethnic groups for metric measurements, it might be beneficial to include questions concerning the ethnicity to the German version of the RDC/TMD for further research, to make the results more comparable.


Assuntos
Comparação Transcultural , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Síndrome da Disfunção da Articulação Temporomandibular/etnologia , Síndrome da Disfunção da Articulação Temporomandibular/epidemiologia , Migrantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Sobremordida/diagnóstico , Sobremordida/epidemiologia , Sobremordida/etnologia , Síndrome da Disfunção da Articulação Temporomandibular/diagnóstico , Turquia/etnologia , U.R.S.S./etnologia
8.
Eur J Oral Sci ; 123(6): 439-46, 2015 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26446049

RESUMO

The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of physiological control of the craniomandibular system during force-controlled biting: in intercuspation, restricted by predetermined anatomic-geometrical conditions [i.e. biting in intercuspation (BIC)]; and on a hydrostatic system [i.e. auto-balanced static equilibrium of the mandible (BAL)], in which the mandible is balanced under unrestricted occlusal conditions. For 20 healthy subjects, the spatial positions of the condyles, the lower molars, and the incisal point were measured, and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the musculus masseter and musculus temporalis anterior were recorded bilaterally, during force-controlled biting (50, 75, 100 N) on a hydrostatic device. The results were compared with those obtained during BIC. During BAL, the neuromuscular system stabilizes one condyle, so it behaves as a virtual fulcrum, and all available biomechanical degrees of freedom of the opposite side are used to achieve a bilaterally equal vertical distance between the upper and lower dental arches. The variability of the positions of the molars was significantly smaller than for the condyles. The EMG co-contraction ratios calculated for homonymous muscle regions revealed significant differences between BIC and BAL, specifically, greater symmetry during BAL with substantial asymmetry of approximately 25% remaining. In conclusion, the results revealed precise neuromuscular control of the position of the lower dental arch; this information might form the basis for interference-free tracking of the mandible in intercuspation under different conditions.


Assuntos
Mandíbula , Força de Mordida , Eletromiografia , Humanos , Músculo Masseter , Dente Molar , Contração Muscular , Músculo Temporal
9.
Gait Posture ; 42(4): 598-600, 2015 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26385200

RESUMO

Recent studies reported on the potential benefits of submaximum clenching of the jaw on human postural control in upright unperturbed stance. However, it remained unclear whether these effects might also be observed among active controls. The purpose of the present study, therefore, was to comparatively examine the influence of concurrent muscle activation in terms of submaximum clenching of the jaw and submaximum clenching of the fists on postural stability. Posturographic analyses were conducted with 17 healthy young adults on firm and foam surfaces while either clenching the jaw (JAW) or clenching the fists (FIST), whereas habitual standing served as the control condition (CON). Both submaximum tasks were performed at 25% maximum voluntary contraction, assessed, and visualized in real time by means of electromyography. Statistical analyses revealed that center of pressure (COP) displacements were significantly reduced during JAW and FIST, but with no differences between both concurrent clenching activities. Further, a significant increase in COP displacements was observed for the foam as compared to the firm condition. The results showed that concurrent muscle activation significantly improved postural stability compared with habitual standing, and thus emphasize the beneficial effects of jaw and fist clenching for static postural control. It is suggested that concurrent activities contribute to the facilitation of human motor excitability, finally increasing the neural drive to the distal muscles. Future studies should evaluate whether elderly or patients with compromised postural control might benefit from these physiological responses, e.g., in the form of a reduced risk of falling.


Assuntos
Mãos/fisiologia , Arcada Osseodentária/fisiologia , Músculo Esquelético/fisiologia , Equilíbrio Postural/fisiologia , Postura/fisiologia , Pressão , Fenômenos Biomecânicos , Eletromiografia , Feminino , Voluntários Saudáveis , Humanos , Masculino , Distribuição Aleatória , Adulto Jovem
10.
Front Psychol ; 6: 750, 2015.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26082747

RESUMO

Human motor control is based on complex sensorimotor processes. Recent research has shown that neuromuscular activity of the craniomandibular system (CMS) might affect human motor control. In particular, improvements in postural stability and muscle strength have been observed as a result of voluntary jaw clenching. Potential benefits of jaw aligning appliances on muscle strength and golf performance have also been described. These reports are highly contradictory, however, and the oral motor task performed is often unclear. The purpose of our study was, therefore, to investigate the effect of submaximum biting on golf performance via shot precision and shot length over three different distances. Participants were 14 male professional golfers - seven with sleep bruxism and seven without - randomly performing golf shots over 60m, 160m, or driving distance while either biting on an oral splint or biting on their teeth; habitual jaw position served as the control condition. Statistical analysis revealed that oral motor activity did not systematically affect golf performance in respect of shot precision or shot length for 60m, 160 m, or driving distance. These findings were reinforced by impact variables such as club head speed and ball speed, which were also not indicative of significant effects. The results thus showed that the strength improvements and stabilizing effects described previously are, apparently, not transferable to such coordination-demanding sports as golf. This could be due to the divergent motor demands associated with postural control and muscle strength on the one hand and the complex coordination of a golf swing on the other. Interestingly, subjects without sleep bruxism performed significantly better at the short distance (60 m) than those with bruxism. Because of the multifactorial etiology of parafunctional CMS activity, conclusions about the need for dental treatment to improve sports performance are, however, completely unwarranted.

11.
Int J Prosthodont ; 27(4): 383-9, 2014.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25010884

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine, on the basis of masticatory performance (MP), total muscle work (TMW), and range of movement (RoM), whether reduction of the profile of the cusps results in loss of the biomechanical effectiveness of chewing by healthy dentate patients. METHODS: Twenty healthy patients (10 female, mean age: 24.1 ± 1.2 years) chewed standardized silicone particles, performing 15 masticatory cycles. Three experimental conditions were investigated: chewing on (1) the natural dentition (ND), (2) splints with structured occlusal profiles simulating the patient's natural dentition (SS), and (3) splints with a plane surface (PS). The expectorated particles were analyzed by a validated scanning procedure. The size distribution of the particles was calculated with the Rosin-Rammler function and the mean particle sizes (X50) were determined for each experimental condition. The target variables of the experimental conditions were compared by repeated measures analysis of variance. RESULTS: X50 values calculated for MP differed significantly (P < .002) between PS and SS, and between ND and SS. Conversely, no significant differences (P > .05) were observed between SS and ND. Regarding muscle work the EMG activity of the masseter differed significantly (P < .001) between the left and right sides, with higher values for the right (chewing) side. No significant differences (P > .05) were observed for TMW and RoM under the three test conditions. CONCLUSIONS: The results confirm the biomechanical significance of structured occlusal surfaces during chewing of brittle test food by young dentate subjects.


Assuntos
Oclusão Dentária , Mastigação/fisiologia , Coroa do Dente/anatomia & histologia , Fenômenos Biomecânicos , Eletromiografia/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Mandíbula/fisiologia , Músculo Masseter/fisiologia , Placas Oclusais , Tamanho da Partícula , Amplitude de Movimento Articular/fisiologia , Músculo Temporal/fisiologia , Fatores de Tempo , Adulto Jovem
12.
Eur J Oral Sci ; 122(1): 49-56, 2014 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24215119

RESUMO

Jaw-closing movements are basic components of physiological motor actions precisely achieving intercuspation without significant interference. The main purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that, despite an imperfect intercuspal position, the precision of jaw-closing movements fluctuates within the range of physiological closing movements indispensable for meeting intercuspation without significant interference. For 35 healthy subjects, condylar and incisal point positions for fast and slow jaw-closing, interrupted at different jaw gaps by the use of frontal occlusal plateaus, were compared with uninterrupted physiological jaw closing, with identical jaw gaps, using a telemetric system for measuring jaw position. Examiner-guided centric relation served as a clinically relevant reference position. For jaw gaps ≤4 mm, no significant horizontal or vertical displacement differences were observed for the incisal or condylar points among physiological, fast, and slow jaw-closing. However, the jaw positions under these three closing conditions differed significantly from guided centric relation for nearly all experimental jaw gaps. The findings provide evidence of stringent neuromuscular control of jaw-closing movements in the vicinity of intercuspation. These results might be of clinical relevance to occlusal intervention with different objectives.


Assuntos
Oclusão Dentária , Mandíbula/fisiologia , Adulto , Relação Central , Eletromiografia , Feminino , Humanos , Incisivo/anatomia & histologia , Masculino , Mandíbula/anatomia & histologia , Côndilo Mandibular/anatomia & histologia , Músculo Masseter/inervação , Músculo Masseter/fisiologia , Movimento , Contração Muscular/fisiologia , Junção Neuromuscular/fisiologia , Amplitude de Movimento Articular/fisiologia , Telemetria/instrumentação , Músculo Temporal/inervação , Músculo Temporal/fisiologia , Fatores de Tempo , Ultrassom/instrumentação
13.
J Orofac Pain ; 27(1): 61-71, 2013.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23424721

RESUMO

AIMS: To test the hypothesis that jaw muscles and specific neck muscles, ie, levator scapulae, trapezius, sternocleidomastoideus, and splenius capitis, co-contract at the different submaximum bite forces usually generated during jaw clenching and tooth grinding, and for different bite force directions. METHODS: Bite-force transducers that measured all three spatial force components were incorporated in 11 healthy subjects. The test persons developed feedback-controlled submaximum bite forces in a variety of bite-force directions. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of the levator scapulae, splenius capitis, and trapezius muscles was recorded, at the level of the fifth cervical vertebra, by use of intramuscular wire electrodes. The activity of the sternocleidomastoideus and masseter muscles was recorded by surface electrodes. For normalization of the EMG data, maximum-effort tasks of the neck muscles were conducted in eight different loading directions by means of a special force-transducer system. Differences between neck-muscle activity during chewing, maximum biting in intercuspation, and the force-controlled motor tasks were compared with the baseline activity of the various muscles by one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. RESULTS: The results confirmed the hypothesis. Co-contractions of the neck muscles in the range of 3% to 10% of maximum voluntary contraction were observed. Significant (P < .05) activity differences were recorded as a result of the different force levels and force directions exerted by the jaw muscles. Long-lasting action potential trains of single motor units triggered by jaw clenching tasks were also detected. CONCLUSION: The findings support the assumption of a relationship between jaw clenching and the neck muscle activity investigated. The low level of co-contraction activity, however, requires further study to elucidate possible pathophysiological interactions at the level of single motor units.


Assuntos
Músculos da Mastigação/fisiologia , Contração Muscular/fisiologia , Músculos do Pescoço/fisiologia , Junção Neuromuscular/fisiologia , Potenciais de Ação/fisiologia , Força de Mordida , Eletrodos Implantados , Eletromiografia/instrumentação , Retroalimentação , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Músculo Masseter/fisiologia , Mastigação/fisiologia , Neurônios Motores/fisiologia , Transdutores , Adulto Jovem
14.
Eur J Oral Sci ; 120(4): 326-34, 2012 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22813223

RESUMO

Bruxism may be involved in the aetiology of myofascial neck pain. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that anterior and posterior neck muscles co-contract during jaw clenching. Ten test subjects developed different feedback-controlled submaximum bite forces in a variety of bite-force directions by means of bite-force transducers. The electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid and supra/infrahyoidal muscles, and of the semispinalis capitis, semispinalis cervicis, and multifidi muscles was recorded by use of surface electrodes and intramuscular wire electrodes, respectively. For normalization of electromyography data, maximum voluntary contraction tasks of the neck muscles were conducted in eight different loading directions. The results confirmed co-contraction of the neck muscles in the range of 2-14% of the maximum voluntary contraction at a bite force ranging from 50 to 300 N. Significant activity differences were observed as a result of the different force levels and force directions exerted by the jaw muscles. Long-lasting tonic activation of specific neck muscles triggered by the jaw-clenching tasks was also detected. These findings support the assumption of a relationship between jaw clenching and the activity of the neck muscles investigated. The low level of co-contraction activity, however, requires further study to elucidate possible pathophysiological interactions at the level of single motor units.


Assuntos
Força de Mordida , Bruxismo/fisiopatologia , Arcada Osseodentária/fisiologia , Mastigação/fisiologia , Contração Muscular/fisiologia , Músculos do Pescoço/fisiologia , Adulto , Análise de Variância , Fenômenos Biomecânicos , Eletromiografia/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
15.
J Oral Rehabil ; 38(10): 729-36, 2011 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21385200

RESUMO

Alterations of body sway caused by isometric contractions of the jaw muscles have been reported previously. The objective of this study was to test if motor tasks of the masticatory system with different control demands affect body posture differently during quiet stance. Position and sway displacements of the center of foot pressure (COP) were measured for 20 healthy subjects who either kept the mandible at rest or performed unilateral and bilateral maximum voluntary teeth clenching, feedback-controlled biting tasks at submaximum bite forces, or unilateral chewing. Two weeks later the measurements were repeated. Compared with quiet stance, the COP results revealed significant changes during the feedback-controlled biting tasks. Robust sway reduction and anterior displacement of the COP were observed under these conditions. Body oscillations were not significantly affected by maximum bites or by unilateral chewing. For most of the variables investigated there were no significant differences between unilateral and bilateral biting. Robust sway reduction during feedback-controlled biting tasks in healthy subjects involved a stiffening phenomenon that was attributed to the common physiological repertoire of posture control, and might optimize the stability of posture under these conditions.


Assuntos
Contração Isométrica/fisiologia , Arcada Osseodentária/fisiologia , Equilíbrio Postural/fisiologia , Desempenho Psicomotor/fisiologia , Adulto , Força de Mordida , Eletromiografia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Valores de Referência
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...