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1.
Epilepsia ; 60(5): 830-844, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30968951

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Pathogenic variants in SCN8A have been associated with a wide spectrum of epilepsy phenotypes, ranging from benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS) to epileptic encephalopathies with variable severity. Furthermore, a few patients with intellectual disability (ID) or movement disorders without epilepsy have been reported. The vast majority of the published SCN8A patients suffer from severe developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE). In this study, we aimed to provide further insight on the spectrum of milder SCN8A-related epilepsies. METHODS: A cohort of 1095 patients were screened using a next generation sequencing panel. Further patients were ascertained from a network of epilepsy genetics clinics. Patients with severe DEE and BFIS were excluded from the study. RESULTS: We found 36 probands who presented with an SCN8A-related epilepsy and normal intellect (33%) or mild (61%) to moderate ID (6%). All patients presented with epilepsy between age 1.5 months and 7 years (mean = 13.6 months), and 58% of these became seizure-free, two-thirds on monotherapy. Neurological disturbances included ataxia (28%) and hypotonia (19%) as the most prominent features. Interictal electroencephalogram was normal in 41%. Several recurrent variants were observed, including Ile763Val, Val891Met, Gly1475Arg, Gly1483Lys, Phe1588Leu, Arg1617Gln, Ala1650Val/Thr, Arg1872Gln, and Asn1877Ser. SIGNIFICANCE: With this study, we explore the electroclinical features of an intermediate SCN8A-related epilepsy with mild cognitive impairment, which is for the majority a treatable epilepsy.

2.
Neurology ; 91(22): e2078-e2088, 2018 Nov 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30413629

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To characterize the neurologic phenotypes associated with COL4A1/2 mutations and to seek genotype-phenotype correlation. METHODS: We analyzed clinical, EEG, and neuroimaging data of 44 new and 55 previously reported patients with COL4A1/COL4A2 mutations. RESULTS: Childhood-onset focal seizures, frequently complicated by status epilepticus and resistance to antiepileptic drugs, was the most common phenotype. EEG typically showed focal epileptiform discharges in the context of other abnormalities, including generalized sharp waves or slowing. In 46.4% of new patients with focal seizures, porencephalic cysts on brain MRI colocalized with the area of the focal epileptiform discharges. In patients with porencephalic cysts, brain MRI frequently also showed extensive white matter abnormalities, consistent with the finding of diffuse cerebral disturbance on EEG. Notably, we also identified a subgroup of patients with epilepsy as their main clinical feature, in which brain MRI showed nonspecific findings, in particular periventricular leukoencephalopathy and ventricular asymmetry. Analysis of 15 pedigrees suggested a worsening of the severity of clinical phenotype in succeeding generations, particularly when maternally inherited. Mutations associated with epilepsy were spread across COL4A1 and a clear genotype-phenotype correlation did not emerge. CONCLUSION: COL4A1/COL4A2 mutations typically cause a severe neurologic condition and a broader spectrum of milder phenotypes, in which epilepsy is the predominant feature. Early identification of patients carrying COL4A1/COL4A2 mutations may have important clinical consequences, while for research efforts, omission from large-scale epilepsy sequencing studies of individuals with abnormalities on brain MRI may generate misleading estimates of the genetic contribution to the epilepsies overall.

4.
Genet Med ; 2018 Aug 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30093711

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To define the phenotypic and mutational spectrum of epilepsies related to DEPDC5, NPRL2 and NPRL3 genes encoding the GATOR1 complex, a negative regulator of the mTORC1 pathway METHODS: We analyzed clinical and genetic data of 73 novel probands (familial and sporadic) with epilepsy-related variants in GATOR1-encoding genes and proposed new guidelines for clinical interpretation of GATOR1 variants. RESULTS: The GATOR1 seizure phenotype consisted mostly in focal seizures (e.g., hypermotor or frontal lobe seizures in 50%), with a mean age at onset of 4.4 years, often sleep-related and drug-resistant (54%), and associated with focal cortical dysplasia (20%). Infantile spasms were reported in 10% of the probands. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) occurred in 10% of the families. Novel classification framework of all 140 epilepsy-related GATOR1 variants (including the variants of this study) revealed that 68% are loss-of-function pathogenic, 14% are likely pathogenic, 15% are variants of uncertain significance and 3% are likely benign. CONCLUSION: Our data emphasize the increasingly important role of GATOR1 genes in the pathogenesis of focal epilepsies (>180 probands to date). The GATOR1 phenotypic spectrum ranges from sporadic early-onset epilepsies with cognitive impairment comorbidities to familial focal epilepsies, and SUDEP.

6.
Neurology ; 89(4): 385-394, 2017 Jul 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28667181

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the phenotypic spectrum caused by mutations in dynamin 1 (DNM1), encoding the presynaptic protein DNM1, and to investigate possible genotype-phenotype correlations and predicted functional consequences based on structural modeling. METHODS: We reviewed phenotypic data of 21 patients (7 previously published) with DNM1 mutations. We compared mutation data to known functional data and undertook biomolecular modeling to assess the effect of the mutations on protein function. RESULTS: We identified 19 patients with de novo mutations in DNM1 and a sibling pair who had an inherited mutation from a mosaic parent. Seven patients (33.3%) carried the recurrent p.Arg237Trp mutation. A common phenotype emerged that included severe to profound intellectual disability and muscular hypotonia in all patients and an epilepsy characterized by infantile spasms in 16 of 21 patients, frequently evolving into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Two patients had profound global developmental delay without seizures. In addition, we describe a single patient with normal development before the onset of a catastrophic epilepsy, consistent with febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome at 4 years. All mutations cluster within the GTPase or middle domains, and structural modeling and existing functional data suggest a dominant-negative effect on DMN1 function. CONCLUSIONS: The phenotypic spectrum of DNM1-related encephalopathy is relatively homogeneous, in contrast to many other genetic epilepsies. Up to one-third of patients carry the recurrent p.Arg237Trp variant, which is now one of the most common recurrent variants in epileptic encephalopathies identified to date. Given the predicted dominant-negative mechanism of this mutation, this variant presents a prime target for therapeutic intervention.


Assuntos
Encefalopatias/genética , Encefalopatias/metabolismo , GTP Fosfo-Hidrolases/genética , GTP Fosfo-Hidrolases/metabolismo , Proteínas Associadas aos Microtúbulos/genética , Proteínas Associadas aos Microtúbulos/metabolismo , Proteínas Mitocondriais/genética , Proteínas Mitocondriais/metabolismo , Mutação , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Feminino , Proteínas de Homeodomínio , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Modelos Moleculares , Fenótipo , Proteína de Homoeobox de Baixa Estatura , Irmãos , Vesículas Sinápticas/metabolismo , Adulto Jovem
7.
Mol Syndromol ; 9(1): 38-44, 2017 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29456482

RESUMO

Chromosomal abnormalities are often identified in people with neurodevelopmental disorders including intellectual disability, autism, and epilepsy. Ring chromosomes, which usually involve gene copy number loss, are formed by fusion of subtelomeric or telomeric chromosomal regions. Some ring chromosomes, including ring 14, 17, and 20, are strongly associated with seizure disorders. We report an individual with a ring chromosome 17, r(17)(p13.3q25.3), with a terminal 17q25.3 deletion and no short arm copy number loss, and with a phenotype characterized by intellectual disability and drug-resistant epilepsy, including a propensity for nonconvulsive status epilepticus.

8.
Mol Genet Genomic Med ; 4(4): 457-64, 2016 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27465585

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sanger sequencing, still the standard technique for genetic testing in most diagnostic laboratories and until recently widely used in research, is gradually being complemented by next-generation sequencing (NGS). No single mutation detection technique is however perfect in identifying all mutations. Therefore, we wondered to what extent inconsistencies between Sanger sequencing and NGS affect the molecular diagnosis of patients. Since mutations in SCN1A, the major gene implicated in epilepsy, are found in the majority of Dravet syndrome (DS) patients, we focused on missed SCN1A mutations. METHODS: We sent out a survey to 16 genetic centers performing SCN1A testing. RESULTS: We collected data on 28 mutations initially missed using Sanger sequencing. All patients were falsely reported as SCN1A mutation-negative, both due to technical limitations and human errors. CONCLUSION: We illustrate the pitfalls of Sanger sequencing and most importantly provide evidence that SCN1A mutations are an even more frequent cause of DS than already anticipated.

9.
J Med Genet ; 53(8): 511-22, 2016 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26989088

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to delineate the neurodevelopmental spectrum associated with SYNGAP1 mutations and to investigate genotype-phenotype correlations. METHODS: We sequenced the exome or screened the exons of SYNGAP1 in a total of 251 patients with neurodevelopmental disorders. Molecular and clinical data from patients with SYNGAP1 mutations from other centres were also collected, focusing on developmental aspects and the associated epilepsy phenotype. A review of SYNGAP1 mutations published in the literature was also performed. RESULTS: We describe 17 unrelated affected individuals carrying 13 different novel loss-of-function SYNGAP1 mutations. Developmental delay was the first manifestation of SYNGAP1-related encephalopathy; intellectual disability became progressively obvious and was associated with autistic behaviours in eight patients. Hypotonia and unstable gait were frequent associated neurological features. With the exception of one patient who experienced a single seizure, all patients had epilepsy, characterised by falls or head drops due to atonic or myoclonic seizures, (myoclonic) absences and/or eyelid myoclonia. Triggers of seizures were frequent (n=7). Seizures were pharmacoresistant in half of the patients. The severity of the epilepsy did not correlate with the presence of autistic features or with the severity of cognitive impairment. Mutations were distributed throughout the gene, but spared spliced 3' and 5' exons. Seizures in patients with mutations in exons 4-5 were more pharmacoresponsive than in patients with mutations in exons 8-15. CONCLUSIONS: SYNGAP1 encephalopathy is characterised by early neurodevelopmental delay typically preceding the onset of a relatively recognisable epilepsy comprising generalised seizures (absences, myoclonic jerks) and frequent triggers.

10.
EBioMedicine ; 2(9): 1063-70, 2015 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26501104

RESUMO

Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) represents the most severe degree of the spectrum of epilepsy severity and is the commonest cause of epilepsy-related premature mortality. The precise pathophysiology and the genetic architecture of SUDEP remain elusive. Aiming to elucidate the genetic basis of SUDEP, we analysed rare, protein-changing variants from whole-exome sequences of 18 people who died of SUDEP, 87 living people with epilepsy and 1479 non-epilepsy disease controls. Association analysis revealed a significantly increased genome-wide polygenic burden per individual in the SUDEP cohort when compared to epilepsy (P = 5.7 × 10(- 3)) and non-epilepsy disease controls (P = 1.2 × 10(- 3)). The polygenic burden was driven both by the number of variants per individual, and over-representation of variants likely to be deleterious in the SUDEP cohort. As determined by this study, more than a thousand genes contribute to the observed polygenic burden within the framework of this study. Subsequent gene-based association analysis revealed five possible candidate genes significantly associated with SUDEP or epilepsy, but no one single gene emerges as common to the SUDEP cases. Our findings provide further evidence for a genetic susceptibility to SUDEP, and suggest an extensive polygenic contribution to SUDEP causation. Thus, an overall increased burden of deleterious variants in a highly polygenic background might be important in rendering a given individual more susceptible to SUDEP. Our findings suggest that exome sequencing in people with epilepsy might eventually contribute to generating SUDEP risk estimates, promoting stratified medicine in epilepsy, with the eventual aim of reducing an individual patient's risk of SUDEP.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/genética , Variação Genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Adulto , Causas de Morte , Morte Súbita , Epilepsia/mortalidade , Epilepsia/patologia , Exoma/genética , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética/métodos , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores de Risco , Análise de Sequência de DNA/métodos , Índice de Gravidade de Doença
11.
Nat Genet ; 47(4): 393-399, 2015 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25751627

RESUMO

Epileptic encephalopathies are a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe epilepsies accompanied by intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental features. Using next-generation sequencing, we identified four different de novo mutations in KCNA2, encoding the potassium channel KV1.2, in six isolated patients with epileptic encephalopathy (one mutation recurred three times independently). Four individuals presented with febrile and multiple afebrile, often focal seizure types, multifocal epileptiform discharges strongly activated by sleep, mild to moderate intellectual disability, delayed speech development and sometimes ataxia. Functional studies of the two mutations associated with this phenotype showed almost complete loss of function with a dominant-negative effect. Two further individuals presented with a different and more severe epileptic encephalopathy phenotype. They carried mutations inducing a drastic gain-of-function effect leading to permanently open channels. These results establish KCNA2 as a new gene involved in human neurodevelopmental disorders through two different mechanisms, predicting either hyperexcitability or electrical silencing of KV1.2-expressing neurons.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/genética , Canal de Potássio Kv1.2/genética , Mutação , Espasmos Infantis/genética , Adulto , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Linhagem , Adulto Jovem
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