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1.
Pediatr Obes ; : e12885, 2022 Jan 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35040268

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Few studies have focused on the role of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in relation to genetic susceptibility to obesity. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the interaction between the presence of ACEs (i.e., physical, psychological and sexual abuse) before the age of 18 and BMI polygenic score. METHODS: Data came from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) Wave IV (2007/2008) where saliva samples were collected for DNA genotyping and information on BMI and ACEs were obtained from 5854 European American (EA), 2073 African American (AA) and 1448 Hispanic American (HA) participants aged 24 to 32 years old. Polygenic scores were calculated as the sum of the number of risk alleles of BMI-related SNPs which were weighted by effect size. A race/ethnicity-stratified mixed-effects linear regression model was used to test for differential association between BMI polygenic score and BMI by the presence of ACEs. RESULTS: We did not find any evidence of significant interaction between ACEs and polygenic score in relation to BMI among EA (p = 0.289), AA (p = 0.618) or HA (p = 0.870). In main effects models, polygenic score was positively associated with BMI in all race/ethnic groups, yet the presence of ACEs was associated with increased BMI only among EA. CONCLUSION: We did not find any evidence that ACEs exacerbate genetic predisposition to increased BMI in early adulthood.

2.
HGG Adv ; 3(1): 100073, 2022 Jan 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35047858

RESUMO

Despite a lifetime prevalence of at least 5%, developmental stuttering, characterized by prolongations, blocks, and repetitions of speech sounds, remains a largely idiopathic speech disorder. Family, twin, and segregation studies overwhelmingly support a strong genetic influence on stuttering risk; however, its complex mode of inheritance combined with thus-far underpowered genetic studies contribute to the challenge of identifying and reproducing genes implicated in developmental stuttering susceptibility. We conducted a trans-ancestry genome-wide association study (GWAS) and meta-analysis of developmental stuttering in two primary datasets: The International Stuttering Project comprising 1,345 clinically ascertained cases from multiple global sites and 6,759 matched population controls from the biobank at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), and 785 self-reported stuttering cases and 7,572 controls ascertained from The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). Meta-analysis of these genome-wide association studies identified a genome-wide significant (GWS) signal for clinically reported developmental stuttering in the general population: a protective variant in the intronic or genic upstream region of SSUH2 (rs113284510, protective allele frequency = 7.49%, Z = -5.576, p = 2.46 × 10-8) that acts as an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) in esophagus-muscularis tissue by reducing its gene expression. In addition, we identified 15 loci reaching suggestive significance (p < 5 × 10-6). This foundational population-based genetic study of a common speech disorder reports the findings of a clinically ascertained study of developmental stuttering and highlights the need for further research.

3.
Diabetologia ; 2021 Dec 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34951656

RESUMO

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Type 2 diabetes is a growing global public health challenge. Investigating quantitative traits, including fasting glucose, fasting insulin and HbA1c, that serve as early markers of type 2 diabetes progression may lead to a deeper understanding of the genetic aetiology of type 2 diabetes development. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 500 loci associated with type 2 diabetes, glycaemic traits and insulin-related traits. However, most of these findings were based only on populations of European ancestry. To address this research gap, we examined the genetic basis of fasting glucose, fasting insulin and HbA1c in participants of the diverse Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study. METHODS: We conducted a GWAS of fasting glucose (n = 52,267), fasting insulin (n = 48,395) and HbA1c (n = 23,357) in participants without diabetes from the diverse PAGE Study (23% self-reported African American, 46% Hispanic/Latino, 40% European, 4% Asian, 3% Native Hawaiian, 0.8% Native American), performing transethnic and population-specific GWAS meta-analyses, followed by fine-mapping to identify and characterise novel loci and independent secondary signals in known loci. RESULTS: Four novel associations were identified (p < 5 × 10-9), including three loci associated with fasting insulin, and a novel, low-frequency African American-specific locus associated with fasting glucose. Additionally, seven secondary signals were identified, including novel independent secondary signals for fasting glucose at the known GCK locus and for fasting insulin at the known PPP1R3B locus in transethnic meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our findings provide new insights into the genetic architecture of glycaemic traits and highlight the continued importance of conducting genetic studies in diverse populations. DATA AVAILABILITY: Full summary statistics from each of the population-specific and transethnic results are available at NHGRI-EBI GWAS catalog ( https://www.ebi.ac.uk/gwas/downloads/summary-statistics ).

5.
Am J Hum Genet ; 108(10): 1836-1851, 2021 10 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34582791

RESUMO

Many common and rare variants associated with hematologic traits have been discovered through imputation on large-scale reference panels. However, the majority of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been conducted in Europeans, and determining causal variants has proved challenging. We performed a GWAS of total leukocyte, neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, eosinophil, and basophil counts generated from 109,563,748 variants in the autosomes and the X chromosome in the Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program, which included data from 61,802 individuals of diverse ancestry. We discovered and replicated 7 leukocyte trait associations, including (1) the association between a chromosome X, pseudo-autosomal region (PAR), noncoding variant located between cytokine receptor genes (CSF2RA and CLRF2) and lower eosinophil count; and (2) associations between single variants found predominantly among African Americans at the S1PR3 (9q22.1) and HBB (11p15.4) loci and monocyte and lymphocyte counts, respectively. We further provide evidence indicating that the newly discovered eosinophil-lowering chromosome X PAR variant might be associated with reduced susceptibility to common allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis and asthma. Additionally, we found a burden of very rare FLT3 (13q12.2) variants associated with monocyte counts. Together, these results emphasize the utility of whole-genome sequencing in diverse samples in identifying associations missed by European-ancestry-driven GWASs.


Assuntos
Asma/epidemiologia , Biomarcadores/metabolismo , Dermatite Atópica/epidemiologia , Leucócitos/patologia , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/epidemiologia , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Asma/genética , Asma/metabolismo , Asma/patologia , Dermatite Atópica/genética , Dermatite Atópica/metabolismo , Dermatite Atópica/patologia , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Genoma Humano , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.) , Fenótipo , Prognóstico , Proteoma/análise , Proteoma/metabolismo , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/genética , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/metabolismo , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/patologia , Reino Unido/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Sequenciamento Completo do Genoma
6.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0249615, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34329319

RESUMO

Several studies have found associations between higher pancreatic fat content and adverse health outcomes, such as diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, but investigations into the genetic contributions to pancreatic fat are limited. This genome-wide association study, comprised of 804 participants with MRI-assessed pancreatic fat measurements, was conducted in the ethnically diverse Multiethnic Cohort-Adiposity Phenotype Study (MEC-APS). Two genetic variants reaching genome-wide significance, rs73449607 on chromosome 13q21.2 (Beta = -0.67, P = 4.50x10-8) and rs7996760 on chromosome 6q14 (Beta = -0.90, P = 4.91x10-8) were associated with percent pancreatic fat on the log scale. Rs73449607 was most common in the African American population (13%) and rs79967607 was most common in the European American population (6%). Rs73449607 was also associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes (OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.89-1.00, P = 0.047) in the Population Architecture Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study and the DIAbetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM), which included substantial numbers of non-European ancestry participants (53,102 cases and 193,679 controls). Rs73449607 is located in an intergenic region between GSX1 and PLUTO, and rs79967607 is in intron 1 of EPM2A. PLUTO, a lncRNA, regulates transcription of an adjacent gene, PDX1, that controls beta-cell function in the mature pancreas, and EPM2A encodes the protein laforin, which plays a critical role in regulating glycogen production. If validated, these variants may suggest a genetic component for pancreatic fat and a common etiologic link between pancreatic fat and type 2 diabetes.


Assuntos
Adiposidade/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Pâncreas/metabolismo , Idoso , Cromossomos Humanos Par 13/genética , Cromossomos Humanos Par 6/genética , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Pâncreas/diagnóstico por imagem , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Proteínas Tirosina Fosfatases não Receptoras/genética
7.
BMC Genomics ; 22(1): 432, 2021 Jun 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34107879

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Circulating white blood cell and platelet traits are clinically linked to various disease outcomes and differ across individuals and ancestry groups. Genetic factors play an important role in determining these traits and many loci have been identified. However, most of these findings were identified in populations of European ancestry (EA), with African Americans (AA), Hispanics/Latinos (HL), and other races/ethnicities being severely underrepresented. RESULTS: We performed ancestry-combined and ancestry-specific genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for white blood cell and platelet traits in the ancestrally diverse Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study, including 16,201 AA, 21,347 HL, and 27,236 EA participants. We identified six novel findings at suggestive significance (P < 5E-8), which need confirmation, and independent signals at six previously established regions at genome-wide significance (P < 2E-9). We confirmed multiple previously reported genome-wide significant variants in the single variant association analysis and multiple genes using PrediXcan. Evaluation of loci reported from a Euro-centric GWAS indicated attenuation of effect estimates in AA and HL compared to EA populations. CONCLUSIONS: Our results highlighted the potential to identify ancestry-specific and ancestry-agnostic variants in participants with diverse backgrounds and advocate for continued efforts in improving inclusion of racially/ethnically diverse populations in genetic association studies for complex traits.


Assuntos
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Genômica , Humanos , Leucócitos , Fenótipo
8.
Hum Mol Genet ; 30(22): 2190-2204, 2021 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34165540

RESUMO

Central obesity is a leading health concern with a great burden carried by ethnic minority populations, especially Hispanics/Latinos. Genetic factors contribute to the obesity burden overall and to inter-population differences. We aimed to identify the loci associated with central adiposity measured as waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist circumference (WC) and hip circumference (HIP) adjusted for body mass index (adjBMI) by using the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL); determine if differences in associations differ by background group within HCHS/SOL and determine whether previously reported associations generalize to HCHS/SOL. Our analyses included 7472 women and 5200 men of mainland (Mexican, Central and South American) and Caribbean (Puerto Rican, Cuban and Dominican) background residing in the USA. We performed genome-wide association analyses stratified and combined across sexes using linear mixed-model regression. We identified 16 variants for waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (WHRadjBMI), 22 for waist circumference adjusted for body mass index (WCadjBMI) and 28 for hip circumference adjusted for body mass index (HIPadjBMI), which reached suggestive significance (P < 1 × 10-6). Many loci exhibited differences in strength of associations by ethnic background and sex. We brought a total of 66 variants forward for validation in cohorts (N = 34 161) with participants of Hispanic/Latino, African and European descent. We confirmed four novel loci (P < 0.05 and consistent direction of effect, and P < 5 × 10-8 after meta-analysis), including two for WHRadjBMI (rs13301996, rs79478137); one for WCadjBMI (rs3168072) and one for HIPadjBMI (rs28692724). Also, we generalized previously reported associations to HCHS/SOL, (8 for WHRadjBMI, 10 for WCadjBMI and 12 for HIPadjBMI). Our study highlights the importance of large-scale genomic studies in ancestrally diverse Hispanic/Latino populations for identifying and characterizing central obesity susceptibility that may be ancestry-specific.

10.
Hum Mol Genet ; 30(15): 1371-1383, 2021 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33949650

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies have been successful mapping loci for individual phenotypes, but few studies have comprehensively interrogated evidence of shared genetic effects across multiple phenotypes simultaneously. Statistical methods have been proposed for analyzing multiple phenotypes using summary statistics, which enables studies of shared genetic effects while avoiding challenges associated with individual-level data sharing. Adaptive tests have been developed to maintain power against multiple alternative hypotheses because the most powerful single-alternative test depends on the underlying structure of the associations between the multiple phenotypes and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here we compare the performance of six such adaptive tests: two adaptive sum of powered scores (aSPU) tests, the unified score association test (metaUSAT), the adaptive test in a mixed-models framework (mixAda) and two principal-component-based adaptive tests (PCAQ and PCO). Our simulations highlight practical challenges that arise when multivariate distributions of phenotypes do not satisfy assumptions of multivariate normality. Previous reports in this context focus on low minor allele count (MAC) and omit the aSPU test, which relies less than other methods on asymptotic and distributional assumptions. When these assumptions are not satisfied, particularly when MAC is low and/or phenotype covariance matrices are singular or nearly singular, aSPU better preserves type I error, sometimes at the cost of decreased power. We illustrate this trade-off with multiple phenotype analyses of six quantitative electrocardiogram traits in the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study.

11.
Pediatr Obes ; 16(7): e12765, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33381925

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The genetic underpinnings of glycemic traits have been understudied in adolescent and Hispanic/Latino (H/L) populations in comparison to adults and populations of European ancestry. OBJECTIVE: To identify genetic factors underlying glycemic traits in an adolescent H/L population. METHODS: We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of fasting glucose (FG) and fasting insulin (FI) in H/L adolescents from the Santiago Longitudinal Study. RESULTS: We identified one novel variant positioned in the CSMD1 gene on chromosome 8 (rs77465890, effect allele frequency = 0.10) that was associated with FI (ß = -0.299, SE = 0.054, p = 2.72×10-8 ) and was only slightly attenuated after adjusting for body mass index z-scores (ß = -0.252, SE = 0.047, p = 1.03×10-7 ). We demonstrated directionally consistent, but not statistically significant results in African and Hispanic adults of the Population Architecture Using Genomics and Epidemiology Consortium. We also identified secondary signals for two FG loci after conditioning on known variants, which demonstrate allelic heterogeneity in well-known glucose loci. CONCLUSION: Our results exemplify the importance of including populations with diverse ancestral origin and adolescent participants in GWAS of glycemic traits to uncover novel risk loci and expand our understanding of disease aetiology.


Assuntos
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Insulina , Adolescente , Adulto , Jejum , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
12.
Circ Genom Precis Med ; 13(4): e002680, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32602732

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We examined how expanding electrocardiographic trait genome-wide association studies to include ancestrally diverse populations, prioritize more precise phenotypic measures, and evaluate evidence for shared genetic effects enabled the detection and characterization of loci. METHODS: We decomposed 10 seconds, 12-lead electrocardiograms from 34 668 multi-ethnic participants (15% Black; 30% Hispanic/Latino) into 6 contiguous, physiologically distinct (P wave, PR segment, QRS interval, ST segment, T wave, and TP segment) and 2 composite, conventional (PR interval and QT interval) interval scale traits and conducted multivariable-adjusted, trait-specific univariate genome-wide association studies using 1000-G imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Evidence of shared genetic effects was evaluated by aggregating meta-analyzed univariate results across the 6 continuous electrocardiographic traits using the combined phenotype adaptive sum of powered scores test. RESULTS: We identified 6 novels (CD36, PITX2, EMB, ZNF592, YPEL2, and BC043580) and 87 known loci (adaptive sum of powered score test P<5×10-9). Lead single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3211938 at CD36 was common in Blacks (minor allele frequency=10%), near monomorphic in European Americans, and had effects on the QT interval and TP segment that ranked among the largest reported to date for common variants. The other 5 novel loci were observed when evaluating the contiguous but not the composite electrocardiographic traits. Combined phenotype testing did not identify novel electrocardiographic loci unapparent using traditional univariate approaches, although this approach did assist with the characterization of known loci. CONCLUSIONS: Despite including one-third as many participants as published electrocardiographic trait genome-wide association studies, our study identified 6 novel loci, emphasizing the importance of ancestral diversity and phenotype resolution in this era of ever-growing genome-wide association studies.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/genética , Eletrocardiografia , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Afro-Americanos/genética , Antígenos CD36/genética , Doenças Cardiovasculares/etnologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/fisiopatologia , Frequência do Gene , Loci Gênicos , Genótipo , Proteínas de Homeodomínio/genética , Humanos , Glicoproteínas de Membrana/genética , Chaperonas Moleculares/genética , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , /genética
13.
Circ Res ; 126(12): 1816-1840, 2020 06 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32496918

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies have revolutionized our understanding of the genetic underpinnings of cardiometabolic disease. Yet, the inadequate representation of individuals of diverse ancestral backgrounds in these studies may undercut their ultimate potential for both public health and precision medicine. The goal of this review is to describe the imperativeness of studying the populations who are most affected by cardiometabolic disease, to the aim of better understanding the genetic underpinnings of the disease. We support this premise by describing the current variation in the global burden of cardiometabolic disease and emphasize the importance of building a globally and ancestrally representative genetics evidence base for the identification of population-specific variants, fine-mapping, and polygenic risk score estimation. We discuss the important ethical, legal, and social implications of increasing ancestral diversity in genetic studies of cardiometabolic disease and the challenges that arise from the (1) lack of diversity in current reference populations and available analytic samples and the (2) unequal generation of health-associated genomic data and their prediction accuracies. Despite these challenges, we conclude that additional, unprecedented opportunities lie ahead for public health genomics and the realization of precision medicine, provided that the gap in diversity can be systematically addressed. Achieving this goal will require concerted efforts by social, academic, professional and regulatory stakeholders and communities, and these efforts must be based on principles of equity and social justice.


Assuntos
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Síndrome Metabólica/genética , Frequência do Gene , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/normas , Humanos , Síndrome Metabólica/epidemiologia , Polimorfismo Genético
14.
PLoS Genet ; 16(3): e1008684, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32226016

RESUMO

Lipid levels are important markers for the development of cardio-metabolic diseases. Although hundreds of associated loci have been identified through genetic association studies, the contribution of genetic factors to variation in lipids is not fully understood, particularly in U.S. minority groups. We performed genome-wide association analyses for four lipid traits in over 45,000 ancestrally diverse participants from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study, followed by a meta-analysis with several European ancestry studies. We identified nine novel lipid loci, five of which showed evidence of replication in independent studies. Furthermore, we discovered one novel gene in a PrediXcan analysis, minority-specific independent signals at eight previously reported loci, and potential functional variants at two known loci through fine-mapping. Systematic examination of known lipid loci revealed smaller effect estimates in African American and Hispanic ancestry populations than those in Europeans, and better performance of polygenic risk scores based on minority-specific effect estimates. Our findings provide new insight into the genetic architecture of lipid traits and highlight the importance of conducting genetic studies in diverse populations in the era of precision medicine.


Assuntos
Lipídeos/sangue , Lipídeos/genética , /genética , Bases de Dados Genéticas , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Genótipo , Humanos , Lipídeos/análise , Masculino , Metagenômica/métodos , Grupos Minoritários , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
15.
BMC Genomics ; 21(1): 228, 2020 Mar 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32171239

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Quantitative red blood cell (RBC) traits are highly polygenic clinically relevant traits, with approximately 500 reported GWAS loci. The majority of RBC trait GWAS have been performed in European- or East Asian-ancestry populations, despite evidence that rare or ancestry-specific variation contributes substantially to RBC trait heritability. Recently developed combined-phenotype methods which leverage genetic trait correlation to improve statistical power have not yet been applied to these traits. Here we leveraged correlation of seven quantitative RBC traits in performing a combined-phenotype analysis in a multi-ethnic study population. RESULTS: We used the adaptive sum of powered scores (aSPU) test to assess combined-phenotype associations between ~ 21 million SNPs and seven RBC traits in a multi-ethnic population (maximum n = 67,885 participants; 24% African American, 30% Hispanic/Latino, and 43% European American; 76% female). Thirty-nine loci in our multi-ethnic population contained at least one significant association signal (p < 5E-9), with lead SNPs at nine loci significantly associated with three or more RBC traits. A majority of the lead SNPs were common (MAF > 5%) across all ancestral populations. Nineteen additional independent association signals were identified at seven known loci (HFE, KIT, HBS1L/MYB, CITED2/FILNC1, ABO, HBA1/2, and PLIN4/5). For example, the HBA1/2 locus contained 14 conditionally independent association signals, 11 of which were previously unreported and are specific to African and Amerindian ancestries. One variant in this region was common in all ancestries, but exhibited a narrower LD block in African Americans than European Americans or Hispanics/Latinos. GTEx eQTL analysis of all independent lead SNPs yielded 31 significant associations in relevant tissues, over half of which were not at the gene immediately proximal to the lead SNP. CONCLUSION: This work identified seven loci containing multiple independent association signals for RBC traits using a combined-phenotype approach, which may improve discovery in genetically correlated traits. Highly complex genetic architecture at the HBA1/2 locus was only revealed by the inclusion of African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos, underscoring the continued importance of expanding large GWAS to include ancestrally diverse populations.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/genética , Eritrócitos/metabolismo , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Característica Quantitativa Herdável , /genética , Feminino , Genética Populacional , Humanos , Masculino , Herança Multifatorial , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Análise de Sequência de DNA , Estados Unidos/etnologia
16.
Am J Hum Genet ; 105(4): 706-718, 2019 10 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31564435

RESUMO

Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is widely used to diagnose diabetes and assess glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. However, nonglycemic determinants, including genetic variation, may influence how accurately HbA1c reflects underlying glycemia. Analyzing the NHLBI Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) sequence data in 10,338 individuals from five studies and four ancestries (6,158 Europeans, 3,123 African-Americans, 650 Hispanics, and 407 East Asians), we confirmed five regions associated with HbA1c (GCK in Europeans and African-Americans, HK1 in Europeans and Hispanics, FN3K and/or FN3KRP in Europeans, and G6PD in African-Americans and Hispanics) and we identified an African-ancestry-specific low-frequency variant (rs1039215 in HBG2 and HBE1, minor allele frequency (MAF) = 0.03). The most associated G6PD variant (rs1050828-T, p.Val98Met, MAF = 12% in African-Americans, MAF = 2% in Hispanics) lowered HbA1c (-0.88% in hemizygous males, -0.34% in heterozygous females) and explained 23% of HbA1c variance in African-Americans and 4% in Hispanics. Additionally, we identified a rare distinct G6PD coding variant (rs76723693, p.Leu353Pro, MAF = 0.5%; -0.98% in hemizygous males, -0.46% in heterozygous females) and detected significant association with HbA1c when aggregating rare missense variants in G6PD. We observed similar magnitude and direction of effects for rs1039215 (HBG2) and rs76723693 (G6PD) in the two largest TOPMed African American cohorts, and we replicated the rs76723693 association in the UK Biobank African-ancestry participants. These variants in G6PD and HBG2 were monomorphic in the European and Asian samples. African or Hispanic ancestry individuals carrying G6PD variants may be underdiagnosed for diabetes when screened with HbA1c. Thus, assessment of these variants should be considered for incorporation into precision medicine approaches for diabetes diagnosis.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus/diagnóstico , Diabetes Mellitus/genética , Variação Genética , Hemoglobina A Glicada/genética , Grupos Populacionais/genética , Medicina de Precisão , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
18.
Am J Hum Genet ; 105(1): 15-28, 2019 07 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31178129

RESUMO

Circulating levels of adiponectin, an adipocyte-secreted protein associated with cardiovascular and metabolic risk, are highly heritable. To gain insights into the biology that regulates adiponectin levels, we performed an exome array meta-analysis of 265,780 genetic variants in 67,739 individuals of European, Hispanic, African American, and East Asian ancestry. We identified 20 loci associated with adiponectin, including 11 that had been reported previously (p < 2 × 10-7). Comparison of exome array variants to regional linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns and prior genome-wide association study (GWAS) results detected candidate variants (r2 > .60) spanning as much as 900 kb. To identify potential genes and mechanisms through which the previously unreported association signals act to affect adiponectin levels, we assessed cross-trait associations, expression quantitative trait loci in subcutaneous adipose, and biological pathways of nearby genes. Eight of the nine loci were also associated (p < 1 × 10-4) with at least one obesity or lipid trait. Candidate genes include PRKAR2A, PTH1R, and HDAC9, which have been suggested to play roles in adipocyte differentiation or bone marrow adipose tissue. Taken together, these findings provide further insights into the processes that influence circulating adiponectin levels.


Assuntos
Adiponectina/genética , Tecido Adiposo/patologia , Exoma/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Lipídeos/análise , Obesidade/etiologia , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Tecido Adiposo/metabolismo , Adolescente , Adulto , Afro-Americanos/genética , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade/patologia , Fenótipo , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Adulto Jovem
19.
Front Genet ; 10: 494, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31178898

RESUMO

Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and disproportionally burdens United States ethnic minorities. Its genetic determinants may differ by disease severity and clinical stages. To uncover genetic factors associated CKD severity among high-risk ethnic groups, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in diverse populations within the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study. Methods: We assembled multi-ethnic genome-wide imputed data on CKD non-overlapping cases [4,150 mild to moderate CKD, 1,105 end-stage kidney disease (ESKD)] and non-CKD controls for up to 41,041 PAGE participants (African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, East Asian, Native Hawaiian, and American Indians). We implemented a generalized estimating equation approach for GWAS using ancestry combined data while adjusting for age, sex, principal components, study, and ethnicity. Results: The GWAS identified a novel genome-wide associated locus for mild to moderate CKD nearby NMT2 (rs10906850, p = 3.7 × 10-8) that replicated in the United Kingdom Biobank white British (p = 0.008). Several variants at the APOL1 locus were associated with ESKD including the APOL1 G1 rs73885319 (p = 1.2 × 10-9). There was no overlap among associated loci for CKD and ESKD traits, even at the previously reported APOL1 locus (p = 0.76 for CKD). Several additional loci were associated with CKD or ESKD at p-values below the genome-wide threshold. These loci were often driven by variants more common in non-European ancestry. Conclusion: Our genetic study identified a novel association at NMT2 for CKD and showed for the first time strong associations of the APOL1 variants with ESKD across multi-ethnic populations. Our findings suggest differences in genetic effects across CKD severity and provide information for study design of genetic studies of CKD in diverse populations.

20.
Nature ; 570(7762): 514-518, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31217584

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have laid the foundation for investigations into the biology of complex traits, drug development and clinical guidelines. However, the majority of discovery efforts are based on data from populations of European ancestry1-3. In light of the differential genetic architecture that is known to exist between populations, bias in representation can exacerbate existing disease and healthcare disparities. Critical variants may be missed if they have a low frequency or are completely absent in European populations, especially as the field shifts its attention towards rare variants, which are more likely to be population-specific4-10. Additionally, effect sizes and their derived risk prediction scores derived in one population may not accurately extrapolate to other populations11,12. Here we demonstrate the value of diverse, multi-ethnic participants in large-scale genomic studies. The Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study conducted a GWAS of 26 clinical and behavioural phenotypes in 49,839 non-European individuals. Using strategies tailored for analysis of multi-ethnic and admixed populations, we describe a framework for analysing diverse populations, identify 27 novel loci and 38 secondary signals at known loci, as well as replicate 1,444 GWAS catalogue associations across these traits. Our data show evidence of effect-size heterogeneity across ancestries for published GWAS associations, substantial benefits for fine-mapping using diverse cohorts and insights into clinical implications. In the United States-where minority populations have a disproportionately higher burden of chronic conditions13-the lack of representation of diverse populations in genetic research will result in inequitable access to precision medicine for those with the highest burden of disease. We strongly advocate for continued, large genome-wide efforts in diverse populations to maximize genetic discovery and reduce health disparities.


Assuntos
/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Grupos Minoritários , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Saúde da Mulher , Estatura/genética , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Genética Médica/métodos , Equidade em Saúde/tendências , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Estados Unidos
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