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1.
Otol Neurotol ; 41(3): e330-e333, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31917769

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Access to postoperative aural rehabilitation limits cochlear implant (CI) penetration to the candidate population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of remote CI programming and aural rehabilitation via telehealth. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective study of one cochlear implant center. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTION: Patients undergoing cochlear implantation from 2015 to 2018 undergoing remote programming as part of routine audiologic follow up. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: AzBio scores, impedances, comfort and threshold levels, and responses to the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids questionnaire modified for CIs (IOI-CI). RESULTS: A total of 22 CIs in 20 patients were included during the study period. Threshold, comfort, and impedance levels were readily obtained via telehealth and were not significantly different between telehealth and live sessions. AzBio scores and warble tone pure tone averages were also similar and acceptable in both session modalities. Based on IOI-CI scores, patients were very satisfied with their hearing outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Using telemedicine, reliable measurements were readily obtained and hearing outcomes after remote programming were comparable to those expected after in-person programming sessions. Patients were overall satisfied with their remote programming sessions. Telehealth is a cost-effective and safe way to deliver post-CI audiologic care, particularly to patients with limited mobility or those in remote locations.

2.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 40(4): 594-597, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30981445

RESUMO

We present two unique cases of myoclonus-induced objective tinnitus (OT), along with a comprehensive literature review on the topic. Primary goals include: explore the relationship between palatal myoclonus (PM) and middle ear myoclonus (MEM), highlight the embryologic, neurologic, and anatomical relationship between the involved peri-tubular muscles, exemplify the first case of OT which documents video evidence demonstrating the link between objective tinnitus and eustachian tube movement. Also, we discuss available treatment interventions and why they often do not fully resolve patients' symptoms. Finally we introduce a novel way to objectively quantify the severity of OT. Ultimately, our series hopes to inform future diagnostic and treatment guidelines.


Assuntos
Zumbido/etiologia , Zumbido/terapia , Adulto , Orelha Média , Tuba Auditiva/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mioclonia/complicações , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Zumbido/diagnóstico , Zumbido/fisiopatologia
3.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 160(2): 187-205, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30921525

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This update of a 2011 guideline developed by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations on the pre-, intra-, and postoperative care and management of children 1 to 18 years of age under consideration for tonsillectomy. Tonsillectomy is defined as a surgical procedure performed with or without adenoidectomy that completely removes the tonsil, including its capsule, by dissecting the peritonsillar space between the tonsil capsule and the muscular wall. Tonsillectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures in the United States, with 289,000 ambulatory procedures performed annually in children <15 years of age, based on the most recent published data. This guideline is intended for all clinicians in any setting who interact with children who may be candidates for tonsillectomy. PURPOSE: The purpose of this multidisciplinary guideline is to identify quality improvement opportunities in managing children under consideration for tonsillectomy and to create explicit and actionable recommendations to implement these opportunities in clinical practice. Specifically, the goals are to educate clinicians, patients, and/or caregivers regarding the indications for tonsillectomy and the natural history of recurrent throat infections. Additional goals include the following: optimizing the perioperative management of children undergoing tonsillectomy, emphasizing the need for evaluation and intervention in special populations, improving the counseling and education of families who are considering tonsillectomy for their children, highlighting the management options for patients with modifying factors, and reducing inappropriate or unnecessary variations in care. Children aged 1 to 18 years under consideration for tonsillectomy are the target patient for the guideline. For this guideline update, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation selected a panel representing the fields of nursing, anesthesiology, consumers, family medicine, infectious disease, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, pediatrics, and sleep medicine. KEY ACTION STATEMENTS: The guideline update group made strong recommendations for the following key action statements (KASs): (1) Clinicians should recommend watchful waiting for recurrent throat infection if there have been <7 episodes in the past year, <5 episodes per year in the past 2 years, or <3 episodes per year in the past 3 years. (2) Clinicians should administer a single intraoperative dose of intravenous dexamethasone to children undergoing tonsillectomy. (3) Clinicians should recommend ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or both for pain control after tonsillectomy. The guideline update group made recommendations for the following KASs: (1) Clinicians should assess the child with recurrent throat infection who does not meet criteria in KAS 2 for modifying factors that may nonetheless favor tonsillectomy, which may include but are not limited to multiple antibiotic allergies/intolerance, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis), or history of >1 peritonsillar abscess. (2) Clinicians should ask caregivers of children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing and tonsillar hypertrophy about comorbid conditions that may improve after tonsillectomy, including growth retardation, poor school performance, enuresis, asthma, and behavioral problems. (3) Before performing tonsillectomy, the clinician should refer children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing for polysomnography if they are <2 years of age or if they exhibit any of the following: obesity, Down syndrome, craniofacial abnormalities, neuromuscular disorders, sickle cell disease, or mucopolysaccharidoses. (4) The clinician should advocate for polysomnography prior to tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing in children without any of the comorbidities listed in KAS 5 for whom the need for tonsillectomy is uncertain or when there is discordance between the physical examination and the reported severity of obstructive sleep-disordered breathing. (5) Clinicians should recommend tonsillectomy for children with obstructive sleep apnea documented by overnight polysomnography. (6) Clinicians should counsel patients and caregivers and explain that obstructive sleep-disordered breathing may persist or recur after tonsillectomy and may require further management. (7) The clinician should counsel patients and caregivers regarding the importance of managing posttonsillectomy pain as part of the perioperative education process and should reinforce this counseling at the time of surgery with reminders about the need to anticipate, reassess, and adequately treat pain after surgery. (8) Clinicians should arrange for overnight, inpatient monitoring of children after tonsillectomy if they are <3 years old or have severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥10 obstructive events/hour, oxygen saturation nadir <80%, or both). (9) Clinicians should follow up with patients and/or caregivers after tonsillectomy and document in the medical record the presence or absence of bleeding within 24 hours of surgery (primary bleeding) and bleeding occurring later than 24 hours after surgery (secondary bleeding). (10) Clinicians should determine their rate of primary and secondary posttonsillectomy bleeding at least annually. The guideline update group made a strong recommendation against 2 actions: (1) Clinicians should not administer or prescribe perioperative antibiotics to children undergoing tonsillectomy. (2) Clinicians must not administer or prescribe codeine, or any medication containing codeine, after tonsillectomy in children younger than 12 years. The policy level for the recommendation about documenting recurrent throat infection was an option: (1) Clinicians may recommend tonsillectomy for recurrent throat infection with a frequency of at least 7 episodes in the past year, at least 5 episodes per year for 2 years, or at least 3 episodes per year for 3 years with documentation in the medical record for each episode of sore throat and ≥1 of the following: temperature >38.3°C (101°F), cervical adenopathy, tonsillar exudate, or positive test for group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus. DIFFERENCES FROM PRIOR GUIDELINE: Incorporating new evidence profiles to include the role of patient preferences, confidence in the evidence, differences of opinion, quality improvement opportunities, and any exclusion to which the action statement does not apply. There were 1 new clinical practice guideline, 26 new systematic reviews, and 13 new randomized controlled trials included in the current guideline update. Inclusion of 2 consumer advocates on the guideline update group. Changes to 5 KASs from the original guideline: KAS 1 (Watchful waiting for recurrent throat infection), KAS 3 (Tonsillectomy for recurrent infection with modifying factors), KAS 4 (Tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing), KAS 9 (Perioperative pain counseling), and KAS 10 (Perioperative antibiotics). Seven new KASs: KAS 5 (Indications for polysomnography), KAS 6 (Additional recommendations for polysomnography), KAS 7 (Tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea), KAS 12 (Inpatient monitoring for children after tonsillectomy), KAS 13 (Postoperative ibuprofen and acetaminophen), KAS 14 (Postoperative codeine), and KAS 15a (Outcome assessment for bleeding). Addition of an algorithm outlining KASs. Enhanced emphasis on patient and/or caregiver education and shared decision making.


Assuntos
Adenoidectomia/normas , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Melhoria de Qualidade , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/etiologia , Tonsilectomia/normas , Tonsilite/complicações , Adenoidectomia/métodos , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Medicina Baseada em Evidências , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Medição de Risco , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/fisiopatologia , Tonsilectomia/métodos , Tonsilite/diagnóstico , Tonsilite/cirurgia , Resultado do Tratamento , Estados Unidos
4.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 160(1_suppl): S1-S42, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30798778

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This update of a 2011 guideline developed by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations on the pre-, intra-, and postoperative care and management of children 1 to 18 years of age under consideration for tonsillectomy. Tonsillectomy is defined as a surgical procedure performed with or without adenoidectomy that completely removes the tonsil, including its capsule, by dissecting the peritonsillar space between the tonsil capsule and the muscular wall. Tonsillectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures in the United States, with 289,000 ambulatory procedures performed annually in children <15 years of age based on the most recent published data. This guideline is intended for all clinicians in any setting who interact with children who may be candidates for tonsillectomy. PURPOSE: The purpose of this multidisciplinary guideline is to identify quality improvement opportunities in managing children under consideration for tonsillectomy and to create explicit and actionable recommendations to implement these opportunities in clinical practice. Specifically, the goals are to educate clinicians, patients, and/or caregivers regarding the indications for tonsillectomy and the natural history of recurrent throat infections. Additional goals include the following: optimizing the perioperative management of children undergoing tonsillectomy, emphasizing the need for evaluation and intervention in special populations, improving the counseling and education of families who are considering tonsillectomy for their children, highlighting the management options for patients with modifying factors, and reducing inappropriate or unnecessary variations in care. Children aged 1 to 18 years under consideration for tonsillectomy are the target patient for the guideline. For this guideline update, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation selected a panel representing the fields of nursing, anesthesiology, consumers, family medicine, infectious disease, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, pediatrics, and sleep medicine. KEY ACTION STATEMENTS: The guideline update group made strong recommendations for the following key action statements (KASs): (1) Clinicians should recommend watchful waiting for recurrent throat infection if there have been <7 episodes in the past year, <5 episodes per year in the past 2 years, or <3 episodes per year in the past 3 years. (2) Clinicians should administer a single intraoperative dose of intravenous dexamethasone to children undergoing tonsillectomy. (3) Clinicians should recommend ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or both for pain control after tonsillectomy. The guideline update group made recommendations for the following KASs: (1) Clinicians should assess the child with recurrent throat infection who does not meet criteria in KAS 2 for modifying factors that may nonetheless favor tonsillectomy, which may include but are not limited to multiple antibiotic allergies/intolerance, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis), or history of >1 peritonsillar abscess. (2) Clinicians should ask caregivers of children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing and tonsillar hypertrophy about comorbid conditions that may improve after tonsillectomy, including growth retardation, poor school performance, enuresis, asthma, and behavioral problems. (3) Before performing tonsillectomy, the clinician should refer children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing for polysomnography if they are <2 years of age or if they exhibit any of the following: obesity, Down syndrome, craniofacial abnormalities, neuromuscular disorders, sickle cell disease, or mucopolysaccharidoses. (4) The clinician should advocate for polysomnography prior to tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing in children without any of the comorbidities listed in KAS 5 for whom the need for tonsillectomy is uncertain or when there is discordance between the physical examination and the reported severity of oSDB. (5) Clinicians should recommend tonsillectomy for children with obstructive sleep apnea documented by overnight polysomnography. (6) Clinicians should counsel patients and caregivers and explain that obstructive sleep-disordered breathing may persist or recur after tonsillectomy and may require further management. (7) The clinician should counsel patients and caregivers regarding the importance of managing posttonsillectomy pain as part of the perioperative education process and should reinforce this counseling at the time of surgery with reminders about the need to anticipate, reassess, and adequately treat pain after surgery. (8) Clinicians should arrange for overnight, inpatient monitoring of children after tonsillectomy if they are <3 years old or have severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥10 obstructive events/hour, oxygen saturation nadir <80%, or both). (9) Clinicians should follow up with patients and/or caregivers after tonsillectomy and document in the medical record the presence or absence of bleeding within 24 hours of surgery (primary bleeding) and bleeding occurring later than 24 hours after surgery (secondary bleeding). (10) Clinicians should determine their rate of primary and secondary posttonsillectomy bleeding at least annually. The guideline update group made a strong recommendation against 2 actions: (1) Clinicians should not administer or prescribe perioperative antibiotics to children undergoing tonsillectomy. (2) Clinicians must not administer or prescribe codeine, or any medication containing codeine, after tonsillectomy in children younger than 12 years. The policy level for the recommendation about documenting recurrent throat infection was an option: (1) Clinicians may recommend tonsillectomy for recurrent throat infection with a frequency of at least 7 episodes in the past year, at least 5 episodes per year for 2 years, or at least 3 episodes per year for 3 years with documentation in the medical record for each episode of sore throat and ≥1 of the following: temperature >38.3°C (101°F), cervical adenopathy, tonsillar exudate, or positive test for group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus. DIFFERENCES FROM PRIOR GUIDELINE: (1) Incorporating new evidence profiles to include the role of patient preferences, confidence in the evidence, differences of opinion, quality improvement opportunities, and any exclusion to which the action statement does not apply. (2) There were 1 new clinical practice guideline, 26 new systematic reviews, and 13 new randomized controlled trials included in the current guideline update. (3) Inclusion of 2 consumer advocates on the guideline update group. (4) Changes to 5 KASs from the original guideline: KAS 1 (Watchful waiting for recurrent throat infection), KAS 3 (Tonsillectomy for recurrent infection with modifying factors), KAS 4 (Tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing), KAS 9 (Perioperative pain counseling), and KAS 10 (Perioperative antibiotics). (5) Seven new KASs: KAS 5 (Indications for polysomnography), KAS 6 (Additional recommendations for polysomnography), KAS 7 (Tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea), KAS 12 (Inpatient monitoring for children after tonsillectomy), KAS 13 (Postoperative ibuprofen and acetaminophen), KAS 14 (Postoperative codeine), and KAS 15a (Outcome assessment for bleeding). (6) Addition of an algorithm outlining KASs. (7) Enhanced emphasis on patient and/or caregiver education and shared decision making.


Assuntos
Doenças Faríngeas/cirurgia , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/cirurgia , Tonsilectomia , Criança , Humanos , Tonsilectomia/efeitos adversos , Tonsilectomia/métodos
5.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 38(1): 57-64, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27780583

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To integrate multiple sources of clinical information with patient feedback to build evidence-based decision support model to facilitate treatment selection for patients suffering from vestibular schwannomas (VS). METHODS: This was a mixed methods study utilizing focus group and survey methodology to solicit feedback on factors important for making treatment decisions among patients. Two 90-minute focus groups were conducted by an experienced facilitator. Previously diagnosed VS patients were recruited by clinical investigators at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). Classical content analysis was used for focus group data analysis. Providers were recruited from practices within the UPMC system and were surveyed using Delphi methods. This information can provide a basis for multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) framework to develop a treatment decision support system for patients with VS. RESULTS: Eight themes were derived from these data (focus group + surveys): doctor/health care system, side effects, effectiveness of treatment, anxiety, mortality, family/other people, quality of life, and post-operative symptoms. These data, as well as feedback from physicians were utilized in building a multi-criteria decision model. DISCUSSION: The study illustrated steps involved in the development of a decision support model that integrates evidence-based data and patient values to select treatment alternatives. CONCLUSIONS: Studies focusing on the actual development of the decision support technology for this group of patients are needed, as decisions are highly multifactorial. Such tools have the potential to improve decision making for complex medical problems with alternate treatment pathways.


Assuntos
Técnicas de Apoio para a Decisão , Neuroma Acústico/mortalidade , Neuroma Acústico/terapia , Conduta Expectante/métodos , Tomada de Decisão Clínica , Técnica Delfos , Medicina Baseada em Evidências , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Masculino , Neuroma Acústico/diagnóstico , Prognóstico , Qualidade de Vida , Radiocirurgia/efeitos adversos , Radiocirurgia/métodos , Análise de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento
6.
J La State Med Soc ; 168(2): 60-2, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27383858

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Wegener's Granulomatosis (WG) is classically characterized by the triad of sinonasal, pulmonary, and renal manifestations. However, a growing body of research has demonstrated that atypical head and neck pathologies including retropharyngeal and parapharyngeal lesions are often the presenting feature of patients found to have WG. CASE: This report describes the hospital course of a patient who presented with a parapharyngeal mass with secondary superior cervical chain compression and Lemierre's Syndrome. We discuss how a stepwise approach involving a multidisciplinary team led to the diagnosis of WG. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a patient presenting with a parapharyngeal mass causing superior cervical chain compression with simultaneous Lemierre's Syndrome who was ultimately diagnosed with WG. We highlight how the early consideration of WG in patients with atypical head and neck lesions refractory to multiple treatment regimens can led to an expeditious diagnosis and the coordination of appropriate short-term and long-term care.


Assuntos
Granulomatose com Poliangiite/complicações , Síndrome de Lemierre/complicações , Doenças Faríngeas/etiologia , Encéfalo/diagnóstico por imagem , Constrição Patológica/etiologia , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Granulomatose com Poliangiite/diagnóstico , Humanos , Síndrome de Lemierre/diagnóstico por imagem , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Doenças Faríngeas/diagnóstico , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X , Adulto Jovem
7.
Ochsner J ; 16(2): 146-9, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27303224

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a growing problem affecting millions of people in the United States. The prevalence of OSA has risen drastically in the past few decades concurrently with the increasing prevalence of obesity. Subsequently, there has been an ever-increasing rise in the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices. While using CPAP devices may lead to many adverse effects, the majority of these effects are described as relatively benign. CASE REPORT: We describe the detailed clinical course and outcome for a patient with otic barotrauma as a result of excessive self-titration of CPAP therapy in an in-home setting. We also discuss the pathophysiology of otic barotrauma and present a review of current literature on the topic. CONCLUSION: While the benefits of CPAP are clear, we must take into account the rare but possible effects on ear structure and function. Many studies describe an increase in middle ear pressure with the use of CPAP, but few describe the effects of this increased pressure on the middle ear, such as the otic barotrauma described in this case. Given the increased prevalence of OSA, it is important to understand the risks associated with CPAP therapy.

8.
Ochsner J ; 16(2): 154-7, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27303226

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The thyroglossal duct fails to involute in up to 7% of adults, creating a thyroglossal duct remnant (TGDR) attached to the hyoid bone. Thyroid malignancies have been reported in approximately 1% of TGDRs. In previous reports of TGDR carcinoma, patients had radiographic evidence of a TGDR at initial clinical presentation. Alternatively, hypertrophy of a TGDR is well described in patients with hypothyroidism because of the growth of functional ectopic thyroid tissue. We present the case of a patient who had no radiographic evidence of a TGDR prior to thyroidectomy but presented 14 months after surgery with a recurrent cervical mass. CASE REPORT: A 58-year-old female underwent total thyroidectomy for micropapillary thyroid cancer. Fourteen months later, she presented with an enlarging cervical mass. She underwent a Sistrunk procedure, and surgical pathology revealed a TGDR with compensatory glandular hypertrophy. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first report of a TGDR follicular adenoma initially appearing as a result of compensatory thyroid glandular hypertrophy following total thyroidectomy for a micropapillary thyroid carcinoma. Our case presented a novel clinical dilemma regarding the best management for a patient with a new TGDR along with a recent history of micropapillary thyroid cancer.

9.
Laryngoscope ; 126(2): 469-71, 2016 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26308370

RESUMO

Objectives/Hypothesis: The human cochlea is most commonly considered to have two and a half turns. Although the causes of cochlear hypoplasia are well described, cochlear hyperplasia is a rarer entity that is poorly understood. We describe rare anatomic cochlear malformations identified in a 4-month-old male originally referred for evaluation after a failed newborn hearing screening. The full diagnostic evaluation, imaging findings, treatment, and follow-up are described in detail. Cochleae with three turns are an uncommon malformation that is not included in current classifications schemes and may represent a distinct type of anomaly not caused by developmental arrest.


Assuntos
Cóclea/anormalidades , Perda Auditiva Neurossensorial/congênito , Ventilação da Orelha Média/métodos , Audiometria , Cóclea/cirurgia , Perda Auditiva Neurossensorial/diagnóstico , Perda Auditiva Neurossensorial/cirurgia , Humanos , Lactente , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X
10.
Ochsner J ; 15(3): 277-83, 2015.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26413004

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Management of the skin/abutment interface in patients with bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs) can occasionally be a challenge. Even with the most compliant patients and the most intensive home/office treatment regimens, painful triamcinolone injections and revision surgery can become necessary. Such treatments can be associated with an inordinate cost burden. To our knowledge this research provides the first objective comparison of cost and patient outcomes after the introduction of topical 0.05% clobetasol cream for the care of the skin/abutment interface in patients with BAHAs. METHODS: Thirty-three patients were managed with the traditional algorithm (local wound care, triamcinolone injection, and revision surgery). Nineteen patients were managed with the contemporary algorithm in which 0.05% topical clobetasol cream was added to the traditional treatment regimen. RESULTS: Common postoperative skin reactions were comparable in the traditional vs contemporary treatment groups: granulation tissue (53.8% vs 56.3%), soft-tissue overgrowth (30.8% vs 18.8%), and both granulation tissue and soft-tissue overgrowth (15.4% vs 25.0%). The addition of clobetasol cream was associated with a marked decrease in the invasive treatment endpoints in the contemporary vs traditional treatment groups: triamcinolone injections (0.0% vs 12.1%) and surgical revision (0.0% vs 9.1%). The difference in cost for managing soft-tissue overgrowth at the abutment site was substantial, with the traditional treatment group averaging $2,773.25 per patient and the contemporary treatment group averaging $47.94 per patient (P<0.021) according to 2013 estimates and values. CONCLUSION: Clobetasol use during early postoperative care of a BAHA implant dramatically decreases cost and improves treatment outcomes by reducing the need for invasive postoperative procedures to treat common postoperative skin reactions.

11.
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol ; 79(7): 1155-7, 2015 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25953454

RESUMO

Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) is an uncommon pediatric disorder often associated with congenital syndromes. After speech therapy, surgery is the standard management. Many surgical approaches to VPI repair have been reported and the complications of these procedures are well documented. To date, there have been no published cases of respiratory failure secondary to pneumomediastinum, pneumopericardium, and bilateral pneumothoraces with associated subcutaneous emphysema after superior-based pharyngeal flap. We present the first case in the literature. Our proposed etiology for the respiratory failure is air tracking from the flap donor site to the pleural spaces of the thoracic cavity via the visceral or prevertebral fascia following positive pressure ventilation.


Assuntos
Faringe/cirurgia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias , Insuficiência Respiratória/etiologia , Retalhos Cirúrgicos , Insuficiência Velofaríngea/cirurgia , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Enfisema Mediastínico/diagnóstico por imagem , Enfisema Mediastínico/etiologia , Pneumopericárdio/diagnóstico por imagem , Pneumopericárdio/etiologia , Pneumotórax/diagnóstico por imagem , Pneumotórax/etiologia , Respiração com Pressão Positiva/efeitos adversos , Radiografia , Enfisema Subcutâneo/etiologia
12.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 35(2): 236-8, 2014.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24411135

RESUMO

IMPORTANCE: Epistaxis is most commonly an easily treated ENT entity with a relatively simple algorithm. Occasionally, however, it is encountered as a devastating disease process that can humble the otolaryngologist. In the setting of comorbidities that exacerbate bleeding, in this case vasculitis due to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), epistaxis can be life-threatening and refractory to conservative management. OBSERVATIONS: This case report describes the hospital course of a patient with severe SLE and intractable epistaxis. We discuss classic management options for epistaxis and offer a novel treatment option for patients with SLE-related vasculitides-goal-directed medical therapy with high-dose intravenous pulse steroid therapy. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: To our knowledge, this report not only is the first description of targeted treatment options for intractable epistaxis in patients with SLE, but also serves to augment the traditional algorithm with the addition of a goal-directed medical therapy-control of epistaxis through high-dose intravenous pulse steroid therapy. We demonstrated that 6 mg of intravenous dexamethasone given every 6 hours can be highly effective in controlling epistaxis in patients with uncontrolled SLE. The presumed mechanism is through control of associated vasculitides.


Assuntos
Dexametasona/administração & dosagem , Epistaxe/tratamento farmacológico , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/complicações , Epistaxe/etiologia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Glucocorticoides/administração & dosagem , Humanos , Injeções Intravenosas , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/tratamento farmacológico , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pulsoterapia/métodos
13.
Laryngoscope ; 123(11): 2829-33, 2013 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23674156

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To compare the cumulative failure percentage of the Cochlear Nucleus N5 CI500 series implant observed, both before and after the voluntary recall of unimplanted devices, to that of the Cochlear Nucleus Freedom CI24RE series implant. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review of 411 patients implanted with either the Nucleus Freedom or the Nucleus N5 device. METHODS: Cochlear implantation was performed in standard fashion. A database was created by combining information obtained from operative case logs, an integrated clinical electronic medical records system, and an external database of devices maintained by Cochlear Corporation. RESULTS: Of the 289 implants of the Nucleus Freedom CI24RE series device at this institution, the cumulative failure percentage was 0%. There were 122 implants of the Nucleus N5 CI500 series device, yielding a 9.8% cumulative failure percent; 82 were manufactured before the voluntary recall and 40 were produced afterward. The 82 implants manufactured before the recall had two associated failures, while the 40 produced afterward had 10 failures. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible that the cumulative failure percentage (CFP) of the Cochlear Nucleus N5 CI500 series implant is not fully defined. While the CFP of the Nucleus Freedom CI24RE series implant at this institution was 0%, it was 9.8% for the Nucleus N5. The CFP of Nucleus N5 devices manufactured before the voluntary recall was 2.4%, while the CFP afterward was 25.0%-nearly 6-fold higher than the company-published value of 4.2% for all Nucleus N5 implants registered globally.


Assuntos
Implantes Cocleares , Recall de Dispositivo Médico , Falha de Prótese , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Desenho de Prótese , Estudos Retrospectivos
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