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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31339356

RESUMO

Rationale Interstitial lung abnormalities (ILA) are associated with the highest genetic risk locus for IPF; however, the extent to which there is additional overlap with IPF, or unique associations among those with ILA is not known. Objectives To perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of ILA. Methods: ILA and the subpleural-predominant subtype were assessed on chest computed tomography (CT) scans in the AGES, COPDGene, Framingham Heart, ECLIPSE, MESA, and SPIROMICS studies. We performed a GWAS of ILA in each cohort and combined the results using a meta-analysis. We assessed for overlapping associations in independent GWASs of IPF. Measurements and Main Results Genome-wide genotyping data were available in 1,699 ILA cases and 10,274 controls. The MUC5B promoter variant rs35705950 was significantly associated with both ILA (p=2.6x10-27) and subpleural ILA (p=1.6x10-29). We discovered novel genome-wide associations near IPO11 (rs6886640, p=3.8x10-8) and FCF1P3 (rs73199442, p=4.8x10-8) with ILA, and HTRE1 (rs7744971, p=4.2x10-8) with subpleural-predominant ILA. These novel associations were not associated with IPF. Of 12 previously reported IPF GWAS loci, 5 (DPP9, DSP, FAM13A, IVD, and MUC5B) were significantly associated (p<0.05/12) with ILA. Conclusions In a GWAS of ILA in six studies, we confirmed the association with a MUC5B promoter variant and found strong evidence for an effect of previously described IPF loci; however, novel ILA associations were not associated with IPF. These findings highlight common and suggest distinct genetically-driven biologic pathways between ILA and IPF.

2.
PLoS Genet ; 15(7): e1008229, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31269066

RESUMO

While many disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with gene expression (expression quantitative trait loci, eQTLs), a large proportion of complex disease genome-wide association study (GWAS) variants are of unknown function. Some of these SNPs may contribute to disease by regulating gene splicing. Here, we investigate whether SNPs that are associated with alternative splicing (splice QTL or sQTL) can identify novel functions for existing GWAS variants or suggest new associated variants in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). RNA sequencing was performed on whole blood from 376 subjects from the COPDGene Study. Using linear models, we identified 561,060 unique sQTL SNPs associated with 30,333 splice sites corresponding to 6,419 unique genes. Similarly, 708,928 unique eQTL SNPs involving 15,913 genes were detected at 10% FDR. While there is overlap between sQTLs and eQTLs, 55.3% of sQTLs are not eQTLs. Co-localization analysis revealed that 7 out of 21 loci associated with COPD (p<1x10-6) in a published GWAS have at least one shared causal variant between the GWAS and sQTL studies. Among the genes identified to have splice sites associated with top GWAS SNPs was FBXO38, in which a novel exon was discovered to be protective against COPD. Importantly, the sQTL in this locus was validated by qPCR in both blood and lung tissue, demonstrating that splice variants relevant to lung tissue can be identified in blood. Other identified genes included CDK11A and SULT1A2. Overall, these data indicate that analysis of alternative splicing can provide novel insights into disease mechanisms. In particular, we demonstrated that SNPs in a known COPD GWAS locus on chromosome 5q32 influence alternative splicing in the gene FBXO38.

3.
Chest ; 2019 Jul 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31283919

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Multiple studies have identified COPD subtypes by using visual or quantitative evaluation of CT images. However, there has been no systematic assessment of a combined visual and quantitative CT imaging classification. We integrated visually defined patterns of emphysema with quantitative imaging features and spirometry data to produce a set of 10 nonoverlapping CT imaging subtypes, and we assessed differences between subtypes in demographic features, physiological characteristics, longitudinal disease progression, and mortality. METHODS: We evaluated 9,080 current and former smokers in the COPDGene study who had available volumetric inspiratory and expiratory CT images obtained using a standardized imaging protocol. We defined 10 discrete, nonoverlapping CT imaging subtypes: no CT imaging abnormality, paraseptal emphysema (PSE), bronchial disease, small airway disease, mild emphysema, upper lobe predominant centrilobular emphysema (CLE), lower lobe predominant CLE, diffuse CLE, visual without quantitative emphysema, and quantitative without visual emphysema. Baseline and 5-year longitudinal characteristics and mortality were compared across these CT imaging subtypes. RESULTS: The overall mortality differed significantly between groups (P < .01) and was highest in the 3 moderate to severe CLE groups. Subjects having quantitative but not visual emphysema and subjects with visual but not quantitative emphysema were unique groups with mild COPD, at risk for progression, and with likely different underlying mechanisms. Subjects with PSE and or moderate to severe CLE had substantial progression of emphysema over 5 years compared with findings in subjects with no CT imaging abnormality (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: The combination of visual and quantitative CT imaging features reflects different underlying pathological processes in the heterogeneous COPD syndrome and provides a useful approach to reclassify types of COPD. TRIAL REGISTRY: ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT00608764; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

6.
Hum Mol Genet ; 28(14): 2352-2364, 2019 Jul 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30997486

RESUMO

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are two pathologically distinct chronic lung diseases that are associated with cigarette smoking. Genetic studies have identified shared loci for COPD and IPF, including several loci with opposite directions of effect. The existence of additional shared genetic loci, as well as potential shared pathobiological mechanisms between the two diseases at the molecular level, remains to be explored. Taking a network-based approach, we built disease modules for COPD and IPF using genome-wide association studies-implicated genes. The two disease modules displayed strong disease signals in an independent gene expression data set of COPD and IPF lung tissue and showed statistically significant overlap and network proximity, sharing 19 genes, including ARHGAP12 and BCHE. To uncover pathways at the intersection of COPD and IPF, we developed a metric, NetPathScore, which prioritizes the pathways of a disease by their network overlap with another disease. Applying NetPathScore to the COPD and IPF disease modules enabled the determination of concordant and discordant pathways between these diseases. Concordant pathways between COPD and IPF included extracellular matrix remodeling, Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and ALK pathways, whereas discordant pathways included advanced glycosylation end product receptor signaling and telomere maintenance and extension pathways. Overall, our findings reveal shared molecular interaction regions between COPD and IPF and shed light on the congruent and incongruent biological processes lying at the intersection of these two complex diseases.

7.
Bioinformatics ; 2019 Apr 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30957844

RESUMO

MOTIVATION: Complex diseases often involve a wide spectrum of phenotypic traits. Better understanding of the biological mechanisms relevant to each trait promotes understanding of the etiology of the disease and the potential for targeted and effective treatment plans. There have been many efforts towards omics data integration and network reconstruction, but limited work has examined the incorporation of relevant (quantitative) phenotypic traits. RESULTS: We propose a novel technique, sparse multiple canonical correlation network analysis (SmCCNet), for integrating multiple omics data types along with a quantitative phenotype of interest, and for constructing multi-omics networks that are specific to the phenotype. As a case study, we focus on miRNA-mRNA networks. Through simulations, we demonstrate that SmCCNet has better overall prediction performance compared to popular gene expression network construction and integration approaches under realistic settings. Applying SmCCNet to studies on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and breast cancer, we found enrichment of known relevant pathways (e.g. the Cadherin pathway for COPD and the interferon-gamma signaling pathway for breast cancer) as well as less known omics features that may be important to the diseases. Although those applications focus on miRNA-mRNA co-expression networks, SmCCNet is applicable to a variety of omics and other data types. It can also be easily generalized to incorporate multiple quantitative phenotype simultaneously. The versatility of SmCCNet suggests great potential of the approach in many areas. AVAILABILITY: The SmCCNet algorithm is written in R, and is freely available on the web at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/SmCCNet/index.html. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

8.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 200(6): 677-690, 2019 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30908940

RESUMO

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common and progressive disease that is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. For many years, knowledge of the genetic basis of COPD was limited to Mendelian syndromes, such as alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and cutis laxa, caused by rare genetic variants. Over the past decade, the proliferation of genome-wide association studies, the accessibility of whole-genome sequencing, and the development of novel methods for analyzing genetic variation data have led to a substantial increase in the understanding of genetic variants that play a role in COPD susceptibility and COPD-related phenotypes. COPDGene (Genetic Epidemiology of COPD), a multicenter, longitudinal study of over 10,000 current and former cigarette smokers, has been pivotal to these breakthroughs in understanding the genetic basis of COPD. To date, over 20 genetic loci have been convincingly associated with COPD affection status, with additional loci demonstrating association with COPD-related phenotypes such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and hypoxemia. In this review, we discuss the contributions of the COPDGene study to the discovery of these genetic associations as well as the ongoing genetic investigations of COPD subtypes, protein biomarkers, and post-genome-wide association study analysis.

9.
Nat Genet ; 51(3): 481-493, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30804560

RESUMO

Reduced lung function predicts mortality and is key to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a genome-wide association study in 400,102 individuals of European ancestry, we define 279 lung function signals, 139 of which are new. In combination, these variants strongly predict COPD in independent populations. Furthermore, the combined effect of these variants showed generalizability across smokers and never smokers, and across ancestral groups. We highlight biological pathways, known and potential drug targets for COPD and, in phenome-wide association studies, autoimmune-related and other pleiotropic effects of lung function-associated variants. This new genetic evidence has potential to improve future preventive and therapeutic strategies for COPD.


Assuntos
Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Pulmão/fisiopatologia , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/genética , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Fatores de Risco , Fumar/genética
10.
Genet Epidemiol ; 43(3): 318-329, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30740764

RESUMO

Genetic association studies have increasingly recognized variant effects on multiple phenotypes. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease with environmental and genetic causes. Multiple genetic variants have been associated with COPD, many of which show significant associations to additional phenotypes. However, it is unknown if these associations represent biological pleiotropy or if they exist through correlation of related phenotypes ("mediated pleiotropy"). Using 6,670 subjects from the COPDGene study, we describe the association of known COPD susceptibility loci with other COPD-related phenotypes and distinguish if these act directly on the phenotypes (i.e., biological pleiotropy) or if the association is due to correlation (i.e., mediated pleiotropy). We identified additional associated phenotypes for 13 of 25 known COPD loci. Tests for pleiotropy between genotype and associated outcomes were significant for all loci. In cases of significant pleiotropy, we performed mediation analysis to test if SNPs had a direct association to phenotype. Most loci showed a mediated effect through the hypothesized causal pathway. However, many loci also had direct associations, suggesting causal explanations (i.e., emphysema leading to reduced lung function) are incomplete. Our results highlight the high degree of pleiotropy in complex disease-associated loci and provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying COPD.


Assuntos
Loci Gênicos , Pleiotropia Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/genética , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética
12.
Nat Commun ; 9(1): 2976, 2018 07 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30061609

RESUMO

Nearly 100 loci have been identified for pulmonary function, almost exclusively in studies of European ancestry populations. We extend previous research by meta-analyzing genome-wide association studies of 1000 Genomes imputed variants in relation to pulmonary function in a multiethnic population of 90,715 individuals of European (N = 60,552), African (N = 8429), Asian (N = 9959), and Hispanic/Latino (N = 11,775) ethnicities. We identify over 50 additional loci at genome-wide significance in ancestry-specific or multiethnic meta-analyses. Using recent fine-mapping methods incorporating functional annotation, gene expression, and differences in linkage disequilibrium between ethnicities, we further shed light on potential causal variants and genes at known and newly identified loci. Several of the novel genes encode proteins with predicted or established drug targets, including KCNK2 and CDK12. Our study highlights the utility of multiethnic and integrative genomics approaches to extend existing knowledge of the genetics of lung function and clinical relevance of implicated loci.

13.
Hum Mol Genet ; 27(21): 3801-3812, 2018 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30060175

RESUMO

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), one of the leading causes of death worldwide, is substantially influenced by genetic factors. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency demonstrates that rare coding variants of large effect can influence COPD susceptibility. To identify additional rare coding variants in patients with severe COPD, we conducted whole exome sequencing analysis in 2543 subjects from two family-based studies (Boston Early-Onset COPD Study and International COPD Genetics Network) and one case-control study (COPDGene). Applying a gene-based segregation test in the family-based data, we identified significant segregation of rare loss of function variants in TBC1D10A and RFPL1 (P-value < 2x10-6), but were unable to find similar variants in the case-control study. In single-variant, gene-based and pathway association analyses, we were unable to find significant findings that replicated or were significant in meta-analysis. However, we found that the top results in the two datasets were in proximity to each other in the protein-protein interaction network (P-value = 0.014), suggesting enrichment of these results for similar biological processes. A network of these association results and their neighbors was significantly enriched in the transforming growth factor beta-receptor binding and cilia-related pathways. Finally, in a more detailed examination of candidate genes, we identified individuals with putative high-risk variants, including patients harboring homozygous mutations in genes associated with cutis laxa and Niemann-Pick Disease Type C. Our results likely reflect heterogeneity of genetic risk for COPD along with limitations of statistical power and functional annotation, and highlight the potential of network analysis to gain insight into genetic association studies.

14.
Physiol Genomics ; 50(9): 688-690, 2018 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29799805

RESUMO

Muscle oxidative capacity is a major determinant of maximum oxygen uptake (V̇O2max). V̇O2max predicts survival in humans. Muscle oxidative capacity is low in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and can be assessed from the muscle oxygen consumption recovery rate constant ( k) by near-infrared spectroscopy. We hypothesized that 11 SNPs, previously associated with the increase in V̇O2max following exercise training, would correlate with k in 152 non-Hispanic White and African American smokers with and without COPD. Associations were adjusted for age, weight, FEV1% predicted, steps/day, and principal components of genetic ancestry. No SNPs were significantly associated with k. rs2792022 within BTAF1 (ß = 0.130, P = 0.053) and rs24575771 within SLC22A3 (ß = 0.106, P = 0.058) approached nominal significance. Case-control stratification identified three SNPs nominally associated with k in moderate-to-severe COPD ( rs6481619 within SVIL ß = 0.152, P = 0.013; BTAF1 ß = 0.196, P = 0.046; rs7386139 within DEPTOR ß = 0.159, P = 0.047). These data support further study of the genomic contributions to skeletal muscle dysfunction in COPD.

15.
Front Genet ; 9: 133, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29725345

RESUMO

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heritable disease, associated with multiple genetic variants. Specific familial types of COPD may be explained by rare variants, which have not been widely studied. We aimed to discover rare genetic variants underlying COPD through a genome-wide linkage scan. Affected-only analysis was performed using the 6K Illumina Linkage IV Panel in 142 cases clustered in 27 families from a genetic isolate, the Erasmus Rucphen Family (ERF) study. Potential causal variants were identified by searching for shared rare variants in the exome-sequence data of the affected members of the families contributing most to the linkage peak. The identified rare variants were then tested for association with COPD in a large meta-analysis of several cohorts. Significant evidence for linkage was observed on chromosomes 15q14-15q25 [logarithm of the odds (LOD) score = 5.52], 11p15.4-11q14.1 (LOD = 3.71) and 5q14.3-5q33.2 (LOD = 3.49). In the chromosome 15 peak, that harbors the known COPD locus for nicotinic receptors, and in the chromosome 5 peak we could not identify shared variants. In the chromosome 11 locus, we identified four rare (minor allele frequency (MAF) <0.02), predicted pathogenic, missense variants. These were shared among the affected family members. The identified variants localize to genes including neuroblast differentiation-associated protein (AHNAK), previously associated with blood biomarkers in COPD, phospholipase C Beta 3 (PLCB3), shown to increase airway hyper-responsiveness, solute carrier family 22-A11 (SLC22A11), involved in amino acid metabolism and ion transport, and metallothionein-like protein 5 (MTL5), involved in nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism. Association of SLC22A11 and MTL5 variants were confirmed in the meta-analysis of 9,888 cases and 27,060 controls. In conclusion, we have identified novel rare variants in plausible genes related to COPD. Further studies utilizing large sample whole-genome sequencing should further confirm the associations at chromosome 11 and investigate the chromosome 15 and 5 linked regions.

16.
Hum Mol Genet ; 27(10): 1819-1829, 2018 05 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29547942

RESUMO

Causal genes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remain elusive. The current study aims at integrating genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and lung expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data to map COPD candidate causal genes and gain biological insights into the recently discovered COPD susceptibility loci. Two complementary genomic datasets on COPD were studied. First, the lung eQTL dataset which included whole-genome gene expression and genotyping data from 1038 individuals. Second, the largest COPD GWAS to date from the International COPD Genetics Consortium (ICGC) with 13 710 cases and 38 062 controls. Methods that integrated GWAS with eQTL signals including transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS), colocalization and Mendelian randomization-based (SMR) approaches were used to map causality genes, i.e. genes with the strongest evidence of being the functional effector at specific loci. These methods were applied at the genome-wide level and at COPD risk loci derived from the GWAS literature. Replication was performed using lung data from GTEx. We collated 129 non-overlapping risk loci for COPD from the GWAS literature. At the genome-wide scale, 12 new COPD candidate genes/loci were revealed and six replicated in GTEx including CAMK2A, DMPK, MYO15A, TNFRSF10A, BTN3A2 and TRBV30. In addition, we mapped candidate causal genes for 60 out of the 129 GWAS-nominated loci and 23 of them were replicated in GTEx. Mapping candidate causal genes in lung tissue represents an important contribution to the genetics of COPD, enriches our biological interpretation of GWAS findings, and brings us closer to clinical translation of genetic associations.

17.
Eur Respir J ; 50(5)2017 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29191953

RESUMO

Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is produced primarily in the lung and is involved in regulating pulmonary surfactants, lipid homeostasis and innate immunity. Circulating SP-D levels in blood are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although causality remains elusive.In 4061 subjects with COPD, we identified genetic variants associated with serum SP-D levels. We then determined whether these variants affected lung tissue gene expression in 1037 individuals. A Mendelian randomisation framework was then applied, whereby serum SP-D-associated variants were tested for association with COPD risk in 11 157 cases and 36 699 controls and with 11 years decline of lung function in the 4061 individuals.Three regions on chromosomes 6 (human leukocyte antigen region), 10 (SFTPD gene) and 16 (ATP2C2 gene) were associated with serum SP-D levels at genome-wide significance. In Mendelian randomisation analyses, variants associated with increased serum SP-D levels decreased the risk of COPD (estimate -0.19, p=6.46×10-03) and slowed the lung function decline (estimate=0.0038, p=7.68×10-3).Leveraging genetic variation effect on protein, lung gene expression and disease phenotypes provided novel insights into SP-D biology and established a causal link between increased SP-D levels and protection against COPD risk and progression. SP-D represents a very promising biomarker and therapeutic target for COPD.


Assuntos
Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/sangue , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/genética , Proteína D Associada a Surfactante Pulmonar/sangue , Adulto , Biomarcadores/sangue , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Progressão da Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Lineares , Pulmão/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fatores de Risco
18.
Nat Genet ; 49(3): 426-432, 2017 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28166215

RESUMO

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. We performed a genetic association study in 15,256 cases and 47,936 controls, with replication of select top results (P < 5 × 10-6) in 9,498 cases and 9,748 controls. In the combined meta-analysis, we identified 22 loci associated at genome-wide significance, including 13 new associations with COPD. Nine of these 13 loci have been associated with lung function in general population samples, while 4 (EEFSEC, DSP, MTCL1, and SFTPD) are new. We noted two loci shared with pulmonary fibrosis (FAM13A and DSP) but that had opposite risk alleles for COPD. None of our loci overlapped with genome-wide associations for asthma, although one locus has been implicated in joint susceptibility to asthma and obesity. We also identified genetic correlation between COPD and asthma. Our findings highlight new loci associated with COPD, demonstrate the importance of specific loci associated with lung function to COPD, and identify potential regions of genetic overlap between COPD and other respiratory diseases.


Assuntos
Loci Gênicos/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Pulmão/fisiologia , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/genética , Fibrose Pulmonar/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Alelos , Asma/genética , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Fatores de Risco , Fumar/genética
19.
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol ; 57(1): 35-46, 2017 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28170284

RESUMO

The heritability of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cannot be fully explained by recognized genetic risk factors identified as achieving genome-wide significance. In addition, the combined contribution of genetic variation to COPD risk has not been fully explored. We sought to determine: (1) whether studies of variants from previous studies of COPD or lung function in a larger sample could identify additional associated variants, particularly for severe COPD; and (2) the impact of genetic risk scores on COPD. We genotyped 3,346 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2,588 cases (1,803 severe COPD) and 1,782 control subjects from four cohorts, and performed association testing with COPD, combining these results with existing genotyping data from 6,633 cases (3,497 severe COPD) and 5,704 control subjects. In addition, we developed genetic risk scores from SNPs associated with lung function and COPD and tested their discriminatory power for COPD-related measures. We identified significant associations between SNPs near PPIC (P = 1.28 × 10-8) and PPP4R4/SERPINA1 (P = 1.01 × 10-8) and severe COPD; the latter association may be driven by recognized variants in SERPINA1. Genetic risk scores based on SNPs previously associated with COPD and lung function had a modest ability to discriminate COPD (area under the curve, ∼0.6), and accounted for a mean 0.9-1.9% lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted for each additional risk allele. In a large genetic association analysis, we identified associations with severe COPD near PPIC and SERPINA1. A risk score based on combining genetic variants had modest, but significant, effects on risk of COPD and lung function.


Assuntos
Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/genética , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/diagnóstico , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/fisiopatologia , Testes de Função Respiratória , Fatores de Risco
20.
Genet Epidemiol ; 41(4): 309-319, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28191685

RESUMO

Whole-exome sequencing using family data has identified rare coding variants in Mendelian diseases or complex diseases with Mendelian subtypes, using filters based on variant novelty, functionality, and segregation with the phenotype within families. However, formal statistical approaches are limited. We propose a gene-based segregation test (GESE) that quantifies the uncertainty of the filtering approach. It is constructed using the probability of segregation events under the null hypothesis of Mendelian transmission. This test takes into account different degrees of relatedness in families, the number of functional rare variants in the gene, and their minor allele frequencies in the corresponding population. In addition, a weighted version of this test allows incorporating additional subject phenotypes to improve statistical power. We show via simulations that the GESE and weighted GESE tests maintain appropriate type I error rate, and have greater power than several commonly used region-based methods. We apply our method to whole-exome sequencing data from 49 extended pedigrees with severe, early-onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the Boston Early-Onset COPD study (BEOCOPD) and identify several promising candidate genes. Our proposed methods show great potential for identifying rare coding variants of large effect and high penetrance for family-based sequencing data. The proposed tests are implemented in an R package that is available on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/GESE/).


Assuntos
Variação Genética , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/genética , Análise de Sequência de DNA/métodos , Idade de Início , Boston , Simulação por Computador , Bases de Dados Genéticas , Família , Genoma Humano , Humanos , Modelos Genéticos , Penetrância , Padrões de Referência
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