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3.
Acad Emerg Med ; 2019 Dec 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31837233

RESUMO

Syncope is a common and costly chief complaint among patients presenting to the emergency department (ED), accounting for 740,000 ED visits annually with an estimated annual cost of $2.4 billion per year in the United States.1,2 Syncope presents a diagnostic dilemma for clinicians in the ED since differentiating serious and benign causes of syncope can be challenging, particularly in the older adult. Routine laboratory testing with complete blood count (CBC) and basic metabolic panel (BMP) is commonly ordered for patients presenting to the ED with syncope.

5.
Acad Emerg Med ; 2019 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31733003

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: More than 2 million patients present to a US emergency department (ED) annually and leave without being seen (LWBS) due to delays in initiating care. We evaluated whether tele-intake at the time of presentation would reduce LWBS rates and ED throughput measures. METHODS: We conducted a before and after study at an urban community hospital. The intervention was use of a tele-intake physician to triage patients from 11am - 6pm, 7 days per week. Tele-intake providers performed a triage history and physical examination, documented findings and initiated orders in the medical record. We assessed the impact of this program using the domains of the National Quality Forum (NQF) framework evaluating access, provider experience, and effectiveness of care. The main outcome was 24-hour LWBS rate. Secondary outcomes were overall door to provider and door to disposition times, left without treatment complete (LWTC), left against medical advice (AMA), left without treatment (LWOT) and physician experience. We compared the 6-month tele-intake period to the same period from the prior year (October 1- April 1, 2017 versus 2016). Additionally, we conducted a survey of our physicians to assess their experience with the program. RESULTS: Total ED volume was similar in the before and after periods (19,892 vs 19,646 patients). The 24-hour LWBS rate was reduced from 2.30% (95% CI 2.0-2.5%) to 1.69%; (1.51-1.87%); p<0.001. Overall door to provider time decreased (median 19 [IQR,9-38] v 16.2 [7.8-34.3] minutes; p<0.001); but ED length of stay for all patients (defined as door in to door out time for all patients) minimally increased (184 minutes [IQR, 100-292] v 184.3 [IQR, 104.4-300]; p<0.001). There was an increase in door to discharge times (146 [IQR, 83-231] v 148 [IQR, 88.2-233.6]; p<0.001) and door to admit times (330 [IQR,253-432] v 357.6 [260.3-514.5]; p<0.001). We saw an increase in LWTC [0.59% (95% CI 0.49-0.70 v 1.1% (CI 0.9-1.2); p<0.001], but no change in AMA [1.4% (95% CI 1.2 - 1.6) v 1.6% (95% CI 1.4-1.78), p=0.21] or LWOT [4.3% (95% CI 4.1-4.6) v 4.4% (95% CI 4.1-4.7), p=0.7. Tele-intake providers thought tele-intake added value (12/15, 80%) and allowed them to effectively address medical problems (14/15, 95%), but only (10/15, 67%) thought it was as good as in-person triage. Of the receiving physicians, most agreed with statements that tele-intake did not interfere with care (19/22, 86%), helped complement care (19/21, 90%) and gave the patient a better experience (19/22, 86%). CONCLUSION: Remote tele-intake provided in an urban community hospital ED reduced LWBS and time to provider but increased left without treatment complete rates and had no impact on LWOT.

6.
Ann Emerg Med ; 2019 Oct 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31668571

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Older adults with syncope are commonly treated in the emergency department (ED). We seek to derive a novel risk-stratification tool to predict 30-day serious cardiac outcomes. METHODS: We performed a prospective, observational study of older adults (≥60 years) with unexplained syncope or near syncope who presented to 11 EDs in the United States. Patients with a serious diagnosis identified in the ED were excluded. We collected clinical and laboratory data on all patients. Our primary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality or serious cardiac outcome. RESULTS: We enrolled 3,177 older adults with unexplained syncope or near syncope between April 2013 and September 2016. Mean age was 73 years (SD 9.0 years). The incidence of the primary outcome was 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.9% to 6.5%). Using Bayesian logistic regression, we derived the FAINT score: history of heart failure, history of cardiac arrhythmia, initial abnormal ECG result, elevated pro B-type natriuretic peptide, and elevated high-sensitivity troponin T. A FAINT score of 0 versus greater than or equal to 1 had sensitivity of 96.7% (95% CI 92.9% to 98.8%) and specificity 22.2% (95% CI 20.7% to 23.8%), respectively. The FAINT score tended to be more accurate than unstructured physician judgment: area under the curve 0.704 (95% CI 0.669 to 0.739) versus 0.630 (95% CI 0.589 to 0.670). CONCLUSION: Among older adults with syncope or near syncope of potential cardiac cause, a FAINT score of zero had a reasonably high sensitivity for excluding death and serious cardiac outcomes at 30 days. If externally validated, this tool could improve resource use for this common condition.

7.
Urology ; 2019 Nov 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31704458

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To study patients who initially presented to the Emergency Department with acute renal colic to determine if patient-reported stone passage detects stone expulsion as accurately as follow-up computed tomography (CT) scan. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a multi-center prospective trial of patients diagnosed by a CT scan with a symptomatic ureteral stone <9 mm in diameter. Patient-reported stone passage, defined as capture or visualization of the stone, was compared to CT scan-confirmed passage performed 29-36 days after initial presentation. RESULTS: Four-hundred-three patients were randomized in the original study and 21 were excluded from this analysis because they were lost to follow-up or received ureteroscopic surgery. Of the 382 remaining evaluable patients, 237 (62.0%) underwent a follow-up CT scan. The mean (standard deviation) diameter of the symptomatic kidney stone was 3.8 mm (1.4). In those who reported stone passage, 93.8% (91/97) demonstrated passage of the symptomatic ureteral stone on follow-up CT. Of patients who did not report stone passage, 72.1% (101/140) demonstrated passage of their stone on follow-up CT. CONCLUSIONS: For patients who report capture or visualization of a ureteral stone, a follow-up CT scan may not be needed to verify stone passage. For patients who do not capture their stone or visualize stone passage, imaging should be considered to confirm passage.

10.
Clin Exp Emerg Med ; 6(2): 106-112, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31261481

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Cardiogenic syncope can present as a seizure. The distinction between seizure disorder and cardiogenic syncope can only be made if one considers the diagnosis. Our main objective was to identify whether patients presenting with a chief complaint (reason for visit) as seizure or syncope received an electrocardiogram in the emergency department across all age groups. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of data collected in the 2010 to 2014 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey comparing patients presenting with a chief complaint of syncope versus seizure to determine likelihood of getting an evaluation for possible life threatening cardiovascular disease. The primary endpoint was receiving an electrocardiogram in the emergency department; secondary endpoint was receiving cardiac biomarkers. RESULTS: There was a total of 144,094 patient encounters. Of these visits, 1,553 had syncope and 1,470 had seizure (60.3% vs. 44.2% female, 19.9% vs. 29.0% non-white). After adjusting for age, sex, mode of arrival and insurance, patients with syncope were more likely to receive an electrocardiogram compared to patients with seizure (odds ratio, 10.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.52 to 13.84). This was true across all age groups (0 to 18 years, 56% vs. 7.5%; 18 to 44 years, 60% vs. 27%; 45 to 64 years, 82% vs. 41%; ≥65 years, 85% vs. 68%; P<0.01 for all). Car- diac biomarkers were also obtained more frequently in adult patients with syncope patients (18 to 44 years, 17.5% vs. 10.5%; 45 to 64 years, 33.8% vs. 21.4%; ≥65 years, 47.1% vs. 32.3%; P<0.01 for all). CONCLUSION: Patients evaluated in the emergency department for syncope received an electrocar- diogram and cardiac biomarkers more frequently than those that had seizure.

11.
Clin Chim Acta ; 495: 522-528, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31152695

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We report the analytical performance of the Elecsys® Troponin T Gen 5 STAT (TnT Gen 5 STAT; Roche Diagnostics) assay. METHODS: Measuring limits/ranges were determined in lithium-heparin plasma samples per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) EP17-A2. Precision was evaluated per CLSI EP05-A2 using lithium-heparin plasma/quality control samples on cobas e 411/cobas e 601 analyzers; two duplicated runs per day for 21 days (n = 84). Cross-reactivity with other troponin forms and interference from endogenous substances/drugs was tested; recovery criterion for no cross-reactivity was within ±10%. RESULTS: Coefficients of variation (CV) for repeatability/intermediate precision were 0.7-5.6%/1.4-10.3% (cobas e 411; mean cardiac troponin T [cTnT]: 7.3-9341 ng/L) and 0.7-3.0%/1.5-6.4% (cobas e 601; mean cTnT: 7.4-9455 ng/L). There was no cross-reactivity with skeletal muscle troponin T (≤ 10,000 ng/L), skeletal muscle troponin I (≤ 100,000 ng/L), cardiac troponin I (≤ 10,000 ng/L), or human troponin C (≤ 80,000 ng/L). No interference was observed with biotin (≤ 20 ng/mL) or 34 drugs. CONCLUSION: The TnT Gen 5 STAT assay demonstrated a CV of <10% at the 99th percentile upper reference limit, meeting precision requirements (Fourth Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction) for high-sensitivity troponin assays.


Assuntos
Análise Química do Sangue/métodos , Imunoensaio/métodos , Troponina T/sangue , Humanos , Limite de Detecção , Medições Luminescentes , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
12.
Ann Emerg Med ; 74(2): 260-269, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31080027

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Many adults with syncope are hospitalized solely for observation and testing. We seek to determine whether hospitalization versus outpatient management for older adults with unexplained syncope is associated with a reduction in postdisposition serious adverse events at 30 days. METHODS: We performed a propensity score analysis using data from a prospective, observational study of older adults with unexplained syncope or near syncope who presented to 11 emergency departments (EDs) in the United States. We enrolled adults (≥60 years) who presented with syncope or near syncope. We excluded patients with a serious diagnosis identified in the ED. Clinical and laboratory data were collected on all patients. The primary outcome was rate of post-ED serious adverse events at 30 days. RESULTS: We enrolled 2,492 older adults with syncope and no serious ED diagnosis from April 2013 to September 2016. Mean age was 73 years (SD 8.9 years), and 51% were women. The incidence of serious adverse events within 30 days after the index visit was 7.4% for hospitalized patients and 3.19% for discharged patients, representing an unadjusted difference of 4.2% (95% confidence interval 2.38% to 6.02%). After propensity score matching on risk of hospitalization, there was no statistically significant difference in serious adverse events at 30 days between the hospitalized group (4.89%) and the discharged group (2.82%) (risk difference 2.07%; 95% confidence interval -0.24% to 4.38%). CONCLUSION: In our propensity-matched sample of older adults with unexplained syncope, for those with clinical characteristics similar to that of the discharged cohort, hospitalization was not associated with improvement in 30-day serious adverse event rates.

13.
Telemed J E Health ; 2019 May 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31120388

RESUMO

Background: Telehealth can increase value by reducing gaps in care, access, and cost for patients, providers, and payers. Medicare reimbursement policies aim to increase health access in areas with a provider shortage. Introduction: The influences of telehealth adoption over time are not well known, and would be beneficial for further policy discussion. Materials and Methods: Using the Information Technology Supplement to the American Hospital Association Annual Survey of Acute Care Hospitals, we determined several predictors of telehealth adoption in California hospitals from 2012 to 2015. Results: There were 870 hospitals evaluated. Telehealth adoption was more likely in 2014 and 2015. Compared with those not using telehealth, hospitals using telehealth were less likely to be located in more populated areas (odds ratio [OR] = 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57-0.98), nonrural areas as defined by metropolitan statistical area (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.20-0.70), and have a higher percentage of employed individuals (OR = 0.0001; 95% CI: 0.00-0.010). Hospitals were more likely to adopt telehealth if they had mobile device integration into the electronic health record (EHR) (OR = 2.97; 95% CI: 1.39-6.33) or a higher percentage of commuters in their ZIP code (OR = 20.24; 95% CI: 1.29-317.4). Telehealth reimbursement for health professional shortage areas did not contribute to increased telehealth adoption. Discussion: The findings suggest how addressing current infrastructural and policy barriers may improve value-based care. Conclusion: Our analysis suggests that telehealth has become more prominent since 2014, and factors such as significant commuting population, mobile device/EHR integration, and nonrural location influence adoption.

14.
Am J Emerg Med ; 2019 Mar 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30928476

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Syncope is a common chief complaint among older adults in the Emergency Department (ED), and orthostatic vital signs are often a part of their evaluation. We assessed whether abnormal orthostatic vital signs in the ED are associated with composite 30-day serious outcomes in older adults presenting with syncope. METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective, observational study at 11 EDs in adults ≥ 60 years who presented with syncope or near syncope. We excluded patients lost to follow up. We used the standard definition of abnormal orthostatic vital signs or subjective symptoms of lightheadedness upon standing to define orthostasis. We determined the rate of composite 30-day serious outcomes, including those during the index ED visit, such as cardiac arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, cardiac intervention, new diagnosis of structural heart disease, stroke, pulmonary embolism, aortic dissection, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, hemorrhage/anemia requiring transfusion, with major traumatic injury from fall, recurrent syncope, and death) between the groups with normal and abnormal orthostatic vital signs. RESULTS: The study cohort included 1974 patients, of whom 51.2% were male and 725 patients (37.7%) had abnormal orthostatic vital signs. Comparing those with abnormal to those with normal orthostatic vital signs, we did not find a difference in composite 30-serious outcomes (111/725 (15.3%) vs 184/1249 (14.7%); unadjusted odds ratio, 1.05 [95%CI, 0.81-1.35], p = 0.73). After adjustment for gender, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure (CHF), history of arrhythmia, dyspnea, hypotension, any abnormal ECG, physician risk assessment, medication classes and disposition, there was no association with composite 30-serious outcomes (adjusted odds ratio, 0.82 [95%CI, 0.62-1.09], p = 0.18). CONCLUSIONS: In a cohort of older adult patients presenting with syncope who were able to have orthostatic vital signs evaluated, abnormal orthostatic vital signs did not independently predict composite 30-day serious outcomes.

15.
Acad Emerg Med ; 26(5): 528-538, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30721554

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: An estimated 1.2 million annual emergency department (ED) visits for syncope/near syncope occur in the United States. Cardiac biomarkers are frequently obtained during the ED evaluation, but the prognostic value of index high-sensitivity troponin (hscTnT) and natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if hscTnT and NT-proBNP drawn in the ED are independently associated with 30-day death/serious cardiac outcomes in adult patients presenting with syncope. METHODS: A prespecified secondary analysis of a prospective, observational trial enrolling participants ≥ age 60 presenting with syncope, at 11 United States hospitals, was conducted between April 2013 and September 2016. Exclusions included seizure, stroke, transient ischemic attack, trauma, intoxication, hypoglycemia, persistent confusion, mechanical/electrical invention, prior enrollment, or predicted poor follow-up. Within 3 hours of consent, hscTnT and NT-proBNP were collected and later analyzed centrally using Roche Elecsys Gen 5 STAT and 2010 Cobas, respectively. Primary outcome was combined 30-day all-cause mortality and serious cardiac events. Adjusting for illness severity, using multivariate logistic regression analysis, variations between primary outcome and biomarkers were estimated, adjusting absolute risk associated with ranges of biomarkers using Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. RESULTS: The cohort included 3,392 patients; 367 (10.8%) experienced the primary outcome. Adjusted absolute risk for the primary outcome increased with hscTnT and NT-proBNP levels. HscTnT levels ≤ 5 ng/L were associated with a 4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3%-5%) outcome risk, and hscTnT > 50 ng/L, a 29% (95% CI = 26%-33%) risk. NT-proBNP levels ≤ 125 ng/L were associated with a 4% (95% CI = 4%-5%) risk, and NT-proBNP > 2,000 ng/L a 29% (95% CI = 25%-32%) risk. Likelihood ratios and predictive values demonstrated similar results. Sensitivity analyses excluding ED index serious outcomes demonstrated similar findings. CONCLUSIONS: hscTnT and NT-proBNP are independent predictors of 30-day death and serious outcomes in older ED patients presenting with syncope.

16.
J Patient Rep Outcomes ; 3(1): 9, 2019 Feb 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30714080

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Group brainstorming is a technique for the elicitation of patient input that has many potential uses, however no data demonstrate concept saturation. In this study we explore concept saturation in group brainstorming performed in a single session as compared to two or three sessions. METHODS: Fifty-two predominately African American adults patients with moderately to poorly controlled Diabetes Mellitus participated in three separate group brainstorming sessions as part of a PCORI-funded group concept mapping study examining comparing methods for the elicitation of patient important outcomes (PIOs). Brainstorming was unstructured, in response to a prompt designed to elicit PIOs in diabetes care. We combined similar brainstormed responses from all three sessions into a 'master list' of unique PIOs, and then compared the proportion obtained at each individual session, as well as those obtained in combinations of 2 sessions, to the master list. RESULTS: Twenty-four participants generated 85 responses in session A, 14 participants generated 63 in session B, and 14 participants generated 47 in session C. Compared to the master list, the individual sessions contributed 87%, 76%, and 63% of PIOs. Session B added 3 unique PIOs not present in session A, and session C added 2 PIOs not present in either A or B. No single session achieved >90% saturation of the master list, but all 3 combinations of 2 sessions achieved > 90%. CONCLUSIONS: Single sessions elicited only 63-87% of the patient-important outcomes obtained across all three sessions, however all combinations of two sessions elicited over 90% of the master list, suggesting that 2 sessions are sufficient for concept saturation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02792777 . Registered 2 June 2016.

17.
BMC Med Res Methodol ; 19(1): 7, 2019 01 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30621586

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Data are limited regarding how to effectively and efficiently identify patient priorities for research or clinical care. Our goal was to compare the comprehensiveness and efficiency of group concept mapping (GCM), a group participatory method, to interviews for identifying patient goals when seeking care. METHODS: We engaged patients with moderately- to poorly-controlled diabetes mellitus in either GCM or an individual interview. The primary outcome was the comprehensiveness of GCM brainstorming (the first stage of GCM) as compared to interviews for eliciting patient-important outcomes (PIOs) related to seeking care. Secondary outcomes included 1) comprehensiveness of GCM brainstorming and interviews compared to a master list of PIOs and 2) efficiency of GCM brainstorming, the entire GCM process and interviews. RESULTS: We engaged 89 interview participants and 52 GCM participants (across 3 iterations of GCM) to identify outcomes most important to patients when making decisions related to diabetes management. We identified 26 PIOs in interviews, 33 PIOs in the first GCM brainstorming session, and 38 PIOs across all three GCM brainstorming sessions. The initial GCM brainstorming session identified 77% (20/26) of interview PIOs, and all 3 GCM brainstorming sessions combined identified 88% (23/26). When comparing GCM brainstorming and interviews to the master list of PIOs, the initial GCM brainstorming sessions identified 80% (33/41), all 3 GCM brainstorming sessions identified 93% (38/41) and interviews identified 63% (26/41) of all PIOs. Compared to interviews, GCM brainstorming required less research team time, more patient time, and had a lowest cost. The entire GCM process still required less research team time than interviews, though required more patient time and had a higher cost than interviews. CONCLUSIONS: GCM brainstorming is a powerful tool for effectively and efficiently identifying PIOs in certain scenarios, though it does not provide the breadth and depth of individual interviews or the higher level conceptual organization of the complete process of GCM. Selection of the optimal method for patient engagement should include consideration of multiple factors including depth of patient input desired, research team expertise, resources, and the population to be engaged. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registered on ClinicalTrials.gov , NCT02792777. Registration information submitted 6/2/2016, with the registration first posted on the ClinicalTrials.gov website 6/8/2016. Data collection began on 4/29/2016.

18.
Clin Res Cardiol ; 108(6): 622-633, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30426240

RESUMO

AIMS: To investigate whether the presence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is independently associated with adverse short-term outcomes in patients diagnosed with acute heart failure (AHF) in the emergency department (ED). METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of patients included in the EAHFE registries 4&5. Patients were divided by the presence of sinus rhythm (SR) or AF at ED arrival. The primary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included the 30-day post-discharge combined endpoint of ED revisit or hospitalisation due to AHF and all-cause mortality. We recorded 54 independent variables that can affect outcomes. Cox regression was used to investigate adjusted significant associations between AF and outcomes. Analyses were repeated according to whether AF was previously known and whether AF was considered responsible for the AHF episode. RESULTS: We analysed 6045 ED visits (mean age 80.4 years, 55.9% women), 3644 (60.3%) with AF. The cumulative 30-day mortality was 9.4%, and the adverse combined endpoint (ACE) was 25.9% (ED revisit with and without hospitalisation were 16.5 and 8.9% and death occurred in 4.7%). No differences were found in outcomes of AHF patients with SR and AF, and among the latter group, no differences were found depending on whether AF was considered responsible for the AHF episode. Patients with previously known AF had significantly lower 30-day mortality and higher post-discharge ACE rates, although these differences disappeared after adjustment for confounders HR 0.782, 95% CI 0.590-1.037, p = 0.087; and HR 1.131, 95% CI 0.924-1.385, p = 0.234). CONCLUSION: The coexistence of AF does not impact the short-term outcomes of patients diagnosed with AHF in the ED.

19.
Am J Emerg Med ; 37(5): 869-872, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30361153

RESUMO

Almost 20% of patients with syncope will experience another event. It is unknown whether recurrent syncope is a marker for a higher or lower risk etiology of syncope. The goal of this study is to determine whether older adults with recurrent syncope have a higher likelihood of 30-day serious clinical events than patients experiencing their first episode. METHODS: This study is a pre-specified secondary analysis of a multicenter prospective, observational study conducted at 11 emergency departments in the US. Adults 60 years or older who presented with syncope or near syncope were enrolled. The primary outcome was occurrence of 30-day serious outcome. The secondary outcome was 30-day serious cardiac arrhythmia. In multivariate analysis, we assessed whether prior syncope was an independent predictor of 30-day serious events. RESULTS: The study cohort included 3580 patients: 1281 (35.8%) had prior syncope and 2299 (64.2%) were presenting with first episode of syncope. 498 (13.9%) patients had 1 prior episode while 771 (21.5%) had >1 prior episode. Those with recurrent syncope were more likely to have congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, previous diagnosis of arrhythmia, and an abnormal ECG. Overall, 657 (18.4%) of the cohort had a serious outcome by 30 days after index ED visit. In multivariate analysis, we found no significant difference in risk of events (adjusted odds ratio 1.09; 95% confidence interval 0.90-1.31; p = 0.387). CONCLUSION: In older adults with syncope, a prior history of syncope within the year does not increase the risk for serious 30-day events.

20.
Ann Emerg Med ; 73(3): 274-280, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30529112

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Controversy remains in regard to the risk of adverse events for patients presenting with syncope compared with near-syncope. The purpose of our study is to describe the difference in outcomes between these groups in a large multicenter cohort of older emergency department (ED) patients. METHODS: From April 28, 2013, to September 21, 2016, we conducted a prospective, observational study across 11 EDs in adults (≥60 years) with syncope or near-syncope. A standardized data extraction tool was used to collect information during their index visit and at 30-day follow-up. Our primary outcome was the incidence of 30-day death or serious clinical events. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for relevant demographic or historical variables. RESULTS: A total of 3,581 patients (mean age 72.8 years; 51.6% men) were enrolled in the study. There were 1,380 patients (39%) presenting with near-syncope and 2,201 (61%) presenting with syncope. Baseline characteristics revealed a greater incidence of congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, previous arrhythmia, nonwhite race, and presenting dyspnea in the near-syncope compared with syncope cohort. There were no differences in the primary outcome between the groups (near-syncope 18.7% versus syncope 18.2%). A multivariate logistic regression analysis identified no difference in 30-day serious outcomes for patients with near-syncope (odds ratio 0.94; 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.14) compared with syncope. CONCLUSION: Near-syncope confers risk to patients similar to that of syncope for the composite outcome of 30-day death or serious clinical event.

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