Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 141
Filtrar
1.
Mol Psychiatry ; 2019 Sep 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31492941

RESUMO

Based on the discovery by the Resilience Project (Chen R. et al. Nat Biotechnol 34:531-538, 2016) of rare variants that confer resistance to Mendelian disease, and protective alleles for some complex diseases, we posited the existence of genetic variants that promote resilience to highly heritable polygenic disorders1,0 such as schizophrenia. Resilience has been traditionally viewed as a psychological construct, although our use of the term resilience refers to a different construct that directly relates to the Resilience Project, namely: heritable variation that promotes resistance to disease by reducing the penetrance of risk loci, wherein resilience and risk loci operate orthogonal to one another. In this study, we established a procedure to identify unaffected individuals with relatively high polygenic risk for schizophrenia, and contrasted them with risk-matched schizophrenia cases to generate the first known "polygenic resilience score" that represents the additive contributions to SZ resistance by variants that are distinct from risk loci. The resilience score was derived from data compiled by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, and replicated in three independent samples. This work establishes a generalizable framework for finding resilience variants for any complex, heritable disorder.

2.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 2019 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31553412

RESUMO

Importance: Psychotic experiences, such as hallucinations and delusions, are reported by approximately 5% to 10% of the general population, although only a small proportion develop psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. Studying the genetic causes of psychotic experiences in the general population, and its association with the genetic causes of other disorders, may increase the understanding of their pathologic significance. Objectives: To determine whether genetic liability to psychotic experiences is shared with schizophrenia and/or other neuropsychiatric disorders and traits and to identify genetic loci associated with psychotic experiences. Design, Setting and Participants: Analyses of genetic correlation, polygenic risk scores, and copy number variation were performed using data from participants in the UK Biobank from April 1, 2018, to March 20, 2019, to assess whether genetic liability to psychotic experiences is shared with schizophrenia and/or other neuropsychiatric disorders and traits. Genome-wide association studies of psychotic experience phenotypes were conducted to identify novel genetic loci. Participants in the final analyses after exclusions included 6123 individuals reporting any psychotic experience, 2143 individuals reporting distressing psychotic experiences, and 3337 individuals reporting multiple occurrences of psychotic experiences. A total of 121 843 individuals who did not report a psychotic experience formed the comparator group. Individuals with a psychotic disorder were excluded from all analyses. Main Outcomes and Measures: Genetic associations with psychotic experience phenotypes. Results: The study included a total of 127 966 participants (56.0% women and 44.0% men; mean [SD] age, 64.0 [7.6] years). Psychotic experiences were genetically correlated with major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Analyses of polygenic risk scores identified associations between psychotic experiences and genetic liability for major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism spectrum disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Individuals reporting psychotic experiences had an increased burden of copy number variations previously associated with schizophrenia (odds ratio [OR], 2.04; 95% CI, 1.39-2.98; P = 2.49 × 10-4) and neurodevelopmental disorders more widely (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.24-2.48; P = 1.41 × 10-3). Genome-wide association studies identified 4 significantly associated loci, including a locus in Ankyrin-3 (ANK3 [GenBank NM_020987]) (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.10-1.23; P = 3.06 × 10-8) with any psychotic experience, and a locus in cannabinoid receptor 2 gene (CNR2 [GenBank NM_001841]) (OR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56-0.78; P = 3.78 × 10-8) with distressing psychotic experiences. The genome-wide association study of any psychotic experience had a low single-nucleotide polymorphism-based heritability estimate (h2 = 1.71%; 95% CI, 1.02%-2.40%). Conclusions and Relevance: A large genetic association study of psychotic experiences from the population-based UK Biobank sample found support for a shared genetic liability between psychotic experiences and schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and neurodevelopmental disorders.

3.
PLoS One ; 14(7): e0218111, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31283791

RESUMO

Late onset Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia for which about 30 susceptibility loci have been reported. The aim of the current study is to identify novel genes associated with Alzheimer's disease using the largest up-to-date reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel, the most accurate imputation software and a novel gene-based analysis approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 million genotypes from 17,008 Alzheimer's cases and 37,154 controls. In addition to earlier reported genes, we detected three novel gene-wide significant loci PPARGC1A (p = 2.2 × 10-6), RORA (p = 7.4 × 10-7) and ZNF423 (p = 2.1 × 10-6). PPARGC1A and RORA are involved in circadian rhythm; circadian disturbances are one of the earliest symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. PPARGC1A is additionally linked to energy metabolism and the generation of amyloid beta plaques. RORA is involved in a variety of functions apart from circadian rhythm, such as cholesterol metabolism and inflammation. The ZNF423 gene resides in an Alzheimer's disease-specific protein network and is likely involved with centrosomes and DNA damage repair.

5.
Brain ; 2019 Jun 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31216018

RESUMO

The mismatch repair gene MSH3 has been implicated as a genetic modifier of the CAG·CTG repeat expansion disorders Huntington's disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1. A recent Huntington's disease genome-wide association study found rs557874766, an imputed single nucleotide polymorphism located within a polymorphic 9 bp tandem repeat in MSH3/DHFR, as the variant most significantly associated with progression in Huntington's disease. Using Illumina sequencing in Huntington's disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1 subjects, we show that rs557874766 is an alignment artefact, the minor allele for which corresponds to a three-repeat allele in MSH3 exon 1 that is associated with a reduced rate of somatic CAG·CTG expansion (P = 0.004) and delayed disease onset (P = 0.003) in both Huntington's disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1, and slower progression (P = 3.86 × 10-7) in Huntington's disease. RNA-Seq of whole blood in the Huntington's disease subjects found that repeat variants are associated with MSH3 and DHFR expression. A transcriptome-wide association study in the Huntington's disease cohort found increased MSH3 and DHFR expression are associated with disease progression. These results suggest that variation in the MSH3 exon 1 repeat region influences somatic expansion and disease phenotype in Huntington's disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1, and suggests a common DNA repair mechanism operates in both repeat expansion diseases.

6.
Biol Psychiatry ; 86(4): 265-273, 2019 Aug 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31230729

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (ncases = 18,381, ncontrols = 27,969) has provided novel opportunities for investigating the etiology of ASD. Here, we integrate the ASD GWAS summary statistics with summary-level gene expression data to infer differential gene expression in ASD, an approach called transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS). METHODS: Using FUSION software, ASD GWAS summary statistics were integrated with predictors of gene expression from 16 human datasets, including adult and fetal brains. A novel adaptation of established statistical methods was then used to test for enrichment within candidate pathways and specific tissues and at different stages of brain development. The proportion of ASD heritability explained by predicted expression of genes in the TWAS was estimated using stratified linkage disequilibrium score regression. RESULTS: This study identified 14 genes as significantly differentially expressed in ASD, 13 of which were outside of known genome-wide significant loci (±500 kb). XRN2, a gene proximal to an ASD GWAS locus, was inferred to be significantly upregulated in ASD, providing insight into the functional consequence of this associated locus. One novel transcriptome-wide significant association from this study is the downregulation of PDIA6, which showed minimal evidence of association in the GWAS, and in gene-based analysis using MAGMA. Predicted gene expression in this study accounted for 13.0% of the total ASD single nucleotide polymorphism heritability. CONCLUSIONS: This study has implicated several genes as significantly up/downregulated in ASD, providing novel and useful information for subsequent functional studies. This study also explores the utility of TWAS-based enrichment analysis and compares TWAS results with a functionally agnostic approach.

7.
Schizophr Bull ; 2019 Jun 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31206164

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment is a clinically important feature of schizophrenia. Polygenic risk score (PRS) methods have demonstrated genetic overlap between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), educational attainment (EA), and IQ, but very few studies have examined associations between these PRS and cognitive phenotypes within schizophrenia cases. METHODS: We combined genetic and cognitive data in 3034 schizophrenia cases from 11 samples using the general intelligence factor g as the primary measure of cognition. We used linear regression to examine the association between cognition and PRS for EA, IQ, schizophrenia, BD, and MDD. The results were then meta-analyzed across all samples. A genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of cognition was conducted in schizophrenia cases. RESULTS: PRS for both population IQ (P = 4.39 × 10-28) and EA (P = 1.27 × 10-26) were positively correlated with cognition in those with schizophrenia. In contrast, there was no association between cognition in schizophrenia cases and PRS for schizophrenia (P = .39), BD (P = .51), or MDD (P = .49). No individual variant approached genome-wide significance in the GWAS. CONCLUSIONS: Cognition in schizophrenia cases is more strongly associated with PRS that index cognitive traits in the general population than PRS for neuropsychiatric disorders. This suggests the mechanisms of cognitive variation within schizophrenia are at least partly independent from those that predispose to schizophrenia diagnosis itself. Our findings indicate that this cognitive variation arises at least in part due to genetic factors shared with cognitive performance in populations and is not solely due to illness or treatment-related factors, although our findings are consistent with important contributions from these factors.

8.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 6(6): 493-505, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31056457

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Several copy number variants (CNVs) are associated with a high risk of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders (referred to as ND-CNVs). We aimed to characterise the effect of ND-CNVs on childhood development and investigate whether different ND-CNVs lead to distinct and specific patterns of cognitive and behavioural outcomes. METHODS: In this case-control study, we used data from the Intellectual Disability and Mental Health: Assessing the Genomic Impact on Neurodevelopment (IMAGINE-ID) study. Children aged 4 years and older with pathogenic CNV or single nucleotide variants were recruited via the UK National Health Service (NHS) medical genetic clinic network and via patient support groups to complete broad online phenotyping, from whom children aged 6-19 years with at least one of a specific group of ND-CNVs (1q21.1 [proximal duplication, and distal deletion and duplication], 2p16.3 deletion, 9q34.3 deletion, 15q11.2 deletion, 15q13.3 deletion and duplication, 16p11.2 [proximal deletion and duplication, and distal deletion], and 22q11.2 deletion and duplication) and their families were approached for a deep phenotyping, home-based assessment, and we report on this sample here. We invited siblings of index children to participate as controls, for whom the presence of ND-CNVs was excluded by use of microarray results and also medical records where possible. We systematically assessed the children for psychiatric disorders and broader traits of neurodevelopmental, cognitive, and psychopathological origin and compared results of ND-CNV carriers with control siblings to test the hypothesis that phenotypes would differ by genotype, both quantitatively in terms of severity and qualitatively in the pattern of associated impairments. FINDINGS: Between Oct 1, 2014, and Dec 31, 2018, of 2819 children recruited, 258 (9%) had one ND-CNV of interest, with 13 CNVs across nine loci, and underwent a home-based assessment. 106 control siblings were enrolled. 186 (80%) of ND-CNV carriers met criteria for one or more psychiatric disorder (odds ratio [OR] 13·8, 95% CI 7·2-26·3, compared with controls). The risk of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (OR 6·9, 3·2-15·1), oppositional defiant disorder (OR 3·6, 1·4-9·4), any anxiety disorder (OR 2·9, 1·2-6·7), and autism spectrum disorder traits (OR 44·1, 15·3-127·5) was particularly high compared with controls. ND-CNV carriers were impaired across all neurodevelopmental, cognitive, and psychopathological traits compared with controls. Only moderate quantitative and qualitative differences in phenotypic profile were found between genotypes. Overall, the range of phenotypes was broadly similar for all ND-CNV genotypes. Traits did show some evidence of genotypic specificity, with rank-based analyses showing moderate qualitative and quantitative profile differences between ND-CNVs; however, the specific genotype accounted for a low proportion of variance in cognitive and behavioural outcomes (approximately 5-20% depending on the trait). INTERPRETATION: The 13 ND-CNVs studied have a similar range of adverse effects on childhood neurodevelopment, despite subtle quantitative and qualitative differences. Genomic risk for neuropsychiatric disorder has pleiotropic effects on multiple processes and neural circuits and indicates that future research should avoid being narrowly focused on single phenotypes. FUNDING: UK Medical Research Council and Medical Research Foundation.

9.
Nat Genet ; 51(5): 793-803, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31043756

RESUMO

Bipolar disorder is a highly heritable psychiatric disorder. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) including 20,352 cases and 31,358 controls of European descent, with follow-up analysis of 822 variants with P < 1 × 10-4 in an additional 9,412 cases and 137,760 controls. Eight of the 19 variants that were genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10-8) in the discovery GWAS were not genome-wide significant in the combined analysis, consistent with small effect sizes and limited power but also with genetic heterogeneity. In the combined analysis, 30 loci were genome-wide significant, including 20 newly identified loci. The significant loci contain genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitter transporters and synaptic components. Pathway analysis revealed nine significantly enriched gene sets, including regulation of insulin secretion and endocannabinoid signaling. Bipolar I disorder is strongly genetically correlated with schizophrenia, driven by psychosis, whereas bipolar II disorder is more strongly correlated with major depressive disorder. These findings address key clinical questions and provide potential biological mechanisms for bipolar disorder.


Assuntos
Transtorno Bipolar/genética , Loci Gênicos , Transtorno Bipolar/classificação , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Transtornos Psicóticos/genética , Esquizofrenia/genética , Biologia de Sistemas
10.
Transl Psychiatry ; 9(1): 74, 2019 02 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30718481

RESUMO

Common genetic variation contributes a substantial proportion of risk for both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Furthermore, there is evidence of significant, but not complete, overlap in genetic risk between the two disorders. It has been hypothesised that genetic variants conferring risk for these disorders do so by influencing brain development, leading to the later emergence of symptoms. The comparative profile of risk gene expression for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder across development over different brain regions however remains unclear. Using genotypes derived from genome-wide associations studies of the largest available cohorts of patients and control subjects, we investigated whether genes enriched for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder association show a bias for expression across any of 13 developmental stages in prefrontal cortical and subcortical brain regions. We show that genetic association with schizophrenia is positively correlated with expression in the prefrontal cortex during early midfetal development and early infancy, and negatively correlated with expression during late childhood, which stabilises in adolescence. In contrast, risk-associated genes for bipolar disorder did not exhibit a bias towards expression at any prenatal stage, although the pattern of postnatal expression was similar to that of schizophrenia. These results highlight the dynamic expression of genes harbouring risk for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder across prefrontal cortex development and support the hypothesis that prenatal neurodevelopmental events are more strongly associated with schizophrenia than bipolar disorder.


Assuntos
Desenvolvimento do Adolescente/fisiologia , Transtorno Bipolar/genética , Transtorno Bipolar/metabolismo , Desenvolvimento Infantil/fisiologia , Desenvolvimento Fetal/fisiologia , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Expressão Gênica/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Córtex Pré-Frontal/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Córtex Pré-Frontal/metabolismo , Esquizofrenia/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Lactente , Adulto Jovem
11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30516002

RESUMO

A major controversy in psychiatric genetics is whether nonadditive genetic interaction effects contribute to the risk of highly polygenic disorders. We applied a support vector machines (SVMs) approach, which is capable of building linear and nonlinear models using kernel methods, to classify cases from controls in a large schizophrenia case-control sample of 11,853 subjects (5,554 cases and 6,299 controls) and compared its prediction accuracy with the polygenic risk score (PRS) approach. We also investigated whether SVMs are a suitable approach to detecting nonlinear genetic effects, that is, interactions. We found that PRS provided more accurate case/control classification than either linear or nonlinear SVMs, and give a tentative explanation why PRS outperforms both multivariate regression and linear kernel SVMs. In addition, we observe that nonlinear kernel SVMs showed higher classification accuracy than linear SVMs when a large number of SNPs are entered into the model. We conclude that SVMs are a potential tool for assessing the presence of interactions, prior to searching for them explicitly.

12.
Biol Psychiatry ; 2018 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30420267

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sequencing studies have pointed to the involvement in schizophrenia of rare coding variants in neuronally expressed genes, including activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (ARC) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) complexes; however, larger samples are required to reveal novel genes and specific biological mechanisms. METHODS: We sequenced 187 genes, selected for prior evidence of association with schizophrenia, in a new dataset of 5207 cases and 4991 controls. Included among these genes were members of ARC and NMDAR postsynaptic protein complexes, as well as voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels. We performed a rare variant meta-analysis with published sequencing data for a total of 11,319 cases, 15,854 controls, and 1136 trios. RESULTS: While no individual gene was significantly associated with schizophrenia after genome-wide correction for multiple testing, we strengthen the evidence that rare exonic variants in the ARC (p = 4.0 × 10-4) and NMDAR (p = 1.7 × 10-5) synaptic complexes are risk factors for schizophrenia. In addition, we found that loss-of-function variants and missense variants at paralog-conserved sites were enriched in voltage-gated sodium channels, particularly the alpha subunits (p = 8.6 × 10-4). CONCLUSIONS: In one of the largest sequencing studies of schizophrenia to date, we provide novel evidence that multiple voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis and confirm the involvement of ARC and NMDAR postsynaptic complexes.

13.
Hum Mol Genet ; 2018 Oct 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30358836

RESUMO

Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the HTT gene. CAG repeat length explains around half of the variation in age-at-onset, but genetic variation elsewhere in the genome accounts for a significant proportion of the remainder. Genome-wide association studies have identified a bidirectional signal on chromosome 15, likely underlain by FAN1 (FANCD2 and FANCI Associated Nuclease 1), a nuclease involved in DNA interstrand cross link repair. Here we show that increased FAN1 expression is significantly associated with delayed age-at-onset and slower progression of HD suggesting FAN1 is protective in the context of an expanded HTT CAG repeat. FAN1 overexpression in human cells reduces CAG repeat expansion in exogenously expressed mutant HTT exon 1, and in patient-derived stem cells and differentiated medium spiny neurons, FAN1 knockdown increases CAG repeat expansion. The stabilising effect is FAN1 concentration and CAG repeat length dependent. We show that FAN1 binds to the expanded HTT CAG repeat DNA and its nuclease activity is not required for protection against CAG repeat expansion. These data shed new mechanistic insights into how the genetic modifiers of HD act to alter disease progression, and show that FAN1 affects somatic expansion of the CAG repeat through a nuclease-independent mechanism. This provides new avenues for therapeutic interventions in HD and potentially other triplet repeat disorders.

14.
J Huntingtons Dis ; 7(3): 209-222, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30103338

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: People with Huntington's disease (HD) have been observed to have lower rates of cancers. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between age of onset of HD, CAG repeat length, and cancer diagnosis. METHODS: Data were obtained from the European Huntington's disease network REGISTRY study for 6540 subjects. Population cancer incidence was ascertained from the GLOBOCAN database to obtain standardised incidence ratios of cancers in the REGISTRY subjects. RESULTS: 173/6528 HD REGISTRY subjects had had a cancer diagnosis. The age-standardised incidence rate of all cancers in the REGISTRY HD population was 0.26 (CI 0.22-0.30). Individual cancers showed a lower age-standardised incidence rate compared with the control population with prostate and colorectal cancers showing the lowest rates. There was no effect of CAG length on the likelihood of cancer, but a cancer diagnosis within the last year was associated with a greatly increased rate of HD onset (Hazard Ratio 18.94, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Cancer is less common than expected in the HD population, confirming previous reports. However, this does not appear to be related to CAG length in HTT. A recent diagnosis of cancer increases the risk of HD onset at any age, likely due to increased investigation following a cancer diagnosis.

15.
Transl Psychiatry ; 8(1): 145, 2018 Aug 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30089819

RESUMO

Whilst associations between polygenic risk scores (PRSs) for schizophrenia and various phenotypic outcomes have been reported, an understanding of developmental pathways can only be gained by modelling comorbidity across psychopathology. We examine how genetic risk for schizophrenia relates to adolescent psychosis-related and internalizing psychopathology using a latent modelling approach, and compare this to genetic risk for other psychiatric disorders, to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the developmental pathways at this age. PRSs for schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, neuroticism and bipolar disorder were generated for individuals in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort. Multivariate linear regression was used to examine the relationships of these PRSs with psychopathology factors modelled within (i) a correlated factors structure and (ii) a bifactor structure. The schizophrenia PRS was associated with an increase in factors describing psychotic experiences, negative dimension, depression and anxiety, but, when modelling a general psychopathology factor based on these measures, specific effects above this persisted only for the negative dimension. Similar factor relationships were observed for the neuroticism PRS, with a (weak) specific effect only for anxiety once modelling general psychopathology. Psychopathology during adolescence can be described by a general psychopathology construct that captures common variance as well as by specific constructs capturing remaining non-shared variance. Schizophrenia risk genetic variants identified through genome-wide association studies mainly index negative rather than positive symptom psychopathology during adolescence. This has potentially important implications both for research and risk prediction in high-risk samples.

16.
Am J Pathol ; 188(9): 1982-1992, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29981742

RESUMO

Effective diabetic kidney disease (DKD) biomarkers remain elusive, and urinary miRNAs represent a potential source of novel noninvasive disease sentinels. We profiled 754 miRNAs in pooled urine samples from DKD patients (n = 20), detecting significantly increased miR-126, miR-155, and miR-29b compared with controls (n = 20). These results were confirmed in an independent cohort of 89 DKD patients, 62 diabetic patients without DKD, and 41 controls: miR-126 (2.8-fold increase; P < 0.0001), miR-155 (1.8-fold increase; P < 0.001), and miR-29b (4.6-fold increase; P = 0.024). Combined receiver operating characteristic curve analysis resulted in an area under the curve of 0.8. A relative quantification threshold equivalent to 80% sensitivity for each miRNA gave a positive signal for 48% of DKD patients compared with 3.6% of diabetic patients without DKD. Laser-capture microdissection of renal biopsy specimens, followed by quantitative RT-PCR, detected miR-155 in glomeruli and proximal and distal tubules, whereas miR-126 and miR-29b were most abundant in glomerular extracts. Subsequent experiments showed miR-126 and miR-29b enrichment in glomerular endothelial cells (GEnCs) compared with podocytes, proximal tubular epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. Significantly increased miR-126 and miR-29b were detected in GEnC conditioned medium in response to tumor necrosis factor-α and transforming growth factor-ß1, respectively. Our data reveal an altered urinary miRNA profile associated with DKD and link these variations to miRNA release from GEnCs.

17.
Methods Mol Biol ; 1780: 443-461, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29856030

RESUMO

In this chapter, genetic modifiers are defined, and the rationale for investigating them in HD explained. Issues involved in modeling the phenotype are discussed, using age at motor onset as an example. The statistical methods for analyzing genetic data (linkage and association) are discussed, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. In particular, the advantage of a genome-wide approach over one based on candidate genes is stressed. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are current method of choice to detect genetic modifiers. The power of GWAS is discussed, along with sources of error, and how these might be detected and corrected. Extensions to GWAS, such as gene- and pathway-wide analyses, are discussed, and also how GWAS may be used to estimate genetic risks and trait heritability. Since GWAS are most effective to detect common genetic variants, methods for analyzing rare variation are also discussed. The uses of other types of genomic data (notably, expression) are discussed, and how they might be integrated with genetic data to find causal genes and variants. The chapter ends with a short overview of future prospects for detecting genetic modifiers of HD.

18.
PLoS Genet ; 14(5): e1007274, 2018 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29750799

RESUMO

Modifiers of Mendelian disorders can provide insights into disease mechanisms and guide therapeutic strategies. A recent genome-wide association (GWA) study discovered genetic modifiers of Huntington's disease (HD) onset in Europeans. Here, we performed whole genome sequencing and GWA analysis of a Venezuelan HD cluster whose families were crucial for the original mapping of the HD gene defect. The Venezuelan HD subjects develop motor symptoms earlier than their European counterparts, implying the potential for population-specific modifiers. The main Venezuelan HD family inherits HTT haplotype hap.03, which differs subtly at the sequence level from European HD hap.03, suggesting a different ancestral origin but not explaining the earlier age at onset in these Venezuelans. GWA analysis of the Venezuelan HD cluster suggests both population-specific and population-shared genetic modifiers. Genome-wide significant signals at 7p21.2-21.1 and suggestive association signals at 4p14 and 17q21.2 are evident only in Venezuelan HD, but genome-wide significant association signals at the established European chromosome 15 modifier locus are improved when Venezuelan HD data are included in the meta-analysis. Venezuelan-specific association signals on chromosome 7 center on SOSTDC1, which encodes a bone morphogenetic protein antagonist. The corresponding SNPs are associated with reduced expression of SOSTDC1 in non-Venezuelan tissue samples, suggesting that interaction of reduced SOSTDC1 expression with a population-specific genetic or environmental factor may be responsible for modification of HD onset in Venezuela. Detection of population-specific modification in Venezuelan HD supports the value of distinct disease populations in revealing novel aspects of a disease and population-relevant therapeutic strategies.


Assuntos
Genes Modificadores/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Doença de Huntington/genética , Sequenciamento Completo do Genoma/métodos , Idade de Início , Saúde da Família , Feminino , Interação Gene-Ambiente , Genética Populacional , Haplótipos , Humanos , Proteína Huntingtina/genética , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Proteínas/genética , Venezuela
19.
Schizophr Bull ; 2018 Mar 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29608775

RESUMO

Risk profile scores (RPS) derived from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) explain a considerable amount of susceptibility for schizophrenia (SCZ). However, little is known about how common genetic risk factors for SCZ influence the structure and function of the human brain, largely due to the constraints of imaging sample sizes. In the current study, we use a novel recall-by-genotype (RbG) methodological approach, where we sample young adults from a population cohort (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children: N genotyped = 8365) based on their SCZ-RPS. We compared 197 healthy individuals at extremes of low (N = 99) or high (N = 98) SCZ-RPS with behavioral tests, and structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We first provide methodological details that will inform the design of future RbG studies for common SCZ genetic risk. We further provide an between group analysis of the RbG individuals (low vs high SCZ-RPS) who underwent structural neuroimaging data (T1-weighted scans) and fMRI data during a reversal learning task. While we found little evidence for morphometric differences between the low and high SCZ-RPS groups, we observed an impact of SCZ-RPS on blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal during reward processing in the ventral striatum (PFWE-VS-CORRECTED = .037), a previously investigated broader reward-related network (PFWE-ROIS-CORRECTED = .008), and across the whole brain (PFWE-WHOLE-BRAIN-CORRECTED = .013). We also describe the study strategy and discuss specific challenges of RbG for SCZ risk (such as SCZ-RPS related homoscedasticity). This study will help to elucidate the behavioral and imaging phenotypes that are associated with SCZ genetic risk.

20.
Genet Epidemiol ; 42(4): 366-377, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29532500

RESUMO

Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) are a method to summarize the additive trait variance captured by a set of SNPs, and can increase the power of set-based analyses by leveraging public genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets. PRS aims to assess the genetic liability to some phenotype on the basis of polygenic risk for the same or different phenotype estimated from independent data. We propose the application of PRSs as a set-based method with an additional component of adjustment for linkage disequilibrium (LD), with potential extension of the PRS approach to analyze biologically meaningful SNP sets. We call this method POLARIS: POlygenic Ld-Adjusted RIsk Score. POLARIS identifies the LD structure of SNPs using spectral decomposition of the SNP correlation matrix and replaces the individuals' SNP allele counts with LD-adjusted dosages. Using a raw genotype dataset together with SNP effect sizes from a second independent dataset, POLARIS can be used for set-based analysis. MAGMA is an alternative set-based approach employing principal component analysis to account for LD between markers in a raw genotype dataset. We used simulations, both with simple constructed and real LD-structure, to compare the power of these methods. POLARIS shows more power than MAGMA applied to the raw genotype dataset only, but less or comparable power to combined analysis of both datasets. POLARIS has the advantages that it produces a risk score per person per set using all available SNPs, and aims to increase power by leveraging the effect sizes from the discovery set in a self-contained test of association in the test dataset.


Assuntos
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Desequilíbrio de Ligação/genética , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Alelos , Simulação por Computador , Humanos , Modelos Genéticos , Fenótipo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Análise de Componente Principal , Fatores de Risco
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA