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1.
Women Birth ; 2021 Oct 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34656517

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the provision of maternity care worldwide. The continuation of maternity services during the pandemic is vital, but midwives have reported feeling overwhelmed in providing these services at this time. However, there are limited studies in Indonesia that have explored the experiences of midwives in providing care during the pandemic. AIM: Our study aims to explore Indonesian midwives' experiences in providing maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We used a descriptive qualitative approach using in-depth interviews to explore the experiences of 15 midwives working in different level of maternity care facilities in two regions in Indonesia, Surabaya and Mataram. All interviews were conducted via WhatsApp call and were audio-recorded with permission. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. FINDINGS: Four themes were identified: 1) fear for the wellbeing of the family and herself, 2) increased workload, 3) motivation and support for midwives, and 4) challenges in providing maternity care for women. DISCUSSION: Sense of duty and loyalty to other midwives motivated midwives to continue working despite their fears and increased workload. Inadequate protection and support and practical challenges faced by midwives should be addressed to ensure midwives' wellbeing and the continuity of maternity care. CONCLUSION: Our study provides insight into Indonesian midwives' experiences in providing maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Adequate protection through PPE availability, effective training and support for midwives' wellbeing is needed to support midwives in providing maternity care during the pandemic. Community's adherence to COVID-19 protocols and good collaboration between primary health centres and hospitals would also benefit midwives.

2.
Women Birth ; 2021 Sep 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34535423

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Substantial changes occurred in Australian healthcare provision during the COVID-19 pandemic to reduce the risk of infection transmission. Little is known about the impact of these changes on childbearing women. AIM: To explore and describe childbearing women's experiences of receiving maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. METHODS: A qualitative exploratory design using semi-structured interviews was used. Women were recruited through social media and self-nominated to participate in an interview. Maximum variation sampling was used. Twenty-seven interviews were conducted with women from across Australia. Data was analysed thematically. FINDINGS: Three primary themes and nine sub-themes emerged: 'navigating a changing health system' (coping with constant change, altered access to care, dealing with physical distancing restrictions, and missing care), 'desiring choice and control' (experiencing poor communication, making hard decisions, and considering alternate models of care), and 'experiencing infection prevention measures' (minimising the risk of exposure and changing care plans to minimise infection risk). DISCUSSION: The substantial changes in care delivery for pregnant and postpartum women during the pandemic appear to have reduced woman-centred care. In most cases, care was perceived as impersonal and incomplete, resulting in a very different experience than expected; consequences included missing care. The presence of a known care provider improved women's sense of communication, choice, and control. CONCLUSION: This study provides unique insight into the experiences of childbearing women across Australia. The importance of respectful woman-centred care cannot be forgotten during a pandemic. The findings may inform future service planning during pandemics and disaster situations.

4.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e046308, 2021 08 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34385236

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Left untreated, sexually transmitted and genital infections (henceforth STIs) in pregnancy can lead to serious adverse outcomes for mother and child. Papua New Guinea (PNG) has among the highest prevalence of curable STIs including syphilis, chlamydia, gonorrhoea, trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis, and high neonatal mortality rates. Diagnosis and treatment of these STIs in PNG rely on syndromic management. Advances in STI diagnostics through point-of-care (PoC) testing using GeneXpert technology hold promise for resource-constrained countries such as PNG. This paper describes the planned economic evaluation of a cluster-randomised cross-over trial comparing antenatal PoC testing and immediate treatment of curable STIs with standard antenatal care in two provinces in PNG. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Cost-effectiveness of the PoC intervention compared with standard antenatal care will be assessed prospectively over the trial period (2017-2021) from societal and provider perspectives. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios will be calculated for the primary health outcome, a composite measure of the proportion of either preterm birth and/or low birth weight; for life years saved; for disability-adjusted life years averted; and for non-health benefits (financial risk protection and improved health equity). Scenario analyses will be conducted to identify scale-up options, and budget impact analysis will be undertaken to understand short-term financial impacts of intervention adoption on the national budget. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis will be conducted to account for uncertainty in key model inputs. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has ethical approval from the Institutional Review Board of the PNG Institute of Medical Research; the Medical Research Advisory Committee of the PNG National Department of Health; the Human Research Ethics Committee of the University of New South Wales; and the Research Ethics Committee of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Findings will be disseminated through national stakeholder meetings, conferences, peer-reviewed publications and policy briefs. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN37134032.


Assuntos
Nascimento Prematuro , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Criança , Análise Custo-Benefício , Feminino , Genitália , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Papua Nova Guiné/epidemiologia , Testes Imediatos , Gravidez , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/diagnóstico , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/tratamento farmacológico
5.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 816, 2021 Aug 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34391422

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In New South Wales (NSW), Australia there are three settings available for women at low risk of complications to give birth: home, birth centre and hospital. Between 2000 and 2012, 93.6% of babies were planned to be born in hospital, 6.0% in a birth centre and 0.4% at home. Availability of alternative birth settings is limited and the cost of providing birth at home or in a birth centre from the perspective of the health system is unknown. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to model the cost of the trajectories of women who planned to give birth at home, in a birth centre or in a hospital from the public sector perspective. METHODS: This was a population-based study using linked datasets from NSW, Australia. Women included met the following selection criteria: 37-41 completed weeks of pregnancy, spontaneous onset of labour, and singleton pregnancy at low risk of complications. We used a decision tree framework to depict the trajectories of these women and Australian Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups (AR-DRGs) were applied to each trajectory to estimate the cost of birth. A scenario analysis was undertaken to model the cost for 30 000 women in one year. FINDINGS: 496 387 women were included in the dataset. Twelve potential outcome pathways were identified and each pathway was costed using AR-DRGs. An overall cost was also calculated by place of birth: $AUD4802 for homebirth, $AUD4979 for a birth centre birth and $AUD5463 for a hospital birth. CONCLUSION: The findings from this study provides some clarity into the financial saving of offering more options to women seeking an alternative to giving birth in hospital. Given the relatively lower rates of complex intervention and neonatal outcomes associated with women at low risk of complications, we can assume the cost of providing them with homebirth and birth centre options could be cost-effective.


Assuntos
Centros de Assistência à Gravidez e ao Parto , Parto Domiciliar , Austrália/epidemiologia , Entorno do Parto , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Parto , Gravidez
6.
BMJ Open ; 11(7): e048271, 2021 07 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34281928

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Pregnancy and early parenthood are key opportunities for interaction with health services and connecting to other families at the same life stage. Public antenatal care should be accessible to all, however barriers persist for families from refugee communities to access, navigate and optimise healthcare during pregnancy. Group Pregnancy Care is an innovative model of care codesigned with a community from a refugee background and other key stakeholders in Melbourne, Australia. Group Pregnancy Care aims to provide a culturally safe and supportive environment for women to participate in antenatal care in a language they understand, to improve health literacy and promote social connections and inclusion. This paper outlines Froup Pregnancy Care and provides details of the evaluation framework. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The evaluation uses community-based participatory research methods to engage stakeholders in codesign of evaluation methods. The study is being conducted across multiple sites and involves multiple phases, use of quantitative and qualitative methods, and an interrupted time series design. Process and cost-effectiveness measures will be incorporated into quality improvement cycles. Evaluation measures will be developed using codesign and participatory principles informed by community and stakeholder engagement and will be piloted prior to implementation. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approvals have been provided by all six relevant authorities. Study findings will be shared with communities and stakeholders via agreed pathways including community forums, partnership meetings, conferences, policy and practice briefs and journal articles. Dissemination activities will be developed using codesign and participatory principles.


Assuntos
Cuidado Pré-Natal , Refugiados , Austrália , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Feminino , Humanos , Análise de Séries Temporais Interrompida , Gravidez
7.
Asia Pac J Public Health ; 33(5): 489-501, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34165364

RESUMO

Preterm birth and stillbirth are important global perinatal health indicators. Definitions of these indicators can differ between countries, affecting comparability of preterm birth and stillbirth rates across countries. This study aimed to document national-level adherence to World Health Organization (WHO) definitions of preterm birth and stillbirth in the WHO Western Pacific region. A systematic search of government health websites and 4 electronic databases was conducted. Any official report or published study describing the national definition of preterm birth or stillbirth published between 2000 and 2020 was eligible for inclusion. A total of 58 data sources from 21 countries were identified. There was considerable variation in how preterm birth and stillbirth was defined across the region. The most frequently used lower gestational age threshold for viability of preterm birth was 28 weeks gestation (range 20-28 weeks), and stillbirth was most frequently classified from 20 weeks gestation (range 12-28 weeks). High-income countries more frequently used earlier gestational ages for preterm birth and stillbirth compared with low- to middle-income countries. The findings highlight the importance of clear, standardized, internationally comparable definitions for perinatal indicators. Further research is needed to determine the impact on regional preterm birth and stillbirth rates.


Assuntos
Nascimento Prematuro , Natimorto , Ásia Ocidental/epidemiologia , Feminino , Idade Gestacional , Indicadores Básicos de Saúde , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Ilhas do Pacífico/epidemiologia , Gravidez , Nascimento Prematuro/epidemiologia , Natimorto/epidemiologia , Organização Mundial da Saúde
8.
Birth ; 2021 Jun 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34180087

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to multiple changes in maternity services worldwide. Systems rapidly adapted to meet public health requirements aimed at preventing transmission of SARS-CoV-2, including quarantine procedures, travel restrictions, border closures, physical distancing and "stay-at-home" orders. Although these changes have impacted all stakeholders in maternity services, arguably the women at the center of this care have been most affected. This study aimed to explore women's experiences of receiving maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. METHODS: A national cross-sectional online survey, including fixed choice and open-ended questions, was conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia; pregnant and postnatal women were recruited through social media networks. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 3364 women. Women felt distressed and alone due to rapid changes to their maternity care. Limited face-to-face contact with health practitioners and altered models of care often required women to accommodate significant changes and to coordinate their own care. Women felt that they were often "doing it alone," due to public health restrictions on support people and visitors, both within and outside health services. Women described some benefits of visitor restrictions, such as, more time for rest, breastfeeding establishment, and bonding with their baby. CONCLUSIONS: This large nationwide Australian study provides unique data on women's experiences of receiving maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Lessons learned provide an opportunity to rebuild and reshape the maternity sector to best meet the needs of women and their families during current and future public health crises.

9.
Women Birth ; 2021 Jun 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34103270

RESUMO

PROBLEM AND BACKGROUND: Caesarean section (CS) rates in Australia and many countries worldwide are high and increasing, with elective repeat caesarean section a significant contributor. AIM: To determine whether midwifery continuity of care for women with a previous CS increases the proportion of women who plan to attempt a vaginal birth in their current pregnancy. METHODS: A randomised controlled design was undertaken. Women who met the inclusion criteria were randomised to one of two groups; the Community Midwifery Program (CMP) (continuity across the full spectrum - antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum) (n=110) and the Midwifery Antenatal Care (MAC) Program (antenatal continuity of care) (n=111) using a remote randomisation service. Analysis was undertaken on an intention to treat basis. The primary outcome measure was the rate of attempted vaginal birth after caesarean section and secondary outcomes included composite measures of maternal and neonatal wellbeing. FINDINGS: The model of care did not significantly impact planned vaginal birth at 36 weeks (CMP 66.7% vs MAC 57.3%) or success rate (CMP 27.8% vs MAC 32.7%). The rate of maternal and neonatal complications was similar between the groups. CONCLUSION: Model of care did not significantly impact the proportion of women attempting VBAC in this study. The similarity in the number of midwives seen antenatally and during labour and birth suggests that these models of care had more similarities than differences and that the model of continuity could be described as informational continuity. Future research should focus on the impact of relationship based continuity of care.

10.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 225(3): 250.e1-250.e38, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33957113

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare the available evidence on intravenous oxytocin dosing regimens for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage following cesarean delivery. DATA SOURCES: We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, Global Index Medicus, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Controlled Register of Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for eligible studies published until February 2020. STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: We included any randomized or nonrandomized study published in peer-reviewed journals that compared at least 2 different dosing regimens of intravenous oxytocin for postpartum hemorrhage prevention in women undergoing cesarean delivery. METHODS: Two authors independently assessed the eligibility of studies, extracted the data, and assessed the risk of bias. The primary outcome was incidence of postpartum hemorrhage ≥1000 mL. Other review outcomes included use of additional uterotonics, blood loss, and adverse maternal events. Data were analyzed according to the type of intravenous administration (bolus only, infusion only, or bolus plus infusion) and total oxytocin dose. A meta-analysis was performed on randomized trials and the results were reported as risk ratios or mean differences with 95% confidence intervals. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluations scale was used to rate the certainty of evidence. Findings from dose-finding trials and nonrandomized studies were reported narratively. RESULTS: A total of 35 studies (7333 women) met our inclusion criteria and included 30 randomized trials and 5 nonrandomized studies. There were limited data available from the trials for most outcomes, and the results were not conclusive. Compared with bolus plus infusion regimens, bolus only regimens probably result in slightly higher mean blood loss (mean difference, 52 mL; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-104 mL; moderate certainty). Among the bolus plus infusion regimens, initial bolus doses <5 IU may reduce nausea (risk ratio, 0.26; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.63; low certainty) when compared with doses of 5-9 IU. Total oxytocin doses of 5-9 IU vs total doses of 10-19 IU may increase the use of additional uterotonics (risk ratio, 13.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.75-96.37; low certainty). Effects on other outcomes were generally inconclusive. CONCLUSION: There are limited data available for comparisons of IV oxytocin regimens for postpartum hemorrhage prevention following cesarean delivery. Bolus plus infusion regimens may lead to minor reductions in mean blood loss and initial bolus doses of <5 IU may minimize nausea. Bolus only regimens of 10 IU vs bolus only regimens of 5 IU may decrease the need for additional uterotonics, however, further comparative trials are required to understand the effects on other key outcomes, particularly hypotension.


Assuntos
Administração Intravenosa , Ocitócicos/administração & dosagem , Ocitocina/administração & dosagem , Hemorragia Pós-Parto/prevenção & controle , Cesárea , Relação Dose-Resposta a Droga , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez
11.
BMC Womens Health ; 21(1): 222, 2021 05 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34044833

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Women from migrant and refugee backgrounds who live in high-income countries are at increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes, including mental health issues, preterm birth and maternal and infant mortality. There is a need to implement and evaluate models of care to meet their specific needs in order to improve health outcomes, their experiences of care, and overcome barriers to access. In Sydney, Australia, a unique model of care was implemented to support women and families from migrant and refugee backgrounds to access health and community-based services through the continuum of pregnancy to the early parenting period. This model of care is known as the Cross Cultural Workers (CCWs) in Maternity and Child and Family Health Service (the CCW Service). The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of service providers regarding the CCW Service and identify recommendations for improvement. METHODS: A mixed-methods study was conducted consisting of surveys and face to face semi-structured interviews. Service providers were recruited from hospital-based maternity and community-based services. Survey data were analysed descriptively. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: Sixty-nine service providers completed surveys and 19 were interviewed. The CCW Service was highly regarded by service providers who perceived it to be critical in improving care for women from migrant and refugee backgrounds. The overarching theme from the interviews was the ability of the CCW Service to act as a 'bridge to health' through the provision of culturally responsive care. There were three main categories; supporting access to health and community-based services, improving the healthcare experience, and organisational factors, including part-time hours, capacity, heavy workloads and confusion/lack of clarity regarding the CCW role, which affected CCWs' capacity to optimally support service providers in providing culturally responsive care. These limitations meant CCWs were not able to meet demand, and fully operationalise the model. CONCLUSION: Service providers perceived the CCW model to be a culturally responsive model of care tailored to the needs of women and families from migrant and refugee backgrounds, that reduces barriers to access, and has the potential to improve perinatal outcomes, and women's experience and satisfaction with care.


Assuntos
Nascimento Prematuro , Refugiados , Migrantes , Austrália , Criança , Comparação Transcultural , Feminino , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Percepção , Gravidez , Pesquisa Qualitativa
12.
Reprod Health ; 18(1): 98, 2021 May 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34006288

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Uterine fundal pressure involves a birth attendant pushing on the woman's uterine fundus to assist vaginal birth. It is used in some clinical settings, though guidelines recommend against it. This systematic review aimed to determine the prevalence of uterine fundal pressure during the second stage of labour for women giving birth vaginally at health facilities. METHODS: The population of interest were women who experienced labour in a health facility and in whom vaginal birth was anticipated. The primary outcome was the use of fundal pressure during second stage of labour. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Global Index Medicus databases were searched for eligible studies published from 1 January 2000 onwards. Meta-analysis was conducted to determine a pooled prevalence, with subgroup analyses to explore heterogeneity. RESULTS: Eighty data sets from 76 studies (n = 898,544 women) were included, reporting data from 22 countries. The prevalence of fundal pressure ranged from 0.6% to 69.2% between studies, with a pooled prevalence of 23.2% (95% CI 19.4-27.0, I2 = 99.97%). There were significant differences in prevalence between country income level (p < 0.001, prevalence highest in lower-middle income countries) and method of measuring use of fundal pressure (p = 0.001, prevalence highest in studies that measured fundal pressure based on women's self-report). CONCLUSIONS: The use of uterine fundal pressure on women during vaginal birth in health facilities is widespread. Efforts to prevent this potentially unnecessary and harmful practice are needed.


Assuntos
Parto Obstétrico/métodos , Segunda Fase do Trabalho de Parto/fisiologia , Obstetrícia/métodos , Parto Obstétrico/efeitos adversos , Parto Obstétrico/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Instalações de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Gravidez , Pressão , Prevalência , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde
13.
Women Birth ; 2021 Apr 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33941497

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In Australia, the provision of maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic was significantly altered to limit transmission of the virus. Many hospitals limited face-to-face appointments to only the pregnant woman and restricted the number of support people present during labour, birth, and postnatal visits to one person. How these restrictions were experienced by partners and support persons of childbearing women are unknown. AIM: To explore the experiences of partners and support persons of women receiving maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A two-phased qualitative study including an online survey and interviews. Analysis was undertaken using content analysis. FINDINGS: Partners and support persons experienced a sense of 'missing out' from the pregnancy and maternity care experience because of changes in the provision of care during the pandemic. They reported feelings of isolation, psychological distress, and reduced bonding time with babies. Conflicting information and processes within and across maternity services contributed to feelings of uncertainty and a perceived reduction in the quality of care. Partners and support persons were negatively impacted by restrictions on maternity wards, however they also perceived these to be of benefit to women. DISCUSSION: Many partners and support persons were negatively impacted by restrictions in maternity services during the pandemic; strategies to ensure their active involvement in maternity care are needed. CONCLUSION: This study offers insights from the unique perspective of partners and support people of women receiving maternity care during the pandemic. Policies and processes that exclude partners and support persons need to be reconsidered.

15.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 9(4): e25668, 2021 04 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33856351

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding plays a major role in the health of mothers and babies and has the potential to positively shape an individual's life both in the short and long term. In the United Kingdom (UK), although 81% of women initiate breastfeeding, only 1% of women breastfeed exclusively to 6 months as recommended by the World Health Organization. In the UK, women who are socially disadvantaged and younger are less likely to breastfeed at 6 to 8 weeks postpartum. One strategy that aims to improve these statistics is the Baby Buddy app, which has been designed and implemented by the UK charity Best Beginnings to be a universal intervention to help reduce health inequalities, including those in breastfeeding. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to retrospectively examine the development of Baby Buddy by applying the Behavior Change Wheel (BCW) framework to understand how it might increase breastfeeding self-efficacy, knowledge, and confidence. METHODS: Retrospective application of the BCW was completed after the app was developed and embedded into maternity services. A three-stage process evaluation used triangulation methods and formalized tools to gain an understanding of the potential mechanisms and behaviors used in apps that are needed to improve breastfeeding rates in the UK. First, we generated a behavioral analysis by mapping breastfeeding barriers and enablers onto the Capability, Opportunity, and Motivation-Behavior (COM-B) system using documents provided by Best Beginnings. Second, we identified the intervention functions and policy categories used. Third, we linked these with the behavior change techniques identified in the app breastfeeding content using the Behavior Change Techniques Taxonomy (BCTTv1). RESULTS: Baby Buddy is a well-designed platform that could be used to change breastfeeding behaviors. Findings from stage one showed that Best Beginnings had defined breastfeeding as a key behavior requiring support and demonstrated a thorough understanding of the context in which breastfeeding occurs, the barriers and enablers of breastfeeding, and the target actions needed to support breastfeeding. In stage two, Best Beginnings had used intervention and policy functions to address the barriers and enablers of breastfeeding. In stage three, Baby Buddy had been assessed for acceptability, practicability, effectiveness, affordability, safety, and equity. Several behavior change techniques that could assist women with decision making around breastfeeding (eg, information about health consequences and credible sources) and possibly affect attitudes and self-efficacy were identified. Of the 39 videos in the app, 19 (49%) addressed physical capabilities related to breastfeeding and demonstrated positive breastfeeding behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Applying a theoretical framework retrospectively to a mobile app is possible and results in useful information to understand potential health benefits and to inform future development. Future research should assess which components and behavioral techniques in the app are most effective in changing behavior and supporting breastfeeding.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , Aplicativos Móveis , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Mães , Gravidez , Estudos Retrospectivos , Reino Unido
16.
Midwifery ; 98: 102996, 2021 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33813305

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Substantial public health measures occurred in Australian society during the COVID-19 pandemic to reduce the risk of community transmission. Little was known about the impact of these changes on childbearing women. AIM: To describe childbearing women's experiences of becoming a mother during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. METHODS: A qualitative exploratory design using semi-structured interviews was used. Women were recruited through social media and self-nominated to participate in an interview. Maximum variation sampling was used. A total of 27 interviews were conducted with women across Australia. Data were analysed thematically. FINDINGS: The thematic analysis resulted in four primary themes and ten sub-themes. The themes were 'going it alone - having a baby was an isolating experience' ('receiving maternity care alone', 'dealing with government restrictions', and 'desiring social support'), 'advocating for self or others' ('seeking reliable information', 'valuing peersupport', and 'having to be resourceful'), 'finding a way through' ('a changed experience for all', 'managing stress and anxiety', 'requiring constant adjustments', and 'managing fear mongering'), and 'keeping safe'. CONCLUSION: Becoming a mother during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia was a profound experience for the women. Following the public health initiatives which resulted in physical distancing restrictions, isolation, and the need to provide and receive social and peer support were common experiences. Whilst public health initiatives are implemented to keep people safe, the social and emotional toll on childbearing women should be considered by healthcare professionals. Childbearing women need to be safe but also require support and reassurance.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/psicologia , Mães/psicologia , Gestantes/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico , Adolescente , Adulto , Austrália/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Pandemias , Gravidez , Pesquisa Qualitativa , SARS-CoV-2 , Apoio Social , Adulto Jovem
17.
Women Birth ; 34(3): 203-205, 2021 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33892907
18.
Women Birth ; 2021 Mar 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33752996

RESUMO

PROBLEM: The COVID-19 pandemic has required rapid and radical changes to the way maternity care is provided in many nations across the world. BACKGROUND: Midwives provide care to childbearing women across the continuum and are key members of the maternity workforce in Australia. AIM: To explore and describe midwives' experiences of providing maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. METHODS: A two-phased cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Data were collected through an online survey and semi-structured interviews between May-June 2020. FINDINGS: Six hundred and twenty midwives responded to the online survey. Many reported a move to telehealth appointments. For labour care, 70% of midwives reported women had limited support; 77% indicated postnatal visiting was impacted. Five main themes were derived from the qualitative data including: coping with rapid and radical changes, challenges to woman-centred care, managing professional resilience, addressing personal and professional challenges, and looking ahead. DISCUSSION: Restrictions applied to women's choices, impacted midwives' ability to provide woman-centred care, which resulted in stress and anxiety for midwives. Professional resilience was supported through collaborative relationships and working in continuity models. Midwives revealed 'silver linings' experienced in providing care during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Findings provide valuable evidence to understand the impact on midwives who have provided care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Knowledge will be useful for health leaders and policy makers as they consider ways to continue care during the pandemic and support the essential midwifery workforce. Recommendations are presented to improve preparedness for future pandemics.

19.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248488, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33760851

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The global COVID-19 pandemic has radically changed the way health care is delivered in many countries around the world. Evidence on the experience of those receiving or providing maternity care is important to guide practice through this challenging time. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Australia. Five key stakeholder cohorts were included to explore and compare the experiences of those receiving or providing care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Women, their partners, midwives, medical practitioners and midwifery students who had received or provided maternity care from March 2020 onwards in Australia were recruited via social media and invited to participate in an online survey released between 13th May and 24th June 2020; a total of 3701 completed responses were received. FINDINGS: While anxiety related to COVID-19 was high among all five cohorts, there were statistically significant differences between the responses from each cohort for most survey items. Women were more likely to indicate concern about their own and family's health and safety in relation to COVID-19 whereas midwives, doctors and midwifery students were more likely to be concerned about occupational exposure to COVID-19 through working in a health setting than those receiving care through attending these environments. Midwifery students and women's partners were more likely to respond that they felt isolated because of the changes to the way care was provided. Despite concerns about care received or provided not meeting expectations, most respondents were satisfied with the quality of care provided, although midwives and midwifery students were less likely to agree. CONCLUSION: This paper provides a unique exploration and comparison of experiences of receiving and providing maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. Findings are useful to support further service changes and future service redesign. New evidence provided offers unique insight into key stakeholders' experiences of the rapid changes to health services.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Atenção à Saúde/tendências , Serviços de Saúde Materna/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Atitude Frente a Saúde , Austrália/epidemiologia , COVID-19/complicações , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Atenção à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Tocologia/educação , Pandemias , Gravidez , SARS-CoV-2/metabolismo , SARS-CoV-2/patogenicidade , Inquéritos e Questionários
20.
Reprod Health ; 18(1): 53, 2021 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33648551

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Approximately 2.6 million babies are stillborn each year globally, of which 98% occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). A 2019 individual participant data meta-analysis of 6 studies from high-income countries found that maternal supine going-to-sleep position increased the risk of stillbirth. It is not clear whether this impact would be the same in LMICs, and the normal sleep behaviour of pregnant women in LMICs is not well understood. OBJECTIVE: Determine the prevalence of different sleeping positions among pregnant women in LMICs, and what (if any) positions were associated with stillbirth using a systematic review. SEARCH STRATEGY: We systematically searched the databases Medline, Embase, Emcare, CINAHL and Global Index Medicus for relevant studies, with no date or language restrictions on 4 April 2020. Reference lists of included studies were also screened. SELECTION CRITERIA: Observational studies of maternal sleep position during pregnancy in LMICs DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Recovered citations were screened and eligible studies were included for extraction. These steps were performed by two independent reviewers. Risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. MAIN RESULTS: A total of 3480 citations were screened but only two studies met the inclusion criteria. The studies were conducted in Ghana and India and reported on different maternal sleep positions: supine and left lateral. In Ghana, a prevalence of 9.7% for supine sleeping position amongst 220 women was found. The primary outcome could not be extracted from the Indian study as sleep position information was only reported for women who had a stillbirth (100 of the 300 participants). CONCLUSION: There is limited information on maternal sleeping position in LMICs. Since sleep position may be a modifiable risk factor for stillbirth, there is a need for further research to understand the sleep practices and behaviours of pregnant women in LMICs. PROSPERO registration: CRD42020173314.


Assuntos
Postura/fisiologia , Gravidez/fisiologia , Sono/fisiologia , Países em Desenvolvimento , Feminino , Humanos , Renda/estatística & dados numéricos , Pobreza/estatística & dados numéricos , Resultado da Gravidez/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Natimorto/epidemiologia , Decúbito Dorsal/fisiologia
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