Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 437
Filtrar
1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33537769

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To identify possible differences in baseline characteristics, initial treatment and treatment response between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patient subgroups based on age at disease onset. METHODS: Daily practice data from the worldwide METEOR registry were used. Patients (7,912) were stratified into three age-groups (age at disease diagnosis <45 years; 45-65 years; >65 years). Initial treatment was compared between the different age-groups. With Cox regression analyses the effect of age-group on time-to-switch from first to second treatment was investigated, and with linear mixed models differences in response to treatment (DAS and HAQ) between the age-groups were assessed, after correction for potential confounders. RESULTS: The >65 years age-group included more men, more seronegative RA with somewhat higher inflammatory markers. Initial treatment choices differed only slightly between the age-groups, and the time-to-switch from initial treatment to the next was similar. DAS and HAQ improvement were dependent on the age-group, reflected by a significant interaction between age-group and outcome. The stratified analysis showed a difference of -0.02 and -0.05 DAS points and, -0.01 and 0.02, HAQ points per month in the <45y and 45-65y age-groups as compared to the >65y age group. A difference that did not seem clinically relevant. CONCLUSION: In this international study on worldwide clinical practice, patients with RA onset >65 years include more men and seronegative arthritis, and were initially treated slightly different than younger patients. We observed no clinically relevant differences in timing of a next treatment step, or response to treatment measured by DAS and HAQ.

3.
Clin Rheumatol ; 2021 Jan 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33452937

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients show an earlier circadian rhythm (i.e. serum melatonin peaks earlier during the night, indicating an earlier timing of the internal circadian pacemaker). In the current study, we examined whether the chronotype, which is influenced by the circadian rhythm, is also earlier. In addition, we explored whether chronotype is related to disease activity and patient-reported outcomes. METHODS: The chronotype (Munich Chronotype Questionnaire) of patients with RA (n = 121; mean age 60 years, 73% female) was compared with that of subjects from the general population (norm group; n = 1695) with a one-sample t test. In addition, we investigated chronotype in relation to disease activity (Disease Activity Score; DAS), reported morning stiffness, fatigue (Checklist Individual Strength), and health-related quality of life (RAND-36). RESULTS: The chronotype of patients with RA was, on average, 23 min (95% CI, 15 to 31 min) earlier than that of the norm group (t(115) = - 5.901, p < 0.001, d = 0.55). Chronotype was not related to disease activity or patient-reported outcomes (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: As expected, chronotype was earlier in RA patients. However, in this correlational study, chronotype was not related to disease activity or patient-reported outcomes. An experimental study is needed to examine whether delaying the circadian rhythm has a positive influence on these outcomes. This insight could improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of RA and contribute to exploring new treatment possibilities. Key Points • This is the first study examining chronotype in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and how chronotype relates to disease activity and patient-reported outcomes. • We found an earlier chronotype in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in subjects from the general population. • In this correlational study, chronotype was not related to disease activity or patient-reported outcomes. An experimental study is needed to examine whether delaying the circadian rhythm positively influences these outcomes.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33401302

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: In SSc patients, disease specific determinants that influence health-related quality of life (HRQoL) over time have not been described. We aim to, in patients with SSc, (i) evaluate if and how HRQoL changes over time, and (ii) assess how different SSc domains and functional impairments contribute to changes in HRQoL over time. METHODS: All SSc patients from the Leiden SSc cohort were included; patients with disease duration <24 months were classified as incident cases. HRQoL was assessed prospectively on an annual basis using the EQ-5D and the SF36. To assess baseline associations between clinical characteristics and HRQoL, linear regressions were performed. To identify possible associations between SSc characteristics and HRQoL change over time, linear mixed models were performed in both incident and prevalent cases. RESULTS: In total, 492 SSc patients were included (n = 202 incident cases), with a median follow-up duration of 3.4 years. At baseline, presence of organ involvement was independently associated with a worse SF36 physical component score and lower EQ-5D score. Over time, gastrointestinal symptoms, Raynaud and digital ulcers were independently associated with deterioration of HRQoL in both incident and prevalent cases. In prevalent cases, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was associated with a decrease in HRQoL over time. Worse functioning as measured by six-min walking distance, mouth-opening, finger-to-palm distance and grip-strength contributed significantly to deterioration of HRQoL over time. CONCLUSION: In SSc, key clinical burdens that contribute to worsening of HRQoL over time include digital ulcers, Raynaud and gastrointestinal involvement. In addition, PAH is a significant burden in prevalent disease.

6.
Rheumatol Ther ; 2020 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33263165

RESUMO

Although treatment with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) has significantly improved clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), many patients do not have access to these treatments. As cost-effective alternatives to their reference products (RPs), biosimilars provide an opportunity to increase access to bDMARDs. The European Medicines Agency and the US Food and Drug Administration have detailed pathways for the approval of biosimilars based on establishing the similarity of the biosimilar to the RP in terms of structure and function, pharmacokinetics (PK), efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity. A number of biosimilars of adalimumab, infliximab, etanercept, and rituximab RPs have been approved in the United States and/or European Union. This article is focused on the seven adalimumab biosimilars. A review of the data for the biosimilars FKB327, ABP 501, BI 695501, GP2017, MSB11022, PF-06410293, and SB5 confirm that these products are highly similar to the adalimumab RP with regard to structure, physicochemical and biological properties, PK, safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy in the treatment of RA and other chronic immune-mediated, inflammatory conditions. Data from several switching studies showed no changes in efficacy, safety, trough serum drug concentration, or immunogenicity between the biosimilars and their RP.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT02260791, NCT02405780, NCT01970475, NCT02137226, NCT02045979, NCT02744755, NCT02144714, NCT02167139, NCT03014947, NCT02114931, NCT02640612, NCT02640612, NCT02167139, NCT03052322, NCT02480153. EudraCT numbers: 2012-005140-23, 2012-000785-37, 2013-003722-84, 2015-000579-28, 2014-002879-29, 2014-000662-21, 2013-004654-13, 2015-002634-41, 2014-005229-11, 2016-002852-26, 2014-000352-29.

7.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 2020 Dec 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33314699

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Autoantibodies such as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) have been described to induce bone loss in RA, which could also be reflected in bone mineral density (BMD). We therefore examined the association between autoantibodies and osteoporosis in two independent RA-cohorts. METHODS: Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of lumbar spine (LS) and left hip (LH) was performed in 408 Dutch and 198 Swedish early RA-patients during five and ten years respectively. The longitudinal effect of ACPA and other autoantibodies on several BMD measures was studied using generalized estimating equations. RESULTS: In the Dutch cohort, ACPA-positive patients had a significantly lower baseline BMD compared to ACPA-negative patients (LH: Estimated Marginal Means (Confidence Interval): 0.92 (0.91-0.93) versus 0.95 (0.03-0.97) g/cm2 (p=0.01)). In accordance, significantly lower baseline Z-scores were observed in the ACPA-positive group compared to the ACPA-negative group (LH: 0.18 (0.08-0.29) vs 0.48 (0.33-0.63) (p<0.01)). However, despite clear baseline differences, ACPA-positivity was not associated with greater decrease in absolute BMD or Z-score over time. Furthermore, there was no association between BMD and higher ACPA levels or other autoantibodies (RF and anti-CarP). In the Swedish cohort, ACPA-positive patients tended to have a higher baseline prevalence of osteopenia (p=0.04), but again, ACPA-positivity was not associated with more osteopenia or osteoporosis over time. CONCLUSION: The presence of ACPA is associated with a significantly lower baseline BMD, but not with greater BMD loss over time in treated RA-patients. These results suggest that ACPA alone do not appear to contribute to bone loss after disease onset when disease activity is well managed.

8.
Sci Transl Med ; 12(570)2020 Nov 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33208502

RESUMO

Autoreactive B cells mediate autoimmune pathology, but exactly how remains unknown. A hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a common autoimmune disease, is the presence of disease-specific anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs). Here, we showed that ACPA-positive B cells in patients with RA strongly expressed T cell-stimulating ligands, produced abundant proinflammatory cytokines, and were proliferative while escaping inhibitory signals. This activated state was found at different degrees in different stages of disease: highest in patients with recent-onset RA, moderate in patients with established RA, and far less pronounced in ACPA-positive individuals "at risk" for developing disease. The activated autoreactive B cell response persisted in patients who achieved clinical remission with conventional treatment. ACPA-positive B cells in blood and synovial fluid secreted increased amounts of the chemoattractant interleukin-8, which attracted neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell in arthritic joints. Tetanus toxoid-specific B cells from the same patients exhibited properties of memory B cells without the activation and proliferation phenotype, but these cells transiently acquired a similar proliferative phenotype upon booster vaccination. Together, these data indicated that continuous antigenic triggering of autoreactive B cells occurs in human autoimmune disease and support the emerging concept of immunological activity that persists under treatment even in clinical remission, which may revise our current concept of treatment targets for future therapeutic interventions. In addition, our data pointed to a pathogenic role of ACPA-positive B cells in the inflammatory disease process underlying RA and favor approaches that aim at their antigen-specific inactivation or depletion.

9.
JMIR Med Inform ; 8(11): e23930, 2020 Nov 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33252349

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Financial codes are often used to extract diagnoses from electronic health records. This approach is prone to false positives. Alternatively, queries are constructed, but these are highly center and language specific. A tantalizing alternative is the automatic identification of patients by employing machine learning on format-free text entries. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to develop an easily implementable workflow that builds a machine learning algorithm capable of accurately identifying patients with rheumatoid arthritis from format-free text fields in electronic health records. METHODS: Two electronic health record data sets were employed: Leiden (n=3000) and Erlangen (n=4771). Using a portion of the Leiden data (n=2000), we compared 6 different machine learning methods and a naïve word-matching algorithm using 10-fold cross-validation. Performances were compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) and the area under the precision recall curve (AUPRC), and F1 score was used as the primary criterion for selecting the best method to build a classifying algorithm. We selected the optimal threshold of positive predictive value for case identification based on the output of the best method in the training data. This validation workflow was subsequently applied to a portion of the Erlangen data (n=4293). For testing, the best performing methods were applied to remaining data (Leiden n=1000; Erlangen n=478) for an unbiased evaluation. RESULTS: For the Leiden data set, the word-matching algorithm demonstrated mixed performance (AUROC 0.90; AUPRC 0.33; F1 score 0.55), and 4 methods significantly outperformed word-matching, with support vector machines performing best (AUROC 0.98; AUPRC 0.88; F1 score 0.83). Applying this support vector machine classifier to the test data resulted in a similarly high performance (F1 score 0.81; positive predictive value [PPV] 0.94), and with this method, we could identify 2873 patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 7 seconds out of the complete collection of 23,300 patients in the Leiden electronic health record system. For the Erlangen data set, gradient boosting performed best (AUROC 0.94; AUPRC 0.85; F1 score 0.82) in the training set, and applied to the test data, resulted once again in good results (F1 score 0.67; PPV 0.97). CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that machine learning methods can extract the records of patients with rheumatoid arthritis from electronic health record data with high precision, allowing research on very large populations for limited costs. Our approach is language and center independent and could be applied to any type of diagnosis. We have developed our pipeline into a universally applicable and easy-to-implement workflow to equip centers with their own high-performing algorithm. This allows the creation of observational studies of unprecedented size covering different countries for low cost from already available data in electronic health record systems.

10.
Lupus ; 29(14): 1892-1901, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33079617

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate all-cause and cause-specific mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric (NP) symptoms in the Netherlands between 2007-2018. METHODS: Patients visiting the tertiary referral NPSLE clinic of the Leiden University Medical Center were included. NP symptoms were attributed to SLE requiring treatment (major NPSLE) or to other and mild causes (minor/non-NPSLE). Municipal registries were checked for current status (alive/deceased). Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using data from the Dutch population. Rate ratio (RR) and 95% CI were calculated using direct standardization to compare mortality between major NPSLE and minor/non-NPSLE. RESULTS: 351 patients were included and 149 patients were classified as major NPSLE (42.5%). Compared with the general population, mortality was increased in major NPSLE (SMR 5.0 (95% CI: 2.6-8.5)) and minor/non-NPSLE patients (SMR 3.7 (95% CI: 2.2-6.0)). Compared with minor/non-NPSLE, mortality was similar in major NPSLE patients (RR: 1.0 (95% CI: 0.5-2.0)). Cause-specific mortality rates demonstrated an increased risk of death due to infections in both groups, whereas death due to cardiovascular disease was only increased in minor/non-NPSLE patients. CONCLUSION: Mortality was increased in both major NPSLE and minor/non-NPSLE patients in comparison with the general population. There was no difference in mortality between major NPSLE and minor/non-NPSLE patients.

11.
J Immunol ; 205(10): 2840-2849, 2020 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33008950

RESUMO

Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their metabolites are potent regulators of inflammation. Generally, omega (n)-3 PUFAs are considered proresolving whereas n-6 PUFAs are classified as proinflammatory. In this study, we characterized the inflammatory response in murine peritonitis and unexpectedly found the accumulation of adrenic acid (AdA), a poorly studied n-6 PUFA. Functional studies revealed that AdA potently inhibited the formation of the chemoattractant leukotriene B4 (LTB4), specifically in human neutrophils, and this correlated with a reduction of its precursor arachidonic acid (AA) in free form. AdA exposure in human monocyte-derived macrophages enhanced efferocytosis of apoptotic human neutrophils. In vivo, AdA treatment significantly alleviated arthritis in an LTB4-dependent murine arthritis model. Our findings are, to our knowledge, the first to indicate that the n-6 fatty acid AdA effectively blocks production of LTB4 by neutrophils and could play a role in resolution of inflammation in vivo.

12.
Lancet Rheumatol ; 2(11): e652-e653, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32864629
13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32961038

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and cyclophosphamide (CYC) are treatment options for progressive interstitial lung disease associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc-ILD). The aims of our retrospective observational study were to evaluate: 1) the evolution of SSc-ILD assessed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in SSc patients treated with HSCT. A group of patients treated with CYC was included as frame of reference; 2) how pulmonary function tests (PFTs) associate with HRCT findings; 3) which factors predict ILD reduction. METHODS: We semi-quantitatively scored total ILD extent, reticulations and ground glass opacities (GGO) on baseline and 1-year HRCTs of SSc patients treated with HSCT or CYC. Linear association between HRCT and PFT changes, and predictors of ILD improvement, were studied. RESULTS: We included 51 patients (HSCT n=20; CYC n=31). Mean change in total ILD score was -5.1% (95%CI -10.2 to 0.0) in HSCT (p=0.050), and -1.0% (95%CI -4.3 to 2.3) in CYC group (p=0.535). For all patients, evolution of HRCT scores was weakly associated with relative changes in PFTs. In univariate logistic regression, higher GGO and total ILD scores, and lower diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide at baseline (DLCO), predicted improvement of ILD extent after treatment, but a multivariable model could not be built to assess independency of predictors. CONCLUSION: One year after treatment with HSCT, a non-significant, but clear, reduction of SSc-ILD extent was observed. Changes in PFTs were associated with changes in HRCT scores but the correlation was weak and cannot be considered conclusive.

14.
PLoS Med ; 17(9): e1003296, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32960885

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Based on different genetic and environmental risk factors and histology, it has been proposed that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) consists of 2 types: autoantibody-positive and autoantibody-negative RA. However, until now, this remained hypothetical. To assess this hypothesis, we studied whether the long-term outcomes differed for these 2 groups of RA patients. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic cohort, 1,285 consecutive RA patients were included between 1993 and 2016 and followed yearly. Treatment protocols in routine care improved over time, irrespective of autoantibody status, and 5 inclusion periods were used as instrumental variables: 1993-1996, delayed mild disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) initiation (reference period); 1997-2000, early mild DMARDs; 2001-2005, early methotrexate; 2006-2010, early methotrexate followed by treat-to-target adjustments; 2011-2016, similar to 2006-2010 plus additional efforts for very early referral. Three long-term outcomes were studied: sustained DMARD-free remission (SDFR) (persistent absence of clinical synovitis after DMARD cessation), mortality, and functional disability measured by yearly Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ). Treatment response in the short term (disease activity) was measured by Disease Activity Score-28 with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR). Linear mixed models and Cox regression were used, stratified for autoantibody positivity, defined as IgG anti-CCP2 and/or IgM rheumatoid factor positivity. In total, 823 patients had autoantibody-positive RA (mean age 55 years, 67% female); 462 patients had autoantibody-negative RA (age 60 years, 64% female). Age, gender, and percentage of autoantibody-positive patients were stable throughout the inclusion periods. Disease activity significantly decreased over time within both groups. SDFR rates increased after introduction of treat-to-target (hazard ratio [HR] 2006-2010 relative to 1993-1996: 3.35 [95% CI 1.46 to 7.72; p = 0.004]; HR 2011-2016: 4.57 [95% CI 1.80 to 11.6; p = 0.001]) in autoantibody-positive RA, but not in autoantibody-negative RA. In autoantibody-positive RA, mortality decreased significantly after the introduction of treat-to-target treatment adjustments (HR 2006-2010: 0.56 [95% CI 0.34 to 0.92; p = 0.023]; HR 2011-2016: 0.33 [95% CI 0.14 to 0.77; p = 0.010]), but not in autoantibody-negative RA (HR 2006-2010: 0.79 [95% CI 0.40 to 1.56; p = 0.50]; HR 2011-2016: 0.36 [95% CI 0.10 to 1.34; p = 0.13]). Similarly, functional disability improved in autoantibody-positive RA for the periods after 2000 relative to 1993-1996 (range -0.16 [95% CI -0.29 to -0.03; p = 0.043] to -0.32 [95% CI -0.44 to -0.20; p < 0.001] units of improvement), but not in autoantibody-negative RA (range 0.10 [95% CI -0.12 to 0.31; p = 0.38] to -0.13 [95% CI -0.34 to 0.07; p = 0.20] units of improvement). Limitations to note were that treatment was not randomized-but it was protocolized and instrumental variable analysis was used to obtain comparable groups-and that a limited spread of ethnicities was included. CONCLUSIONS: Although disease activity has improved in both autoantibody-positive and autoantibody-negative RA in recent decades, the response in long-term outcomes differed. We propose that it is time to subdivide RA into autoantibody-positive RA (type 1) and autoantibody-negative RA (type 2), in the hope that this leads to stratified treatment in RA.


Assuntos
Artrite Reumatoide/tratamento farmacológico , Artrite Reumatoide/epidemiologia , Artrite Reumatoide/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Antirreumáticos/efeitos adversos , Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Autoanticorpos/genética , Autoanticorpos/imunologia , Biomarcadores Farmacológicos/sangue , Estudos de Coortes , Progressão da Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Metotrexato/efeitos adversos , Metotrexato/uso terapêutico , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Países Baixos/epidemiologia , Índice de Gravidade de Doença
15.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 72(11): 1897-1904, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32840062

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Anti-topoisomerase I (anti-topo I) autoantibodies in systemic sclerosis (SSc) are associated with diffuse skin involvement and interstitial lung fibrosis. Thus far, however, the relationship between anti-topo I antibody response and disease course has not yet been fully evaluated. This study was undertaken to gain insight into the association between characteristics of the anti-topo I antibody response and clinical disease course in SSc patients positive for anti-topo I antibodies. METHODS: Levels of anti-topo I IgG, anti-topo I IgM, and anti-topo I IgA were assessed in consecutive serum samples obtained from patients at baseline who were positive for anti-topo I IgG in the Leiden Combined Care In Systemic Sclerosis (CCISS) cohort. One-year disease progression was defined by a relevant increase in modified Rodnan skin thickness score (MRSS), decline in pulmonary function, development of digital ulcers, renal crisis, and pulmonary hypertension, and/or mortality. Validation was performed in SSc patients who were positive for anti-topo I from the Oslo University Hospital and University Hospital Zurich. RESULTS: Of the 103 patients with anti-topo I IgG in the CCISS cohort, clinical data were available to assess 1-year disease progression in 81 patients. Of these 81 patients, 23 (28%) had disease progression. At baseline, patients with disease progression were significantly more often anti-topo I IgM-positive than those who did not experience disease progression (21 [91%] of 23 versus 33 [57%] of 58; P < 0.01). This finding was confirmed in the independent validation samples. CONCLUSION: In SSc patients who were anti-topo I IgG-positive, presence of anti-topo I IgM, which might be considered as a surrogate for an ongoing autoreactive B cell immune response, is associated with disease progression.

16.
RMD Open ; 6(2)2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32506054

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To study whether there is an association between body mass index (BMI) category and survival of various tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in a real-life longitudinal international registry. METHODS: Data from 5230 patients with RA starting treatment with any TNFi were selected from the METEOR registry. Patients were divided into six BMI categories: 3.7% underweight, BMI<18.5 kg/m2; 46% normal weight, BMI 18.5-25 kg/m2; 32% pre-obesity, BMI 25-30 kg/m2; 13% obesity class I, BMI 30-35 kg/m2; 3.4% obesity class II, BMI 35-40 kg/m2; and 1.6% obesity class III, BMI >40 kg/m2. Time on treatment in the different BMI categories was compared for all TNFi combined and for the infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept separately, using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression analyses. Cox regression analyses were adjusted for potential confounders, with follow-up censored at 5000 days. RESULTS: Patients in obesity class II (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.54) and III (HR 1.67, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.18) and underweight patients (HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.58) showed statistically significantly shorter TNFi survival than normal weight patients. The effect in underweight patients was strongest for infliximab (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.20 to 2.76), the effect in overweight patients was strongest for infliximab (category II (HR 1.49, 95% CI 0.98 to 2.26); category III (HR 1.46, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.71)) and etanercept (category II (HR 1.27 95% CI 0.98 to 1.65); category III (HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.25 to 2.55)). No significant effect modification from reported pain was found. CONCLUSION: Both underweight and overweight patients discontinued TNFi treatment earlier than normal weight patients, without evidence of reported pain as the main determinant. It remains uncertain what determines TNFi survival in individual patients.

17.
J Rheumatol ; 2020 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32482649

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Autoreactive antibody responses, including the use of several isotypes of autoantibodies, have been shown to associate with clinical outcome in several rheumatic autoimmune diseases. The goal of this study was 1) to evaluate whether anti-centromere antibody(ACA) and anti-topoisomerase antibody(ATA) specific isotype expression and 2) organ involvement associate with the degree of microangiopathy in SSc. METHODS: ACA and ATA IgG, IgM and IgA levels were measured in baseline serum samples of ACA IgG+ and ATA IgG+ SSc patients. The degree of microangiopathy was determined based on nailfold videocapillaroscopy images at the same time point. Logistic regression analyses with autoantibodies, clinical characteristics, isotype expression and ACA resp. ATA IgG, IgM and IgA levels as independent and NVC pattern as dependent variable were performed. RESULTS: In 164 patients isotype levels and degree of microangiopathy were evaluated. Logistic regression confirmed the association of the degree of microangiopathy with the presence of digital ulcers(OR 3.1 (1.4-6.6)), interstitial lung disease(OR 3.2 (1.1-9.7)) and pulmonary arterial hypertension(OR 5.25 (1.69-16.36)). ATA positivity was associated with more severe microangiopathy(OR 2.09 (1.05-4.13)). Patients that solely expressed ACA IgG showed a trend towards less severe microangiopathy compared to patients expressing also ACA IgM and/or IgA, levels of ACA IgG and ATA IgM associated with microangiopathy severity. CONCLUSION: We observed an association between ACA and ATA responses and the degree of microangiopathy in SSc. These findings might indicate that the breath of the autoimmune response as reflected by autoantibody production and microvascular damage interact in the pathophysiology of SSc.

18.
Sci Transl Med ; 12(545)2020 May 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32461333

RESUMO

It is challenging to quickly diagnose slowly progressing diseases. To prioritize multiple related diagnoses, we developed G-PROB (Genetic Probability tool) to calculate the probability of different diseases for a patient using genetic risk scores. We tested G-PROB for inflammatory arthritis-causing diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, spondyloarthropathy, psoriatic arthritis, and gout). After validating on simulated data, we tested G-PROB in three cohorts: 1211 patients identified by International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes within the eMERGE database, 245 patients identified through ICD codes and medical record review within the Partners Biobank, and 243 patients first presenting with unexplained inflammatory arthritis and with final diagnoses by record review within the Partners Biobank. Calibration of G-probabilities with disease status was high, with regression coefficients from 0.90 to 1.08 (1.00 is ideal). G-probabilities discriminated true diagnoses across the three cohorts with pooled areas under the curve (95% CI) of 0.69 (0.67 to 0.71), 0.81 (0.76 to 0.84), and 0.84 (0.81 to 0.86), respectively. For all patients, at least one disease could be ruled out, and in 45% of patients, a likely diagnosis was identified with a 64% positive predictive value. In 35% of cases, the clinician's initial diagnosis was incorrect. Initial clinical diagnosis explained 39% of the variance in final disease, which improved to 51% (P < 0.0001) after adding G-probabilities. Converting genotype information before a clinical visit into an interpretable probability value for five different inflammatory arthritides could potentially be used to improve the diagnostic efficiency of rheumatic diseases in clinical practice.

19.
RMD Open ; 6(1)2020 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32471854

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The window of opportunity (WOO) hypothesis suggests a limited time frame to stop rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We hypothesised that a WOO could either be represented by a hyperbolic ('curved') decline in the chance to achieve the outcome sustained drug-free remission (sDFR) over time, after which achieving sDFR is not possible anymore, or by a more gradual linear decline approaching zero chance to achieve sDFR. METHODS: Patients with RA (symptom duration <2 years) were included from two randomised trials: BehandelStrategieën (BeSt), n=508 and Induction therapy with Methotrexate and Prednisone in Rheumatoid Or Very Early arthritic Disease (IMPROVED), n=479. Cox-regression was performed to assess the shape of the association between symptom duration and sDFR (Disease Activity Score<1.6, no disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs for ≥1 year) for patients starting slow-acting monotherapy (IMPROVED, BeSt) or fast-acting combination therapy (BeSt). Likelihood ratio tests were used to compare the fit of linear and non-linear models in both databases separately. Predictions from the best fitting models were used to assess whether the absolute risk to achieve sDFR approaches zero with increasing symptom duration. RESULTS: In BeSt and IMPROVED, 54/226 and 110/421 patients achieved sDFR with fast-acting treatment, and 53/243 (BeSt) with slow-acting treatment. Non-linear models did not fit better than linear models (fast-acting treatment BeSt p=0.743, IMPROVED p=0.337; slow-acting treatment BeSt p=0.609). After slow-acting monotherapy, linear models declined steeper. None of the models approached zero chance to achieve sDFR over time. CONCLUSIONS: The chance to achieve sDFR decreased gradually over time, and decreased fastest in patients starting slow-acting monotherapy. In both treatment groups, we found no evidence for a WOO within 2 years symptom duration.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA