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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34444065

RESUMO

University students have high rates of health risk behaviours, and these may be predictive of academic success. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the association between individual and multiple health risk behaviours and academic achievement in a sample of Australian university students. Data from the University of Newcastle Student Healthy Lifestyle Survey 2019 were used. Health risk behaviours (diet, physical activity, sitting time, sleep, alcohol consumption, smoking) were assessed, and total number of risk factors calculated. Academic achievement was assessed using self-reported grade point average (GPA). The association between health risk behaviours and GPA was explored using linear regression, adjusted for socio-demographic and student characteristics. The sample included 1543 students (mean age 25.0 ± 7.9 years, 70.6% female). Lower GPA was associated with not meeting fruit consumption recommendations (ß = -0.203), consuming >1 cup of soft drink/week (ß = -0.307), having takeaway foods ≥1 time/week (ß = -0.130), not consuming breakfast daily (ß = -0.261), not meeting sleep recommendations (ß = -0.163), exceeding single occasion alcohol consumption risk (ß = -0.277), smoking (ß = -0.393), and having a higher number of risk factors (ß = -0.105). This study identified modest associations between GPA and health risk behaviours, suggesting that further research is warranted into whether strategies to improve university students' health could modestly improve their academic achievement.


Assuntos
Sucesso Acadêmico , Adolescente , Adulto , Austrália/epidemiologia , Desjejum , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Comportamentos de Risco à Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Estudantes , Universidades , Adulto Jovem
2.
Obes Rev ; 22(10): e13295, 2021 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34159684

RESUMO

A vast body of evidence regarding eHealth interventions for nutrition, physical activity, sedentary behavior, and obesity exists. This scoping review of systematic reviews aimed to evaluate the current level of evidence in this growing field. Seven electronic databases were searched for systematic reviews published until October 27, 2019. The systematic reviews must have included adult participants only and have evaluated eHealth behavioral interventions with the primary aim of changing nutrition, physical activity, and sedentary behavior or treating or preventing overweight and obesity. One hundred and six systematic reviews, published from 2006 to 2019, were included. Almost all (n = 98) reviews evaluated the efficacy of interventions. Over half (n = 61) included interventions focused on physical activity, followed by treatment of obesity (n = 28), nutrition (n = 22), prevention of obesity (n = 18), and sedentary behavior (n = 6). Many reviews (n = 46) evaluated one type of eHealth intervention only, while 60 included two or more types. Most reviews (n = 67) were rated as being of critically low methodological quality. This scoping review identified an increasing volume of systematic reviews evaluating eHealth interventions. It highlights several evidence gaps (e.g., evaluation of other outcomes, such as reach, engagement, or cost effectiveness), guiding future research efforts in this area.

3.
Nutr Diet ; 2021 Jun 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34169615

RESUMO

AIM: The aim of this study was to compare food and nutrient intakes of young Australian adults (18-24 years) to national recommendations as per the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating and Nutrient Reference Values. METHODS: Dietary intake of 18 to 24 year olds (n = 1005) participating in the Advice, Ideas, and Motivation for My Eating (Aim4Me) study was self-reported using the 120-item Australian Eating Survey Food Frequency Questionnaire. Median daily servings of Australian Guide to Healthy Eating food groups, macronutrients and micronutrients were compared to recommendations in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating and Nutrient Reference Values using t-tests or Kruskal-Wallis tests (P < .05). RESULTS: None of the young adults met all Australian Guide to Healthy Eating recommendations. The highest adherence [% meeting recommendations, median (IQR)] was for meat/alternatives [38%, 2.1(1.8)] and fruit [32%, 1.5(1.6)], with <25% meeting remaining food-group recommendations. The majority (76%) exceeded recommendations for the consumption of discretionary foods [4.0(3.3) vs 0-3 serves] and 81% had excessive saturated fat intakes. Young adults who met all key Nutrient Reference Values (dietary fibre, folate, iodine, iron, calcium and zinc) (18%) consumed a higher number of serves of all food groups, including discretionary foods. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary intakes of contemporary young adults do not align with Australian Guide to Healthy Eating targets, while meeting Nutrient Reference Values is achieved by a higher consumption of all food groups, including discretionary foods. Strategies to increase consumption of nutrient-dense foods in young adults to achieve the Nutrient Reference Values are warranted.

4.
Nutrients ; 13(4)2021 Mar 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33805030

RESUMO

University food environments are typically dominated by unhealthy food choices. The aim was to investigate associations between on-campus food purchasing behaviours and dietary intake in an Australian university student sample. An online cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2017-2018 with students (n = 362, 71.0% female, mean age 27.5 ± 10.5 years) from the University of Newcastle, Australia. On-campus food purchasing behaviours (purchasing frequency and weekly expenditure), dietary intake (diet quality and percentage energy/day from energy-dense, nutrient-poor (EDNP) foods) and sociodemographic and student characteristics (e.g., time spent on campus) were measured. Linear regression was used to explore associations between food purchasing behaviours and dietary intake, adjusted for potential confounders. Mean percentage energy/day from EDNP foods was 31.7 ± 14.4. Mean diet quality score was 32.6 ± 10.2 out of 73. Higher percentage energy/day from EDNP foods was associated with higher weekly expenditure (ß = 0.203, p < 0.001) and more frequent purchase (ß = 18.041, p < 0.001 for ≥4 times a week vs. never) of food/drinks on campus. Diet quality was not significantly associated with purchase frequency or expenditure (p > 0.05). Findings are supportive of changes being made to university food environments, as a strategy to improve dietary intake among university students.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Consumidor/estatística & dados numéricos , Dieta/métodos , Ingestão de Energia , Alimentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Valor Nutritivo , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Austrália , Comércio , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Universidades
5.
J Sports Sci ; 39(15): 1754-1771, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33685357

RESUMO

Physical activity (PA) participation declines from adolescence to young adulthood. This review evaluates the effectiveness of interventions aiming to improve PA among healthy young adults (17-35 years), and the effectiveness of the behaviour change techniques (BCTs) used. Six electronic databases were searched up to December 2019, for randomized controlled trials aiming to achieve PA behaviour change among young adults. In total, 66 RCTs were included. Meta-analyses for moderate-vigorous PA (n = 11 studies), steps (n = 5 studies) and total PA (MET min/week, n = 11 studies) identified that intervention participants compared with control significantly increased PA at time points up to 3 months and >3 months. Narrative synthesis identified that 34 RCTs (52%) reported significant between group differences favouring the intervention for one or more PA outcome. BCTs with the highest effectiveness were material reward, valued self-identity and habit formation. However, the overall test of significance demonstrated no significant relationship between type or number of BCTs and effectiveness. This review identified interventions that improve steps, moderate-vigorous and total PA in young adults in the shorter-term, and BCTs associated with greater effectiveness. Further research is needed to determine strategies to achieve longer-term effectiveness of PA interventions in young adults.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico/psicologia , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Promoção da Saúde/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Metabolismo Energético , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Objetivos , Humanos , Entrevista Motivacional , Recompensa , Autoimagem , Adulto Jovem
6.
Public Health Nutr ; : 1-18, 2021 Mar 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33722332

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe strategies used to recruit and retain young adults in nutrition, physical activity and/or obesity intervention studies, and quantify the success and efficiency of these strategies. DESIGN: A systematic review was conducted. The search included six electronic databases to identify randomised controlled trials (RCT) published up to 6 December 2019 that evaluated nutrition, physical activity and/or obesity interventions in young adults (17-35 years). Recruitment was considered successful if the pre-determined sample size goal was met. Retention was considered acceptable if ≥80 % retained for ≤6-month follow-up or ≥70 % for >6-month follow-up. RESULTS: From 21 582 manuscripts identified, 107 RCT were included. Universities were the most common recruitment setting used in eighty-four studies (79 %). Less than half (46 %) of the studies provided sufficient information to evaluate whether individual recruitment strategies met sample size goals, with 77 % successfully achieving recruitment targets. Reporting for retention was slightly better with 69 % of studies providing sufficient information to determine whether individual retention strategies achieved adequate retention rates. Of these, 65 % had adequate retention. CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights poor reporting of recruitment and retention information across trials. Findings may not be applicable outside a university setting. Guidance on how to improve reporting practices to optimise recruitment and retention strategies within young adults could assist researchers in improving outcomes.

7.
J Hum Nutr Diet ; 2021 Mar 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33650747

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Disordered eating habits, poor dietary intake and nutritional status, and altered body composition are highly prevalent among individuals with substance use disorders. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of dietary interventions in adults with substance use disorders for illicit substances or illicit use of pharmaceutical substances. METHODS: Eight scientific databases were searched using predetermined text word and subject heading (MeSH) searches for experimental studies published up to March 2020 that evaluated interventions aiming to improve dietary intake in adults with substance use disorders for illicit substances or illicit use of pharmaceutical substances, which included dietary intake outcomes. RESULTS: Of 9299 articles identified, five studies were included. Three studies (60%) were conducted in outpatient/community clinic settings and two studies (40%) were conducted in inpatient/residential treatment centres. Dietary interventions ranged in duration from 5 weeks to 24 months. These included education and behaviour change advice for nutrition and other lifestyle behaviours (n = 3 studies), nutrition education and provision of healthy food choices within the residential treatment centre (n = 1 study), and polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation (n = 1 study). Three studies (60%) reported small but significant change in one or more dietary outcome at post-intervention, including reductions in sweets, fast food or caffeine intake, as well as increases in fruit and vegetable intake. CONCLUSIONS: This review has identified a small number of studies, despite the strong evidence that dietary intervention is needed in substance use rehabilitation. More research is needed to determine the most effective intervention approaches for this group, including robust study designs.

8.
Nutrients ; 13(2)2021 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33525585

RESUMO

University students have high rates of health risk behaviors and psychological distress. This study explores patterns of health behaviors among a sample of Australian university students, and determines whether patterns of health behaviors are associated with psychological distress and demographic characteristics. Cross-sectional data from the University of Newcastle Student Healthy Lifestyle Survey 2019 were analyzed. Fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, physical activity, sitting time, smoking, alcohol intake, drug use, sleep and psychological distress were assessed. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify patterns of health risk behaviors, and latent class regression to explore associations between psychological distress and demographic characteristics with health behavior classes. Analysis included 1965 students (mean age 25.8 ± 8.6 years, 70.7% female). Three patterns of health behaviors were identified: healthier (48.6%), moderate (40.2%) and unhealthy (11.2%) lifestyle classes. Students in the moderate and unhealthy lifestyle classes had higher odds of moderate (OR 1.43 and 2.37) and high/very high psychological distress risk (OR 2.71 and 11.69). Students in the unhealthy and moderate lifestyle classes had a higher odds of being male, younger, enrolled in transition to university and English language courses, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent and to report some financial difficulty. Study findings may be used to inform the design of mental health interventions for university students that target key health risk behaviors.


Assuntos
Comportamentos de Risco à Saúde , Análise de Classes Latentes , Angústia Psicológica , Estudantes/psicologia , Universidades , Adolescente , Adulto , Austrália , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Probabilidade , Fatores de Risco , Adulto Jovem
9.
Nutr Rev ; 2020 Nov 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33249446

RESUMO

CONTEXT: Frequent consumption of home-prepared meals is associated with higher diet quality in children and adults. Therefore, increasing the culinary skills of women and couples during their childbearing years may be an effective strategy for the prevention of overweight and obesity. OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of culinary nutrition-education interventions for women with or without their partners during preconception, pregnancy, or postpartum (PPP) on parental cooking skills, nutrition knowledge, parent/child diet quality, or health outcomes. DATA SOURCES: Eligibility criteria were defined using a PICOS framework. A systematic search strategy was developed to identify eligible studies and was implemented in 11 electronic databases. Reference lists of selected systematic reviews were manually searched for additional studies. DATA EXTRACTION: Study characteristics and outcomes were extracted from eligible studies by 1 reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. DATA ANALYSIS: A narrative synthesis of the findings of eligible studies was prepared including descriptive statistics. Reporting was guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement and Synthesis Without Meta-Analysis in systematic reviews reporting guideline. RESULTS: A total of 6951 articles were identified from the search strategy and 31 studies during pregnancy or postpartum were included. By category, the number of studies with a favorable outcome per total number of studies measuring outcome were as follows: parental food/cooking skills (n = 5 of 5), nutrition knowledge (n = 6 of 11), parent/child diet quality (n = 10 of 19), infant feeding (n = 6 of 11), eating behavior (n = 2 of 5), maternal (n = 2 of 5) and child anthropometry (n = 6 of 10), mental health and development n = (2 of 3), and clinical indictors (n = 1 of 1). CONCLUSIONS: Culinary nutrition-education interventions during pregnancy and the postpartum period show promise in improving cooking skills, diet quality, and a variety of health-related outcomes. The precise effect of these interventions during PPP is limited by the quality and heterogeneity of study designs to date. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO registration number: CRD42020154966.

10.
Nutr J ; 19(1): 78, 2020 07 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32731865

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Young adulthood has become synonymous with the development of poor lifestyle behaviours associated with an increased risk of preventable chronic disease in later years. Interventions aiming to improve health behaviours may be more engaging and effective if they are targeted to males or females than interventions with a gender-neutral approach. This review will examine the outcome effectiveness of gender-targeted and gender-neutral interventions targeting nutrition, physical activity or overweight/obesity in young adults (17-35 years). METHODS: Six electronic databases were searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published up to December 2019 that evaluated nutrition, physical activity and/or overweight/obesity interventions in young adults (17-35 years). An effective intervention was one where the change in one or more primary outcome was positive and statistically significantly different from baseline, compared with control, or if no control comparator, compared with another active intervention. Effectiveness of outcomes was compared between gender-targeted and gender-neutral studies. RESULTS: In total 21,582 manuscripts were identified and 107 RCTs were included; 30 gender-targeted studies (28%) and 77 gender-neutral (72%). Most gender-targeted studies were female targeted (n = 22, 73%). Primary outcome/s were adiposity (n = 36, 34%), nutrition (n = 29, 27%), physical activity (n = 28, 26%), or a combination of (n = 14, 14%). A greater proportion of gender-targeted than gender-neutral studies were effective in improving nutrition (n = 6, 100% and n = 17, 74% of studies respectively) and physical activity outcomes (n = 6, 86% and n = 14, 67% respectively), where as a greater proportion of gender-neutral studies were effective in improving adiposity outcomes (n = 13, 59% and n = 5, 36% respectively). None of these differences were statistically significant. Meta-analyses for weight found no significant differences between gender-targeted and gender-neutral studies for weight loss or weight gain prevention studies. Meta-analysis for fruit and vegetable intake demonstrated a significantly greater increase in intervention participants in gender-targeted studies of +158 g/day for > 3 months. CONCLUSIONS: Although differences in outcome effectiveness were identified between gender-targeted and gender-neutral studies, these were not significantly different. This is likely due to an insufficient number of studies to detect a difference. The meta-analysis for fruit and vegetable intake findings should be interpreted with caution due to including only two gender-targeted studies. The findings collectively are suggestive of a potential difference requiring further investigation. To truly determine the effectiveness of gender-targeted interventions, well-designed RCTs comparing gender-targeted interventions with gender-neutral and control are needed. REGISTRATION: This systematic review is a secondary analysis of studies included in a systematic review examining the effectiveness of interventions targeting nutrition, physical activity, or overweight/obesity in young adults, for which a predefined protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42017075795).

11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32785044

RESUMO

This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) aimed to determine the acceptability and preliminary efficacy of a web-based cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention intervention for women following preeclampsia. Australian women with a recent history (≤4 years post diagnosis) of preeclampsia were randomized into two study arms: (1) Be Healthe for your Heart, a web-based behavioral intervention or; (2) Control, access to the National Heart Foundation website. Assessments were conducted at baseline, and after three months. Intervention acceptability and impact on absolute CVD 30-year risk score, CVD risk markers and health behaviors were assessed. Twenty-four of 31 (77.4%) women completed the three-month assessment. Eleven out of 13 intervention participants (84.6%) agreed/strongly agreed they were satisfied with the program, with a mean score of 4.2 ± 0.9 (maximum of five). There were no significant between or within group differences in absolute CVD risk, CVD risk markers or health behaviors from baseline to three months. Women with a history of preeclampsia were successfully recruited and retained and they reported high levels of acceptability with the Be Healthe for your Heart program. Further research is therefore needed from powered trials to determine the impact of web-based lifestyle interventions on CVD risk in this at-risk group.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares , Pré-Eclâmpsia , Nascimento Prematuro , Adulto , Austrália , Doenças Cardiovasculares/prevenção & controle , Feminino , Humanos , Internet , Projetos Piloto , Pré-Eclâmpsia/prevenção & controle , Gravidez , Qualidade de Vida
14.
Nutrients ; 12(3)2020 Mar 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32213973

RESUMO

University food environments typically offer an abundance of unhealthy foods, including through vending machines. This review evaluated the effectiveness of nutrition interventions in vending machines in the university setting. Ten databases were searched for experimental studies published up to July 2019, evaluating nutrition interventions that aimed to encourage the purchase or consumption of healthier foods and drinks in vending machines in the university setting. In total, 401 articles were identified, and 13 studies were included. Studies were pre-post test (n = 7, 54%), randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (n = 5, 38%), and non-randomized controlled trial (n = 1, 8%). Most studies were from the USA (n = 10, 77%) and were published between 2014 and 2018 (n = 9, 69%). Eight interventions (62%) reported positive change in outcomes, including increased number/proportion of sales or revenue from healthier items (n = 6), improved adherence to guidelines for the ratio of healthy/unhealthy products available (n = 1), and improved consumer perception of items available (n = 1). Effective interventions involved the promotion, reduced pricing, increased availability, and/or optimized product placement of healthier items within vending machines. Strategies to improve the nutritional quality of food and drinks in vending machines are warranted. This may be achieved by making healthier options more available and promoting them; however, more robust intervention studies are needed to determine effectiveness.


Assuntos
Bebidas , Dieta Saudável , Distribuidores Automáticos de Alimentos , Alimentos Especializados , Promoção da Saúde , Estado Nutricional , Universidades , Comportamento do Consumidor , Avaliação do Impacto na Saúde , Estilo de Vida Saudável , Humanos , Valor Nutritivo , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde
15.
Obes Rev ; 21(6): e13009, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32064761

RESUMO

Young adulthood is associated with the highest rate of weight gain compared with any other adult age group. This review evaluates the effectiveness of interventions with adiposity outcomes among young adults and identifies which behaviour change techniques (BCTs) are most effective. BCT utilization was assessed using Michie's 93-item BCT Taxonomy v1. Six electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials assessing change in adiposity in young adults (17-35 years) until December 2019; identifying 21,582 articles. Fifty-one studies were included. Meta-analyses for weight (n=19 studies), body mass index (BMI) (n=20 studies), and waist circumference (n=10 studies) demonstrated no significant between-group differences at ≤3 or >3 months. There were no differences between interventions focusing on weight loss or weight-gain prevention. Narrative synthesis showed significant between-group differences in weight change, favouring the intervention in 14/43 (33%) studies. In studies assessing BMI and waist circumference, this was 31% (11/36) and 25% (4/16). Two BCTs had a percentage effectiveness ratio >50% in weight loss interventions; social support (unspecified) and self-monitoring behaviour, and one in weight-gain prevention interventions; and goal-setting (outcome). Findings demonstrate initial potential for these types of BCTs and can help build cumulative evidence towards delivering effective, cost-efficient, and replicable interventions.


Assuntos
Adiposidade , Promoção da Saúde/métodos , Sobrepeso/prevenção & controle , Sobrepeso/terapia , Programas de Redução de Peso/métodos , Adulto , Humanos , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Resultado do Tratamento , Perda de Peso , Adulto Jovem
16.
BMC Womens Health ; 20(1): 14, 2020 01 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31973716

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Women of childbearing age are vulnerable to weight gain. This scoping review examines the extent and range of research undertaken to evaluate behavioral interventions to support women of childbearing age to prevent and treat overweight and obesity. METHODS: Eight electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCT) or systematic reviews of RCTs until 31st January 2018. Eligible studies included women of childbearing age (aged 15-44 years), evaluated interventions promoting behavior change related to diet or physical activity to achieve weight gain prevention, weight loss or maintenance and reported weight-related outcomes. RESULTS: Ninety studies met the inclusion criteria (87 RCTs, 3 systematic reviews). Included studies were published from 1998 to 2018. The studies primarily focused on preventing excessive gestational weight gain (n = 46 RCTs, n = 2 systematic reviews), preventing postpartum weight retention (n = 18 RCTs) or a combination of the two (n = 14 RCTs, n = 1 systematic review). The RCTs predominantly evaluated interventions that aimed to change both diet and physical activity behaviors (n = 84) and were delivered in-person (n = 85). CONCLUSIONS: This scoping review identified an increasing volume of research over time undertaken to support women of childbearing age to prevent and treat overweight and obesity. It highlights, however, that little research is being undertaken to support the young adult female population unrelated to pregnancy or preconception.


Assuntos
Terapia Comportamental/tendências , Obesidade/prevenção & controle , Obesidade/terapia , Sobrepeso/prevenção & controle , Sobrepeso/terapia , Programas de Redução de Peso/tendências , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Gravidez , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Adulto Jovem
17.
J Am Coll Health ; 68(7): 734-741, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31140957

RESUMO

Objective: To describe lifestyle behaviors (fruit and vegetable intake, alcohol intake, physical activity, sitting time, smoking, drug use, sleep, sexual health) and health risk factors (body mass index, food insecurity, mental health) in a sample of Australian university students. Participants: 3,077 students from the University of Newcastle (UON), Australia (mean age 27.1 ± 9.8 years, 69.4% female) were surveyed in September-October 2017. Methods: Cross-sectional self-report survey, the UON Student Healthy Lifestyle Survey 2017. Results: Participants with unhealthy lifestyle behaviors included; 89.5% not meeting vegetable recommendations, 50.3% exceeding lifetime risk guidelines for alcohol intake, and 38.1% insufficiently physically active. Rates of health risk factors included; 39.6% overweight/obese, 37.6% high or very high risk of psychological distress, and 22.0% food insecure. Conclusions: Rates of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and related health risk factors were high within the study population, highlighting the importance of ongoing monitoring and prioritization of effective strategies to improve university student health.


Assuntos
Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Estilo de Vida , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Austrália , Estudos Transversais , Dieta , Exercício Físico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , Autorrelato , Sono , Fumar/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Universidades , Adulto Jovem
18.
Nutr Diet ; 77(3): 331-343, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31680432

RESUMO

AIM: This study aimed to explore clustering among individual eating behaviours in a sample of Australian university students, and explore associations between clustered eating behaviours and demographic characteristics. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis of data from the University of Newcastle (UON) Student Healthy Lifestyle Survey 2017 was conducted. Measures included eating behaviours (eg, vegetables, energy-dense nutrient poor [EDNP] food intakes) assessed using short diet questions, and demographic characteristics (eg, age, undergraduate/postgraduate student). Factor analysis was used to explore clustering of individual eating behaviours (ie, identify factors). Linear regression models were used to explore associations between eating behaviour factors identified and demographic characteristics. RESULTS: A total of 3062 students (70% female; 56% aged 17-24 years) were included in the analysis. The six eating behaviour factors identified (characterised by higher consumption of the named foods/drinks) were; EDNP snack foods, meat and takeaway foods, fruit and vegetables, sugary drinks, breakfast, and breads and cereals. A higher fruit and vegetable factor score was associated with being female (P < .001), and a higher meat and takeaway foods factor score was associated with being male (P < .001) and of younger age (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Nutrient-rich foods clustered together and EDNP foods clustered together, that is, the identified factors represent either nutrient-rich or EDNP foods. Interventions in the university setting should target students with the poorest eating behaviours, including males and younger students.


Assuntos
Dieta , Comportamento Alimentar , Alimentos , Valor Nutritivo , Adolescente , Austrália , Análise por Conglomerados , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estudantes , Universidades , Adulto Jovem
19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31861750

RESUMO

Food insecurity is much higher among university students than the general population, and is linked with poorer mental health, diet and academic achievement. The aim of this study was to explore the level of food insecurity among a sample of Australian university students and determine which socio-demographic and student characteristics predict food insecurity. An online cross-sectional survey with students from the University of Newcastle, Australia was conducted in 2017-2018. Food insecurity was assessed using the 6-item US Department of Agriculture Food Security Survey Module, and socio-demographic (e.g., age, living situation) and student characteristics (e.g., undergraduate/postgraduate student) were captured. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the odds of food insecurity for each of the socio-demographic and student characteristics, and included characteristics of significance in bivariate analyses as potential confounders. Data for 366 students were analysed (mean age 27.3 ± 10.4 years, 27.3% male). Forty-eight percent of participants were food insecure. The odds of food insecurity were higher among students living in rental accommodation compared with their parents' home (OR = 2.39, 95% CI 1.41, 4.06), and undergraduate compared with postgraduate students (OR = 3.50, 95% CI 1.83, 6.69). Commencing university and moving away from parents may be key times for intervention. Strategies that can provide longstanding benefit are needed to address the high level of food insecurity among university students.


Assuntos
Abastecimento de Alimentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes/psicologia , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Universidades/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Austrália , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31653026

RESUMO

University students report unhealthy diets and experience poorer mental health than the general population. This study explores the association between psychological distress and resilience with dietary intake in a sample of Australian university students. Cross-sectional data from the University of Newcastle Student Healthy Lifestyle Survey 2017 were analysed. Psychological distress (Kessler Scale), resilience (Brief Resilience Scale) and fruit, vegetable, soft drink, takeaway food and breakfast intakes (short diet questions) were assessed. Socio-demographic (e.g., gender), student (e.g., undergraduate/postgraduate) and health characteristics (e.g., physical activity) were captured. Multivariate linear regression models explored associations between psychological distress and resilience with dietary intake, with adjustment for potential confounders. Analysis included 2710 students (mean age 26.9 ± 9.5 years, 30.4% male). In adjusted models, lower psychological distress was associated with higher fruit (ß = -0.37, p = 0.001) and vegetable (ß = -0.37, p < 0.001) serves/day, more frequent breakfast consumption (p < 0.001) and less frequent soft drink and takeaway food consumption (p < 0.001). Higher resilience was associated with higher fruit (ß = 0.03, p = 0.022) and vegetable (ß = 0.06, p < 0.001) serves/day, more frequent breakfast consumption (p = 0.005), and less frequent soft drink (p < 0.001) and takeaway food consumption (p = 0.001). These results highlight a potential link between psychological distress and resilience with diet, and that further research in this area is warranted.


Assuntos
Dieta/psicologia , Dieta/estatística & dados numéricos , Ingestão de Alimentos/psicologia , Comportamento Alimentar/psicologia , Angústia Psicológica , Resiliência Psicológica , Estudantes/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Austrália , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Universidades , Adulto Jovem
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