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1.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(1): 1-5, 2020 Jan 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31917782

RESUMO

In May 2018, a study of birth defects in infants born to women with diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Botswana reported an eightfold increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) among births with periconceptional exposure to antiretroviral therapy (ART) that included the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG) compared with other ART regimens (1). The World Health Organization* (WHO) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services† (HHS) promptly issued interim guidance limiting the initiation of DTG during early pregnancy and in women of childbearing age with HIV who desire pregnancy or are sexually active and not using effective contraception. On the basis of additional data, WHO now recommends DTG as a preferred treatment option for all populations, including women of childbearing age and pregnant women. Similarly, the U.S. recommendations currently state that DTG is a preferred antiretroviral drug throughout pregnancy (with provider-patient counseling) and as an alternative antiretroviral drug in women who are trying to conceive.§ Since 1981 and 1994, CDC has supported separate surveillance programs for HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (2) and birth defects (3) in state health departments. These two surveillance programs can inform public health programs and policy, linkage to care, and research activities. Because birth defects surveillance programs do not collect HIV status, and HIV surveillance programs do not routinely collect data on occurrence of birth defects, the related data have not been used by CDC to characterize birth defects in births to women with HIV. Data from these two programs were linked to estimate overall prevalence of NTDs and prevalence of NTDs in HIV-exposed pregnancies during 2013-2017 for 15 participating jurisdictions. Prevalence of NTDs in pregnancies among women with diagnosed HIV infection was 7.0 per 10,000 live births, similar to that among the general population in these 15 jurisdictions, and the U.S. estimate based on data from 24 states. Successful linking of data from birth defects and HIV/AIDS surveillance programs for pregnancies among women with diagnosed HIV infection suggests that similar data linkages might be used to characterize possible associations between maternal diseases or maternal use of medications, such as integrase strand transfer inhibitors used to manage HIV, and pregnancy outcomes. Although no difference in NTD prevalence in HIV-exposed pregnancies was found, data on the use of integrase strand transfer inhibitors in pregnancy are needed to understand the safety and risks of these drugs during pregnancy.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Defeitos do Tubo Neural/epidemiologia , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/diagnóstico , Adolescente , Adulto , Antirretrovirais/efeitos adversos , Antirretrovirais/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/tratamento farmacológico , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
2.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(2): 25-29, 2020 Jan 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31945037

RESUMO

Birth defects are a leading cause of infant mortality in the United States, accounting for 20.6% of infant deaths in 2017 (1). Rates of infant mortality attributable to birth defects (IMBD) have generally declined since the 1970s (1-3). U.S. linked birth/infant death data from 2003-2017 were used to assess trends in IMBD. Overall, rates declined 10% during 2003-2017, but decreases varied by maternal and infant characteristics. During 2003-2017, IMBD rates decreased 4% for infants of Hispanic mothers, 11% for infants of non-Hispanic black (black) mothers, and 12% for infants of non-Hispanic white (white) mothers. In 2017, these rates were highest among infants of black mothers (13.3 per 10,000 live births) and were lowest among infants of white mothers (9.9). During 2003-2017, IMBD rates for infants who were born extremely preterm (20-27 completed gestational weeks), full term (39-40 weeks), and late term/postterm (41-44 weeks) declined 20%-29%; rates for moderate (32-33 weeks) and late preterm (34-36 weeks) infants increased 17%. Continued tracking of IMBD rates can help identify areas where efforts to reduce IMBD are needed, such as among infants born to black and Hispanic mothers and those born moderate and late preterm (32-36 weeks).


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/mortalidade , Mortalidade Infantil/tendências , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Anormalidades Congênitas/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Lactente , Mortalidade Infantil/etnologia , Lactente Extremamente Prematuro , Recém-Nascido , Criança Pós-Termo , Recém-Nascido Prematuro , Masculino , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
3.
Birth Defects Res ; 111(18): 1436-1447, 2019 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31642616

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: In this report, the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) examines and compares gastroschisis and omphalocele for a recent 5-year birth cohort using data from 30 population-based birth defect surveillance programs in the United States. METHODS: As a special call for data for the 2019 NBDPN Annual Report, state programs reported expanded data on gastroschisis and omphalocele for birth years 2012-2016. We estimated the overall prevalence (per 10,000 live births) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each defect as well as by maternal race/ethnicity, maternal age, infant sex, and case ascertainment methodology utilized by the program (active vs. passive). We also compared distribution of cases by maternal and infant factors and presence/absence of other birth defects. RESULTS: The overall prevalence estimates (per 10,000 live births) were 4.3 (95% CI: 4.1-4.4) for gastroschisis and 2.1 (95% CI: 2.0-2.2) for omphalocele. Gastroschisis was more frequent among young mothers (<25 years) and omphalocele more common among older mothers (>40 years). Mothers of infants with gastroschisis were more likely to be underweight/normal weight prior to pregnancy and mothers of infants with omphalocele more likely to be overweight/obese. Omphalocele was twice as likely as gastroschisis to co-occur with other birth defects. CONCLUSIONS: This report highlights important differences between gastroschisis and omphalocele. These differences indicate the importance of distinguishing between these defects in epidemiologic assessments. The report also provides additional data on co-occurrence of gastroschisis and omphalocele with other birth defects. This information can provide a basis for future research to better understand these defects.

4.
Birth Defects Res ; 111(18): 1420-1435, 2019 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31580536

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Using the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) annual data report, U.S. national prevalence estimates for major birth defects are developed based on birth cohort 2010-2014. METHODS: Data from 39 U.S. population-based birth defects surveillance programs (16 active case-finding, 10 passive case-finding with case confirmation, and 13 passive without case confirmation) were used to calculate pooled prevalence estimates for major defects by case-finding approach. Fourteen active case-finding programs including at least live birth and stillbirth pregnancy outcomes monitoring approximately one million births annually were used to develop national prevalence estimates, adjusted for maternal race/ethnicity (for all conditions examined) and maternal age (trisomies and gastroschisis). These calculations used a similar methodology to the previous estimates to examine changes over time. RESULTS: The adjusted national birth prevalence estimates per 10,000 live births ranged from 0.62 for interrupted aortic arch to 16.87 for clubfoot, and 19.93 for the 12 critical congenital heart defects combined. While the birth prevalence of most birth defects studied remained relatively stable over 15 years, an increasing prevalence was observed for gastroschisis and Down syndrome. Additionally, the prevalence for atrioventricular septal defect, tetralogy of Fallot, omphalocele, and trisomy 18 increased in this period compared to the previous periods. Active case-finding programs generally had higher prevalence rates for most defects examined, most notably for anencephaly, anophthalmia/microphthalmia, trisomy 13, and trisomy 18. CONCLUSION: National estimates of birth defects prevalence provide data for monitoring trends and understanding the impact of these conditions. Increasing prevalence rates observed for selected conditions warrant further examination.

5.
Birth Defects Res ; 111(11): 630-639, 2019 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30920179

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: We investigated differences in prevalence of major birth defects by maternal nativity within racial/ethnic groups for 27 major birth defects. METHODS: Data from 11 population-based birth defects surveillance systems in the United States including almost 13 million live births (approximately a third of U.S. births) during 1999-2007 were pooled. We calculated prevalence estimates for each birth defect for five racial/ethnic groups. Using Poisson regression, crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were also calculated using births to US-born mothers as the referent group in each racial/ethnic group. RESULTS: Approximately 20% of case mothers and 26% of all mothers were foreign-born. Elevated aPRs for infants with foreign-born mothers were found for spina bifida and trisomy 13, 18, and 21, while lower prevalence patterns were found for pyloric stenosis, gastroschisis, and hypospadias. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that birth defects prevalence varies by nativity within race/ethnic groups, with elevated prevalence ratios for some specific conditions and lower prevalence for others. More detailed analyses focusing on a broader range of maternal behaviors and characteristics are required to fully understand the implications of our findings.

6.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 68(2): 31-36, 2019 Jan 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30653484

RESUMO

Prevalence of gastroschisis, a serious birth defect of the abdominal wall resulting in some of the abdominal contents extending outside the body at birth, has been increasing worldwide (1,2). Gastroschisis requires surgical repair after birth and is associated with digestive and feeding complications during infancy, which can affect development. Recent data from 14 U.S. states indicated an increasing prevalence of gastroschisis from 1995 to 2012 (1). Young maternal age has been strongly associated with gastroschisis, but research suggests that risk factors such as smoking, genitourinary infections, and prescription opioid use also might be associated (3-5). Data from 20 population-based state surveillance programs were pooled and analyzed to assess age-specific gastroschisis prevalence during two 5-year periods, 2006-2010 and 2011-2015, and an ecologic approach was used to compare annual gastroschisis prevalence by annual opioid prescription rate categories. Gastroschisis prevalence increased only slightly (10%) from 2006-2010 to 2011-2015 (prevalence ratio = 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.1), with the highest prevalence among mothers aged <20 years. During 2006-2015, the prevalence of gastroschisis was 1.6 times higher in counties with high opioid prescription rates (5.1 per 10,000 live births; CI = 4.9-5.3) and 1.4 times higher where opioid prescription rates were medium (4.6 per 10,000 live births; CI = 4.4-4.8) compared with areas with low prescription rates (3.2 per 10,000 live births; CI = 3.1-3.4). Public health research is needed to understand factors contributing to the association between young maternal age and gastroschisis and assess the effect of prescription opioid use during pregnancy on this pregnancy outcome.


Assuntos
Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Prescrições de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Fenômenos Ecológicos e Ambientais , Gastrosquise/epidemiologia , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Analgésicos Opioides/efeitos adversos , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Gastrosquise/etnologia , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Mães/estatística & dados numéricos , Gravidez , Efeitos Tardios da Exposição Pré-Natal , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
7.
Birth Defects Res ; 110(19): 1478-1486, 2018 11 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30444307

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: In this data brief, we examine major eye and ear anomalies (anophthalmia/microphthalmia, anotia/microtia, and congenital cataract) for a recent 5-year birth cohort using data from 30 population-based birth defects surveillance programs in the United States. METHODS: As a special call for data for the 2018 NBDPN Annual Report, state programs reported expanded data on eye/ear anomalies for birth years 2011-2015. We calculated the combined overall prevalence (per 10,000 live births) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), for the three anomalies as well as by maternal age, maternal race/ethnicity, infant sex, laterality, presence/absence of other major birth defects, and case ascertainment methodology utilized by the program (active vs. passive). RESULTS: The overall prevalence estimate (per 10,000 live births) was 1.5 (95% CI: 1.4-1.5) for anophthalmia/microphthalmia, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.4-1.6) for congenital cataract, and 1.8 (95% CI: 1.7-1.8) for anotia/microtia. Congenital cataract prevalence varied little by maternal race/ethnicity, infant sex, or case ascertainment methodology; prevalence differences were more apparent across strata for anophthalmia/microphthalmia and anotia/microtia. Prevalence among active vs. passive ascertainment programs was 50% higher for anophthalmia/microphthalmia (1.9 vs. 1.2) and two-fold higher for anotia/microtia (2.6 vs. 1.2). Anophthalmia/microphthalmia was more likely than other conditions to co-occur with other birth defects. All conditions were more frequent among older mothers (40+ years). CONCLUSIONS: This data brief provides recent prevalence estimates for anophthalmia/microphthalmia, congenital cataract, and anotia/microtia that address a data gap by examining pooled data from 30 population-based surveillance systems, covering a five-year birth cohort of about 12.4 million births.


Assuntos
Anoftalmia/epidemiologia , Microtia Congênita/epidemiologia , Microftalmia/epidemiologia , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Catarata/epidemiologia , Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Orelha/anormalidades , Anormalidades do Olho , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Idade Materna , Mães , Razão de Chances , Vigilância da População/métodos , Gravidez , Prevalência , Sistema de Registros , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos
8.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 67(3): 91-96, 2018 Jan 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29370151

RESUMO

Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious birth defects, including microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1). Population-based birth defects surveillance systems are critical to monitor all infants and fetuses with birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection, regardless of known exposure or laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy. CDC analyzed data from 15 U.S. jurisdictions conducting population-based surveillance for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection.* Jurisdictions were stratified into the following three groups: those with 1) documented local transmission of Zika virus during 2016; 2) one or more cases of confirmed, symptomatic, travel-associated Zika virus disease reported to CDC per 100,000 residents; and 3) less than one case of confirmed, symptomatic, travel-associated Zika virus disease reported to CDC per 100,000 residents. A total of 2,962 infants and fetuses (3.0 per 1,000 live births; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.9-3.2) (2) met the case definition.† In areas with local transmission there was a non-statistically significant increase in total birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection from 2.8 cases per 1,000 live births in the first half of 2016 to 3.0 cases in the second half (p = 0.10). However, when neural tube defects and other early brain malformations (NTDs)§ were excluded, the prevalence of birth defects strongly linked to congenital Zika virus infection increased significantly, from 2.0 cases per 1,000 live births in the first half of 2016 to 2.4 cases in the second half, an increase of 29 more cases than expected (p = 0.009). These findings underscore the importance of surveillance for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection and the need for continued monitoring in areas at risk for Zika.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Anormalidades Congênitas/virologia , Vigilância da População , Infecção por Zika virus/complicações , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/virologia , Prevalência , Porto Rico/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
9.
Birth Defects Res ; 109(18): 1504-1514, 2017 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29152924

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal defects are a phenotypically and etiologically diverse group of malformations. Despite their combined prevalence and clinical impact, little is known about the epidemiology of these birth defects. Therefore, the objective of the 2017 National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) data brief was to better describe the occurrence of gastrointestinal defects. METHODS: As part of the 2017 NBDPN annual report, 28 state programs provided additional data on gastrointestinal defects for the period 2010-2014. Counts and prevalence estimates (per 10,000 live births) were calculated overall and by demographic characteristics for (1) biliary atresia; (2) esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula; (3) rectal and large intestinal atresia/stenosis; and (4) small intestinal atresia/stenosis. Additionally, we explored the frequency of these malformations co-occurring with other structural birth defects. RESULTS: Pooling data from all participating registries, the prevalence estimates were: 0.7 per 10,000 live births for biliary atresia (713 cases); 2.3 per 10,000 live births for esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (2,472 cases); 4.2 per 10,000 live births for rectal and large intestinal atresia/stenosis (4,334 cases); and 3.4 per 10,000 live births for small intestinal atresia/stenosis (3,388 cases). Findings related to co-occurring birth defects were especially notable for esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula, rectal and large intestinal atresia/stenosis, and small intestinal atresia/stenosis, where the median percentage of non-isolated cases was 53.9%, 45.5%, and 50.6%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These population-based prevalence estimates confirm some previous studies, and provide a foundation for future epidemiologic studies of gastrointestinal defects. Exploring the genetic and environmental determinants of these malformations may yield new clues into their etiologies.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Gastroenteropatias/epidemiologia , Atresia Biliar/epidemiologia , Colo/anormalidades , Bases de Dados Factuais , Atresia Esofágica/epidemiologia , Feminino , Trato Gastrointestinal , Humanos , Atresia Intestinal/epidemiologia , Nascimento Vivo , Masculino , Vigilância da População/métodos , Gravidez , Prevalência , Sistema de Registros , Fístula Traqueoesofágica/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos
10.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 66(8): 219-222, 2017 Mar 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28253231

RESUMO

Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause serious brain abnormalities, but the full range of adverse outcomes is unknown (1). To better understand the impact of birth defects resulting from Zika virus infection, the CDC surveillance case definition established in 2016 for birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection* (2) was retrospectively applied to population-based birth defects surveillance data collected during 2013-2014 in three areas before the introduction of Zika virus (the pre-Zika years) into the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas (Americas) (3). These data, from Massachusetts (2013), North Carolina (2013), and Atlanta, Georgia (2013-2014), included 747 infants and fetuses with one or more of the birth defects meeting the case definition (pre-Zika prevalence = 2.86 per 1,000 live births). Brain abnormalities or microcephaly were the most frequently recorded (1.50 per 1,000), followed by neural tube defects and other early brain malformations† (0.88), eye abnormalities without mention of a brain abnormality (0.31), and other consequences of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction without mention of brain or eye abnormalities (0.17). During January 15-September 22, 2016, the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR) reported 26 infants and fetuses with these same defects among 442 completed pregnancies (58.8 per 1,000) born to mothers with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy (2). Although the ascertainment methods differed, this finding was approximately 20 times higher than the proportion of one or more of the same birth defects among pregnancies during the pre-Zika years. These data demonstrate the importance of population-based surveillance for interpreting data about birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Vigilância da População , Infecção por Zika virus/congênito , Adulto , Anormalidades Congênitas/virologia , Feminino , Georgia/epidemiologia , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Massachusetts/epidemiologia , North Carolina/epidemiologia , Gravidez , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez , Prevalência , Estudos Retrospectivos
11.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 26(2): 186-194, 2017 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28067585

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although rates of neural tube defects (NTDs) have declined in the United States since fortification, disparities still exist with Hispanic women having the highest risk of giving birth to a baby with a NTD. The Promotora de Salud model using community lay health workers has been shown to be an effective tool for reaching Hispanics for a variety of health topics; however, literature on its effectiveness in folic acid interventions is limited. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An intervention using the Promotora de Salud model was implemented in four U.S. counties with large populations of Hispanic women. The study comprised the following: (1) a written pretest survey to establish baseline levels of folic acid awareness, knowledge, and consumption; (2) a small group education intervention along with a 90-day supply of multivitamins; and (3) a postintervention (posttest) assessment conducted 4 months following the intervention. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences in pre- and posttests were observed for general awareness about folic acid and vitamins and specific knowledge about the benefits of folic acid. Statistically significant changes were also seen in vitamin consumption and multivitamin consumption. Folic acid supplement consumption increased dramatically by the end of the study. CONCLUSIONS: The Promotora de Salud model relies on interpersonal connections forged between promotoras and the communities they serve to help drive positive health behaviors. The findings underscore the positive impact that these interpersonal connections can have on increasing awareness, knowledge, and consumption of folic acid. Utilizing the Promotora de Salud model to reach targeted populations might help organizations successfully implement their programs in a culturally appropriate manner.


Assuntos
Ácido Fólico/uso terapêutico , Educação em Saúde/métodos , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Promoção da Saúde/métodos , Hispano-Americanos , Defeitos do Tubo Neural/prevenção & controle , Adulto , Suplementos Nutricionais , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Humanos , Cuidado Pré-Concepcional , Gravidez , Estados Unidos , Vitaminas/uso terapêutico
12.
Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol ; 106(11): 972-982, 2016 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27891783

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Congenital microcephaly has been linked to maternal Zika virus infection. However, ascertaining infants diagnosed with microcephaly can be challenging. METHODS: Thirty birth defects surveillance programs provided data on infants diagnosed with microcephaly born 2009 to 2013. The pooled prevalence of microcephaly per 10,000 live births was estimated overall and by maternal/infant characteristics. Variation in prevalence was examined across case finding methods. Nine programs provided data on head circumference and conditions potentially contributing to microcephaly. RESULTS: The pooled prevalence of microcephaly was 8.7 per 10,000 live births. Median prevalence (per 10,000 live births) was similar among programs using active (6.7) and passive (6.6) methods; the interdecile range of prevalence estimates was wider among programs using passive methods for all race/ethnicity categories except Hispanic. Prevalence (per 10,000 live births) was lowest among non-Hispanic Whites (6.5) and highest among non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics (11.2 and 11.9, respectively); estimates followed a U-shaped distribution by maternal age with the highest prevalence among mothers <20 years (11.5) and ≥40 years (13.2). For gestational age and birth weight, the highest prevalence was among infants <32 weeks gestation and infants <1500 gm. Case definitions varied; 41.8% of cases had an HC ≥ the 10th percentile for sex and gestational age. CONCLUSION: Differences in methods, population distribution of maternal/infant characteristics, and case definitions for microcephaly can contribute to the wide range of observed prevalence estimates across individual birth defects surveillance programs. Addressing these factors in the setting of Zika virus infection can improve the quality of prevalence estimates. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:972-982, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Assuntos
Monitoramento Epidemiológico , Microcefalia/epidemiologia , Infecção por Zika virus/epidemiologia , Zika virus , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Prevalência , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
13.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 65(2): 23-6, 2016 Jan 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26796490

RESUMO

Gastroschisis is a serious congenital defect in which the intestines protrude through an opening in the abdominal wall. Gastroschisis requires surgical repair soon after birth and is associated with an increased risk for medical complications and mortality during infancy. Reports from multiple surveillance systems worldwide have documented increasing prevalence of gastroschisis since the 1980s, particularly among younger mothers; however, since publication of a multistate U.S. report that included data through 2005, it is not known whether prevalence has continued to increase. Data on gastroschisis from 14 population-based state surveillance programs were pooled and analyzed to assess the average annual percent change (AAPC) in prevalence and to compare the prevalence during 2006-2012 with that during 1995-2005, stratified by maternal age and race/ethnicity. The pooled data included approximately 29% of U.S. births for the period 1995-2012. During 1995-2012, gastroschisis prevalence increased in every category of maternal age and race/ethnicity, and the AAPC ranged from 3.1% in non-Hispanic white (white) mothers aged <20 years to 7.9% in non-Hispanic black (black) mothers aged <20 years. These corresponded to overall percentage increases during 1995-2012 that ranged from 68% in white mothers aged <20 years to 263% in black mothers aged <20 years. Gastroschisis prevalence increased 30% between the two periods, from 3.6 per 10,000 births during 1995-2005 to 4.9 per 10,000 births during 2006-2012 (prevalence ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-1.4), with the largest increase among black mothers aged <20 years (prevalence ratio = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.6-2.5). Public health research is urgently needed to identify factors contributing to this increase.


Assuntos
Gastrosquise/epidemiologia , Vigilância da População , Adulto , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Distribuição por Idade , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Gastrosquise/etnologia , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
15.
BMC Public Health ; 15: 925, 2015 Sep 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26386816

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Population-based birth defects surveillance is a core public health activity in the United States (U.S.); however, the lack of national data quality standards has limited the use of birth defects surveillance data across state programs. Development of national standards will facilitate data aggregation and utilization across birth defects surveillance programs in the U.S. METHODS: Based on national standards for other U.S. public health surveillance programs, existing National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) guidelines for conducting birth defects surveillance, and information from birth defects surveillance programs regarding their current data quality practices, we developed 11 data quality measures that focused on data completeness (n = 5 measures), timeliness (n = 2), and accuracy (n = 4). For each measure, we established tri-level performance criteria (1 = rudimentary, 2 = essential, 3 = optimal). In January 2014, we sent birth defects surveillance programs in each state, District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the U.S. Department of Defense Birth and Infant Health Registry an invitation to complete a self-administered NBDPN Standards Data Quality Assessment Tool. The completed forms were electronically submitted to the CDC for analyses. RESULTS: Of 47 eligible population-based surveillance programs, 45 submitted a completed assessment tool. Two of the 45 programs did not meet minimum inclusion criteria and were excluded; thus, the final analysis included information from 43 programs. Average scores for four of the five completeness performance measures were above level 2. Conversely, the average scores for both timeliness measures and three of the four accuracy measures were below level 2. Surveillance programs using an active case-finding approach scored higher than programs using passive case-finding approaches for the completeness and accuracy measures, whereas their average scores were lower for timeliness measures. CONCLUSIONS: This initial, nation-wide assessment of data quality across U.S. population-based birth defects surveillance programs highlights areas for improvement. Using this information to identify strengths and weaknesses, the birth defects surveillance community, working through the NBDPN, can enhance and implement a consistent set of standards that can promote uniformity and enable surveillance programs to work towards improving the potential of these programs.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Confiabilidade dos Dados , Vigilância da População/métodos , Sistema de Registros/normas , Coleta de Dados , Humanos , Lactente , Características de Residência , Fatores de Tempo , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
16.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 64(1): 1-5, 2015 Jan 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25590678

RESUMO

In 1992, the U.S. Public Health Service recommended that all women capable of becoming pregnant consume 400 µg of folic acid daily to prevent neural tube defects (NTDs). NTDs are major birth defects of the brain and spine that occur early in pregnancy as a result of improper closure of the embryonic neural tube, which can lead to death or varying degrees of disability. The two most common NTDs are anencephaly and spina bifida. Beginning in 1998, the United States mandated fortification of enriched cereal grain products with 140 µg of folic acid per 100 g. Immediately after mandatory fortification, the birth prevalence of NTD cases declined. Fortification was estimated to avert approximately 1,000 NTD-affected pregnancies annually. To provide updated estimates of the birth prevalence of NTDs in the period after introduction of mandatory folic acid fortification (i.e., the post-fortification period), data from 19 population-based birth defects surveillance programs in the United States, covering the years 1999-2011, were examined. After the initial decrease, NTD birth prevalence during the post-fortification period has remained relatively stable. The number of births occurring annually without NTDs that would otherwise have been affected is approximately 1,326 (95% confidence interval = 1,122-1,531). Mandatory folic acid fortification remains an effective public health intervention. There remain opportunities for prevention among women with lower folic acid intakes, especially among Hispanic women, to further reduce the prevalence of NTDs in the United States.


Assuntos
Anencefalia/prevenção & controle , Ácido Fólico/administração & dosagem , Alimentos Fortificados , Política de Saúde , Vigilância da População , Disrafismo Espinal/prevenção & controle , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Anencefalia/epidemiologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Gravidez , Disrafismo Espinal/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
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