Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 11 de 11
Filtrar
1.
BMJ Open ; 11(4): e049996, 2021 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33795314

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To examine whether engagement in COVID-19-related work was associated with an increased prevalence of depressive symptoms among the staff members working in a designated medical institution for COVID-19 in Tokyo, Japan. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTING: Data were obtained from a health survey conducted in July 2020 among the staff members of a designated medical institution for COVID-19 in Tokyo, Japan. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1228 hospital workers. EXPOSURE OF INTEREST: Engagement in COVID-19-related work (qualitatively (ie, the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection at work or affiliation to related departments) as well as quantitatively (ie, working hours)) and job categories. OUTCOME MEASURES: Depressive symptoms. RESULTS: There was no significant association between depressive symptoms and engagement in work with potential exposure to SARS-CoV-2 or affiliation to COVID-19-related departments. However, working for longer hours in March/April, when Japan witnessed a large number of infected cases, was significantly associated with depressive symptoms (≥11 hours/day: prevalence ratio (PR)=1.45, 95% CI=1.06 to 1.99, compared with ≤8 hours/day). Nurses were more likely to exhibit depressive symptoms than did doctors (PR=1.70, 95% CI=1.14 to 2.54). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection at work or having an affiliation to related departments might not be linked with a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms among Japanese hospital workers; contrarily, long working hours appeared to increase the prevalence of depressive symptoms.


Assuntos
/psicologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Recursos Humanos em Hospital/psicologia , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Hospitais , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos e Questionários , Tóquio/epidemiologia
3.
Diabetes Care ; 44(3): 757-764, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33441421

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Prediabetes has been suggested to increase risk for death; however, the definitions of prediabetes that can predict death remain elusive. We prospectively investigated the association of multiple definitions of prediabetes with the risk of death from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer in Japanese workers. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study included 62,785 workers who underwent a health checkup in 2010 or 2011 and were followed up for death from 2012 to March 2019. Prediabetes was defined according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values or a combination of both using the American Diabetes Association (ADA) or World Health Organization (WHO)/International Expert Committee (IEC) criteria. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to investigate the associations. RESULTS: Over a 7-year follow-up, 229 deaths were documented. Compared with normoglycemia, prediabetes defined according to ADA criteria was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.53; 95% CI 1.12-2.09) and death due to cancer (HR 2.37; 95% CI 1.45-3.89) but not with death due to CVD. The results were materially unchanged when prediabetes was defined according to ADA FPG, ADA HbA1c, WHO FPG, or combined WHO/IEC criteria. Diabetes was associated with the risk of all-cause, CVD, and cancer deaths. CONCLUSIONS: In a cohort of Japanese workers, FPG- and HbA1c-defined prediabetes, according to ADA or WHO/IEC, were associated with a significantly increased risk of death from all causes and cancer but not CVD.

4.
Int J Cancer ; 2020 Aug 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32761607

RESUMO

Smoking has been consistently associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in Western populations; however, evidence is limited and inconsistent in Asian people. To assess the association of smoking status, smoking intensity and smoking cessation with colorectal risk in the Japanese population, we performed a pooled analysis of 10 population-based cohort studies. Study-specific hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox's proportional hazards model and then pooled using a random-effects model. Among 363 409 participants followed up for 2 666 004 person-years, 9232 incident CRCs were identified. In men, compared with never smokers, ever smokers showed higher risk of CRC. The HRs (95% CI) were 1.19 (1.10-1.29) for CRC, 1.19 (1.09-1.30) for colon cancer, 1.28 (1.13-1.46) for distal colon cancer and 1.21 (1.07-1.36) for rectal cancer. Smoking was associated with risk of CRC in a dose-response manner. In women, compared with never smokers, ever smokers showed increased risk of distal colon cancer (1.47 [1.19-1.82]). There was no evidence of a significant gender difference in the association of smoking and CRC risk. Our results confirm that smoking is associated with an increased risk of CRC, both overall and subsites, in Japanese men and distal colon cancer in Japanese women.

5.
Am J Hum Biol ; : e23437, 2020 May 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32459043

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: While several experimental studies in animals and humans have suggested the protective effect of nightly fasting duration (NFD) against cardiometabolic risk factors, few population-based studies have been conducted. This study aimed to investigate the association between NFD and metabolic syndrome (MetS) among Japanese non-shift workers. METHODS: A subset of 1054 non-shift workers from the Furukawa Nutrition and Health Study were included in this analysis. Participants completed dietary and lifestyle surveys during a periodic checkup. NFD was defined as the time between dinner and breakfast and was categorized into four groups (ie, ≥12 hours, 11 hours, 10 hours, and ≤9 hours). MetS was defined as ≥3 of the following components: high waist circumference (≥90 cm [men] and ≥80 cm [women]), high triglycerides (≥150 mg/dL), low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (<40 mg/dL [men] and <50 mg/dL [women]), hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥130 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure ≥85 mm Hg), and high fasting glucose (fasting plasma glucose ≥100 mg/dL or hemoglobin A1c ≥5.6%). A multivariable logistic regression model was used to examine the association between NFD and MetS. RESULTS: The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of MetS for the highest (≥12 hours) through lowest (≤9 hours) NFD categories were 1.00 (reference), 0.83 (0.51-1.35), 0.83 (0.48-1.43), and 0.80 (0.43-1.48) (P for trend = 0.50) after adjusting for covariates. Further analyses on the relationship between NFD and each MetS component found no significant associations. CONCLUSIONS: We did not find any evidence of a significant association between NFD and MetS among non-shift workers in Japan.

6.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 47, 2020 01 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31931779

RESUMO

It was highlighted that in the original article [1] the selection process was not described clearly enough to avoid confusion under the heading of the Target of Outcomes in the Methods section.

7.
Sleep ; 43(1)2020 01 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31555821

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Social jetlag, a mismatch between biological and social timing, has been reported to be associated with depressive symptoms among general population. However, evidence on this association is lacking among non-shift workers, who are under pressure to adapt themselves to a work schedule. We investigated the cross-sectional association of social jetlag with depressive symptoms among Japanese non-shift workers. METHODS: This study included 1,404 employees, aged 18-78 years, who completed a study questionnaire at a periodic health checkup. Social jetlag was calculated as the absolute value of the difference in the midpoint of sleep times between weekdays and weekends. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) with adjustments for potential confounders including diet and chronotype. RESULTS: Of the study participants, 63.5%, 28.4%, and 8.1% had less than 1 hour, 1 to less than 2 hours, and at least 2 hours of social jetlag, respectively. Greater social jetlag was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of having depressive symptoms. The multivariable-adjusted OR (95% confidence interval) were 1.30 (0.95 to 1.78) and 2.14 (1.26-3.62) for 1 to less than 2 hour and at least 2 hours compared to less than 1 hour of social jetlag. The association between social jetlag and depressive symptoms appeared to be linear, according to restricted cubic spline regression. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that greater social jetlag is associated with an increased likelihood of having depressive symptoms among non-shift workers.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Depressão/psicologia , Relações Interpessoais , Sono/fisiologia , Tolerância ao Trabalho Programado/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Japão , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Admissão e Escalonamento de Pessoal , Probabilidade , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
8.
Cancer Sci ; 110(11): 3603-3614, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31482651

RESUMO

Red meat and processed meat have been suggested to increase risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), especially colon cancer. However, it remains unclear whether these associations differ according to meat subtypes or colon subsites. The present study addressed this issue by undertaking a pooled analysis of large population-based cohort studies in Japan: 5 studies comprising 232 403 participants (5694 CRC cases) for analysis based on frequency of meat intake, and 2 studies comprising 123 635 participants (3550 CRC cases) for analysis based on intake quantity. Study-specific hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model and then pooled using the random effect model. Comparing the highest vs lowest quartile, beef intake was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer in women (pooled HR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.44) and distal colon cancer (DCC) risk in men (pooled HR 1.30; 95% CI, 1.05-1.61). Frequent intake of pork was associated with an increased risk of distal colon cancer in women (pooled HR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.10-1.87) for "3 times/wk or more" vs "less than 1 time/wk". Frequent intake of processed red meat was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer in women (pooled HR 1.39; 95% CI, 0.97-2.00; P trend = .04) for "almost every day" vs "less than 1 time/wk". No association was observed for chicken consumption. The present findings support that intake of beef, pork (women only), and processed red meat (women only) might be associated with a higher risk of colon (distal colon) cancer in Japanese.


Assuntos
Neoplasias do Colo/etiologia , Carne/efeitos adversos , Neoplasias Retais/etiologia , Animais , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático , Índice de Massa Corporal , Bovinos , Colo , Intervalos de Confiança , Feminino , Manipulação de Alimentos , Humanos , Japão , Masculino , Carne/classificação , Aves Domésticas , Carne Vermelha/efeitos adversos , Medição de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Suínos
9.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 893, 2019 Jul 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31286931

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mobilising non-professional health workers has been successful in improving community health, but the effectiveness of an education program targeting youths in a community-based approach remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of an intervention with youth on cardiovascular disease risk factors of community adults. METHODS: A 12-month cluster randomised trial was conducted in a semi-urban area of Colombo in Sri Lanka. Facilitators trained youth club members aged 15-29 years to assess cardiovascular disease risk factors and take actions in the community to address relevant issues. The control group received no intervention. Body weight and blood pressure as primary outcomes and lifestyle of adults as secondary outcomes were measured pre- and post-intervention. Multilevel linear and logistic regressions were used to assess the effects of the intervention on changes in continuous and binary outcomes, respectively, from baseline to endpoint. RESULTS: Of 512 participants at baseline, 483 completed the final assessment after the intervention. Regarding primary outcomes, the intervention group showed a significantly greater decrease in body weight after intervention than the control group. The mean (95% confidence interval) difference of body weight change for intervention versus control group was - 2.83 kg (- 3.31, - 2.35). There was no statistically significant difference in blood pressure between the two groups. Turning to the secondary outcomes, in diet, the intervention group had a higher probability of consuming at least one serving/day of fruits (p = 0.02) and a lower probability of consuming snacks twice/day or more (p < 0.001) than the control group. CONCLUSIONS: An intervention employing youths as change agents was effective in lowering body weight among community adults in Sri Lanka. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Trial registration number: SLCTR/2017/002 , Name of registry: Sri Lanka Clinical Trials Registry, Date of registration: 19th January 2017, Date of enrolment of the first participant to the trial: 1st February 2017.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/psicologia , Educação em Saúde/métodos , Relações Interpessoais , Características de Residência , Comportamento de Redução do Risco , Adolescente , Adulto , Pressão Sanguínea , Determinação da Pressão Arterial , Peso Corporal , Doenças Cardiovasculares/etiologia , Análise por Conglomerados , Dieta , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Modelos Lineares , Masculino , Análise Multinível , Fatores de Risco , Sri Lanka , Adulto Jovem
10.
Sleep Med ; 51: 53-58, 2018 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30099352

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Social jetlag, ie, the mismatch between biological and social timing, has been suggested to induce obesity and cardiometabolic abnormalities. Yet, no study has currently linked social jetlag to metabolic syndrome (MetS) among Asians. The aim of this study was to investigate the cross-sectional association of social jetlag with MetS in a Japanese working population. METHODS: Participants were 1164 employees, aged 18-78 years, who completed a health survey at a periodic checkup. Social jetlag was calculated as the difference in hours of midpoint of sleep times between weekdays and weekends. MetS was defined according to the Joint Interim Statement criteria. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between social jetlag and MetS with adjustment for potential confounding variables. RESULTS: Greater social jetlag was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of having MetS. The multivariable adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) for ≥2 h of social jetlag was 1.92 (1.01-3.67) compared to those with <1 h of social jetlag. Of the components of MetS, greater social jetlag was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of having high waist circumference; the multivariable adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) for ≥2 h of social jetlag was 2.26 (1.33-3.84) compared to those with <1 h of social jetlag. CONCLUSION: Social jetlag may be associated with an increased likelihood of having MetS among non-shift workers.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/estatística & dados numéricos , Síndrome do Jet Lag/fisiopatologia , Síndrome Metabólica/diagnóstico , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Emprego , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Japão , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Sono/fisiologia , Circunferência da Cintura
11.
Int J Equity Health ; 16(1): 59, 2017 04 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28376808

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Financial risk protection and equity are major components of universal health coverage (UHC), which is defined as ensuring access to health services for all citizens without any undue financial burden. We investigated progress towards UHC financial risk indicators and assessed variability of inequalities in financial risk protection indicators by wealth quintile. We further examined the determinants of different financial hardship indicators related to healthcare costs. METHODS: A cross-sectional, three-stage probability survey was conducted in Bangladesh, which collected information from 1600 households from August to November 2011. Catastrophic health payments, impoverishment, and distress financing (borrowing or selling assets) were treated as financial hardship indicators in UHC. Poisson regression models were used to identify the determinants of catastrophic payment, impoverishment and distress financing separately. Slope, relative and concentration indices of inequalities were used to assess wealth-based inequalities in financial hardship indicators. RESULTS: The study found that around 9% of households incurred catastrophic payments, 7% faced distress financing, and 6% experienced impoverishing health payments in Bangladesh. Slope index of inequality indicated that the incidence of catastrophic health payment and distress financing among the richest households were 12 and 9 percentage points lower than the poorest households respectively. Multivariable Poisson regression models revealed that all UHC financial hardship indicators were significantly higher among household that had members who received inpatient care or were in the poorest quintile. The presence of a member with chronic illness in a household increased the risk of impoverishment by nearly double. CONCLUSION: This study identified a greater inequality in UHC financial hardship indicators. Rich households in Bangladesh were facing disproportionately less financial hardship than the poor ones. Households can be protected from financial hardship associated with healthcare costs by implementing risk pooling mechanism, increasing GDP spending on health, and properly monitoring subsidized programs in public health facilities.


Assuntos
Financiamento Pessoal , Equidade em Saúde/economia , Gastos em Saúde , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/economia , Pobreza , Classe Social , Cobertura Universal do Seguro de Saúde , Adulto , Idoso , Bangladesh , Doença Catastrófica/economia , Criança , Doença Crônica/economia , Efeitos Psicossociais da Doença , Estudos Transversais , Características da Família , Feminino , Financiamento Governamental , Serviços de Saúde/economia , Hospitalização/economia , Humanos , Masculino
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...