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2.
BMJ Open ; 9(8): e025525, 2019 Aug 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31462460

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To identify differences in psychosocial, behavioural and clinical outcomes between patients with heart failure (HF) with and without stroke. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A secondary analysis of 1023 patients with heart failure enrolled in the Coordinating study evaluating Outcomes of Advising and Counselling in Heart failure. SETTING: Seventeen hospitals located across the Netherlands. OUTCOMES MEASURES: Depressive symptoms (Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), quality of life (Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, Ladder of Life Scale), self-care (European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale), adherence to HF management (modified version of the Heart Failure Compliance Questionnaire) and readmission for HF, cardiovascular-cause and all-cause hospitalisations at 18 months, and all-cause mortality at 18 months and 3 years. RESULTS: Compared with those without stroke, patients with HF with a stroke (10.3%; n=105) had twice the likelihood of severe depressive symptoms (OR 2.83, 95% CI 1.27 to 6.28, p=0.011; OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.03 to 4.88, p=0.043) at 12 and 18 months, poorer disease-specific and generic quality of life (OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.61 to 4.84, p<0.001; OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.09 to 3.50, p=0.019) at 12 months, poorer self-care (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.05 to 3.11, p=0.034; OR 2.87, 95% CI 1.61 to 5.11, p<0.0011) and HF management adherence (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.81, p=0.012; OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.72, p=0.004) at 12 and 18 months, higher rates of hospitalisations and mortality at 18 months and higher all-cause mortality (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.91, p=0.016) at 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with HF and stroke have worse psychosocial, behavioural and clinical outcomes, notably from 12 months, than those without stroke. To ameliorate these poor outcomes long-term, integrated disease management pathways are warranted.

3.
J Cardiovasc Nurs ; 2019 Aug 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31441802

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Thirst is a distressing symptom and influences quality of life of patients with heart failure (HF). Knowledge about thirst in HF is insufficient; therefore, the aim of this study was to describe factors related to thirst, self-reported reasons for thirst, and interventions to relieve thirst in 3 different countries. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Sweden, the Netherlands, and Japan. Patients were recruited at the HF clinic or during HF hospitalization. Thirst was assessed by a visual analog scale (0-100); reasons for thirst and interventions to relieve thirst were assessed by an open-ended questionnaire. Patients were divided into low and high thirst based on the first and third tertiles of the visual analog scale. RESULTS: Two hundred sixty-nine patients participated in the study (age, 72 ± 12 years). Mean thirst intensity was 24 ± 24, with a mean thirst of 53 ± 15 in the highest tertile. No significant differences in thirst among the 3 countries were found. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that a higher dose of loop diuretics (odds ratio, 3.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-8.06) and fluid restriction (odds ratio, 2.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-4.32) were related to thirst. The most reported reasons for thirst were salty/spicy food (20%) and low fluid intake (18%). Most of the patients (56%) drank more in case of thirst; 20% only drank a little bit, probably related to a fluid restriction. CONCLUSIONS: Thirst in patients with HF was related to a higher dose of loop diuretics and fluid restriction. Healthcare providers should realize that it is important to assess thirst regularly and reconsider the need of a fluid restriction and the amount of loop diuretics in case of thirst.

5.
Eur J Heart Fail ; 21(9): 1142-1148, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31343108

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Exercise training programmes (ETPs) are a crucial component in cardiac rehabilitation in heart failure (HF) patients. The Exercise Training in HF (ExTraHF) survey has reported poor implementation of ETPs in countries affiliated to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The aim of the present sub-analysis was to investigate the regional variations in the implementation of ETPs for HF patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study was designed as a web-based survey of cardiac units, divided into five areas, according to the geographical location of the countries surveyed. Overall, 172 centres replied to the survey, in charge of 78 514 patients, differentiated in 52 Northern (n = 15 040), 48 Southern (n = 27 127), 34 Western (n = 11 769), 24 Eastern European (n = 12 748), and 14 extra-European centres (n = 11 830). Greater ETP implementation was observed in Western (76%) and Northern (63%) regions, whereas lower rates were seen in Southern (58%), Eastern European (50%) and extra-European (36%) regions. The leading barrier was the lack of resources in all (83-65%) but Western region (37%) where patients were enrolled in dedicated settings and specialized units (75%). In 40% of centres, non-inclusion of ETP in the national or local guideline pathway accounted for the lack of ETP implementation. CONCLUSION: Exercise training programmes are poorly implemented in the ESC affiliated countries, mainly because of the lack of resources and/or national and local guidelines. The linkage with dedicated cardiac rehabilitation centres (as in the Western region) or the model of local rehabilitation services adopted in Northern countries may be considered as options to overcome these gaps.

6.
J Rehabil Med ; 51(7): 532-538, 2019 Jul 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31161225

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Physical activity is an essential part of managing heart failure. However, adherence to activity recommendations is low, especially in female patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of healthcare providers regarding sex differences in physical activity, motivation, barriers, and whether adaptations in care based on sex might be meaningful. METHODS: This is a qualitative study; data were collected in semi-structured interviews with healthcare providers. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The major overarching theme was that healthcare providers feel that "Men and women are equal, but different". This theme was explained in terms of 7 sub-themes with associated categories, as follows: "Men and women prefer and perform different physical activity regardless of health status", "Male and female heart failure patients have different motivations for, and barriers to, being active", "Factors related to differences in physical activity and physical capacity between male and female heart failure patients", "Heart failure has more impact on physical activity and physical capacity than patient's sex", and "Tailoring activity advice for heart failure patients based on sex." DISCUSSION: Healthcare providers had clear opinions regarding the existence of sex differences that might affect patients' care. Several differences were identified in male and female heart failure patients in terms of physical activity. There seems to be a conflict between fear of discriminating and the value of personalizing care.

7.
J Rehabil Med ; 51(8): 607-615, 2019 Sep 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31233184

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To describe the relationships among 3 measures of physical fitness (exercise capacity, muscle function and functional capacity) in patients with heart failure, and to determine whether these measures are influenced by impairment of movement. METHODS: Secondary analysis of baseline data from the Italian subsample (n = 96) of patients with heart failure enrolled in a randomized controlled trial, the HF-Wii study. Exercise capacity was measured with the 6-min walk test, muscle function was measured with the unilateral isotonic heel-lift, bilateral isometric shoulder abduction and unilateral isotonic shoulder flexion, and functional capacity was measured with the Duke Activity Status Index. Principal component analysis was used to detect covariance of the data. RESULTS: Exercise capacity correlated with all of the tests related to muscle function (r = 0.691-0.423, p < 0.001) and functional capacity (r = 0.531). Moreover, functional capacity correlated with muscle func-tion (r = 0.482-0.393). Principal component analysis revealed the bidimensional structure of these 3 measures, thus accounting for 58% of the total variance in the variables measured. CONCLUSION: Despite the correlations among exercise capacity, muscle function and functional capacity, these measures loaded on 2 different factors. The use of a wider range of tests will help clinicians to perform a more tailored assessment of physical fitness, especially in those patients with heart failure who have impairment of movement.

8.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31119288

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Patient-centred care (PCC) is the cornerstone for healthcare professionals (HCP) to promote high quality care for patients with cardiovascular conditions. It is defined as 'Providing care that is respectful of, and responsive to, individual patient preferences, needs and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions'. PCC can improve patient outcomes and allow patients and HCP to manage care collaboratively using best available evidence. However, there is no clear understanding how extensively these guidelines incorporate PCC recommendations. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incorporation of PCC into a selection of guidelines published by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). METHODS: Using a narrative literature review and expert consensus, the Science Committee within the Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (ACNAP) developed a checklist to determine PCC incorporation in clinical guidelines. Nine ESC guidelines were reviewed evaluated with committee members independently evaluating five PCC aspects: patient voice & involvement, multidisciplinary involvement, holistic care recommendations, flexibility to meet patients' needs, and provision of patient tools. The level of congruence in item ratings by experts was then compared. RESULTS: The incorporation of PCC using these respective five categories, ranged from 4% (patient tools) to 53% in the 'multidisciplinary involvement' category. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the inclusion of PCC was low, indicating that patient perspectives and needs were less likely to be taken into account when developing, endorsing or formulating recommendations. Future development of guidelines should ensure better incorporation of patients' perspective, in particular, and other PCC aspects highlighted in this study.

9.
Eur J Heart Fail ; 2019 May 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31129923

RESUMO

The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) has published a series of guidelines on heart failure (HF) over the last 25 years, most recently in 2016. Given the amount of new information that has become available since then, the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the ESC recognized the need to review and summarise recent developments in a consensus document. Here we report from the HFA workshop that was held in January 2019 in Frankfurt, Germany. This expert consensus report is neither a guideline update nor a position statement, but rather a summary and consensus view in the form of consensus recommendations. The report describes how these guidance statements are supported by evidence, it makes some practical comments, and it highlights new research areas and how progress might change the clinical management of HF. We have avoided re-interpretation of information already considered in the 2016 ESC/HFA guidelines. Specific new recommendations have been made based on the evidence from major trials published since 2016, including sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors in type 2 diabetes mellitus, MitraClip for functional mitral regurgitation, atrial fibrillation ablation in HF, tafamidis in cardiac transthyretin amyloidosis, rivaroxaban in HF, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in non-ischaemic HF, and telemedicine for HF. In addition, new trial evidence from smaller trials and updated meta-analyses have given us the chance to provide refined recommendations in selected other areas. Further, new trial evidence is due in many of these areas and others over the next 2 years, in time for the planned 2021 ESC guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure.

10.
Heart Lung ; 48(5): 381-385, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31122692

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Physical activity is important for all heart failure (HF) patients to improve quality of life and physical function. Since adherence to physical activity is low and could differ between seasons, it is essential to explore factors related to change that may depend on seasonal changes. The purpose of this study was to describe the seasonal differences in physical activity and assess factors that influence these differences in a country with markedly different winter-to-summer weather conditions (in temperature, hours of daylight and snow fall). METHODS: The study had a cross-sectional survey design. Outpatients with HF completed a questionnaire on physical activity, motivation and self-efficacy to exercise and HF symptom severity in the summer and the winter in a northern hemisphere country. We used analysis of variance to evaluate seasonal differences in physical activity, motivation, self-efficacy and HF symptom severity. RESULTS: Eighty-seven patients with HF (29% women, mean age 70 ± 9 years) were included and 35% performed less physical activity (METs) in the winter, compared to the summer. Increased symptom severity during the winter was associated with lower activity levels. CONCLUSION: One-third of the patients performed less physical activity during the winter compared to the summer, and this was associated with symptom severity. Decreased physical activity was not related with motivation and self-efficacy. This study emphasises the need for personalised physical activity programmes that also assess symptom severity and change in symptom severity depending between seasons.

11.
Eur J Heart Fail ; 21(5): 553-576, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30989768

RESUMO

Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of heart muscle diseases and an important cause of heart failure (HF). Current knowledge on incidence, pathophysiology and natural history of HF in cardiomyopathies is limited, and distinct features of their therapeutic responses have not been systematically addressed. Therefore, this position paper focuses on epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history and latest developments in treatment of HF in patients with dilated (DCM), hypertrophic (HCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathies. In DCM, HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) has high incidence and prevalence and represents the most frequent cause of death, despite improvements in treatment. In addition, advanced HF in DCM is one of the leading indications for heart transplantation. In HCM, HF with preserved ejection (HFpEF) affects most patients with obstructive, and ∼10% of patients with non-obstructive HCM. A timely treatment is important, since development of advanced HF, although rare in HCM, portends a poor prognosis. In RCM, HFpEF is common, while HFrEF occurs later and more frequently in amyloidosis or iron overload/haemochromatosis. Irrespective of RCM aetiology, HF is a harbinger of a poor outcome. Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of HF in cardiomyopathies have significant implications for therapeutic decision-making. In addition, new aetiology-specific treatment options (e.g. enzyme replacement therapy, transthyretin stabilizers, immunoadsorption, immunotherapy, etc.) have shown a potential to improve outcomes. Still, causative therapies of many cardiomyopathies are lacking, highlighting the need for the development of effective strategies to prevent and treat HF in cardiomyopathies.

12.
Geriatr Nurs ; 2019 Mar 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30867091

RESUMO

Measuring family caregivers' experiences of collaboration with nurses is important in the context of health care reforms that advocate an increased role of families in care. The Family Collaboration Scale (FCS) measures collaboration between nurses and family caregivers, however, the scale has a broad scope. Thus, the aim of this study was to construct a measure that is focused on collaboration only. After revision, a 25-item version of the FCS was sent to 777 family caregivers of hospitalized patients (≥70 years). Psychometric evaluation was employed by the Non-Parametric Item Response Theory to evaluate how items of the revised FCS behave. In total, 302 (39%) family caregivers were found eligible, mean (SD) age 65 (13) and 71% female. A 20-item FCS is proposed showing good psychometric properties. This study contributes to the limited knowledge of measuring collaboration between family caregivers and nurses.

13.
Geriatr Nurs ; 2019 Mar 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30867090

RESUMO

Family caregivers of an older person who was recently hospitalized often feel unprepared for their new or expanded tasks. Quality and continuity of care for older people is expected to improve when nurses collaborate with family caregivers as partners in care. The aim of this study was to explore the unique contribution of collaboration between family caregivers of older patients and hospital nurses as a possible predictor for preparedness of caregiving after hospital discharge. With a cross sectional design, a postal survey was sent to 777 family caregivers of home-dwelling hospitalized patients (≥70 years). Regression analyses were used to test the association between collaboration and preparedness for caregiving. In total, 506 (68%) family caregivers responded of whom 281 (38%) were eligible. Their mean (SD) age was 65 (13) and 71% were female. Family caregivers' level of collaboration with nurses was significantly associated with their preparedness for caregiving.

14.
15.
J Med Internet Res ; 21(2): e10362, 2019 Feb 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30724744

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Noninvasive telemonitoring (TM) can be used in heart failure (HF) patients to perform early detection of decompensation at home, prevent unnecessary health care utilization, and decrease health care costs. However, the evidence is not sufficient to be part of HF guidelines for follow-up care, and we have no knowledge of how TM is used in the Nordic Baltic region. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe health care professionals' (HCPs) perception of and presumed experience with noninvasive TM in daily HF patient care, perspectives of the relevance of and reasons for applying noninvasive TM, and barriers to the use of noninvasive TM. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was performed between September and December 2016 in Norway and Lithuania with physicians and nurses treating HF patients at either a hospital ward or an outpatient clinic. A total of 784 questionnaires were sent nationwide by postal mail to 107 hospitals. The questionnaire consisted of 43 items with close- and open-ended questions. In Norway, the response rate was 68.7% (226/329), with 57 of 60 hospitals participating, whereas the response rate was 68.1% (310/455) in Lithuania, with 41 of 47 hospitals participating. Responses to the closed questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and the open-ended questions were analyzed using summative content analysis. RESULTS: This study showed that noninvasive TM is not part of the current daily clinical practice in Norway or Lithuania. A minority of HCPs responded to be familiar with noninvasive TM in HF care in Norway (48/226, 21.2%) and Lithuania (64/310, 20.6%). Approximately half of the HCPs in both countries perceived noninvasive TM to be relevant in follow-up of HF patients in Norway (131/226, 58.0%) and Lithuania (172/310, 55.5%). For physicians in both countries and nurses in Norway, the 3 most mentioned reasons for introducing noninvasive TM were to improve self-care, to reduce hospitalizations, and to provide high-quality care, whereas the Lithuanian nurses described ability to treat more patients and to reduce their workload as reasons for introducing noninvasive TM. The main barriers to implement noninvasive TM were lack of funding from health care authorities or the Territorial Patient Fund. Moreover, HCPs perceive that HF patients themselves could represent barriers because of their physical or mental condition in addition to a lack of internet access. CONCLUSIONS: HCPs in Norway and Lithuania are currently nonusers of TM in daily HF care. However, they perceive a future with TM to improve the quality of care for HF patients. Financial barriers and HF patients' condition may have an impact on the use of TM, whereas sufficient funding from health care authorities and improved knowledge may encourage the more widespread use of TM in the Nordic Baltic region and beyond.

17.
Patient Prefer Adherence ; 12: 2223-2231, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30425459

RESUMO

Background: Patients with heart failure (HF) can suffer from increased thirst intensity and distress. Trajectories of thirst intensity and distress from hospital to home are unclear. The aim of this study was to describe thirst intensity and distress trajectories in patients from the time of hospital admission to 4 weeks after discharge, and describe trajectories of thirst intensity and distress by patients' characteristics (gender, age, body mass index [BMI], plasma urea, anxiety, and depression). Patients and methods: In this observational study, data were collected from patients with HF (n=30) at hospital admission, discharge, and at 2 and 4 weeks after discharge. Thirst intensity (visual analog scale, 100 mm) and distress (Thirst Distress Scale-HF, score 9-45) were used. Trajectories were examined using growth modeling. Results: Trajectory of the thirst intensity was significantly different, for patients with low and high thirst intensity levels (median cut-off 39 mm), from admission to 4 weeks follow up (thirst increased and decreased, respectively). Patients with high level of thirst distress (median score >22) at admission, having fluid restriction and women continued to have higher thirst distress over time. Patients feeling depressed had higher thirst intensity over time. There were no differences in the trajectories of thirst intensity and distress by age, BMI, plasma urea, and anxiety. Conclusion: Intensity and distress of thirst, having fluid restriction, and feeling depressed at the admission were critical in predicting the trajectory of thirst intensity and distress after discharge to home in patients with HF. Effective intervention relieving thirst should be provided before their discharge to home.

18.
Eur J Heart Fail ; 2018 Nov 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30474896

RESUMO

Exercise training (ET) and secondary prevention measures in cardiovascular disease aim to stimulate early physical activity and to facilitate recovery and improve health behaviours. ET has also been proposed for heart failure patients with a ventricular assist device (VAD), to help recovery in the patient's functional capacity. However, the existing evidence in support of ET in these patients remains limited. After a review of current knowledge on the causes of the persistence of limitation in exercise capacity in VAD recipients, and concerning the benefit of ET in VAD patients, the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology has developed the present document to provide practical advice on implementing ET. This includes appropriate screening to avoid complications and then starting with early mobilisation, ET prescription is individualised to meet the patient's needs. Finally, gaps in our knowledge are discussed.

19.
ANS Adv Nurs Sci ; 2018 Nov 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30475237

RESUMO

The Middle-Range Theory of Self-Care of Chronic Illness has been used widely since it was first published in 2012. With the goal of theoretical refinement in mind, we evaluated the theory to identify areas where the theory lacked clarity and could be improved. The concept of self-care monitoring was determined to be underdeveloped. We do not yet know how the process of symptom monitoring influences the symptom appraisal process. Also, the manner in which self-care monitoring and self-care management are associated was thought to need refinement. As both of these issues relate to symptoms, we decided to enrich the Middle-Range Theory with knowledge from theories about symptoms. Here, we propose a revision to the Middle-Range Theory of Self-Care of Chronic Illness where symptoms are clearly integrated with the self-care behaviors of self-care maintenance, monitoring, and management.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

20.
Eur J Prev Cardiol ; : 2047487318815316, 2018 Nov 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30477323
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