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1.
J Clin Nurs ; 2020 Apr 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32250493

RESUMO

Quarantine or physical isolation, used for centuries to contain the spread of infection, isolates those who have (or may have) been infected by a contagious disease to control or limit contamination. The COVID-19, a novel coronavirus first reported in Wuhan, China in late 2019, has rapidly spread across the globe becoming a pandemic. Modern quarantine strategies have been imposed globally in an attempt to curtail the spread of the COVID-19 infection including short- to medium-term lockdowns, voluntary home curfew, restriction on the assembly of groups of people, cancellation of planned social and public events, closure of mass transit systems, and other travel restrictions.

2.
J Clin Nurs ; 2020 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32237252

RESUMO

Personal resilience has been conceptualised in many different ways; however, a common definition is that resilience is the ability to cope successfully despite adverse circumstances (Henshall, 2020). Historically, the term 'resilience' encompasses both physiological and psychological aspects and the latter is personal to individuals, with some people having more developed strategies for personal resilience than others. Understandings of resilience vary between populations, contexts and cultures (McDonald et al., 2012), with resilience being viewed in some cases as an inherent personality trait and in others as a dynamic process existing on a continuum between resilience and vulnerability.

3.
J Clin Nurs ; 2020 Apr 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32239784

RESUMO

Internationally, health authorities and governments are warning older people that they are at a higher risk of more serious and possible fatal illness associated with COVID-19. Mortality data from Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service (25/3/20) indicates a risk of mortality of 3.6% for people in their 60s, which increases to 8.0% and 14.8% for people in their 70s and over 80s. Therefore, the global recommendation for older populations includes social isolation, which involves staying at home and avoiding contact with other people, possibly for an extended period of time, currently estimated to be between three and four months. Older populations in this current context, refers to people over 70 years, and 50 years in some particularly vulnerable Indigenous populations.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32198811

RESUMO

Seclusion and restraint are coercive practices associated with physical and psychological harm. International bodies have called for an end to these practices. However, these practices continue to be used. Elimination programmes have had some success in reducing the rates of these practices. Understanding coercive practices through the perspectives of involved individuals may facilitate a complete cessation of seclusion and restraint from the practice. Therefore, this qualitative review explored how nurses and consumers experienced seclusion and restraint events in mental health care. Five databases were searched. The search strategy resulted in the inclusion of fourteen qualitative papers. A thematic analysis was used to synthesize the findings. Six themes emerged under three main categories; shared experiences: disruption in care, disruption in the therapeutic relationship and shared negative impacts; nurses' experiences: Absence of less coercive alternatives; and consumers' experiences: overpowered, humiliated and punished. Considering these experiences during planning for seclusion and restraint prevention might facilitate more effective implementation of seclusion and restraint elimination programmes. Our findings suggested that consumers should receive recovery-oriented, trauma-informed and consumer-centred care; while nurses should be better supported through personal, professional and organizational developmental strategies. Further research should focus on investigating shared interventions among consumers and nurses and exploring carers' experiences with coercive practices.

5.
Contemp Nurse ; : 1-18, 2020 Mar 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32141400

RESUMO

Background: Regular health screening provides opportunities for early detection and effective treatment of disease. There is underutilisation of health services by migrants from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, particularly refugees in Australia.Aim: To explore the beliefs, understandings, and use of health and healthcare screening services among African refugee women living in Australia.Design/Method: Qualitative secondary analysis.Method: Oral narratives derived from two primary qualitative datasets of Sub-Saharan women in New South Wales, Australia, underwent secondary thematic analysis.Findings: Twenty-two of the forty-two women had refugee status on migrating to Australia. Thematic findings reflection of misinformation, low health literacy, and health screening as not a priority.Conclusions: There is an urgent need to develop innovative strategies to engage refugee migrant women in health screening by provision of culturally meaningful health information.Relevance to clinical practice: Including refugee women's suggestions for information to be provided by health services may improve attitudes towards screening and preventative health care.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32048469

RESUMO

Nurses play a crucial role in the implementation of restrictive practices such as seclusion and restraint. Restrictive practices have been widely recognized as harmful practices and efforts to reduce their use have been in place for several years. While some reductions have been achieved, more information and insight into the perspectives and experiences of front-line mental health nursing staff is required if further changes are to be realized. Sixty-five respondents participated in an online survey to investigate Australian mental health nurses' personal experiences and opinions regarding restrictive practices. Analysis revealed restrictive practices as a complex, contested and challenging area of practice. Analysis of data revealed five main ways that restrictive practices were framed by respondents. These were as follows: as a response to fear; to maintain safety for all; a legacy of time and place; the last resort; and, a powerful source of occupational distress. In addition, findings revealed the need to support staff involved in restrictive practices. This need could be satisfied through the implementation of procedures to address post-restrictive distress at all levels of the organization. Ensuring an optimal work environment that includes appropriate staffing, availability of supportive education and structured routine debriefing of all episodes of restrictive practice is critical in achieving further reductions in seclusion and restraint.

8.
Nurse Res ; 28(1): 17-24, 2020 Mar 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32026662

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The use of focus groups to collect data has increased in nursing research and provides rich, in-depth understanding of a phenomenon that can inform clinical practice. Guidance has been developed on facilitating focus groups. However, there is little guidance about how to translate, analyse or present focus group data from countries with linguistic differences. AIM: To explore contemporary examples of translating, analysing and presenting focus group data from countries with linguistic differences and to provide an in-depth example of decision-making in a study involving focus group data from two countries. DISCUSSION: The study highlights the need for a clear rationale and transparency in the reporting of the translation, analysis and presentation of data. Detailed and transparent reporting needs to include not only translation, but also when this occurred and if the data were amalgamated. CONCLUSION: There is a need for evidence-based guidance concerning how to report the translation, transcription and analysis of focus group data from countries with linguistic differences. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The authors provide recommendations concerning information that researchers should provide about translation when publishing studies, and argue for the use of a bilingual lead researcher.

9.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 42: 102691, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31931304

RESUMO

This paper examines pre-registration nursing students' perceptions of the practice of intentional rounding and perceived benefits for nurses and patients. Intentional rounding was developed to ensure nursing staff regularly check on patients to ensure that all care needs are met. It has been linked to a reduction in falls and call bell use, and an increase in patient safety. No previous studies have examined pre-registration nursing students' role in the practice of intentional rounding during clinical placements nor the perceptions of rounding practices, important from a future workforce perspective. A cross-sectional multisite study was undertaken, and pre-registration nursing students completed the Nurses' Perceptions of Patient Rounding Scale between August 2017- June 2018, distributed using online education platforms and email. Strobe reporting guidelines were used to report findings. Participants perceived positive benefits in intentional rounding for nurses and patients. Mixed opinions surrounded the sufficiency of education received around the intervention. Previous nursing experience was linked to opposing opinions of intentional rounding, depending on education levels. Participants had a positive perception of intentional rounding practices overall. Education surrounding intentional rounding needs to be consistent, and introduced before students are expected to actively participate in the practice of rounding on clinical placement.

11.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 29(1): 92-101, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31917517

RESUMO

Migrants from areas affected by war, especially refugee migrants, are susceptible to mental health issues. In addition to recognising trauma, health professionals, such as mental health nurses, need to be aware of the strength and resilience of refugees and migrants. The capacity to provide trauma-informed care that is shaped by the recognition of clients' strength and resilience is required/paramount to meet the current demand of multiculturalism emanating from an increased global migration. To facilitate increased awareness about West African women's resilience prior to migration and support trauma-informed care, we used a qualitative strength-based storytelling approach with 22 West African women residing in Sydney, Australia. Thematic analysis of the women's stories identified two major themes: When the World Falls Apart and Battered but Strong. Findings revealed that past personal experiences significantly influenced participants' strength and resilience and contributed to their mental health. Mental health professionals such as nurses can play an important role by incorporating knowledge about the resilience of migrants and refugees into providing appropriate trauma-informed care.

12.
J Transcult Nurs ; : 1043659619899999, 2020 Jan 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31948353

RESUMO

Introduction: This article outlines the processes used to meaningfully and authentically engage Australian Aboriginal communities in Northern New South Wales, Australia, to develop culturally appropriate stroke health resources. Methodology: Participatory action research using the research topic yarning framework is a collaborative, culturally safe way to uncover vital information and concepts. There were two stages in the participatory action research project: community engagement and evaluation of the processes involved in developing the localised, culturally appropriate health resources. Results: Establishing relationships built on trust, mutual sharing of knowledge, and bringing together the wider community, enabled the health message to be embedded within the community, ensuring the message was culturally appropriate and sustainable. Discussion: The stroke education resource is a tangible outcome and a major achievement; however, the process of authentic engagement to achieve the final product was the ultimate accomplishment.

13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31930654

RESUMO

This study aimed to implement and evaluate a work-based personal resilience enhancement intervention for forensic nurses. A mixed methods design consisting of surveys, interviews, and a case study approach, whereby the experiences of a group of nurses were studied in relation to their experiences of an intervention programme to enhance personal resilience, was utilized. Nurses working on forensic inpatient wards were invited to participate. Senior nurses were recruited as mentors. Data were collected via pre- and post-programme surveys to evaluate nurses' levels of resilience. Post-programme interviews were undertaken with nurses and mentors to explore their experiences of the programme. Descriptive statistics of survey data examined changes in nurses' resilience levels pre- and post-intervention. Free-text survey data and interview data were analysed thematically. The SQUIRE 2.0 checklist was adhered to. Twenty-nine nurses participated. Levels of personal resilience (M = 4.12, SD = 0.60) were significantly higher post-programme than pre-programme (M = 3.42, SD = 0.70), (t49 = 3.80, P = 0.000, 95% CI = 0.32, 1.07). Nurses felt the programme had a marked impact on their personal resilience, self-awareness, confidence, and professional relationships. The benefits of the programme demonstrate the advantages of providing a nurturing environment for nurses to consolidate their resilience levels. Findings demonstrated that resilience enhancement programmes can increase nurses' levels of resilience and confidence and improve inter-professional relationships. Our findings are important for clinicians, nurse managers, and policymakers considering strategies for improving the workplace environment for nurses. The long-term impact of resilience programmes may improve nurse retention and recruitment.

14.
J Clin Nurs ; 2020 Jan 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31944460

RESUMO

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact of a Twitterchat focusing on antimicrobial resistance and it is feasibility for integration within a nursing prelicensure research methods class. BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance is one of the greatest threats to global health and food security. Consequently, developing a global approach with large outreach is critical. Twitter, as a popular social media platform, is useful for creating communities of practice and communities of interest. DESIGN: A case study design using a Twitterchat is a hosted, convened and focussed discussion on a particular topic using a discrete hashtag. METHOD: Using a standardised protocol, a Twitterchat was undertaken over a 24-hr period and digital metrics assessed at 72 hr. A summary of impact was undertaken using an online tool provided by Union Metrics (https://unionmetrics.com/). CONCLUSIONS: At 72 hr, 2,632,762 accounts were reached and over 10 million impressions achieved. Twitterchats can be useful in creating awareness and fostering a community of interest and demonstrating the role of nurses in thought leadership. A formalised research study will draw on this case study to evaluate the impact on the Twitter participants and nursing students. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Social media are an accessible and useful tool to harness focus and attention on clinical issues with global relevance. Demonstrating the utility and leverage to nursing students is important in increasing their understanding of the importance of communication and diffusion of information.

15.
Nurs Health Sci ; 22(1): 20-27, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31670474

RESUMO

Compassion fatigue is known to impact the well-being of nurses and patient safety outcomes. Currently, there is limited academic understanding of the role of demographic factors in contributing to compassion fatigue in critical care nurses. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between nurse demographic characteristics and the development of compassion fatigue, as indicated by level of burnout and compassion satisfaction in critical care nurses in Saudi Arabia. The cross-sectional study design included administering three surveys to critical care nurses (n = 321) in four Saudi public hospitals to examine the nurse demographic variables in relation to compassion fatigue, the compassion fatigue coping strategies of nurses, and nurse resilience. The results show both demographic and workplace structural elements, such as length of work shift, education level, and nationality, were all significant factors in resilience to compassion fatigue among Saudi critical care nurses, whereas factors of age and sex were not significant. This study concludes that the demographic characteristics of critical care nurses enable the identification of levels of compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction, and their resilience to the effects of compassion fatigue.

17.
J Clin Nurs ; 29(7-8): 1381-1397, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31856353

RESUMO

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the nature of knowledge exchange on a multi-disciplinary Australasian intensive care virtual community of practice, "ICUConnect." BACKGROUND: Current organisational structures and cultures constrain the social networks of healthcare professionals, limiting access to contemporary best practice knowledge. While virtual communities can facilitate knowledge and clinical expertise exchange in professional networks, their effectiveness has not been established. DESIGN: A sequential mixed-methods design with a quantitative core and qualitative supplementary component was used to explore the content of discussions from an intensive care virtual community. SRQR has been used to report this study. METHODS: Email archives of an intensive care listserv (2003-2013) were mined using a two-stage sampling technique to identify discussion threads (with >2 posts) concerning ventilator or airway practices (cluster) and two sets of 20 threads (stratified across years). Summative content analysis was used to examine both manifest and latent content. RESULTS: Forty threads containing 326 emails posted by 133 individuals from 80 organisations were analysed. Nurses contributed 68% (55% were in clinical leadership roles) and physicians 27%. Three subject areas were identified: clinical practices (71%); equipment (23%); and clinical governance (6%). "Knowledge-requested" and "knowledge-supplied" posts were categorised as follows: experiential and explicit (33% and 16%, respectively); experiential (27% and 35%); or explicit (40% and 17%). Knowledge supplied was also categorised as "know-how" (20%); "know-why" (5%) or "no knowledge" exchanged (6%). The central construct of virtual community work was identified with six elements that facilitated participation and knowledge exchange including: (a) the discussion thread; (b) sharing of artefacts; (c) community; (d) cordiality; (e) maven work; and (f) promotion of the VC. Members asked questions to benchmark their practice, while those who answered were focused on ensuring that best practices were delivered. CONCLUSIONS: ICUConnect reflected characteristics of a virtual community of practice, enabling key benefits for members and the broader Australasian intensive care community, especially access to best practice knowledge from clinical experts. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: This study demonstrated that a practice-based VC can function effectively as a VCoP to establish an effective professional network where members have access to up-to-date best practice knowledge. Healthcare organisations could leverage VCs to support the professional development of HCPs and ensure that local clinical practices are based on contemporaneous knowledge. Participation by nurses in these communities facilitates individual professional development and access to important clinical knowledge and expertise, and ultimately reinforcing the unique position of nursing in delivering effective, consistent high-quality patient care.

18.
J Clin Nurs ; 29(5-6): 720-735, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31856356

RESUMO

AIM: To better understand occupational stress faced by nurse academics. METHODS: A mixed-methods systematic review, following the Joanna Briggs Institute [JBI], (Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewers' Manual: 2014 edition, 2014) process. Studies were assessed for quality and risk of bias by using standardised critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute. In addition, processes and reporting were checked against the Equator guidelines. See Appendix S1. RESULTS: The review revealed that nursing academics do experience occupational stress, including burnout. Occupational stress for academic nurses is associated with various factors including work-life balance, workload issues, resources and support, and adapting to change. However, much of the literature focuses on nurses during the initial transition from clinical to academic environment, with rather less focus on established mid-to-late career nurse academics. DISCUSSION: Occupational stress and burnout are evident in the university academic workforce, adversely affecting the well-being of academic nurses, and the long-term sustainability of the academic nursing workforce. While there is considerable literature focusing on the novice academic nurse, particularly during the transition period, rather less is known about occupational stress among academic nurses across the career trajectory. Various strategies to deal with the negative consequences of occupational stress are identified, including (a) quality mentors for novice and younger nursing academics; (b) training in resilience building for novice academics; (c) supporting collegial relationships and reducing bullying; (d) assistance for professional development and research; (e) better support and resources to overcome increasing workloads; and (f) greater work-related empowerment to enhance job satisfaction. CONCLUSION: There is a need for a broader whole-of-career research focus to more fully identify, explore and mitigate the occupational stressors that negatively affect the academic nurse workforce. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: A strong and resilient academic nurse workforce is essential for the sustainability of the profession. Organisations should review their work practices and provide greater work-related empowerment to reduce occupational stressors among nursing academics.

19.
BMJ Qual Saf ; 29(1): 19-30, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31171710

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Improved hospital care is needed to reduce newborn mortality in low/middle-income countries (LMIC). Nurses are essential to the delivery of safe and effective care, but nurse shortages and high patient workloads may result in missed care. We aimed to examine nursing care delivered to sick newborns and identify missed care using direct observational methods. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using direct-observational methods for 216 newborns admitted in six health facilities in Nairobi, Kenya, was used to determine which tasks were completed. We report the frequency of tasks done and develop a nursing care index (NCI), an unweighted summary score of nursing tasks done for each baby, to explore how task completion is related to organisational and newborn characteristics. RESULTS: Nursing tasks most commonly completed were handing over between shifts (97%), checking and where necessary changing diapers (96%). Tasks with lowest completion rates included nursing review of newborns (38%) and assessment of babies on phototherapy (15%). Overall the mean NCI was 60% (95% CI 58% to 62%), at least 80% of tasks were completed for only 14% of babies. Private sector facilities had a median ratio of babies to nurses of 3, with a maximum of 7 babies per nurse. In the public sector, the median ratio was 19 babies and a maximum exceeding 25 babies per nurse. In exploratory multivariable analyses, ratios of ≥12 babies per nurse were associated with a 24-point reduction in the mean NCI compared with ratios of ≤3 babies per nurse. CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of nursing care is missed with potentially serious effects on patient safety and outcomes in this LMIC setting. Given that nurses caring for fewer babies on average performed more of the expected tasks, addressing nursing is key to ensuring delivery of essential aspects of care as part of improving quality and safety.

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