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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(10): e2019843, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33030551

RESUMO

Importance: Gender differences in interprofessional conflict may exist and precipitate differential achievement, wellness, and attrition in medicine. Objective: Although substantial attention and research has been directed toward improving gender equity in surgery and addressing overall physician wellness, research on the role of interprofessional conflict has been limited. The objective of this study was to understand scenarios driving interprofessional conflict involving women surgeons, the implications of the conflict on personal, professional, and patient outcomes, and how women surgeons navigate conflict adjudication. Design, Setting, and Participants: A qualitative approach was used to explore the nature, implications, and ways of navigating interprofessional workplace conflict experienced by women surgeons. The setting was a national sample of US women surgeons. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to recruit women surgeons in training or practice from annual surgical society meetings. Participants were eligible if they were currently in a surgical training program or surgical practice. Nearly all participants had experienced at least 1 workplace conflict with a nonphysician staff member resulting in a formal write-up. Exposures: A workplace conflict was defined as any conflict resulting in the nonphysician staff member taking action such as confronting the woman surgeon, reporting the event to supervisors, or filing a formal report. Main Outcomes and Measures: Interviews were conducted between February 19, 2019, and June 21, 2019. Recordings were transcribed and deidentified. Inductive thematic analysis was used to examine data in relation to the research questions. Results: Thirty US women surgeons (8 [27%] age 25-34 years, 16 [53%] age 35-44 years, 5 [17%] age 45-54 years, and 1 [3%] age 55-64 years) of varying surgical specialties were interviewed. Conflicts were often reported as due to a breakdown in communication or from performance-related disputes. Participants perceived personal and professional implications including self-doubt, depression, frustration, anxiety, loss of sleep, reputational harms, and delays to advancement. Participants also described potential patient safety implications primarily due to decreased communication resulting from some surgeons being hesitant to engage in subsequent interactions. Participants described a variety of navigation strategies including relationship management, rapport building, and social capital. The success of these processes tended to vary by individual circumstances, including the details of the conflict, practice setting, level of support of leadership, and individual personality of the surgeon. Conclusions and Relevance: This qualitative study highlights women surgeons' experiences with interprofessional workplace conflict. Interprofessional culture building, broader dissemination of implicit bias training, and transparent and equitable adjudication systems are potential strategies for avoiding or mitigating the implications of these conflicts.

3.
JCO Oncol Pract ; : OP2000454, 2020 Oct 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33095694

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The learning health care system (LHS) was designed to enable real-time learning and research by harnessing data generated during patients' clinical encounters. This novel approach begets ethical questions regarding the oversight of users and uses of patient data. Understanding patients' perspectives is vitally important. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted democratic deliberation sessions focused on CancerLinQ, a real-world LHS. Experts presented educational content, and then small group discussions were held to elicit viewpoints. The deliberations centered around whether policies should permit or deny certain users and uses of secondary data. De-identified transcripts of the discussions were examined by using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Analysis identified two thematic clusters: expectations and concerns, which seemed to inform LHS governance recommendations. Participants expected to benefit from the LHS through the advancement of medical knowledge, which they hoped would improve treatments and the quality of their care. They were concerned that profit-driven users might manipulate the data in ways that could burden or exploit patients, hinder medical decisions, or compromise patient-provider communication. It was recommended that restricted access, user fees, and penalties should be imposed to prevent users, especially for-profit entities, from misusing data. Another suggestion was that patients should be notified of potential ethical issues and included on diverse, unbiased governing boards. CONCLUSION: If patients are to trust and support LHS endeavors, their concerns about for-profit users must be addressed. The ethical implementation of such systems should consist of patient representation on governing boards, transparency, and strict oversight of for-profit users.

4.
Acad Med ; 95(10): 1479-1482, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33006867

RESUMO

The Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women is designed to promote the careers of senior female leaders in academic health care in a way that ultimately seeks to transform culture and promote gender equity far beyond the careers of its participants. In an era of increased awareness of gender inequity within academic medicine, the longevity of the ELAM program raises several important questions. First, why is such a program still needed? Second, what exactly does it do, and what has been its influence on its participants and beyond? And third, what lessons can ELAM's example provide to help guide the medical profession as it strives to promote gender equity in the field? In this Invited Commentary, the authors seek to answer these questions from the perspective of a recent program participant and the current program director. The authors review the evidence that identifies how women, even today, face accumulating disadvantage over the course of their academic careers, stemming from repeated encounters with powerful unconscious biases and stereotypes, societal expectations for a gendered division of domestic labor, and still-present overt discrimination and sexual harassment. They describe ELAM's approach, which builds the knowledge and skills of the women who participate in the program, while also intentionally raising their visibility within their home institutions so that they have opportunities to share with institutional leaders what they have learned in ways that not only promote their own careers but also support gender equity in the broader environment. The authors conclude by offering thoughts on how ELAM's model may be leveraged in the future, ideally in partnership with the numerous professional societies, funding agencies, and other organizations that are committed to accelerating the rate of progress toward gender equity at all levels of academic medicine.

5.
J Natl Compr Canc Netw ; 18(10): 1322-1326, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33022640

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients with good performance status (PS) tend to be favored in randomized clinical trials (RCTs), possibly limiting the generalizability of trial findings. We aimed to characterize trial-related factors associated with the use of PS eligibility criteria and analyze patient accrual breakdown by PS. METHODS: Adult, therapeutic, multiarm phase III cancer-specific RCTs were identified through ClinicalTrials.gov. PS data were extracted from articles. Trials with a PS restriction ECOG score ≤1 were identified. Factors associated with PS restriction were determined, and the use of PS restrictions was analyzed over time. RESULTS: In total, 600 trials were included and 238,213 patients had PS data. Of those trials, 527 studies (87.8%) specified a PS restriction cutoff, with 237 (39.5%) having a strict inclusion criterion (ECOG PS ≤1). Enrollment criteria restrictions based on PS (ECOG PS ≤1) were more common among industry-supported trials (P<.001) and lung cancer trials (P<.001). Nearly half of trials that led to FDA approval included strict PS restrictions. Most patients enrolled across all trials had an ECOG PS of 0 to 1 (96.3%). Even among trials that allowed patients with ECOG PS ≥2, only 8.1% of those enrolled had a poor PS. Trials of lung, breast, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary cancers all included <5% of patients with poor PS. Finally, only 4.7% of patients enrolled in trials that led to subsequent FDA approval had poor PS. CONCLUSIONS: Use of PS restrictions in oncologic RCTs is pervasive, and exceedingly few patients with poor PS are enrolled. The selective accrual of healthier patients has the potential to severely limit and bias trial results. Future trials should consider a wider cancer population with close toxicity monitoring to ensure the generalizability of results while maintaining patient safety.

6.
J Clin Oncol ; : JCO2001703, 2020 Sep 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32986529

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Understanding acute toxicities after whole-breast radiotherapy is important to inform patients, guide treatment decisions, and target supportive care. We evaluated patient-reported outcomes prospectively collected from a cohort of patients with breast cancer. METHODS: We describe the maximal toxicity reported by 8,711 patients treated between 2012 and 2019 at 27 practices. Multivariable models identified characteristics associated with (1) breast pain, (2) bother from itching, stinging/burning, swelling, or hurting of the treated breast, and (3) fatigue within 7 days of completing whole-breast radiotherapy. RESULTS: Moderate or severe breast pain was reported by 3,233 (37.1%): 1,282 (28.9%) of those receiving hypofractionation and 1,951 (45.7%) of those receiving conventional fractionation. Frequent bother from at least one breast symptom was reported by 4,424 (50.8%): 1,833 (41.3%) after hypofractionation and 2,591 (60.7%) after conventional fractionation. Severe fatigue was reported by 2,008 (23.1%): 843 (19.0%) after hypofractionation and 1,165 (27.3%) after conventional fractionation. Among patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy, younger age (P < .001), higher body mass index (BMI; P < .001), Black (P < .001) or other race (P = .002), smoking status (P < .001), larger breast volume (P = .002), lack of chemotherapy receipt (P = .004), receipt of boost treatment (P < .001), and treatment at a nonteaching center predicted breast pain. Among patients receiving conventionally fractionated radiotherapy, younger age (P < .001), higher BMI (P = .003), Black (P < .001) or other race (P = .002), diabetes (P = .001), smoking status (P < .001), and larger breast volume (P < .001) predicted breast pain. CONCLUSION: In this large observational data set, substantial differences existed according to radiotherapy dose fractionation. Race-related differences in pain existed despite controlling for multiple other factors; additional research is needed to understand what drives these differences to target potentially modifiable factors. Intensifying supportive care may be appropriate for subgroups identified as being vulnerable to greater toxicity.

9.
Am J Infect Control ; 2020 Sep 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-800031

RESUMO

A significant change for patients and families during SARs-CoV-2 has been the restriction of visitors for hospitalized patients. We analyzed SARs-CoV-2 hospital visitation policies and found widespread variation in both development and content. This variation has the potential to engender inequity in access. We propose guidance for hospital visitation policies for this pandemic to protect, respect, and support patients, visitors, clinicians, and communities.

10.
Am J Infect Control ; 2020 Sep 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32991966

RESUMO

A significant change for patients and families during SARs-CoV-2 has been the restriction of visitors for hospitalized patients. We analyzed SARs-CoV-2 hospital visitation policies and found widespread variation in both development and content. This variation has the potential to engender inequity in access. We propose guidance for hospital visitation policies for this pandemic to protect, respect, and support patients, visitors, clinicians, and communities.

11.
Pract Radiat Oncol ; 2020 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32947041

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Scales for rating acute radiation dermatitis (ARD) have not been validated despite decades of clinical use, and little is known regarding the relationship between toxicity scores and patient-reported symptoms. Skin tone also complicates assessment of ARD, and as such we sought to design an illustrated scale to consistently describe ARD across several skin tone types in breast cancer patients undergoing radiation (RT). METHODS: Patients undergoing RT for breast cancer were enrolled on a prospective study with photographs obtained at 2-week intervals. Photographs were clustered according to the apparent severity of acute radiation dermatitis and a descriptive photonumeric scale was developed. Four clinically experienced raters used both the illustrated photonumeric scale and the CTCAE to independently score the collection of photographs in two independent sessions. RESULTS: Among 80 unique patients with 192 photographs, 47 patients (59%) completed questionnaires about their symptoms during RT. Physicians completed toxicity forms at the point-of-care for 52 patients (65%). Photonumeric ratings compared against patient reports of dry and moist desquamation demonstrated high specificity (95% and 93%, respectively) and negative predictive value (84% and 92%), indicating correct identification of patients who did not report dry or moist desquamation. The sensitivity and positive predictive value for separate measures of dry and moist desquamation were considerably lower. A combined measure of any desquamation (dry or moist) portrayed higher diagnostic accuracy, resulting in 72% sensitivity, 93% specificity, 75% PPV, and 92% NPV. Photonumeric ratings of dry or moist desquamation were significantly associated with patient reports of itching, burning/stinging, hurting, and swelling. CONCLUSION: The xxx scale for acute radiation dermatitis is a simple grading rubric that is distinguished by characterization of its intra- and inter-rater reliability and diagnostic accuracy, correlation with patient-reported symptoms of bother and pain, and applicability across the spectrum of skin pigmentation.

12.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(9): e19746, 2020 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32870160

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Respecting patient privacy and confidentiality is critical for doctor-patient relationships and public trust in medical professionals. The frequency of potentially identifiable disclosures online during periods of active engagement is unknown. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to quantify potentially identifiable content shared on social media by physicians and other health care providers using the hashtag #ShareAStoryInOneTweet. METHODS: We accessed and searched Twitter's API using Symplur software for tweets that included the hashtag #ShareAStoryInOneTweet. We identified 1206 tweets by doctors, nurses, and other health professionals out of 43,374 tweets shared in May 2018. Tweet content was evaluated in January 2019 to determine the incidence of instances where names or potentially identifiable information about patients were shared; content analysis of tweets in which information about others had been disclosed was performed. The study also evaluated whether participants raised concerns about privacy breaches and estimated the frequency of deleted tweets. The study used dual, blinded coding for a 10% sample to estimate intercoder reliability using Cohen κ statistic for identifying the potential identifiability of tweet content. RESULTS: Health care professionals (n=656) disclosing information about others included 486 doctors (74.1%) and 98 nurses (14.9%). Health care professionals sharing stories about patient care disclosed the time frame in 95 tweets (95/754, 12.6%) and included patient names in 15 tweets (15/754, 2.0%). It is estimated that friends or families could likely identify the clinical scenario described in 242 of the 754 tweets (32.1%). Among 348 tweets about potentially living patients, it was estimated that 162 (46.6%) were likely identifiable by patients. Intercoder reliability in rating the potential identifiability demonstrated 86.8% agreement, with a Cohen κ of 0.8 suggesting substantial agreement. We also identified 78 out of 754 tweets (6.5%) that had been deleted on the website but were still viewable in the analytics software data set. CONCLUSIONS: During periods of active sharing online, nurses, physicians, and other health professionals may sometimes share more information than patients or families might expect. More study is needed to determine whether similar events arise frequently and to understand how to best ensure that patients' rights are adequately respected.

13.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(9): e2017129, 2020 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32960279

RESUMO

Importance: Women aged 70 years or older with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer have an excellent prognosis, but because of their age and comorbidities, they are at higher risk for treatment-related adverse events. Despite studies demonstrating the safety of omitting previously routine therapies, including sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and postlumpectomy radiotherapy, these treatments continue to be used at high rates. Physicians cite patient preference as one factor associated with overuse. However, little is known about how women view potential de-escalation of therapies. Objective: To evaluate older women's preferences for SLNB and radiotherapy in the setting of guidelines recommending them or allowing for their omission. Design, Setting, and Participants: This qualitative study was performed from October 2019 to January 2020. Midwestern women aged 70 years and older who had never received a diagnosis of breast cancer were recruited online and interviewed. Guided by an interpretive description approach, interviews were analyzed to produce a thematic description. Data analysis was performed from January to March 2020. Exposures: Participants were presented with hypothetical scenarios in which they received a diagnosis of low-risk, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer and were given treatment options in accordance with current guidelines. Main Outcomes and Measures: The interviews elicited perspectives on breast cancer treatment, including surgery, SLNB, chemotherapy, and postlumpectomy radiotherapy. Results: The median (interquartile range) age of the 30 participants was 72.0 (71.0-76.5) years. Most of the women were White (26 participants [87%]), lived in metropolitan areas (29 participants [97%]), and were college educated (20 participants [67%] had a 4-year degree or higher). Overall, women expressed the belief that age-based guidelines were appropriate on the basis of decreased recurrence risk and increased frailty in older patients. However, many participants stated that these guidelines should not apply to healthy older women with a long life expectancy. Some participants struggled to understand that the basis for treatment de-escalation in older patients is a favorable, not poor, prognosis. Women who said they would undergo SLNB (12 participants [40%]) perceived the procedure as low risk and providing peace of mind. Most participants (22 participants [73%]) expressed a preference for omitting postlumpectomy radiotherapy because of the perceived risks, lack of benefit, and inconvenience. Conclusions and Relevance: Positive reframing of the excellent prognosis driving national recommendations for de-escalation may reduce breast cancer overtreatment in older women. Strategies for reducing SLNB use will likely require education on the risks vs benefits and addressing patient preferences for peace of mind. In contrast, efforts to reduce radiotherapy use may need to address clinician or organizational factors.

14.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 2020 Jul 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32734367

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: For women older than 70 years with early-stage breast cancer, the routine use of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and adjuvant radiotherapy offers no overall survival benefit and may be perceived as undesirable by many women. National guidelines allow possible omission of these practices for older women. This study aimed to assess the availability of web-based educational materials targeting older women and their age-specific treatment recommendations. METHODS: The study systematically assessed the websites of the top 25 "Best Hospitals for Cancer" ranked by the U.S. News & World Report, as well as the websites of four prominent national cancer organizations. RESULTS: Websites for the leading cancer hospitals and national cancer organizations contain extremely limited information directed toward older patients with breast cancer. Both SLNB and adjuvant radiotherapy are described as treatments "typically," "most often," or "usually" used in combination with breast-conserving surgery without circumstances noted for possible omission. Specifically, no hospital website and only one national organization in this study included information on the recommendation to avoid routine SLNB. Only two hospitals and two national organizations included information suggesting possible omission of adjuvant radiotherapy for patients older than 70 years. CONCLUSION: The absence of online material for older patients with breast cancer represents a gap potentially contributing to overtreatment by framing SLNB and adjuvant radiotherapy as necessary. Informational resources available to women aged 70 years or older may aid in informed physician-patient communication and decision-making, which may reduce SLNB and adjuvant radiotherapy for patients who might opt out of these procedures if fully informed about them.

15.
JAMA Oncol ; 2020 Aug 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32761102

RESUMO

Importance: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has dramatically changed the US health care system, causing an influx of patients who require resources. Many oncologists are having challenging conversations with their patients about how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting cancer care and may desire evidence-based communication guidance. Objectives: To identify the clinical scenarios that pose communication challenges, understand patient reactions to these scenarios, and develop a communication guide with sample responses. Design, Setting, and Participants: This qualitative study that was conducted at a single Midwestern academic medical center invited physicians to respond to a brief semistructured interview by email or telephone and then disseminated an anonymous online survey among patients with cancer. Oncology-specific, COVID-19-related clinical scenarios were identified by the physicians, and potential reactions to these scenarios were gleaned from the patient responses to the survey. Health communication experts were invited to participate in the iterative development of a communication guide, comprising 3 essential communication principles and strategies and informed by insights from physicians and patients. This study was conducted from March 25, 2020, to April 2, 2020. Interventions: Expert review, interviews, and surveys assessing challenging situations specific to cancer management during the COVID-19 pandemic. Main Outcomes and Measures: Oncology-specific, COVID-19-related clinical scenarios from physician interviews; responses to each scenario from patient surveys; and applicable communication principles from health communication expert literature review. Results: Of the 8 physicians who participated in interviews, 4 were men (50%) and 4 were women (50%). These physicians represented the following disciplines: internal medicine (n = 1), hematology/oncology (n = 2), radiation oncology (n = 3), and surgical oncology (n = 2). Their disease site specialization included cancers of the breast, head and neck, melanoma, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts. A total of 48 patients with cancer completed the online survey; no demographic information was collected from the patients. The physicians identified 8 oncology-specific, COVID-19-related scenarios in which communication might be challenging: (1) worse outcomes from COVID-19, (2) delay in cancer screening, (3) delay in diagnostic workup, (4) delay in initiation of treatment, (5) offer of nonstandard treatment, (6) treatment breaks, (7) delay in follow-up imaging or care, and (8) inability to be admitted into the hospital for management. Potential patient reactions to each of these scenarios were compiled from survey responses. For most scenarios, patient reactions involved anger, fear, and anxiety (eg, "I'm scared"; "This isn't fair. I am upset."). These emotional patient responses informed the selection of the 3 general communication principles, which suggested language and strategies that physicians can use to respond to patients. Conclusions and Relevance: In this qualitative study, physicians and patients identified communication needs used by health communication experts to inform the development of a practical, evidence-based communication guide for oncology care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

18.
JAMA Oncol ; 2020 Aug 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695709

RESUMO

Importance: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has dramatically changed the US health care system, causing an influx of patients who require resources. Many oncologists are having challenging conversations with their patients about how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting cancer care and may desire evidence-based communication guidance. Objectives: To identify the clinical scenarios that pose communication challenges, understand patient reactions to these scenarios, and develop a communication guide with sample responses. Design, Setting, and Participants: This qualitative study that was conducted at a single Midwestern academic medical center invited physicians to respond to a brief semistructured interview by email or telephone and then disseminated an anonymous online survey among patients with cancer. Oncology-specific, COVID-19-related clinical scenarios were identified by the physicians, and potential reactions to these scenarios were gleaned from the patient responses to the survey. Health communication experts were invited to participate in the iterative development of a communication guide, comprising 3 essential communication principles and strategies and informed by insights from physicians and patients. This study was conducted from March 25, 2020, to April 2, 2020. Interventions: Expert review, interviews, and surveys assessing challenging situations specific to cancer management during the COVID-19 pandemic. Main Outcomes and Measures: Oncology-specific, COVID-19-related clinical scenarios from physician interviews; responses to each scenario from patient surveys; and applicable communication principles from health communication expert literature review. Results: Of the 8 physicians who participated in interviews, 4 were men (50%) and 4 were women (50%). These physicians represented the following disciplines: internal medicine (n = 1), hematology/oncology (n = 2), radiation oncology (n = 3), and surgical oncology (n = 2). Their disease site specialization included cancers of the breast, head and neck, melanoma, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts. A total of 48 patients with cancer completed the online survey; no demographic information was collected from the patients. The physicians identified 8 oncology-specific, COVID-19-related scenarios in which communication might be challenging: (1) worse outcomes from COVID-19, (2) delay in cancer screening, (3) delay in diagnostic workup, (4) delay in initiation of treatment, (5) offer of nonstandard treatment, (6) treatment breaks, (7) delay in follow-up imaging or care, and (8) inability to be admitted into the hospital for management. Potential patient reactions to each of these scenarios were compiled from survey responses. For most scenarios, patient reactions involved anger, fear, and anxiety (eg, "I'm scared"; "This isn't fair. I am upset."). These emotional patient responses informed the selection of the 3 general communication principles, which suggested language and strategies that physicians can use to respond to patients. Conclusions and Relevance: In this qualitative study, physicians and patients identified communication needs used by health communication experts to inform the development of a practical, evidence-based communication guide for oncology care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32757135

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Although many studies clearly demonstrate disparities in cancer clinical trial enrollment, there is a lack of consensus on potential causes. Furthermore, virtually nothing is known about associations between patients' decision-making style and their participation in clinical trials. METHODS: Women with newly diagnosed, stage 0-II breast cancer reported to the Georgia and Los Angeles County Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries in 2013-2014 were surveyed approximately seven months after diagnosis. We investigated two primary outcome variables: (1) invitation to participate in a clinical trial, (2) participation in a clinical trial. We evaluated bivariate associations using Chi-squared tests and used multivariable logistic regression models to investigate associations between patient variables, including decision-making style, and the primary outcomes. RESULTS: 2578 patients responded (71% response rate); 30% were > age 65, 18% were black, 18% were Latina, 29% had ≤ high school education. 10% of patients reported invitation to participate in a clinical trial; 5% reported participation in a clinical trial. After adjustment younger age, receipt of chemotherapy or radiation, disease stage, and a more rational (versus more intuitive) decision-making style were associated with a higher odds of invitation to participate. Being married was associated with a higher odds of participation; having an annual family income ≥ $40,000 was associated with a lower odds of participation. CONCLUSIONS: 10% of patients reported invitation to participate in a clinical trial, and half of these reported participation. Invitation to participate varied by age and decision-making style, and participation varied by marital status and income.

20.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 2020 Jul 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32720038

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Multiple studies have demonstrated the safety of omitting therapies in older women with breast cancer. Despite de-implementation guidelines, up to 65% of older women continue to receive one or more of these low-value services. Previous work has investigated the role of both provider and patient attitudes as barriers to de-implementation; however, the importance of the patient's maximizing-minimizing preferences within this context remains unclear. METHODS: In this qualitative study, we conducted 30 semi-structured interviews with women ≥ 70 years of age without a previous diagnosis of breast cancer to elicit perspectives on breast cancer treatment in relation to their medical maximizing-minimizing preferences, as determined by the single-item maximizer-minimizer elicitation question (MM1). We used an interpretive description approach in analysis to produce a thematic survey. RESULTS: Participants were relatively evenly distributed across the MM1 (minimizer, n = 8; neutral, n = 13; maximizer, n = 9). Despite being told of recommendations allowing for the safe omission of sentinel lymph node biopsy and post-lumpectomy radiotherapy, maximizers consistently stated preferences for more medical intervention and aggressive therapies over minimizers and neutral individuals. CONCLUSION: Medical maximizing-minimizing preferences in older women correspond with preferences for breast cancer treatment options that guidelines identify as potentially unnecessary. Increased awareness of patient-level variability in maximizing-minimizing preferences may be valuable in developing optimal intervention strategies to reduce utilization of low-value care.

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