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1.
Science ; 367(6484)2020 03 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32193296

RESUMO

The cerebral cortex underlies our complex cognitive capabilities, yet little is known about the specific genetic loci that influence human cortical structure. To identify genetic variants that affect cortical structure, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 51,665 individuals. We analyzed the surface area and average thickness of the whole cortex and 34 regions with known functional specializations. We identified 199 significant loci and found significant enrichment for loci influencing total surface area within regulatory elements that are active during prenatal cortical development, supporting the radial unit hypothesis. Loci that affect regional surface area cluster near genes in Wnt signaling pathways, which influence progenitor expansion and areal identity. Variation in cortical structure is genetically correlated with cognitive function, Parkinson's disease, insomnia, depression, neuroticism, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.


Assuntos
Córtex Cerebral/anatomia & histologia , Variação Genética , Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/genética , Mapeamento Encefálico , Cognição , Loci Gênicos , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Tamanho do Órgão/genética , Doença de Parkinson/genética
2.
Hum Brain Mapp ; 2020 Mar 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32198905

RESUMO

Alterations in regional subcortical brain volumes have been investigated as part of the efforts of an international consortium, ENIGMA, to identify reliable neural correlates of major depressive disorder (MDD). Given that subcortical structures are comprised of distinct subfields, we sought to build significantly from prior work by precisely mapping localized MDD-related differences in subcortical regions using shape analysis. In this meta-analysis of subcortical shape from the ENIGMA-MDD working group, we compared 1,781 patients with MDD and 2,953 healthy controls (CTL) on individual measures of shape metrics (thickness and surface area) on the surface of seven bilateral subcortical structures: nucleus accumbens, amygdala, caudate, hippocampus, pallidum, putamen, and thalamus. Harmonized data processing and statistical analyses were conducted locally at each site, and findings were aggregated by meta-analysis. Relative to CTL, patients with adolescent-onset MDD (≤ 21 years) had lower thickness and surface area of the subiculum, cornu ammonis (CA) 1 of the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (Cohen's d = -0.164 to -0.180). Relative to first-episode MDD, recurrent MDD patients had lower thickness and surface area in the CA1 of the hippocampus and the basolateral amygdala (Cohen's d = -0.173 to -0.184). Our results suggest that previously reported MDD-associated volumetric differences may be localized to specific subfields of these structures that have been shown to be sensitive to the effects of stress, with important implications for mapping treatments to patients based on specific neural targets and key clinical features.

3.
Hum Brain Mapp ; 2020 Mar 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32154629

RESUMO

Neuroimaging has played an important part in advancing our understanding of the neurobiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). At the same time, neuroimaging studies of OCD have had notable limitations, including reliance on relatively small samples. International collaborative efforts to increase statistical power by combining samples from across sites have been bolstered by the ENIGMA consortium; this provides specific technical expertise for conducting multi-site analyses, as well as access to a collaborative community of neuroimaging scientists. In this article, we outline the background to, development of, and initial findings from ENIGMA's OCD working group, which currently consists of 47 samples from 34 institutes in 15 countries on 5 continents, with a total sample of 2,323 OCD patients and 2,325 healthy controls. Initial work has focused on studies of cortical thickness and subcortical volumes, structural connectivity, and brain lateralization in children, adolescents and adults with OCD, also including the study on the commonalities and distinctions across different neurodevelopment disorders. Additional work is ongoing, employing machine learning techniques. Findings to date have contributed to the development of neurobiological models of OCD, have provided an important model of global scientific collaboration, and have had a number of clinical implications. Importantly, our work has shed new light on questions about whether structural and functional alterations found in OCD reflect neurodevelopmental changes, effects of the disease process, or medication impacts. We conclude with a summary of ongoing work by ENIGMA-OCD, and a consideration of future directions for neuroimaging research on OCD within and beyond ENIGMA.

4.
Transl Psychiatry ; 10(1): 100, 2020 Mar 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32198361

RESUMO

This review summarizes the last decade of work by the ENIGMA (Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta Analysis) Consortium, a global alliance of over 1400 scientists across 43 countries, studying the human brain in health and disease. Building on large-scale genetic studies that discovered the first robustly replicated genetic loci associated with brain metrics, ENIGMA has diversified into over 50 working groups (WGs), pooling worldwide data and expertise to answer fundamental questions in neuroscience, psychiatry, neurology, and genetics. Most ENIGMA WGs focus on specific psychiatric and neurological conditions, other WGs study normal variation due to sex and gender differences, or development and aging; still other WGs develop methodological pipelines and tools to facilitate harmonized analyses of "big data" (i.e., genetic and epigenetic data, multimodal MRI, and electroencephalography data). These international efforts have yielded the largest neuroimaging studies to date in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance use disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy, and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. More recent ENIGMA WGs have formed to study anxiety disorders, suicidal thoughts and behavior, sleep and insomnia, eating disorders, irritability, brain injury, antisocial personality and conduct disorder, and dissociative identity disorder. Here, we summarize the first decade of ENIGMA's activities and ongoing projects, and describe the successes and challenges encountered along the way. We highlight the advantages of collaborative large-scale coordinated data analyses for testing reproducibility and robustness of findings, offering the opportunity to identify brain systems involved in clinical syndromes across diverse samples and associated genetic, environmental, demographic, cognitive, and psychosocial factors.

5.
Am J Psychiatry ; : appiajp201919030225, 2020 Mar 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32212855

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia has recently been associated with widespread white matter microstructural abnormalities, but the functional effects of these abnormalities remain unclear. Widespread heterogeneity of results from studies published to date preclude any definitive characterization of the relationship between white matter and cognitive performance in schizophrenia. Given the relevance of deficits in cognitive function to predicting social and functional outcomes in schizophrenia, the authors carried out a meta-analysis of available data through the ENIGMA Consortium, using a common analysis pipeline, to elucidate the relationship between white matter microstructure and a measure of general cognitive performance, IQ, in patients with schizophrenia and healthy participants. METHODS: The meta-analysis included 760 patients with schizophrenia and 957 healthy participants from 11 participating ENIGMA Consortium sites. For each site, principal component analysis was used to calculate both a global fractional anisotropy component (gFA) and a fractional anisotropy component for six long association tracts (LA-gFA) previously associated with cognition. RESULTS: Meta-analyses of regression results indicated that gFA accounted for a significant amount of variation in cognition in the full sample (effect size [Hedges' g]=0.27, CI=0.17-0.36), with similar effects sizes observed for both the patient (effect size=0.20, CI=0.05-0.35) and healthy participant groups (effect size=0.32, CI=0.18-0.45). Comparable patterns of association were also observed between LA-gFA and cognition for the full sample (effect size=0.28, CI=0.18-0.37), the patient group (effect size=0.23, CI=0.09-0.38), and the healthy participant group (effect size=0.31, CI=0.18-0.44). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides robust evidence that cognitive ability is associated with global structural connectivity, with higher fractional anisotropy associated with higher IQ. This association was independent of diagnosis; while schizophrenia patients tended to have lower fractional anisotropy and lower IQ than healthy participants, the comparable size of effect in each group suggested a more general, rather than disease-specific, pattern of association.

6.
Transl Psychiatry ; 10(1): 91, 2020 Mar 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32170058

RESUMO

The stress-related gene FKBP5 has been related to dysregulated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling, showing increased GR sensitivity in trauma-exposed subjects with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but not in those without PTSD. However, the neural mechanism underlying the effects of FKBP5 remains poorly understood. Two hundred and thirty-seven Han Chinese adults who had lost their only child were included. Four FKBP5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs3800373, rs9296158, rs1360780, and rs9470080) were genotyped. All 179 participants were successfully divided into three FKBP5 diplotype subgroups according to two major FKBP5 H1 and H2 yin yang haplotypes. Brain average spectral power was compared using a two-way (PTSD diagnosis and FKBP5 diplotypes) analysis of covariance within four separate frequency bands (slow-5, slow-4, slow-3, and slow-2). Adults with PTSD showed lower spectral power in bilateral parietal lobules in slow-4 and in left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in slow-5. There was significant FKBP5 diplotype main effect in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in slow-4 (H1/H1 higher than other two subgroups), and in precentral/postcentral gyri and middle cingulate cortex (MCC) in slow-3 (H2/H2 higher than other two subgroups). Also, there was a significant diagnosis × FKBP5 diplotype interaction effect in right parietal lobule in slow-3. These findings suggest that adults with PTSD have lower low-frequency power in executive control network regions. Lower power in ACC and greater power in the motor/sensory areas in FKBP5 high-risk diplotype group suggest a disturbance of emotional processing and hypervigilance/sensitization to threatening stimuli. The interaction effect of diagnosis × FKBP5 in parietal lobule may contribute to PTSD development.

7.
Brain ; 143(2): 684-700, 2020 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32040561

RESUMO

Brain structural covariance networks reflect covariation in morphology of different brain areas and are thought to reflect common trajectories in brain development and maturation. Large-scale investigation of structural covariance networks in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may provide clues to the pathophysiology of this neurodevelopmental disorder. Using T1-weighted MRI scans acquired from 1616 individuals with OCD and 1463 healthy controls across 37 datasets participating in the ENIGMA-OCD Working Group, we calculated intra-individual brain structural covariance networks (using the bilaterally-averaged values of 33 cortical surface areas, 33 cortical thickness values, and six subcortical volumes), in which edge weights were proportional to the similarity between two brain morphological features in terms of deviation from healthy controls (i.e. z-score transformed). Global networks were characterized using measures of network segregation (clustering and modularity), network integration (global efficiency), and their balance (small-worldness), and their community membership was assessed. Hub profiling of regional networks was undertaken using measures of betweenness, closeness, and eigenvector centrality. Individually calculated network measures were integrated across the 37 datasets using a meta-analytical approach. These network measures were summated across the network density range of K = 0.10-0.25 per participant, and were integrated across the 37 datasets using a meta-analytical approach. Compared with healthy controls, at a global level, the structural covariance networks of OCD showed lower clustering (P < 0.0001), lower modularity (P < 0.0001), and lower small-worldness (P = 0.017). Detection of community membership emphasized lower network segregation in OCD compared to healthy controls. At the regional level, there were lower (rank-transformed) centrality values in OCD for volume of caudate nucleus and thalamus, and surface area of paracentral cortex, indicative of altered distribution of brain hubs. Centrality of cingulate and orbito-frontal as well as other brain areas was associated with OCD illness duration, suggesting greater involvement of these brain areas with illness chronicity. In summary, the findings of this study, the largest brain structural covariance study of OCD to date, point to a less segregated organization of structural covariance networks in OCD, and reorganization of brain hubs. The segregation findings suggest a possible signature of altered brain morphometry in OCD, while the hub findings point to OCD-related alterations in trajectories of brain development and maturation, particularly in cingulate and orbitofrontal regions.

8.
Psychol Med ; : 1-10, 2020 Jan 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31983347

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Losing one's only child is a major traumatic life event that may lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, the underlying mechanisms of its psychological consequences remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated subregional hippocampal functional connectivity (FC) networks based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and the deoxyribonucleic acid methylation of the human glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) in adults who had lost their only child. METHODS: A total of 144 Han Chinese adults who had lost their only child (51 adults with PTSD and 93 non-PTSD adults [trauma-exposed controls]) and 50 controls without trauma exposure were included in this fMRI study (age: 40-67 years). FCs between hippocampal subdivisions (four regions in each hemisphere: cornu ammonis1 [CA1], CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus [DG]) and methylation levels of the NR3C1 gene were compared among the three groups. RESULTS: Trauma-exposed adults, regardless of PTSD diagnosis, had weaker positive FC between the left hippocampal CA1, left DG, and the posterior cingulate cortex, and weaker negative FC between the right CA1, right DG, and several frontal gyri, relative to healthy controls. Compared to non-PTSD adults, PTSD adults showed decreased negative FC between the right CA1 region and the right middle/inferior frontal gyri (MFG/IFG), and decreased negative FC between the right DG and the right superior frontal gyrus and left MFG. Both trauma-exposed groups showed lower methylation levels of the NR3C1 gene. CONCLUSIONS: Adults who had lost their only child may experience disrupted hippocampal network connectivity and NR3C1 methylation status, regardless of whether they have developed PTSD.

9.
AIDS Care ; 32(4): 429-437, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31635484

RESUMO

Although behavioral problems have been observed in children and adolescents with perinatally-acquired HIV infection (PHIV), behavioral information regarding younger PHIV children are scarce. This study aims to identify behavioral problems in PHIV and HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) children and to evaluate factors associated with such problems. A prospective study of PHIV and HEU young children was conducted. Behavioral problems were assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) at baseline and 12 months later among children aged 18-60 months old. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Parenting Styles & Dimensions Questionnaire identified primary caregivers' symptoms of depression and parenting styles, respectively, at both visits. Chi-squared analyses were used to compare the prevalence of behavioral problems between groups. Factors associated with behavioral problems were analyzed by logistic regression. From 2016 to 2017, 121 children (41 PHIV and 80 HEU) were assessed with no significant differences in prevalence of Total, Internalizing, Externalizing, and Syndrome scales problems between PHIV and HEU at both visits (p > 0.5). Primary caregivers' depression and lower education in addition to authoritarian and permissive parenting styles were significantly related to child behavioral problems. Family-centered care for families affected by HIV, including positive parenting promotion, mental health care, and education are warranted.

10.
AIDS ; 34(3): 415-426, 2020 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31725432

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess changes in regional brain volumes after 24 months among individuals who initiated combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) within weeks of HIV exposure. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study of Thai participants in the earliest stages of HIV-1infection. METHODS: Thirty-four acutely HIV-infected individuals (AHI; Fiebig I-V) underwent brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopy at 1.5 T and immediately initiated cART. Imaging was repeated at 24 months. Regional brain volumes were quantified using FreeSurfer's longitudinal pipeline. Voxel-wise analyses using tensor-based morphometry (TBM) were conducted to verify regional assessments. Baseline brain metabolite levels, blood and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers assessed by ELISA, and peripheral blood monocyte phenotypes measured by flow cytometry were examined as predictors of significant volumetric change. RESULTS: Participants were 31 ±â€Š8 years old. The estimated mean duration of infection at cART initiation was 15 days. Longitudinal analyses revealed reductions in volumes of putamen (P < 0.001) and caudate (P = 0.006). TBM confirmed significant atrophy in the putamen and caudate, and also in thalamic and hippocampal regions. In exploratory post-hoc analyses, higher baseline frequency of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)-expressing total monocytes correlated with greater caudate volumetric decrease (ρ = 0.67, P = 0.017), whereas the baseline density of PSGL-1-expressing inflammatory (CD14CD16) monocytes correlated with putamen atrophy (ρ = 0.65, P = 0.022). CONCLUSION: Suppressive cART initiated during AHI may not prevent brain atrophy. Volumetric decrease appears greater than expected age-related decline, although examination of longitudinal change in demographically similar HIV-uninfected Thai individuals is needed. Mechanisms underlying progressive HIV-related atrophy may include early activation and enhanced adhesive and migratory capacity of circulating monocyte populations.

11.
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses ; 36(1): 83-91, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31617381

RESUMO

Few studies have examined systemic mitochondrial function in conjunction with brain imaging in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Oxidative phosphorylation enzyme protein levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were measured in association with neuroimaging indices in 28 HIV+ individuals. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging yielded volumes of seven brain regions of interest; diffusion tensor imaging determined fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) in the corpus callosum (CC). Higher nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase levels correlated with lower volumes of thalamus (p = .005) and cerebral white matter (p = .049) and, in the CC, with lower FA (p = .011, body; p = .005, genu; p = .009, total CC) and higher MD (p = .023, body; p = .035, genu; p = .019, splenium; p = .014, total CC). Greater cytochrome c oxidase levels correlated with lower thalamic (p = .034) and cerebellar gray matter (p = .021) volumes. The results indicate that systemic mitochondrial cellular bioenergetics are associated with brain health in HIV.

12.
Mol Psychiatry ; 2019 Dec 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31811260

RESUMO

DNA methylation, which is modulated by both genetic factors and environmental exposures, may offer a unique opportunity to discover novel biomarkers of disease-related brain phenotypes, even when measured in other tissues than brain, such as blood. A few studies of small sample sizes have revealed associations between blood DNA methylation and neuropsychopathology, however, large-scale epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) are needed to investigate the utility of DNA methylation profiling as a peripheral marker for the brain. Here, in an analysis of eleven international cohorts, totalling 3337 individuals, we report epigenome-wide meta-analyses of blood DNA methylation with volumes of the hippocampus, thalamus and nucleus accumbens (NAcc)-three subcortical regions selected for their associations with disease and heritability and volumetric variability. Analyses of individual CpGs revealed genome-wide significant associations with hippocampal volume at two loci. No significant associations were found for analyses of thalamus and nucleus accumbens volumes. Cluster-based analyses revealed additional differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with hippocampal volume. DNA methylation at these loci affected expression of proximal genes involved in learning and memory, stem cell maintenance and differentiation, fatty acid metabolism and type-2 diabetes. These DNA methylation marks, their interaction with genetic variants and their impact on gene expression offer new insights into the relationship between epigenetic variation and brain structure and may provide the basis for biomarker discovery in neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric conditions.

13.
Mol Psychiatry ; 2019 Nov 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31780770

RESUMO

Identifying both the commonalities and differences in brain structures among psychiatric disorders is important for understanding the pathophysiology. Recently, the ENIGMA-Schizophrenia DTI Working Group performed a large-scale meta-analysis and reported widespread white matter microstructural alterations in schizophrenia; however, no similar cross-disorder study has been carried out to date. Here, we conducted mega-analyses comparing white matter microstructural differences between healthy comparison subjects (HCS; N = 1506) and patients with schizophrenia (N = 696), bipolar disorder (N = 211), autism spectrum disorder (N = 126), or major depressive disorder (N = 398; total N = 2937 from 12 sites). In comparison with HCS, we found that schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism spectrum disorder share similar white matter microstructural differences in the body of the corpus callosum; schizophrenia and bipolar disorder featured comparable changes in the limbic system, such as the fornix and cingulum. By comparison, alterations in tracts connecting neocortical areas, such as the uncinate fasciculus, were observed only in schizophrenia. No significant difference was found in major depressive disorder. In a direct comparison between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, there were no significant differences. Significant differences between schizophrenia/bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder were found in the limbic system, which were similar to the differences in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder relative to HCS. While schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may have similar pathological characteristics, the biological characteristics of major depressive disorder may be close to those of HCS. Our findings provide insights into nosology and encourage further investigations of shared and unique pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders.

14.
Addict Biol ; : e12830, 2019 Nov 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31746534

RESUMO

While imaging studies have demonstrated volumetric differences in subcortical structures associated with dependence on various abused substances, findings to date have not been wholly consistent. Moreover, most studies have not compared brain morphology across those dependent on different substances of abuse to identify substance-specific and substance-general dependence effects. By pooling large multinational datasets from 33 imaging sites, this study examined subcortical surface morphology in 1628 nondependent controls and 2277 individuals with dependence on alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, methamphetamine, and/or cannabis. Subcortical structures were defined by FreeSurfer segmentation and converted to a mesh surface to extract two vertex-level metrics-the radial distance (RD) of the structure surface from a medial curve and the log of the Jacobian determinant (JD)-that, respectively, describe local thickness and surface area dilation/contraction. Mega-analyses were performed on measures of RD and JD to test for the main effect of substance dependence, controlling for age, sex, intracranial volume, and imaging site. Widespread differences between dependent users and nondependent controls were found across subcortical structures, driven primarily by users dependent on alcohol. Alcohol dependence was associated with localized lower RD and JD across most structures, with the strongest effects in the hippocampus, thalamus, putamen, and amygdala. Meanwhile, nicotine use was associated with greater RD and JD relative to nonsmokers in multiple regions, with the strongest effects in the bilateral hippocampus and right nucleus accumbens. By demonstrating subcortical morphological differences unique to alcohol and nicotine use, rather than dependence across all substances, results suggest substance-specific relationships with subcortical brain structures.

15.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 4958, 2019 10 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31673008

RESUMO

Altered structural brain asymmetry in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been reported. However, findings have been inconsistent, likely due to limited sample sizes. Here we investigated 1,774 individuals with ASD and 1,809 controls, from 54 independent data sets of the ENIGMA consortium. ASD was significantly associated with alterations of cortical thickness asymmetry in mostly medial frontal, orbitofrontal, cingulate and inferior temporal areas, and also with asymmetry of orbitofrontal surface area. These differences generally involved reduced asymmetry in individuals with ASD compared to controls. Furthermore, putamen volume asymmetry was significantly increased in ASD. The largest case-control effect size was Cohen's d = -0.13, for asymmetry of superior frontal cortical thickness. Most effects did not depend on age, sex, IQ, severity or medication use. Altered lateralized neurodevelopment may therefore be a feature of ASD, affecting widespread brain regions with diverse functions. Large-scale analysis was necessary to quantify subtle alterations of brain structural asymmetry in ASD.

16.
Nat Genet ; 51(11): 1624-1636, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31636452

RESUMO

Subcortical brain structures are integral to motion, consciousness, emotions and learning. We identified common genetic variation related to the volumes of the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, brainstem, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen and thalamus, using genome-wide association analyses in almost 40,000 individuals from CHARGE, ENIGMA and UK Biobank. We show that variability in subcortical volumes is heritable, and identify 48 significantly associated loci (40 novel at the time of analysis). Annotation of these loci by utilizing gene expression, methylation and neuropathological data identified 199 genes putatively implicated in neurodevelopment, synaptic signaling, axonal transport, apoptosis, inflammation/infection and susceptibility to neurological disorders. This set of genes is significantly enriched for Drosophila orthologs associated with neurodevelopmental phenotypes, suggesting evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. Our findings uncover novel biology and potential drug targets underlying brain development and disease.


Assuntos
Encéfalo/anatomia & histologia , Encéfalo/metabolismo , Drosophila melanogaster/metabolismo , Variação Genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/genética , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/patologia , Adulto , Idoso , Animais , Estudos de Coortes , Drosophila melanogaster/genética , Drosophila melanogaster/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Humanos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Tamanho do Órgão
18.
Commun Biol ; 2: 285, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31396565

RESUMO

Brain lobar volumes are heritable but genetic studies are limited. We performed genome-wide association studies of frontal, occipital, parietal and temporal lobe volumes in 16,016 individuals, and replicated our findings in 8,789 individuals. We identified six genetic loci associated with specific lobar volumes independent of intracranial volume. Two loci, associated with occipital (6q22.32) and temporal lobe volume (12q14.3), were previously reported to associate with intracranial and hippocampal volume, respectively. We identified four loci previously unknown to affect brain volumes: 3q24 for parietal lobe volume, and 1q22, 4p16.3 and 14q23.1 for occipital lobe volume. The associated variants were located in regions enriched for histone modifications (DAAM1 and THBS3), or close to genes causing Mendelian brain-related diseases (ZIC4 and FGFRL1). No genetic overlap between lobar volumes and neurological or psychiatric diseases was observed. Our findings reveal part of the complex genetics underlying brain development and suggest a role for regulatory regions in determining brain volumes.

19.
Neuropsychopharmacology ; 44(13): 2285-2293, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31434102

RESUMO

Fronto-limbic white matter (WM) abnormalities are assumed to lie at the heart of the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD); however, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have reported heterogeneous results and it is not clear how the clinical heterogeneity is related to the observed differences. This study aimed to identify WM abnormalities that differentiate patients with BD from healthy controls (HC) in the largest DTI dataset of patients with BD to date, collected via the ENIGMA network. We gathered individual tensor-derived regional metrics from 26 cohorts leading to a sample size of N = 3033 (1482 BD and 1551 HC). Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) from 43 regions of interest (ROI) and average whole-brain FA were entered into univariate mega- and meta-analyses to differentiate patients with BD from HC. Mega-analysis revealed significantly lower FA in patients with BD compared with HC in 29 regions, with the highest effect sizes observed within the corpus callosum (R2 = 0.041, Pcorr < 0.001) and cingulum (right: R2 = 0.041, left: R2 = 0.040, Pcorr < 0.001). Lithium medication, later onset and short disease duration were related to higher FA along multiple ROIs. Results of the meta-analysis showed similar effects. We demonstrated widespread WM abnormalities in BD and highlighted that altered WM connectivity within the corpus callosum and the cingulum are strongly associated with BD. These brain abnormalities could represent a biomarker for use in the diagnosis of BD. Interactive three-dimensional visualization of the results is available at www.enigma-viewer.org.

20.
Cereb Cortex ; 29(12): 5217-5233, 2019 Dec 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31271414

RESUMO

Secondhand smoke exposure is a major public health risk that is especially harmful to the developing brain, but it is unclear if early exposure affects brain structure during middle age and older adulthood. Here we analyzed brain MRI data from the UK Biobank in a population-based sample of individuals (ages 44-80) who were exposed (n = 2510) or unexposed (n = 6079) to smoking around birth. We used robust statistical models, including quantile regressions, to test the effect of perinatal smoke exposure (PSE) on cortical surface area (SA), thickness, and subcortical volumes. We hypothesized that PSE would be associated with cortical disruption in primary sensory areas compared to unexposed (PSE-) adults. After adjusting for multiple comparisons, SA was significantly lower in the pericalcarine (PCAL), inferior parietal (IPL), and regions of the temporal and frontal cortex of PSE+ adults; these abnormalities were associated with increased risk for several diseases, including circulatory and endocrine conditions. Sensitivity analyses conducted in a hold-out group of healthy participants (exposed, n = 109, unexposed, n = 315) replicated the effect of PSE on SA in the PCAL and IPL. Collectively our results show a negative, long term effect of PSE on sensory cortices that may increase risk for disease later in life.

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