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1.
Am J Health Behav ; 45(4): 665-676, 2021 07 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34340734

RESUMO

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to understand COVID-19 information seeking among Korean immigrant women in comparison to their flu/cold information seeking. In particular, the study aimed to examine: (1) the levels of information sought regarding both COVID-19 and the flu/cold, and (2) the content of information discussed at each level. Methods: We analyzed the posts on Missy USA--one of the largest Korean online communities for married Korean immigrant women. Two sets of data, one for COVID-19 (n=726) and the other for the flu/cold (n=50), were analyzed with codes at different levels, which were adapted from the social-ecological model. Results: Applying the social-ecological model, we found that about 80% of information regarding the flu/cold and about 60% of COVID-19 information was concentrated at individual, interpersonal, and organizational levels. Information seeking at the community level was more frequent for COVID-19 than for the flu/cold. Conclusions: Our finding that Korean immigrant women primarily sought information regarding COVID-19 serves as a theoretical contribution at the transnational level, which might be relevant for immigrant women during the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Resfriado Comum , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor , Emigrantes e Imigrantes , Influenza Humana , Comportamento de Busca de Informação , Mídias Sociais , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , República da Coreia/etnologia , Estados Unidos/etnologia
2.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-11, 2021 Jul 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34292859

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to understand healthcare utilization behavior among Korean international students in the U.S. Participants and methods: Seventeen Korean international students in New York City participated in in-depth personal interviews. Results: The participants passively utilized U.S. healthcare by minimizing, avoiding, or delaying needed healthcare. However, they actively utilized transnational healthcare (in Korea) as an alternative strategy. Participants' negative perception of the U.S. healthcare system (as a predisposing factor) influenced healthcare utilization in the U.S. The enabling transnational factors influenced their transnational healthcare utilization. Low perceived need for healthcare (as a need factor) determined the country where they utilized healthcare. Conclusion: Andersen's healthcare utilization model is applicable in explaining healthcare utilization behavior among Korean international students, who could be considered a nontraditional vulnerable population. On-campus health education and promotion may help international students receive timely healthcare, especially those who do not return to their home country routinely.

3.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1137, 2021 06 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34126968

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake is low among East African adolescents in the US. Adolescents' preferences influence HPV vaccine decisions, yet few interventions exist that address East African adolescents' beliefs about HPV vaccines. We describe a multi-step process on how to create a theory-based comic book by integrating empirical findings, theory and focus group data from East African parents in the US. METHODS: Our multi-methods process included conducting focus groups with Somali, Ethiopian, and Eritrean mothers (n = 30) to understand mothers and adolescents socio-cultural beliefs and information needs about the HPV vaccine, creating comic book messages integrating the focus group findings, and assessing the acceptability of the finalized comic book among Somali, Ethiopian, and Eritrean adolescents (n = 134). RESULTS: We identified categories around socio-cultural beliefs (such ethnic representation and concerns about pork gelatin in vaccines), HPV vaccine information needs, and diffusion of information. We then mapped the categories to theoretical constructs and operationalized them into the comic book. Finally, we describe the overall acceptability of the comic book and specifics on comic book structure, appeal of characters, and message relevance. CONCLUSIONS: A rigorous multi-step process that integrates theory and focus group data can help create culturally appropriate health messages that can educate and appeal to the community.


Assuntos
Infecções por Papillomavirus , Vacinas contra Papillomavirus , Adolescente , Livros , Eritreia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Infecções por Papillomavirus/prevenção & controle , Pais , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde , Somália , Vacinação
4.
Hisp Health Care Int ; : 15404153211024116, 2021 Jun 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34159831

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hispanic/Latino populations experience significant barriers to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. ProCRCScreen is a multicomponent CRC screening program that can help primary care clinics improve CRC screening rates, but it needs adaptation to better meet the health care needs of Spanish-speaking Hispanic/Latino populations. METHODS: We conducted four focus groups with 22 Spanish-speaking Latino patients and used inductive qualitative content analysis to identify potential program adaptations. RESULTS: We identified lack of social support for CRC screening and confusion about completing stool-based testing as important barriers to CRC screening. Participants recommended increased specificity of the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) instructions to increase the likelihood of successful test completion, especially for first-time screening. They also endorsed patient navigation for support in completing CRC screening. DISCUSSION: We adapted the informational materials and workflows for the ProCRCScreen program. Future research to test the adapted program is needed.

5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34067932

RESUMO

To support implementation strategies for upcoming influenza (flu) vaccinations for foreign-born and racial/ethnic minority groups, we analyzed the 2018 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) database and performed logistic regression to examine the factors associated with, and the interaction between nativity and race/ethnicity in directing flu vaccination rates during the past 12 months (n = 25,045). As a result, we found nativity and race/ethnicity were associated with flu vaccination rates; foreign-born and non-Hispanic black respondents were less likely to take the vaccine than U.S.-born and non-Hispanic white respondents. The odds ratios were largest for the elderly, those working in the healthcare industry, those with health insurance, and those with a usual source of care (ORs = 3.058, 2.871, 2.317, and 2.342, respectively), suggesting that access to healthcare resources is critical for the uptake of the flu vaccine. There was a significant interaction effect between nativity and race/ethnicity. For improving flu vaccination rates, more support is necessary for foreign-born people and racial/ethnic minorities who have lower health insurance rates and usual sources of care than U.S.-born people and non-Hispanic whites, and thus are less able to adequately access healthcare resources in a timely manner.


Assuntos
Grupos Étnicos , Influenza Humana , Adulto , Afro-Americanos , Idoso , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Grupos Minoritários , Estados Unidos , Vacinação
8.
Tumour Virus Res ; 11: 200214, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33647533

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To develop and evaluate an online continuing education (CE) course designed to improve healthcare provider self-efficacy to make strong adolescent HPV vaccine recommendations to East African immigrant families. METHODS: Focus groups with providers and East African immigrant mothers informed course development. Providers serving East African immigrant families were recruited to view the course and complete pre-/post-test and two-month follow-up surveys. Pre-/post differences were compared with paired t-tests. RESULTS: 202 providers completed the course and pre-/post-test; 158 (78%) completed two-month follow-up. Confidence to make strong HPV vaccine recommendations to East African families increased from 68% pre-test to 98% post-test. Confidence to address common parental concerns also increased: safety, 54% pre-test, 92% post-test; fertility, 55% pre-test, 90% post-test; child too young, 68% pre-test, 92% post-test; and pork gelatin in vaccine manufacturing, 38% pre-test, 90% post-test. Two-month follow-up scores remained high (97% for overall confidence, 94%-97% for addressing parental concerns). All pre-/post-test and pre-test/two-month follow-up comparisons were statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The online CE course focused on culturally appropriate strategies for making strong recommendations and addressing specific parental concerns was effective for increasing provider self-efficacy to recommend HPV vaccination to East African families. Similar courses could be tailored to other priority populations.

9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33572336

RESUMO

Although Korean immigrants report worse self-rated health and a higher self-employment rate than other Asian immigrant groups, the relationship between their employment type and self-rated health is understudied. This study examines the relationship between employment type and self-rated health among Korean immigrants in the US. Survey data of 421 first-generation working-age (18-64 years old) Korean immigrants in the New York-New Jersey area were analyzed. The self-administrated survey questionnaire included 39 items (e.g., sociodemographic characteristics, self-rated health, and health insurance status). A logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between the dependent variable-self-rated health (e.g., bad/not bad vs. good/very good)-and independent variable-employment type (e.g., work at non-ethnic firms, work at co-ethnic firms, self-employed, and unemployed)-by focusing on differences regarding gender and number of years living in the US. Self-employed and unemployed Korean immigrants were less likely to report good health compared to those working in non-ethnic firms. After controlling for sociodemographic characteristics (age, gender, marital status, education, health insurance status, membership in any Koran association, religion, and English proficiency), the relationship between employment type and self-rated health remained significant among female and recent Korean immigrants. More worksite interventions by occupational health nurses that target self-employed Korean immigrants, especially women and recent immigrants, are necessary.


Assuntos
Emigrantes e Imigrantes , Adolescente , Adulto , Emprego , Feminino , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , New Jersey , República da Coreia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
10.
Transl Behav Med ; 11(6): 1244-1253, 2021 06 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33447851

RESUMO

Asian Americans have the lowest rate of awareness about hypertension, including controlled hypertension, among all racial/ethnic groups in the USA. A high proportion of Asian American older adults have limited English proficiency (LEP) and hypertension. This study adapted the Check. Change. Control. (CCC) program, a community-based intervention for hypertension control delivered in a face-to-face group setting, to phone-based delivery and evaluated the acceptability of the program among Asian American older adults with LEP. Thirteen participants received phone-based educational sessions on hypertension control over 4 months. After 4 months of interventions, we interviewed the 13 Asian American older adults and 4 counselors to examine the acceptability of the adapted CCC program. Both Asian American older adults and counselors found the phone-based delivery of the CCC program to be acceptable, and some participants recommended holding an in-person meeting before telephone delivery to review the program content and clarify information. Future study needs to explore the effectiveness of the phone-based delivery of the program on blood pressure management among larger groups of Asian American older adults.


Assuntos
Americanos Asiáticos , Hipertensão , Telemedicina , Idoso , Pressão Sanguínea , Hábitos , Humanos , Hipertensão/prevenção & controle , Telefone , Estados Unidos
11.
Transl Behav Med ; 11(2): 462-469, 2021 Mar 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32582949

RESUMO

Cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death in the USA among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) over the age of 65. Healthy Eating Healthy Aging (HEHA), an evidence-based heart health program, can provide culturally appropriate nutrition education to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease. Community-based organizations (CBOs) are optimal settings to implement community-based programs. However, there is inadequate research on how evidence-based interventions like HEHA are implemented in CBOs. This study examined processes that facilitated the implementation of HEHA among CBOs serving older AAPIs. Twelve representatives from CBOs that implemented the HEHA program were recruited to participate in a semistructured interview. All the participants were CBO directors or senior managers. A semistructured interview guide was created and informed by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to capture how HEHA played into the five domains of CFIR: (a) intervention characteristics, (b) outer setting, (c) inner setting, (d) characteristics of the individuals, and (e) process. Data analysis captured themes under the CFIR domains. All five CFIR domains emerged from the interviews. Under intervention characteristics, three constructs emerged as facilitating the implementation of HEHA: (a) the participant's beliefs around the quality of the HEHA program and its ability to promote healthy eating, (b) HEHA's adaptability to different AAPI subgroups, and (c) perceptions of how successfully HEHA was bundled and assembled. Under outer setting, the participants described the community's need for healthy eating programs and how the HEHA program meets that need. Four constructs emerged under inner setting: (a) the CBO's structural characteristics and social standing in the community; (b) resources dedicated to the implementation and ongoing operations, including funding, training, education, physical space, and time; (c) the culture of the CBO; and (d) the participant's commitment and involvement in marketing, promotion, and implementation of HEHA. Under characteristics of individuals, participants' described their desire to learn the content of HEHA and deliver them successfully. Under process, participants described strategies to engage relevant individuals to facilitate HEHA implementation. The interviews with CBO representatives provided insights into CFIR domain constructs that facilitated the implementation of HEHA. CBOs are key settings for community health education. Understanding processes that lead to the successful implementation of evidence-based interventions among CBOs is critical for accelerating the dissemination and implementation of best practices.

12.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 8(2)2020 Apr 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32283724

RESUMO

Korean immigrants in the United States (U.S.) are known for their preference for, and dependence on, co-ethnic doctors due to various barriers to the U.S. healthcare system. Recent immigrants tend to face more barriers than their non-recent counterparts. However, there is little information on how they find their doctors in the U.S. This study includes a self-administrated survey of Korean immigrants aged 18 and above who lived in the New York-New Jersey Metropolitan area in 2013-2014 (n = 440). Descriptive analysis was conducted to understand the most common information sources and the number of sources based on the duration of stay in the U.S. More recent Korean immigrants were female, had no family doctor, uninsured, younger, and more educated than their non-recent counterparts. Regardless of the duration of stay in the U.S., family members and friends were the most frequently sought-after sources for Korean immigrants in their search for doctors. In addition to family members and friends, non-recent Korean immigrants also used other methods (e.g., Korean business directories), whereas recent immigrants used both U.S. and Korean websites. More recent Korean immigrants used multiple sources compared to non-recent Korean immigrants, often combined with a Korean website. Our study suggests policy implications to improve recent immigrants' accessibility to health information in a timely manner.

13.
J Immigr Minor Health ; 22(6): 1184-1192, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31960255

RESUMO

Growing costs of prescription medication are leading to increased purchases of prescriptions abroad. Yet there is a research gap of factors associated with this practice by nativity and race/ethnicity. We analyzed the 2017 National Health Interview Survey (n = 26,488). The outcome was whether the respondent purchased prescription medications from another country to save money in the past 12 months. Predictors were drawn from Andersen's healthcare utilization model. We used logistic regression models to examine factors associated with purchases by nativity and race/ethnicity. Foreign-born and Hispanic respondents showed a higher rate of purchasing medications abroad compared to their US-born and non-Hispanic white counterparts. Foreign-born respondents who are uninsured, who have no usual place of healthcare, who have difficulty finding a doctor, and who have lived in the US for less than 10 years were more likely to buy medications abroad. Different racial/ethnic groups differed on associated enabling factors. Need factor was significantly associated only with Hispanics' purchase of medications abroad. Our research reveals the need for health education regarding the safety and the illegality of this behavior, especially among recent and Hispanic immigrants.

14.
Int J Health Serv ; 48(1): 148-165, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28950763

RESUMO

Applying Andersen's health care utilization model, this paper shows the prevalence of immigrants' medical and dental tourism and associated factors. An analysis of the 2003 New Immigrant Survey data shows that about 17% of immigrants received medical care in a foreign country, whereas about one-third obtained dental care outside the United States. Latino immigrants have a higher prevalence of both types of tourism than their Asian counterparts. Race, level of education, and health insured status are commonly associated with medical and dental tourism. The findings contribute to the scarce literature on immigrants' health care utilization and medical and dental tourism.


Assuntos
Assistência Odontológica/estatística & dados numéricos , Emigrantes e Imigrantes , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Turismo Médico/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , China/etnologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , México/etnologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prevalência , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
15.
Am J Health Behav ; 41(4): 461-470, 2017 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28601106

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This study examined factors associated with first-generation Korean immigrants' medical tours to the homeland, which has emerged as a field of study in immigrant medical transnationalism and immigrant healthcare behaviors. METHODS: This paper reports survey data from 507 Korean immigrants and indepth interviews with 120 Korean immigrants in the New York-New Jersey area. RESULTS: About one-fourth of survey respondents have visited their home country for medical care since their migration to the US. Of those with relatives in Korea, 29% have experienced at least one medical tour, compared to only 9.2% of those without relatives in Korea. Having frequent contacts with relatives in the home country was positively associated with the number of medical tour visits. CONCLUSION: Except for social transnational ties, other types of transnational ties with the home country were marginally related to Korean immigrants' medical tourism. Surprisingly, their health insurance status itself, which is assumed to be important, was not statistically associated with medical tourism. Although this study has the limitation of analyzing a convenience sample, it contributes to the literature on immigrant transnationalism and immigrant healthcare behaviors by using a mixed-methods approach to focus on one ethnic group's medical transnationalism.


Assuntos
Emigrantes e Imigrantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Seguro Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Turismo Médico/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , New Jersey/etnologia , New York/etnologia , República da Coreia/etnologia , Adulto Jovem
16.
Soc Sci Med ; 168: 93-100, 2016 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27639484

RESUMO

This paper examines first-generation Korean immigrants' barriers to healthcare in the US and their strategies for coping with these issues by analyzing survey data from 507 Korean immigrants and in-depth interviews with 120 Korean immigrants in the New York-New Jersey area. It reports that more than half of Korean immigrants have barriers to healthcare in the US, with the language barrier being the most frequent response, followed by having no health insurance. Korean immigrants are not passive, but rather active entities who display coping strategies for these barriers, such as seeing co-ethnic doctors in the US, seeking Hanbang (traditional Korean medicine) in the US, and taking medical tours to the home country. However, their coping strategies are far removed from formal US healthcare as their behaviors are still restricted to the informal healthcare within the ethnic community or home country. This study methodologically and theoretically contributes to the literature on immigrants' healthcare behaviors by using a mixed-method approach and developing a specific framework for one particular immigrant group.


Assuntos
Adaptação Psicológica , Americanos Asiáticos/psicologia , Barreiras de Comunicação , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/normas , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoas sem Cobertura de Seguro de Saúde/psicologia , Pessoas sem Cobertura de Seguro de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , New Jersey/etnologia , New York/etnologia , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/etnologia , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Inquéritos e Questionários
17.
Issues Ment Health Nurs ; 33(8): 505-12, 2012 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22849777

RESUMO

This study investigated weight changes and patient characteristics associated with weight gain in a public psychiatric hospital. A retrospective chart review was conducted on a multi-racial population admitted for psychiatric inpatient treatment. Patients gained an average of 5.41 pounds during psychiatric hospitalization. Patients with normal weight at admission were significantly more likely to gain weight compared to overweight or obese patients. Black patients showed the greatest weight gain, while Asian patients showed the smallest weight gain. This study suggests that it may be possible to identify specific demographic characteristics that warrant more intensive clinical evaluation, although additional research is necessary.


Assuntos
Hospitalização , Transtornos Mentais/reabilitação , Ganho de Peso , Adulto , Feminino , Hospitais Psiquiátricos , Humanos , Pacientes Internados , Masculino , Análise Multivariada , Cidade de Nova Iorque , Análise de Regressão , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Ganho de Peso/etnologia
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