Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 101
Filtrar
1.
Intern Med J ; 51(7): 1168-1172, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34278700

RESUMO

Time to symptom limitation (Tlim ) achieved during constant work rate tests is considerably more responsive to change than measures commonly recorded during ramp-based tests, such as peak rate of oxygen uptake and maximal work rate (Wmax ). There is limited literature on the use of, and physiological and symptom responses to, constant work rate cycle ergometry tests in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). The results of this study provide evidence that the constant work rate cycle ergometry test, when conducted at 80% of the Wmax , elicits peak physiological and symptom responses and appears to be safe in adults with CF. For clinicians prescribing exercise at an intensity approaching or equivalent to 80% of the Wmax in a non-laboratory-based setting, consideration needs to be given to the level of supervision and patient monitoring required.


Assuntos
Fibrose Cística , Adulto , Fibrose Cística/diagnóstico , Ergometria , Exercício Físico , Teste de Esforço , Humanos
2.
J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev ; 41(4): 264-266, 2021 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33828046

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT) was used to evaluate ground-based walking training in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. During pre-training testing, those who walked 5-10 min on the first ESWT with minimal symptoms performed additional ESWTs at increasing speeds until they were at least moderately symptomatic and terminated the test between 5 and 10 min. This report compares participant characteristics and test responsiveness with participants grouped according to whether or not faster walking speeds were selected for the ESWT during pre-training testing. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of data collected in the intervention group during a randomized controlled trial. The intervention was supervised ground-based walking training, performed two to three times/wk, for 8-10 wk. Prior to and immediately following completion of training, participants completed the 6-min walk test (6MWT), incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT), and ESWT. RESULTS: Data were available on 77 participants (70 ± 9 yr, forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration [FEV1] 43 ± 15 % predicted). For those whom a faster speed was selected during the pre-training ESWTs were characterized by milder dyspnea and leg fatigue on completion of the baseline 6MWT and ISWT (P < .05 for all). On training completion, the change in ESWT was greater in those for whom a faster speed was selected (376 ± 344 sec vs 176 ± 274 sec; P = .017). CONCLUSIONS: Participants who report modest symptoms on completion of the pre-training 6MWT or ISWT may achieve a long pre-training ESWT time. In this situation, repeating the pre-training ESWT at a faster walking speed to achieve an exercise time between 5 and 10 min with moderate symptoms may be advantageous.


Assuntos
Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica , Velocidade de Caminhada , Teste de Esforço , Tolerância ao Exercício , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Teste de Caminhada , Caminhada
3.
Braz J Phys Ther ; 25(1): 97-102, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32499168

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to determine, in Australian pulmonary rehabilitation programs for people with COPD: (1) whether oxygen saturation (SpO2) was monitored during exercise testing; (2) whether supplemental oxygen was available during exercise testing and/or training; (3) whether oxygen was prescribed during exercise training; and the reason for providing oxygen; (4) whether a protocol was available for supplemental oxygen prescription during exercise training. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional multi-center study using a purposed-designed survey. De-identified survey data were analyzed and the absolute number and percentage of responses were recorded for each question. RESULTS: The survey was sent to 261 pulmonary rehabilitation programs and 142 surveys (54%) were available for analysis. Oxygen saturation was monitored during exercise testing in 92% of programs. Supplemental oxygen was available in the majority of programs during exercise testing (82%) and training (84%). The rationale cited by 87 programs (73%) for prescribing oxygen during exercise training was maintaining SpO2 above a threshold ranging from SpO2 80-88%. Forty-five (32%) programs had a protocol for oxygen prescription during exercise training. CONCLUSION: While monitoring of SpO2 during exercise testing and using supplemental oxygen during testing and training is common in Australian pulmonary rehabilitation programs, few programs had a protocol in place for the prescription of supplemental oxygen for people with COPD who were not on long-term oxygen therapy. This may be due to lack of strong evidence to support the use of supplemental oxygen during exercise training.


Assuntos
Terapia por Exercício/métodos , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/fisiopatologia , Austrália , Estudos Transversais , Teste de Esforço , Tolerância ao Exercício , Humanos , Oxigenoterapia , Qualidade de Vida
4.
J Intensive Care Med ; : 885066620981899, 2020 Dec 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33334223

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To compare the physical function on ICU discharge in adults who survived an ICU admission for acute lung injury (ALI) with those admitted for a critical illness other than ALI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two groups were recruited, (i) those who survived an ICU admission for ALI and, (ii) those who survived an ICU admission for a critical illness other than ALI. Within 7 days of discharge from ICU, in all participants, measures were collected of peripheral muscle strength, balance, walking speed and functional exercise capacity. RESULTS: Recruitment was challenging and ceased prior to achieving the desired sample size. Participants with ALI (n = 22) and critical illness (n = 33) were of similar median age (50 vs. 57 yr, p = 0.09), sex proportion (males %, 45 vs. 58, p = 0.59) and median APACHE II score (21.5 vs. 23.0, p = 0.74). Compared with the participants with critical illness, those with ALI had lower hand grip (mean ± SD, 18 ± 9 vs. 13 ± 8 kg, p = 0.018) and shoulder flexion strength (10 ± 4 vs. 7 ± 3 kg, p = 0.047), slower 10-meter walk speed (median [IQR], 1.03 [0.78 to 1.14] vs. 0.78 [0.67 to 0.94] m/s, p = 0.039) and shorter 6-minute walk distance (265 [71 to 328] vs. 165 [53 to 220] m, p = 0.037). The Berg balance scores were similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with survivors of a critical illness that is not ALI, those with ALI are likely to have greater physical impairment when measured shortly after discharge to the ward.

5.
J Clin Med ; 9(10)2020 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32992871

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To optimize outcomes in people with cystic fibrosis (CF), guidelines recommend 30 to 60 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise on most days. Accumulating this volume of exercise contributes importantly to the substantial treatment burden associated with CF. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on exercise capacity in people with CF. METHODS: This randomized controlled trial included people with CF aged ≥15 years, who were allocated to either eight weeks of thrice-weekly 10-min sessions of HIIT (experimental group) or eight weeks of weekly contact (control group). Before and after the intervention period, participants completed measurements of time to symptom limitation (Tlim) during a constant work rate cycle ergometry test (primary outcome), and maximal work rate (Wmax) during a ramp-based cycle ergometry test and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). RESULTS: Fourteen participants (median (IQR) age 31 (28, 35) years, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) 61 (45, 80) % predicted) were included (seven in each group). Compared to the control group, participants in the experimental group demonstrated a greater magnitude of change in Tlim, Wmax (p = 0.017 for both) and in the physical function domain of HRQoL (p = 0.03). No other between-group differences were demonstrated. Mild post-exercise muscle soreness was reported on a single occasion by four participants. Overall, participants attended 93% of all HIIT sessions. DISCUSSION: Eight weeks of low-volume (i.e., 30-min/week) HIIT produced gains in exercise capacity and self-reported physical function and was well tolerated by people with CF.

6.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 7(1)2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32213536

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Care bundles are sets of evidence-based interventions to improve quality of hospital care at admission and discharge. Within a wider multi-method evaluation of care bundles for adults with an emergency admission for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a qualitative study was conducted. The aim was to evaluate how bundles were used, and healthcare professionals' experiences of the impact of bundles on the process of care delivery. METHODS: Within the wider evaluation, four acute hospitals that were using COPD care bundles were purposefully sampled for geographical variation. Qualitative data were gathered through non-participant observation of patient care and interviews with healthcare professionals, patients and carers. This paper reports a thematic analysis of data from observation and interviews with professionals. RESULTS: Healthcare professionals generally experienced care bundles as positive for standardising working practices and patient care, valuing how bundles could support a clear care pathway for patients, enable transitions between settings and identify postdischarge support required by patients. Successful use of bundles was perceived as more likely with the presence of either (or both) a clinical champion for bundles and system-based initiatives such as financial incentives, within a local culture of quality improvement. Challenges in accurately diagnosing COPD hampered bundle use, including delivery of bundles to those subsequently considered ineligible, or missed opportunities to deliver admission bundles to those with COPD. CONCLUSION: Care bundles shape admission and discharge care processes for patients with COPD, from the perspective of staff involved in their delivery. However, different organisational, staff and clinical factors aid or hinder bundle use in an acute hospital context, suggesting potentially resolvable reasons for variable implementation of bundles. Finally, bundles may enhance staff experience of care delivery, even if the impact on patient outcomes remains uncertain.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Hospitais , Admissão do Paciente , Pacotes de Assistência ao Paciente/métodos , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/terapia , Adulto , Assistência ao Convalescente/métodos , Cuidadores/psicologia , Atenção à Saúde/métodos , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Inglaterra/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Alta do Paciente , Readmissão do Paciente , Pacientes/psicologia , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/epidemiologia , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Melhoria de Qualidade
7.
J Cyst Fibros ; 19(2): 271-276, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31522924

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Respiratory exacerbations impair lung function and health-related quality of life in people with CF, with delayed identification of exacerbations often resulting in worse outcomes. We developed a smartphone application (app) for adults with CF to report symptoms to the CF team, and investigated its impact on antibiotic use and other outcomes. METHODS: Participants were randomised to intervention (use of the app weekly or sooner if symptoms had worsened) or control (usual care). The app comprised questions relating to symptoms suggestive of an exacerbation. If worsening symptoms were reported, the participant was contacted by the nurse practitioner. The primary outcome measure was the number of courses and days of intravenous (IV) antibiotics. RESULTS: Sixty participants (29 female, aged [mean ±â€¯SD] 31 ±â€¯9 years, FEV1 60 ±â€¯18% predicted) were recruited, with 29 (48%) allocated to the intervention group. Over the 12-month follow-up, there was no clear effect of the app on the number of courses of IV antibiotics (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6 to 1.7), however number of courses of oral antibiotics increased (IRR 1.5; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.2). The median [IQR] time to detection of exacerbation requiring oral or IV antibiotics was shorter in the intervention group compared with the control group (70 [123] vs. 141 [140] days; p = .02). No between-group differences were observed in other outcomes. CONCLUSION: The use of an app reduced time to detect respiratory exacerbations that required antibiotics, however did not demonstrate a clear effect on the number of courses of IV antibiotics.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/administração & dosagem , Fibrose Cística , Conduta do Tratamento Medicamentoso/estatística & dados numéricos , Smartphone , Avaliação de Sintomas , Telemedicina , Administração Intravenosa/métodos , Administração Intravenosa/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Fibrose Cística/diagnóstico , Fibrose Cística/fisiopatologia , Diagnóstico Precoce , Intervenção Médica Precoce/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Autorrelato/estatística & dados numéricos , Software , Avaliação de Sintomas/métodos , Avaliação de Sintomas/estatística & dados numéricos , Exacerbação dos Sintomas , Telemedicina/instrumentação , Telemedicina/métodos
8.
Lung ; 198(1): 213-219, 2020 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31828516

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To determine the effects of providing a wheeled walker (WW) for use in the home and community, on daily physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: A randomised cross-over study in which participants with COPD characterised by a 6-min walk distance ≤ 450 m, who had recently finished pulmonary rehabilitation, completed two 5-week phases. During one phase, participants were provided a WW to use, whereas during the other phase, the WW was not available. The order of the phases was randomised. For the final week of each phase, measures of PA and ST were collected using wearable devices and health-related quality of life was measured using the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRDQ). Wheeled walker use was also measured using an odometer attached to the device. RESULTS: 17 participants [FEV1 = median (interquartile range) 33 (25) % pred; ten males] aged mean (SD) 73 (9) years completed the study. Comparing the data collected when the WW was not available for use, the daily step count was greater (mean difference [MD] 707 steps/day (95% confidence interval [CI] 75 to 1340) and participants tended to report less dyspnoea during daily life (MD 0.5 points per item, 95% CI - 0.1 to 1.0) when WW was available. No differences were observed for ST, upright time or stepping time. The WW was used over 4504 m/week (95% CI 2746 to 6262). CONCLUSION: These data demonstrated that, when provided to selected patients with COPD, WWs increased daily step count. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12609000332224.


Assuntos
Dispneia/fisiopatologia , Exercício Físico , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/reabilitação , Comportamento Sedentário , Andadores , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Cross-Over , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/fisiopatologia , Qualidade de Vida , Teste de Caminhada
10.
ERJ Open Res ; 5(4)2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31687372

RESUMO

In people with cystic fibrosis (CF), greater cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with improved survival and quality of life. Wearable activity monitors are a popular method of monitoring exercise, with measures of heart rate used to indicate exercise intensity. We assessed the agreement of heart rate recordings obtained using the Fitbit Charge HR™, Polar® H7 heart rate sensor and Masimo SET® Rad-5v pulse oximeter with the three-lead ECG during continuous and interval exercise. Adults with CF completed two exercise sessions, of 15-min duration per session, on a cycle ergometer while wearing the previously mentioned monitors. Firstly, participants cycled at 30% of estimated peak workload (W peak). Secondly, participants cycled at 1-min intervals at 60% of W peak interspersed with 2 min of unloaded cycling. Heart rate readings on all devices were recorded at minute intervals and their agreement was analysed using the Bland-Altman method. The Polar® H7 heart rate sensor had the best agreement with three-lead ECG, with a bias of 0±1 bpm during both continuous and interval exercise. The Masimo SET® Rad-5v pulse oximeter had good agreement, with a bias of 1±7 bpm and 1±5 bpm during continuous and interval exercise, respectively. The Fitbit Charge HR™ demonstrated less agreement, with a bias of 9±17 bpm and 5±13 bpm during continuous and interval exercise, respectively. The Fitbit Charge HR™ is not recommended for assessing heart rate during exercise in adults with CF. Findings support the use of the Polar® H7 for accurate heart rate monitoring.

11.
J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev ; 39(5): 338-343, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31393279

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To investigate the characteristics that distinguish responders from nonresponders to ground-based walking training (GBWT) in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: An analysis was undertaken of data collected during a trial of GBWT in people with COPD. Responders to GBWT were defined in 2 ways: (1) improved time on the endurance shuttle walk test of ≥190 sec (criterion A); or (2) improved ability to walk, perceived by the participant to be at least "moderate" (criterion B). Differences in participant characteristics, pre-training exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, and the improvement in the distance walked during the training program were examined between responders and nonresponders. RESULTS: Of the 95 participants randomized to GBWT (age 69 ± 8 yr, forced expiratory volume in 1 sec [FEV1] % predicted = 43% ± 15%), data were available for analysis on 78 and 73 patients by criterion A and criterion B, respectively. According to criterion A, 32 (41%) participants were responders. The odds of being a responder increased with increasing FEV1 % predicted (OR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.5, for every 5% increase) and increased with decreasing pre-training incremental shuttle walk distance (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, for every 50-m decrement). According to criterion B, 42 (58%) participants were responders. There were no differences in characteristics or pre-training measures between the responders and nonresponders. For both criteria, responders demonstrated greater change in the distance walked during the training program (P < .05). CONCLUSION: Responders to GBWT had lower pre-training exercise capacity, had better lung function, and demonstrated greater change in the distance walked during the training program.


Assuntos
Terapia por Exercício/métodos , Tolerância ao Exercício/fisiologia , Pulmão/fisiologia , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/terapia , Teste de Caminhada/métodos , Caminhada/fisiologia , Idoso , Feminino , Volume Expiratório Forçado , Humanos , Masculino , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/fisiopatologia , Testes de Função Respiratória , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento , Teste de Caminhada/estatística & dados numéricos
12.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 6(1): e000425, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31258918

RESUMO

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) accounts for 10% of emergency hospital admissions in the UK annually. Nearly 33% of patients are readmitted within 28 days of discharge. We evaluated the effectiveness of implementing standardised packages of care called 'care bundles' on COPD readmission, emergency department (ED) attendance, mortality, costs and process of care. Methods: This is a mixed-methods, controlled before-and-after study with nested case studies. 31 acute hospitals in England and Wales which introduced COPD care bundles (implementation sites) or provided usual care (comparator sites) were recruited and provided monthly aggregate data. 14 sites provided additional individual patient data. Participants were adults admitted with an acute exacerbation of COPD. Results: There was no evidence that care bundles reduced 28-day COPD readmission rates: OR=1.02 (95% CI 0.83 to 1.26). However, the rate of ED attendance was reduced in implementation sites over and above that in comparator sites (implementation: IRR=0.63 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.71); comparator: IRR=1.12 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.24); group-time interaction p<0.001). At implementation sites, delivery of all bundle elements was higher but was only achieved in 2.2% (admissions bundle) and 7.6% (discharge bundle) of cases. There was no evidence of cost-effectiveness. Staff viewed bundles positively, believing they help standardise practice and facilitate communication between clinicians. However, they lacked skills in change management, leading to inconsistent implementation. Discussion: COPD care bundles were not effectively implemented in this study. They were associated with a reduced number of subsequent ED attendances, but not with change in readmissions, mortality or reduced costs. This is unsurprising given the low level of bundle uptake in implementation sites, and it remains to be determined if COPD care bundles affect patient care and outcomes when they are effectively implemented. Trial registration number: ISRCTN13022442.


Assuntos
Análise Custo-Benefício , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência/organização & administração , Implementação de Plano de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Pacotes de Assistência ao Paciente/métodos , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/terapia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Progressão da Doença , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência/economia , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência/estatística & dados numéricos , Inglaterra , Feminino , Custos de Cuidados de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Implementação de Plano de Saúde/organização & administração , Humanos , Tempo de Internação/economia , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pacotes de Assistência ao Paciente/economia , Alta do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Readmissão do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/economia , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Qualidade de Vida , País de Gales
13.
J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev ; 39(4): E16-E22, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31241523

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study compared exercise responses in individuals who had recently survived an admission to the intensive care unit for acute lung injury (ALI) with healthy controls. METHODS: Ten patients with ALI were recruited at 2 Australian hospitals. Six weeks after hospital discharge, participants completed lung function measures and a laboratory-based cardiopulmonary exercise test. Identical measures were collected in 21 healthy participants of similar age and gender distribution. RESULTS: Compared with the healthy participants, the ALI participants were similar in age (51 ± 14 vs 50 ± 16 yr), with a lower peak oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2) (median [interquartile range], 31.80 [26.60-41.73] vs 17.80 [14.85-20.85] mL/kg/min; P < .01) and higher ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide ((Equation is included in full-text article.)E/(Equation is included in full-text article.)CO2) at anaerobic threshold (mean ± SD, 25.7 ± 2.5 vs 35.2 ± 4.1; P < .01). Analysis of individual ALI participant responses showed that 8 participants had a decreased peak (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2 and anaerobic threshold. All ALI participants were limited by leg fatigue. Abnormalities of pulmonary gas exchange were present in 7 participants. Evidence of cardiac ischemia was present in 2 participants. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with healthy controls, ALI participants had reduced exercise capacity, mainly due to profound deconditioning. Exercise training to optimize aerobic capacity would appear to be a rehabilitation priority in this population.


Assuntos
Lesão Pulmonar Aguda/reabilitação , Teste de Esforço/métodos , Terapia por Exercício/métodos , Tolerância ao Exercício/fisiologia , Lesão Pulmonar Aguda/etiologia , Lesão Pulmonar Aguda/fisiopatologia , Lesão Pulmonar Aguda/terapia , Limiar Anaeróbio , Austrália , Cuidados Críticos/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Consumo de Oxigênio , Troca Gasosa Pulmonar , Ventilação Pulmonar/fisiologia
14.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 6: CD009955, 2019 06 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31204439

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Decreased exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are common in people following lung resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Exercise training has been demonstrated to confer gains in exercise capacity and HRQoL for people with a range of chronic conditions, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure, as well as in people with prostate and breast cancer. A programme of exercise training may also confer gains in these outcomes for people following lung resection for NSCLC. This systematic review updates our 2013 systematic review. OBJECTIVES: The primary aim of this review was to determine the effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and adverse events in people following lung resection (with or without chemotherapy) for NSCLC. The secondary aims were to determine the effects of exercise training on other outcomes such as HRQoL, force-generating capacity of peripheral muscles, pressure-generating capacity of the respiratory muscles, dyspnoea and fatigue, feelings of anxiety and depression, lung function, and mortality. SEARCH METHODS: We searched for additional randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2019, Issue 2 of 12), MEDLINE (via PubMed) (2013 to February 2019), Embase (via Ovid) (2013 to February 2019), SciELO (The Scientific Electronic Library Online) (2013 to February 2019), and PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) (2013 to February 2019). SELECTION CRITERIA: We included RCTs in which participants with NSCLC who underwent lung resection were allocated to receive either exercise training, which included aerobic exercise, resistance exercise, or a combination of both, or no exercise training. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors screened the studies and identified those eligible for inclusion. We used either postintervention values (with their respective standard deviation (SD)) or mean changes (with their respective SD) in the meta-analyses that reported results as mean difference (MD). In meta-analyses that reported results as standardised mean difference (SMD), we placed studies that reported postintervention values and those that reported mean changes in separate subgroups. We assessed the certainty of evidence for each outcome by downgrading or upgrading the evidence according to GRADE criteria. MAIN RESULTS: Along with the three RCTs included in the original version of this review (2013), we identified an additional five RCTs in this update, resulting in a total of eight RCTs involving 450 participants (180 (40%) females). The risk of selection bias in the included studies was low and the risk of performance bias high. Six studies explored the effects of combined aerobic and resistance training; one explored the effects of combined aerobic and inspiratory muscle training; and one explored the effects of combined aerobic, resistance, inspiratory muscle training and balance training. On completion of the intervention period, compared to the control group, exercise capacity expressed as the peak rate of oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and six-minute walk distance (6MWD) was greater in the intervention group (VO2peak: MD 2.97 mL/kg/min, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.93 to 4.02 mL/kg/min, 4 studies, 135 participants, moderate-certainty evidence; 6MWD: MD 57 m, 95% CI 34 to 80 m, 5 studies, 182 participants, high-certainty evidence). One adverse event (hip fracture) related to the intervention was reported in one of the included studies. The intervention group also achieved greater improvements in the physical component of general HRQoL (MD 5.0 points, 95% CI 2.3 to 7.7 points, 4 studies, 208 participants, low-certainty evidence); improved force-generating capacity of the quadriceps muscle (SMD 0.75, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.1, 4 studies, 133 participants, moderate-certainty evidence); and less dyspnoea (SMD -0.43, 95% CI -0.81 to -0.05, 3 studies, 110 participants, very low-certainty evidence). We observed uncertain effects on the mental component of general HRQoL, disease-specific HRQoL, handgrip force, fatigue, and lung function. There were insufficient data to comment on the effect of exercise training on maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures and feelings of anxiety and depression. Mortality was not reported in the included studies. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Exercise training increased exercise capacity and quadriceps muscle force of people following lung resection for NSCLC. Our findings also suggest improvements on the physical component score of general HRQoL and decreased dyspnoea. This systematic review emphasises the importance of exercise training as part of the postoperative management of people with NSCLC.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Pulmonar de Células não Pequenas/reabilitação , Terapia por Exercício , Tolerância ao Exercício/fisiologia , Neoplasias Pulmonares/reabilitação , Exercícios Respiratórios , Carcinoma Pulmonar de Células não Pequenas/cirurgia , Feminino , Volume Expiratório Forçado/fisiologia , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/cirurgia , Masculino , Força Muscular/fisiologia , Consumo de Oxigênio , Cuidados Pós-Operatórios/métodos , Músculo Quadríceps/fisiologia , Qualidade de Vida , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Treinamento de Força , Fatores de Tempo
15.
Lung ; 197(3): 315-319, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30982940

RESUMO

This multi-centred, randomised controlled trial explored the effects of adding ongoing feedback to a 12-month unsupervised maintenance walking program, on daily physical activity (PA) in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Participants were randomised to either an intervention group (IG) or a usual care group (UCG). During the maintenance program, the IG received ongoing feedback (telephone calls, biofeedback provided via pedometer and progressive goal setting) and the UCG received no feedback. The SenseWear® Pro3 Armband was used to measure PA. Of the 86 participants {IG = 42, (mean [SD]: age 70 [7] years; FEV1 43 [16] % predicted); UCG = 44, (age 69 [9] years; FEV1 44 [15] % predicted)} included at baseline, 43 had sufficient data to be included in the final analysis. There were no between-group differences in any of the PA variables from baseline to completion of the program (all p > 0.05). Ongoing feedback was no more effective than no feedback in improving PA during a 12-month unsupervised walking program.Trial Registration: The trial was registered in the Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12609000472279).


Assuntos
Terapia por Exercício , Exercício Físico , Retroalimentação Psicológica , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/reabilitação , Caminhada , Acelerometria , Idoso , Feminino , Monitores de Aptidão Física , Volume Expiratório Forçado , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/fisiopatologia
16.
Eur Respir J ; 53(5)2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30880289

RESUMO

Almost half the patients referred to pulmonary rehabilitation with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) desaturate during exercise. Although oxygen supplementation may ameliorate oxygen desaturation, the effects on outcomes of exercise training have not been rigorously evaluated. This study aimed to determine whether supplemental oxygen during exercise training was more effective than medical air in improving exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in people with COPD.People with COPD who demonstrated oxygen desaturation <90% during the 6-min walk test were recruited to this multicentre trial with randomisation (independent, concealed allocation) to either an Oxygen group or Air group, blinding (participants, exercise trainers and European Respiratory Journal assessors) and intention-to-treat analysis. Both groups received the respective gas from concentrators via nasal prongs at 5 L·min-1 during exercise training consisting of treadmill and cycle exercise, three times per week for 8 weeks. Primary outcomes were the endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT) time and Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ)-Total score.111 participants (60 males), mean±sd age 69±7 years, with moderate to severe COPD were recruited and 97 completed (Oxygen group n=52; Air group n=45). At the end of the 8-week training programme there were no between-group differences in change in ESWT (mean difference 15 s (95% CI -106-136 s) or change in CRQ-Total (0.0 points (95% CI -0.3-0.3 points)). Within-group changes at end-training were significant for ESWT and CRQ-Total (all p<0.01).Exercise capacity and HRQoL improved in both groups, with no greater benefit from training with supplemental oxygen than medical air.


Assuntos
Terapia por Exercício/métodos , Oxigenoterapia/métodos , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/reabilitação , Qualidade de Vida , Idoso , Austrália , Tolerância ao Exercício , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Oximetria , Resultado do Tratamento , Teste de Caminhada
17.
Respir Care ; 64(9): 1116-1122, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30890629

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study sought to explore factors in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) that predicted whether (i) someone was engaged in full-time paid work, and (ii) those engaged in paid work reported problems with absenteeism and/or presenteeism. METHODS: Adults with cystic fibrosis who live in Western Australia completed absenteeism and presenteeism questions from the World Health Organization's Health Performance Questionnaire. The participants were grouped by work status (full time vs part time or unemployed) and by self-reported absenteeism and presenteeism (evidence of vs no evidence of). We explored whether factors such as air-flow obstruction, level of education, health-related quality of life (measured by using the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised), and treatment adherence predicted group membership. RESULTS: Of the 50 participants for whom data were available (median [interquartile range] age 30 [25-36] y; mean ± SD FEV1% predicted, 60 ± 18%); 34 (68%) worked full time. A higher education level increased the odds of working full time (odds ratio 1.74, 95% CI 1.36-1.89). Among the employed participants, problems with absenteeism and presenteeism were reported by 20 (47%) and 7 (16%), respectively. Both those who reported problems with absenteeism or presenteeism were characterized only by lower scores on the role domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised (P = .02). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the majority of adults with cystic fibrosis worked full time and a low percentage of the sample reported problems with absenteeism and presenteeism.


Assuntos
Absenteísmo , Fibrose Cística/psicologia , Escolaridade , Emprego/psicologia , Presenteísmo/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Obstrução das Vias Respiratórias/etiologia , Obstrução das Vias Respiratórias/psicologia , Fibrose Cística/complicações , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Qualidade de Vida , Inquéritos e Questionários , Cooperação e Adesão ao Tratamento/psicologia , Austrália Ocidental
18.
Respir Med ; 146: 18-22, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30665513

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In people with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the minimal detectable difference (MDD) in endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT) performance following exercise training is unclear. We sought to determine the MDD for ESWT performance following supervised ground-based walking training using anchor- and distribution-based approaches and report whether these values exceeded random variation in test performance. METHODS: Participants with COPD trained for 30-45 min, 2-3 times weekly for 8-10 weeks. The ESWT was performed before and after the training period. Immediately after training, participants rated their change in walking ability using a Global Rating of Change scale. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to derive the value that best separated those who perceived their improvement in walking ability to be at least 'a little' better from 'almost the same, hardly any change'. These values were compared with those calculated using a distribution-based method. Random variation in test performance was defined as the minimal detectable change (MDC), calculated using the standard error of measurement. RESULTS: 78 participants (aged 70 ±â€¯8 yr and FEV1 43 ±â€¯15% predicted) completed the ESWT before and after training. The value that best separated those who perceived their walking ability as 'a little' better was 70 s. The 95% confidence intervals around this estimate traversed zero. The distribution-based estimate was 156 s. The MDC was 227 s. CONCLUSIONS: The MDD established using the anchor- and distribution-based approaches differed considerably. Large variation in test performance cautions against using the MDD to interpret changes in an individual. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12609000472279).


Assuntos
Tolerância ao Exercício/fisiologia , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/fisiopatologia , Teste de Caminhada/métodos , Idoso , Austrália/epidemiologia , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Feminino , Volume Expiratório Forçado/fisiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/diagnóstico , Capacidade Vital/fisiologia
19.
Intern Med J ; 49(10): 1209-1220, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30324769

RESUMO

Participation in regular physical activity decreases the risk of developing cardiometabolic disease. However, the proportion of people who participate in the recommended amount of physical activity is low, with common barriers including competing interests and inclement weather. In people with chronic cardiorespiratory conditions, participation in physical activity is reduced further by disease-specific barriers, time burden of treatment and unpleasant symptoms during physical activity. Addressing these barriers during adolescence and early adulthood may promote greater physical activity participation into older age. The aim of this review was to classify interventions aimed at optimising participation in physical activity as 'promising' or 'not promising' in people aged 15-45 years with chronic cardiorespiratory conditions and categorise the behaviour change techniques (BCT) within these interventions. Nine databases and registries were searched (October 2017) for studies that reported objective measures of physical activity before and after an intervention period. Interventions were classified as 'promising' if a between-group difference in physical activity was demonstrated. Michie et al.'s (2013) v1 Taxonomy was used to unpack the BCT within interventions. Across the six included studies (n = 396 participants), 19 (20%) of 93 BCT were described. The interventions of three studies were classified as 'promising'. The most commonly used BCT comprised goal setting, action planning and social support. Five BCT were solely used in 'promising' interventions. Our review demonstrated that only 20% of BCT have been utilised, and those BCT that were used only in 'promising' physical activity interventions in adolescents and adults with chronic cardiorespiratory conditions were isolated.


Assuntos
Terapia Comportamental/métodos , Doenças Cardiovasculares/terapia , Exercício Físico , Pneumopatias/terapia , Adolescente , Adulto , Doença Crônica , Promoção da Saúde , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Adulto Jovem
20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30450213

RESUMO

Background: In people with cystic fibrosis (CF), higher exercise capacity is associated with better health-related quality of life (HRQoL), reduced risk of hospitalisation for a respiratory infection and survival. Therefore, optimisation of exercise capacity is an important treatment goal. The Australian and New Zealand clinical practice guidelines recommend that people with CF complete 30 to 60 min of moderate intensity aerobic exercise on most days of the week. This recommendation can be difficult to achieve by people with CF because of time constraints, and intolerable breathlessness and muscle fatigue during continuous exercise. In contrast, a low-volume, high intensity interval training (HIIT) program may be a more achievable and efficient training method to improve exercise capacity in people with CF. Methods: A randomised controlled trial will be undertaken. Forty people with CF (aged ≥15 years) will be randomly allocated, on a 1:1 ratio, to either the experimental or control group. Regardless of their group allocation, all participants will be asked to continue with their usual daily treatment for the study duration. Those in the experimental group will complete 8 weeks of thrice weekly HIIT on a cycle ergometer. Those in the control group will receive weekly contact with the investigators. The primary outcome of this study is exercise capacity. Secondary outcomes are HRQoL, exercise self-efficacy, feelings of anxiety, depression and enjoyment. These outcomes will be recorded at baseline (i.e. prior to randomisation) and following the 8-week intervention period. The study will also report other outcomes of the HIIT program (cardiovascular responses, symptom response, post-exercise muscle soreness and tolerance) and behaviour change techniques such as reinforcement, feedback and goal setting, used during the HIIT program. Discussion: This study will determine the effects of 8-weeks of supervised, low-volume HIIT, completed on a cycle ergometer on measures of exercise capacity, HRQoL, exercise self-efficacy, feelings of anxiety, depression and enjoyment. If effective, this type of training could be an attractive alternative to traditional continuous training because it may be more achievable and time efficient. Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR):12617001271392 (04/09/2017).

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...