Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 15 de 15
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Epilepsia ; 60(11): 2277-2285, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31625145

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Monoallelic de novo gain-of-function variants in the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN8A are one of the recurrent causes of severe developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE). In addition, a small number of de novo or inherited monoallelic loss-of-function variants have been found in patients with intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, or movement disorders. Inherited monoallelic variants causing either gain or loss-of-function are also associated with less severe conditions such as benign familial infantile seizures and isolated movement disorders. In all three categories, the affected individuals are heterozygous for a SCN8A variant in combination with a wild-type allele. In the present study, we describe two unusual families with severely affected individuals who inherited biallelic variants of SCN8A. METHODS: We identified two families with biallelic SCN8A variants by diagnostic gene panel sequencing. Functional analysis of the variants was performed using voltage clamp recordings from transfected ND7/23 cells. RESULTS: We identified three probands from two unrelated families with DEE due to biallelic SCN8A variants. Each parent of an affected individual carried a single heterozygous SCN8A variant and exhibited mild cognitive impairment without seizures. In both families, functional analysis demonstrated segregation of one allele with complete loss-of-function, and one allele with altered biophysical properties consistent with partial loss-of-function. SIGNIFICANCE: These studies demonstrate that SCN8A DEE may, in rare cases, result from inheritance of two variants, both of which exhibit reduced channel activity. In these families, heterozygosity for the dominant variants results in less severe disease than biallelic inheritance of two variant alleles. The clinical consequences of variants with partial and complete loss of SCN8A function are variable and likely to be influenced by genetic background.

2.
Epilepsia ; 60(5): 830-844, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30968951

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Pathogenic variants in SCN8A have been associated with a wide spectrum of epilepsy phenotypes, ranging from benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS) to epileptic encephalopathies with variable severity. Furthermore, a few patients with intellectual disability (ID) or movement disorders without epilepsy have been reported. The vast majority of the published SCN8A patients suffer from severe developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE). In this study, we aimed to provide further insight on the spectrum of milder SCN8A-related epilepsies. METHODS: A cohort of 1095 patients were screened using a next generation sequencing panel. Further patients were ascertained from a network of epilepsy genetics clinics. Patients with severe DEE and BFIS were excluded from the study. RESULTS: We found 36 probands who presented with an SCN8A-related epilepsy and normal intellect (33%) or mild (61%) to moderate ID (6%). All patients presented with epilepsy between age 1.5 months and 7 years (mean = 13.6 months), and 58% of these became seizure-free, two-thirds on monotherapy. Neurological disturbances included ataxia (28%) and hypotonia (19%) as the most prominent features. Interictal electroencephalogram was normal in 41%. Several recurrent variants were observed, including Ile763Val, Val891Met, Gly1475Arg, Gly1483Lys, Phe1588Leu, Arg1617Gln, Ala1650Val/Thr, Arg1872Gln, and Asn1877Ser. SIGNIFICANCE: With this study, we explore the electroclinical features of an intermediate SCN8A-related epilepsy with mild cognitive impairment, which is for the majority a treatable epilepsy.

3.
Brain ; 142(2): 376-390, 2019 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30615093

RESUMO

Ion channel mutations can cause distinct neuropsychiatric diseases. We first studied the biophysical and neurophysiological consequences of four mutations in the human Na+ channel gene SCN8A causing either mild (E1483K) or severe epilepsy (R1872W), or intellectual disability and autism without epilepsy (R1620L, A1622D). Only combined electrophysiological recordings of transfected wild-type or mutant channels in both neuroblastoma cells and primary cultured neurons revealed clear genotype-phenotype correlations. The E1483K mutation causing mild epilepsy showed no significant biophysical changes, whereas the R1872W mutation causing severe epilepsy induced clear gain-of-function biophysical changes in neuroblastoma cells. However, both mutations increased neuronal firing in primary neuronal cultures. In contrast, the R1620L mutation associated with intellectual disability and autism-but not epilepsy-reduced Na+ current density in neuroblastoma cells and expectedly decreased neuronal firing. Interestingly, for the fourth mutation, A1622D, causing severe intellectual disability and autism without epilepsy, we observed a dramatic slowing of fast inactivation in neuroblastoma cells, which induced a depolarization block in neurons with a reduction of neuronal firing. This latter finding was corroborated by computational modelling. In a second series of experiments, we recorded three more mutations (G1475R, M1760I, G964R, causing intermediate or severe epilepsy, or intellectual disability without epilepsy, respectively) that revealed similar results confirming clear genotype-phenotype relationships. We found intermediate or severe gain-of-function biophysical changes and increases in neuronal firing for the two epilepsy-causing mutations and decreased firing for the loss-of-function mutation causing intellectual disability. We conclude that studies in neurons are crucial to understand disease mechanisms, which here indicate that increased or decreased neuronal firing is responsible for distinct clinical phenotypes.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto/genética , Canal de Sódio Disparado por Voltagem NAV1.6/genética , Neurônios/fisiologia , Animais , Células Cultivadas , Humanos , Potenciais da Membrana/fisiologia , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Ratos
4.
Expert Rev Mol Diagn ; 19(3): 217-228, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30661434

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Within the last decade, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has resulted in remarkable advances in the field of epilepsy genetics. NGS has become a routine part of the diagnostic workup in many countries. A workup that has led to higher diagnostic yields and insights into the underlying disease mechanisms. Areas covered: In this review, we report on the recent contributions of NGS testing to the diagnosis and the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms, phenotypic variability, and genetic heterogeneity of different epilepsies including developmental and/or epileptic encephalopathies, focal and generalized epilepsies. Furthermore, we discuss how the increased knowledge of the genetic architecture of the epilepsies can be translated into more personalized treatment. Expert opinion/commentary: Targeted gene panels or whole exome sequencing can provide a genetic diagnosis for up to 30% of the patients with early-onset epilepsy. Despite current technical limitations, NGS-based technologies can become the new first-tier diagnostic tests in the epilepsies. As the pool of genetically diagnosed patients has increased, so has the demand for more accurate treatment. Approximately 25% of the epilepsy patients with de novo mutations have genetic diagnoses with potential targets for precision medicine approaches, thus illustrating the enormous utility of genetic testing for therapeutic decision-making.

5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30374684

RESUMO

Fusobacterium species are components of the normal microbiota of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. They are increasingly recognized as causative agents of oral, laryngeal, and tonsillar infections. Several fusobacterial species are involved in infections, with F. necrophorum and F. nucleatum being the most commonly cultured subtypes. In this study, we aimed to investigate clinical and prognostic differences in terms of mortality and association with malignancy between F. necrophorum and F. nucleatum detected by culture and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This is a systematic, comparative, retrospective, non-interventional study. Data were extracted from the Department of Clinical Microbiology, Region Zealand, Denmark: all patients with F. necrophorum or F. nucleatum detected by culture or 16S rRNA gene sequencing from 1st of January 2010 to 30th of June 2015 were included. In total, F. necrophorum was detected in samples from 75 patients, and F. nucleatum in samples from 68 patients (total: n = 143). Thirteen patients had a current cancer diagnosis at the time of fusobacterial sampling. Multivariate analyses revealed a significant association of "current cancer" with 30-day mortality. Fusobacterial subtype was not associated with mortality neither in overall nor in subgroups with or without current cancer. Despite differences in clinical disease pattern between F. necrophorum and F. nucleatum, mortality was unaffected by fusobacterial subtype. Mortality was significantly related to comorbidity, especially a current diagnosis of cancer. Our data highlights the current debate whether fusobacterial involvement in cancer may have disease-altering properties, rather than being opportunistic pathogens secondary to cancer disease.

6.
Neurology ; 91(12): e1112-e1124, 2018 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30171078

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To delineate the electroclinical features of SCN8A infantile developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE13, OMIM #614558). METHODS: Twenty-two patients, aged 19 months to 22 years, underwent electroclinical assessment. RESULTS: Sixteen of 22 patients had mildly delayed development since birth. Drug-resistant epilepsy started at a median age of 4 months, followed by developmental slowing, pyramidal/extrapyramidal signs (22/22), movement disorders (12/22), cortical blindness (17/22), sialorrhea, and severe gastrointestinal symptoms (15/22), worsening during early childhood and plateauing at age 5 to 9 years. Death occurred in 4 children, following extreme neurologic deterioration, at 22 months to 5.5 years. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus recurred in 14 of 22 patients. The most effective antiepileptic drugs were oxcarbazepine, carbamazepine, phenytoin, and benzodiazepines. EEG showed background deterioration, epileptiform abnormalities with a temporo-occipital predominance, and posterior delta/beta activity correlating with visual impairment. Video-EEG documented focal seizures (FS) (22/22), spasm-like episodes (8/22), cortical myoclonus (8/22), and myoclonic absences (1/22). FS typically clustered and were prolonged (<20 minutes) with (1) cyanosis, hypomotor, and vegetative semiology, sometimes unnoticed, followed by (2) tonic-vibratory and (3) (hemi)-clonic manifestations ± evolution to a bilateral tonic-clonic seizure. FS had posterior-temporal/occipital onset, slowly spreading and sometimes migrating between hemispheres. Brain MRI showed progressive parenchymal atrophy and restriction of the optic radiations. CONCLUSIONS: SCN8A developmental and epileptic encephalopathy has strikingly consistent electroclinical features, suggesting a global progressive brain dysfunction primarily affecting the temporo-occipital regions. Both uncontrolled epilepsy and developmental compromise contribute to the profound impairment (increasing risk of death) during early childhood, but stabilization occurs in late childhood.

7.
Epilepsy Res ; 143: 79-81, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29677576

RESUMO

SCN8A-related epilepsies are often severe developmental and epileptic encephalopathies. Seizures can be treatment resistant, and patients suffer from severe intellectual disability. Reports have suggested that SCN8A-related epilepsies have a high mortality with SUDEP as the major underlying cause. SUDEP is a catastrophic event, and the risk of occurrence should be correctly and carefully discussed with patients and families. We tested the hypothesis of SUDEP as the main cause of death in SCN8A-related epilepsies by reviewing all the currently reported patients with SCN8A. In addition, we collected unpublished patients through an international network. In total, we reviewed the data of 190 patients. In our cohort, 10 patients were deceased, and the overall mortality was 5.3%. Within the ten deceased patients, age at death ranged from 16 months to 17 years; the majority (7/10) of them died in early childhood. Three patients died of probable or definite SUDEP. Thus, our data do not indicate an increased risk when compared to other DEEs. Indeed, death in SCN8A-related epilepsies seems to occur most often in children experiencing a relentless worsening of their epilepsy and neurological condition, rendering them susceptible to pulmonary infections and respiratory distress that ultimately can be fatal.

8.
Epilepsia ; 59(2): 389-402, 2018 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29315614

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Pathogenic SLC6A1 variants were recently described in patients with myoclonic atonic epilepsy (MAE) and intellectual disability (ID). We set out to define the phenotypic spectrum in a larger cohort of SCL6A1-mutated patients. METHODS: We collected 24 SLC6A1 probands and 6 affected family members. Four previously published cases were included for further electroclinical description. In total, we reviewed the electroclinical data of 34 subjects. RESULTS: Cognitive development was impaired in 33/34 (97%) subjects; 28/34 had mild to moderate ID, with language impairment being the most common feature. Epilepsy was diagnosed in 31/34 cases with mean onset at 3.7 years. Cognitive assessment before epilepsy onset was available in 24/31 subjects and was normal in 25% (6/24), and consistent with mild ID in 46% (11/24) or moderate ID in 17% (4/24). Two patients had speech delay only, and 1 had severe ID. After epilepsy onset, cognition deteriorated in 46% (11/24) of cases. The most common seizure types were absence, myoclonic, and atonic seizures. Sixteen cases fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for MAE. Seven further patients had different forms of generalized epilepsy and 2 had focal epilepsy. Twenty of 31 patients became seizure-free, with valproic acid being the most effective drug. There was no clear-cut correlation between seizure control and cognitive outcome. Electroencephalography (EEG) findings were available in 27/31 patients showing irregular bursts of diffuse 2.5-3.5 Hz spikes/polyspikes-and-slow waves in 25/31. Two patients developed an EEG pattern resembling electrical status epilepticus during sleep. Ataxia was observed in 7/34 cases. We describe 7 truncating and 18 missense variants, including 4 recurrent variants (Gly232Val, Ala288Val, Val342Met, and Gly362Arg). SIGNIFICANCE: Most patients carrying pathogenic SLC6A1 variants have an MAE phenotype with language delay and mild/moderate ID before epilepsy onset. However, ID alone or associated with focal epilepsy can also be observed.


Assuntos
Epilepsias Mioclônicas/fisiopatologia , Proteínas da Membrana Plasmática de Transporte de GABA/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/fisiopatologia , Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/fisiopatologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Anticonvulsivantes/uso terapêutico , Ataxia/complicações , Ataxia/genética , Ataxia/fisiopatologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Eletroencefalografia , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/complicações , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/genética , Epilepsias Parciais/complicações , Epilepsias Parciais/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsias Parciais/genética , Epilepsias Parciais/fisiopatologia , Epilepsia Generalizada/complicações , Epilepsia Generalizada/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsia Generalizada/genética , Epilepsia Generalizada/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/complicações , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/complicações , Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/genética , Masculino , Mutação , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/complicações , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/genética , Fenótipo , Resultado do Tratamento , Ácido Valproico/uso terapêutico , Adulto Jovem
9.
Ugeskr Laeger ; 179(14)2017 Apr 03.
Artigo em Dinamarquês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28416069

RESUMO

Ketogenic diet (KD) is used worldwide in the treatment of medically refractory epilepsy. Since the introduction of KD in the early 1900s, new approaches such as medium-chain triglyceride ketogenic diet, modified Atkins diet and low glycaemic index treatment have been suggested as alternative treatments. Several studies have documented significant seizure reduction from all four diets. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the effect of dietary treatment and to discuss advantages in initiating dietary treatment as an early treatment instead of as a last option.

10.
Brain ; 140(5): 1316-1336, 2017 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28379373

RESUMO

Mutations in SCN2A, a gene encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.2, have been associated with a spectrum of epilepsies and neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we report the phenotypes of 71 patients and review 130 previously reported patients. We found that (i) encephalopathies with infantile/childhood onset epilepsies (≥3 months of age) occur almost as often as those with an early infantile onset (<3 months), and are thus more frequent than previously reported; (ii) distinct phenotypes can be seen within the late onset group, including myoclonic-atonic epilepsy (two patients), Lennox-Gastaut not emerging from West syndrome (two patients), and focal epilepsies with an electrical status epilepticus during slow sleep-like EEG pattern (six patients); and (iii) West syndrome constitutes a common phenotype with a major recurring mutation (p.Arg853Gln: two new and four previously reported children). Other known phenotypes include Ohtahara syndrome, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, and intellectual disability or autism without epilepsy. To assess the response to antiepileptic therapy, we retrospectively reviewed the treatment regimen and the course of the epilepsy in 66 patients for which well-documented medical information was available. We find that the use of sodium channel blockers was often associated with clinically relevant seizure reduction or seizure freedom in children with early infantile epilepsies (<3 months), whereas other antiepileptic drugs were less effective. In contrast, sodium channel blockers were rarely effective in epilepsies with later onset (≥3 months) and sometimes induced seizure worsening. Regarding the genetic findings, truncating mutations were exclusively seen in patients with late onset epilepsies and lack of response to sodium channel blockers. Functional characterization of four selected missense mutations using whole cell patch-clamping in tsA201 cells-together with data from the literature-suggest that mutations associated with early infantile epilepsy result in increased sodium channel activity with gain-of-function, characterized by slowing of fast inactivation, acceleration of its recovery or increased persistent sodium current. Further, a good response to sodium channel blockers clinically was found to be associated with a relatively small gain-of-function. In contrast, mutations in patients with late-onset forms and an insufficient response to sodium channel blockers were associated with loss-of-function effects, including a depolarizing shift of voltage-dependent activation or a hyperpolarizing shift of channel availability (steady-state inactivation). Our clinical and experimental data suggest a correlation between age at disease onset, response to sodium channel blockers and the functional properties of mutations in children with SCN2A-related epilepsy.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/tratamento farmacológico , Epilepsia/genética , Epilepsia/fisiopatologia , Canal de Sódio Disparado por Voltagem NAV1.2/genética , Canal de Sódio Disparado por Voltagem NAV1.2/fisiologia , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/genética , Bloqueadores dos Canais de Sódio/uso terapêutico , Adolescente , Adulto , Idade de Início , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Epilepsia/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Mutação , Fenótipo , Adulto Jovem
11.
Neurology ; 88(5): 483-492, 2017 01 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28053010

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the ß3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3 probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies. Electrophysiologic analysis of 7 mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes, using coexpression of wild-type or mutant ß3, together with α5 and γ2s subunits and an automated 2-microelectrode voltage-clamp system, revealed reduced GABA-induced current amplitudes or GABA sensitivity for 5 of 7 mutations. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that GABRB3 mutations are associated with a broad phenotypic spectrum of epilepsies and that reduced receptor function causing GABAergic disinhibition represents the relevant disease mechanism.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/genética , Mutação , Receptores de GABA-A/genética , Animais , Automação Laboratorial , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Epilepsia/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Heterozigoto , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Potenciais da Membrana/fisiologia , Oócitos , Técnicas de Patch-Clamp , Fenótipo , Receptores de GABA-A/metabolismo , Xenopus laevis
12.
Mol Syndromol ; 7(4): 210-219, 2016 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27781031

RESUMO

In recent years, several genes have been causally associated with epilepsy. However, making a genetic diagnosis in a patient can still be difficult, since extensive phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity has been observed in many monogenic epilepsies. This study aimed to analyze the genetic basis of a wide spectrum of epilepsies with age of onset spanning from the neonatal period to adulthood. A gene panel targeting 46 epilepsy genes was used on a cohort of 216 patients consecutively referred for panel testing. The patients had a range of different epilepsies from benign neonatal seizures to epileptic encephalopathies (EEs). Potentially causative variants were evaluated by literature and database searches, submitted to bioinformatic prediction algorithms, and validated by Sanger sequencing. If possible, parents were included for segregation analysis. We identified a presumed disease-causing variant in 49 (23%) of the 216 patients. The variants were found in 19 different genes including SCN1A, STXBP1, CDKL5, SCN2A, SCN8A, GABRA1, KCNA2, and STX1B. Patients with neonatal-onset epilepsies had the highest rate of positive findings (57%). The overall yield for patients with EEs was 32%, compared to 17% among patients with generalized epilepsies and 16% in patients with focal or multifocal epilepsies. By the use of a gene panel consisting of 46 epilepsy genes, we were able to find a disease-causing genetic variation in 23% of the analyzed patients. The highest yield was found among patients with neonatal-onset epilepsies and EEs.

13.
Infect Drug Resist ; 9: 221-227, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27695351

RESUMO

This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and/or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium necrophorum. We found a total of 137 cases of LS, of which 47 were infected with F. necrophorum and others with Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. Complications of this rare but severe disease included osteomyelitis, meningitis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mortality was extremely high in the pre-antibiotic era but has diminished with the advent of antibiotics. This review showed a mortality rate of only 2% of which none of the cases involved fusobacteria. Duration of treatment varied; a 4-6-week course of carbapenem or piperacillin/tazobactam in combination with metronidazole was optimum. Other treatment options included anticoagulants in 46% of cases, which is unwarrantedly high, as to date, no evidence of the positive effects of anticoagulants in LS exists. Only two cases had ligation of the internal jugular vein performed. This review confirms the rare, but severe aspects of LS. Mortality from LS in this day and age appears to be low, however the syndrome is difficult to recognize, and still requires the full attention of the clinician.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA