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5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31841266

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Few studies have examined how workplace support can address work productivity loss among individuals with systemic sclerosis (SSc). We examined: 1) the relationship between unmet workplace support needs and work productivity loss among workers with SSc; and 2) whether SSc symptom severity, fatigue, active disease periods and workplace activity limitations mediate the relationship between unmet workplace support and work productivity loss. METHOD: A cross-sectional survey was conducted of employed individuals with SSc who were recruited through rheumatology clinics. Information on work productivity loss (i.e., absenteeism, presenteeism, job disruptions), and the need, availability and use of workplace supports were collected. SSc symptom severity (e.g., workplace activity limitations, active disease periods, fatigue and overall SSc symptom severity), demographic, health and work context characteristics were collected. Three Bayesian path models examined the association between unmet workplace support needs and each work productivity loss outcome. SSc symptom severity variables were examined as mediators in each model. RESULTS: 110 employed participants were recruited (mean age=49 years ± 12.9). Over three quarters of participants were female (77%) and worked full-time (77%). Most needed workplace supports included extended health benefits (84%), special equipment (63%) and flex-time (59%). Additionally, 61% reported unmet workplace support needs. Path models indicated that indirect relationships between unmet workplace support needs and work productivity loss were significant. For all models, workplace activity limitations mediated the relationship between unmet workplace support need and productivity loss. CONCLUSION: To foster productive employment of people with SSc, interventions need to address symptom severity and meet workplace support needs.

6.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 2019 Nov 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31769217

RESUMO

In their letter (1), Dr. Rodrigues Fonseca and colleagues refer to their analysis of the new EULAR/ACR 2019 criteria in a group of 122 patients with childhood onset SLE and 89 patients with other diagnoses mimicking SLE (2). This analysis was published before the full contents of the EULAR/ACR 2019 manuscript (3;4) were available, which may have led to not taking important aspects into account.

7.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 21(1): 223, 2019 Nov 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31685018

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common symptom of systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease (SARD). Patients with SARD have a protracted pre-clinical phase during which progressive immunologic derangements occur culminating in disease. In this study, we sought to determine when fatigue develops and whether its presence correlates with inflammatory factors or predicts disease progression. METHODS: Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA)-negative healthy controls (HCs) and ANA-positive participants with no criteria, at least one clinical criteria (undifferentiated connective tissue disease, UCTD), or meeting SARD classification criteria were recruited. Fatigue was assessed using a modified version of the FACIT-F questionnaire and the presence of fibromyalgia determined using a questionnaire based on the modified 2010 ACR criteria. Peripheral blood expression of five IFN-induced genes was quantified by NanoString and the levels of IL-1ß, IL-6, or TNF-α by ELISA. RESULTS: Fatigue was as prevalent and severe in individuals lacking SARD criteria as it was in UCTD and SARD. Overall, ~ 1/3 of ANA+ subjects met fibromyalgia criteria, with no differences between sub-groups. Although fatigue was more severe in these individuals, those lacking fibromyalgia remained significantly more fatigued than ANA- HC. However, even in these subjects, fatigue correlated with the widespread pain index and symptom severity scores on the fibromyalgia questionnaire. Fatigue was not associated with elevated cytokine levels in any of the ANA+ sub-groups and did not predict imminent disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue is common in ANA+ individuals lacking sufficient criteria for a SARD diagnosis, correlates with fibromyalgia-related symptoms, and is not associated with inflammation or predictive of disease progression.

8.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31675169

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Using a longitudinal observational cohort of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients, we sought to identify progression rates, and factors predictive of spinal progression. As a secondary aim we analyzed the effect of tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) treatment on radiographic progression. METHODS: AS patients who had baseline and follow-up cervical and lumbar X-rays were included in the study. Radiographic damage was assessed by the modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spinal Score (mSASSS). A change of 2 mSASSS units in 2 years was defined as progression. The characteristics of the study group such as demographic, clinical, laboratory, and treatment history were collected. RESULTS: There were 350 patients in the study. The mean mSASSS increased from 9.3 (15.8) units at baseline to 17.7 (21.7) units by the 6th year. Change in mSASSS scores between the 0 to 2, 2 to 4 and 4 to 6 years were 1.23 (2.68), 1.47 (2.86), and 1.52 (3.7) units respectively. Overall 24.3% of the group progressed in 2 years' time. Male sex (HR 2.46, 95%CI 1.05, 5.76), presence of baseline damage (HR 7.98, 95%CI 3.98, 16), increased inflammatory markers (logCRP; HR 1.35, 95%CI 1.07, 1.70) and TNFi use (HR 0.82, 95%CI 0.70, 0.96) were predictive of radiographic progression. There was a 20% reduction in the rate of progression with TNFi. CONCLUSION: Male sex, presence of baseline damage, active disease state and higher inflammatory markers confer a high-risk group for disease progression. Treatment with TNFi showed a disease modifying effect by slowing the rate of radiographic progression.

11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31560454

RESUMO

A project towards new SLE classification criteria supported by both EULAR and the ACR is based on weighted criteria that include both laboratory and clinical items. Combinations of certain symptoms may occur commonly in SLE, which would argue against independently counting these items. However, these interrelationships have not been formally investigated. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the interrelationship between candidate criteria items in an international early SLE cohort and in the Euro-Lupus cohort. METHODS: The international early SLE cohort included 389 patients, who were diagnosed within the last 3 years. Data on ACR 1997, SLICC 2012 and 30 additional items were collected. To evaluate the inter-relationship of criteria, a tetrachoric correlation was used to assess the degree of association between different manifestations of the same organ-system. The correlations identified in the international early SLE cohort were validated in the Euro-Lupus cohort. RESULTS: A few relevant correlations were observed among specific clinical cutaneous manifestations (in particular, malar rash correlated with photosensitivity, alopecia, and oral ulcers) and serologic manifestations (anti-Sm and anti-dsDNA and anti-RNP, anti-Ro with anti-La, and between anti-phospholipid antibodies), and these results were validated in the Euro-Lupus cohort. The associations within the mucocutaneous domain, hematologic and the specific autoantibodies suggest that within a single domain only the highest ranking item should be counted to avoid overrepresentation. CONCLUSIONS: Some of the candidate SLE criteria do cluster within domains. Given these interrelationships, multiple criteria within a domain should not be independently counted. These results are important for the structure of new SLE classification criteria.

13.
J Scleroderma Relat Disord ; 4(1): 17-27, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30906878

RESUMO

The Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium (SCTC) represents many of the clinical researchers in the world who are interested in improving the efficiency of clinical trials in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). The SCTC has established 11 working groups (WGs) to develop and validate better ways of measuring and recording multiple aspects of this heterogeneous disease. These include groups working on arthritis, disease damage, disease activity, cardiac disease, juvenile SSc, the gastrointestinal tract, vascular component, calcinosis, scleroderma renal crisis, interstitial lung disease, and skin measurement. Members of the SCTC may join any one or more of these groups. Some of the WGs have only recently started their work, some are nearing completion of their mandated tasks and others are in the midst of their projects. All these projects, which are described in this paper, will help to improve clinical trials and observational studies by improving or developing better, more sensitive ways of measuring various aspects of the disease. As Lord Kelvin stated, "To measure is to know. If you cannot measure it you cannot improve it." The SCTC is dedicated to improving the lives of patients with SSc and it is our hope that the contributions of the WGs will be one important step in this process.

14.
J Rheumatol ; 46(9): 1103-1108, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30824634

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: A multiethnic systemic sclerosis (SSc) cohort study to evaluate ethnic variations in disease manifestations, internal organ involvement, and survival. METHODS: Adults who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism classification criteria for SSc between 1970 and 2017 were included. Self-reported ethnicity was categorized as European-descent white, Afro-Caribbean, Hispanic, Arab, East Asian, South Asian, First Nations, or Persian. The primary outcome was the time from diagnosis to death from all causes. Survival probabilities and median survival times were determined using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. RESULTS: There were 1005 subjects evaluated, the majority of whom were European-descent white (n = 745, 74%), Afro-Caribbean (n = 58, 6%), South Asian (n = 70, 7%), and East Asian (n = 80, 8%). Compared to European-descent white subjects, East Asians less frequently had calcinosis (29% vs 9%, p = 0.002) and esophageal dysmotility (88% vs 69%, p = 0.002); Afro-Caribbeans more frequently had interstitial lung disease (31% vs 53%, p = 0.007); and First Nations subjects more frequently had diffuse cutaneous disease (35% vs 56%, p = 0.02) and diabetes (5% vs 33%, p = 0.03). We found no difference in the short-term survival across ethnicities. Hispanic subjects have better longterm survival (81.3%, 95% CI 63-100) compared to European-descent white subjects (55%, 95% CI 51-60). East Asians appear to have the longest median survival time (43.3 yrs) and Arabs the shortest median survival time (15 yrs). There was no significant difference in median survival times between Afro-Caribbean and European-descent white subjects (22.2 vs 22.6 yrs). CONCLUSION: Ethnic variations in some SSc disease manifestations are observed. However, this does not result in significant differences in short-term survival but may affect longterm survival.

15.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 78(5): 634-640, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30692164

RESUMO

European League Against Rheumatism and are jointly supporting multiphase development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification criteria based on weighted criteria and a continuous probability scale. Prior steps included item generation, item reduction and hierarchical organisation of candidate criteria using an evidence-based approach. Our objectives were to determine relative weights using multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) and to set a provisional threshold score for SLE classification. An SLE Expert Panel (8 European, 9 North American) submitted 164 real, unique cases with a wide range of SLE probability in a standardised format. Using the candidate criteria, experts scored and rank-ordered 20 representative cases. At an in-person meeting, experts reviewed inter-rater reliability of scoring, further refined criteria definitions and participated in an MCDA exercise. Based on expert consensus decisions on pairwise comparisons of criteria, 1000minds software calculated criteria weights and rank-ordered the remaining 144 cases based on their additive scores. The score of the lowest-ranked case for which complete expert consensus was achieved defined the provisional threshold classification score. Inter-rater reliability of scoring cases with the candidate criteria was good. MCDA involved 74 pairwise decisions and was repeated for the arthritis and mucocutaneous domains when the initial ranking of some cases did not match expert opinion. After criteria weights and additive scores were recalculated once, experts reached consensus for SLE classification for all cases scoring>83. Using an iterative process, the candidate criteria definitions were refined, preliminary weights were calculated and a provisional threshold score for SLE classification was determined.


Assuntos
Técnicas de Apoio para a Decisão , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/classificação , Reumatologia/normas , Consenso , Humanos , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Reumatologia/métodos
16.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 71(6): 964-971, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30614663

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To generate a core set of items to develop classification criteria for scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) using consensus methodology. METHODS: An international, multidisciplinary panel of experts was invited to participate in a 3-round Delphi exercise developed using a survey based on items identified by a scoping review. In round 1, participants were asked to identify omissions and clarify ambiguities regarding the items in the survey. In round 2, participants were asked to rate the validity and feasibility of the items using Likert-type scales ranging from 1 to 9 (where 1 = very invalid/unfeasible, 5 = uncertain, and 9 = very valid/feasible). In round 3, participants reviewed the results and comments from round 2 and were asked to provide final ratings. Items rated as highly valid and feasible (median scores ≥7 for each) in round 3 were selected as the provisional core set of items. A consensus meeting using a nominal group technique was conducted to further reduce the core set of items. RESULTS: Ninety-nine experts from 16 countries participated in the Delphi exercise. Of the 31 items in the survey, consensus was achieved on 13, in the categories hypertension, renal insufficiency, proteinuria, and hemolysis. Eleven experts took part in the nominal group technique discussion, where consensus was achieved in 5 domains: blood pressure, acute kidney injury, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, target organ dysfunction, and renal histopathology. CONCLUSION: A core set of items that characterize SRC was identified using consensus methodology. This core set will be used in future data-driven phases of this project to develop classification criteria for SRC.


Assuntos
Lesão Renal Aguda/classificação , Hipertensão Maligna/classificação , Rim/patologia , Escleroderma Sistêmico/complicações , Lesão Renal Aguda/etiologia , Anemia Hemolítica/classificação , Anemia Hemolítica/etiologia , Pressão Sanguínea , Técnica Delfos , Humanos , Hipertensão/classificação , Hipertensão/etiologia , Hipertensão Maligna/etiologia , Proteinúria/classificação , Proteinúria/etiologia , Índice de Gravidade de Doença
17.
J Rheumatol ; 46(7): 721-726, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30554156

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Given the complexity and heterogeneity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), high-performing classification criteria are critical to advancing research and clinical care. A collaborative effort by the European League Against Rheumatism and the American College of Rheumatology was undertaken to generate candidate criteria, and then to reduce them to a smaller set. The objective of the current study was to select a set of criteria that maximizes the likelihood of accurate classification of SLE, particularly early disease. METHODS: An independent panel of international SLE experts and the SLE classification criteria steering committee (conducting SLE research in Canada, Mexico, United States, Austria, Germany, Greece, France, Italy, and Spain) ranked 43 candidate criteria. A consensus meeting using nominal group technique (NGT) was conducted to reduce the list of criteria for consideration. RESULTS: The expert panel NGT exercise reduced the candidate criteria for SLE classification from 43 to 21. The panel distinguished potential "entry criteria," which would be required for classification, from potential "additive criteria." Potential entry criteria were antinuclear antibody (ANA) ≥ 1:80 (HEp-2 immunofluorescence), and low C3 and/or low C4. The use of low complement as an entry criterion was considered potentially useful in cases with negative ANA. Potential additive criteria included lupus nephritis by renal biopsy, autoantibodies, cytopenias, acute and chronic cutaneous lupus, alopecia, arthritis, serositis, oral mucosal lesions, central nervous system manifestations, and fever. CONCLUSION: The NGT exercise resulted in 21 candidate SLE classification criteria. The next phases of SLE classification criteria development will require refinement of criteria definitions, evaluation of the ability to cluster criteria into domains, and evaluation of weighting of criteria.

18.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 71(1): 91-98, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30035365

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presents with nonspecific signs and symptoms that are also found in other conditions. This study aimed to evaluate manifestations at disease onset and to compare early SLE manifestations to those of diseases mimicking SLE. METHODS: Academic lupus centers in Asia, Europe, North America, and South America collected baseline data on patients who were referred to them during the previous 3 years for possible SLE and who had a symptom duration of <1 year. Clinical and serologic manifestations were compared between patients diagnosed as having SLE and those diagnosed as having SLE-mimicking conditions. Diagnostic performance of the 1997 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) SLE classification criteria and the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) SLE classification criteria was tested. RESULTS: Data were collected on 389 patients with early SLE and 227 patients with SLE-mimicking conditions. Unexplained fever was more common in early SLE than in SLE-mimicking conditions (34.5% versus 13.7%, respectively; P < 0.001). Features less common in early SLE included Raynaud's phenomenon (22.1% versus 48.5%; P < 0.001), sicca symptoms (4.4% versus 34.4%; P < 0.001), dysphagia (0.3% versus 6.2%; P < 0.001), and fatigue (28.3% versus 37.0%; P = 0.024). Anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-ß2 -glycoprotein I antibodies, positive Coombs' test results, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, hypocomplementemia, and leukopenia were more common in early SLE than in SLE-mimicking conditions. Symptoms detailed in the ACR and SLICC classification criteria were significantly more frequent among those with early SLE. Fewer patients with early SLE were not identified as having early SLE with use of the SLICC criteria compared to the ACR criteria (16.5% versus 33.9%), but the ACR criteria demonstrated higher specificity than the SLICC criteria (91.6% versus 82.4%). CONCLUSION: In this multicenter cohort, clinical manifestations that could help to distinguish early SLE from SLE-mimicking conditions were identified. These findings may aid in earlier SLE diagnosis and provide information for ongoing initiatives to revise SLE classification criteria.


Assuntos
Doenças Autoimunes/diagnóstico , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/diagnóstico , Síndrome de Sjogren/diagnóstico , Adulto , Anemia Hemolítica Autoimune/etiologia , Anticorpos Antinucleares , Síndrome Antifosfolipídica/diagnóstico , Artrite Reumatoide/diagnóstico , Autoanticorpos/imunologia , Estudos de Coortes , Proteínas do Sistema Complemento/imunologia , Teste de Coombs , DNA/imunologia , Transtornos de Deglutição/etiologia , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Feminino , Febre de Causa Desconhecida/etiologia , Hepatite Autoimune/diagnóstico , Humanos , Leucopenia/etiologia , Doenças Pulmonares Intersticiais/diagnóstico , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/classificação , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/complicações , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/imunologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Doença Mista do Tecido Conjuntivo/diagnóstico , Doença de Raynaud/etiologia , Escleroderma Sistêmico/diagnóstico , Síndrome de Sjogren/etiologia , Tireoidite Autoimune/diagnóstico , Doenças do Tecido Conjuntivo Indiferenciado/diagnóstico , Adulto Jovem , beta 2-Glicoproteína I/imunologia
20.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 20(1): 264, 2018 11 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30486869

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD) relies on the presence of hallmark anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), many of which can be detected years before clinical manifestations. However, ANAs are also seen in healthy individuals, most of whom will not develop SARD. Here, we examined a unique cohort of asymptomatic ANA+ individuals to determine whether they share any of the cellular immunologic features seen in SARD. METHODS: Healthy ANA- controls and ANA+ (ANA ≥1:160 by immunofluorescence) participants with no SARD criteria, with at least one criterion (undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD)), or meeting SARD classification criteria were recruited. Peripheral blood cellular immunological changes were assessed by flow cytometry and transcript levels of BAFF, interferon (IFN)-induced and plasma cell-expressed genes were quantified by NanoString. RESULTS: A number of the immunologic abnormalities seen in SARD, including changes in peripheral B (switched memory) and T (iNKT, T regulatory, activated memory T follicular helper) subsets and B cell activation, were also seen in asymptomatic ANA+ subjects and those with UCTD. The extent of these immunologic changes correlated with ANA titer or the number of different specific ANAs produced. Principal component analysis of the cellular data indicated that a significant proportion of asymptomatic ANA+ subjects and subjects with UCTD clustered  with patients with early SARD, rather than ANA- healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: ANA production is associated with altered T and B cell activation even in asymptomatic individuals. Some of the currently accepted cellular features of SARD may be associated with ANA production rather than the immunologic events that cause symptoms in SARD.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Antinucleares/imunologia , Doenças Autoimunes/imunologia , Linfócitos B/imunologia , Doenças Reumáticas/imunologia , Linfócitos T Auxiliares-Indutores/imunologia , Adulto , Idoso , Anticorpos Antinucleares/análise , Artrite Reumatoide/imunologia , Artrite Reumatoide/metabolismo , Doenças Autoimunes/diagnóstico , Doenças Autoimunes/metabolismo , Linfócitos B/metabolismo , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Ativação Linfocitária/imunologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Plasmócitos/imunologia , Plasmócitos/metabolismo , Doenças Reumáticas/diagnóstico , Doenças Reumáticas/metabolismo , Linfócitos T Auxiliares-Indutores/metabolismo
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