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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31427378

RESUMO

Diagnostic Exome Sequencing yields a single genetic diagnosis in approximately 30% of cases, and according to recent studies the prevalence of identifying two genetic conditions in a single individual ranges between 4.6 and 7%. We present a patient diagnosed with three different rare conditions, each explained by a pathogenic mutation in a different gene. A 17 year old female was evaluated for history of motor and speech delay, scoliosis, distinctive craniofacial features and dry skin in the Department of Clinical Genomics at Mayo Clinic. Her distinctive features included prominent forehead, epicanthus, depressed nasal bridge, narrow mouth, prognathism, malar flattening and oligodontia. Family history was notable for dry skin in her mother and missing teeth in the paternal grandmother. Previous diagnostic testing was unrevealing including biochemical testing, echocardiogram, abdominal ultrasound and electroencephalogram. Previous genetic testing included a microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization that was reported normal. Three pathogenic loss-of-function heterozygous variants were identified by exome trio sequencing, each linked to different genetic conditions: SIN3A (Witteveen-Kolk syndrome), FLG (dermatitis) and EDAR (ectodermal dysplasia). Together, these three genetic alterations could explain the patient's overall phenotype. This patient demonstrates the importance of performing a thorough curation of exome data when presented with a complex phenotype. Although phenotypic variability can explain some of these situations, the hypothesis of multiple diseases co-existing in a single patient should never be disregarded completely.

2.
Neurology ; 92(11): e1238-e1249, 2019 03 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30737342

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to expand the spectrum of epilepsy syndromes related to STX1B, encoding the presynaptic protein syntaxin-1B, and establish genotype-phenotype correlations by identifying further disease-related variants. METHODS: We used next-generation sequencing in the framework of research projects and diagnostic testing. Clinical data and EEGs were reviewed, including already published cases. To estimate the pathogenicity of the variants, we used established and newly developed in silico prediction tools. RESULTS: We describe 17 new variants in STX1B, which are distributed across the whole gene. We discerned 4 different phenotypic groups across the newly identified and previously published patients (49 patients in 23 families): (1) 6 sporadic patients or families (31 affected individuals) with febrile and afebrile seizures with a benign course, generally good drug response, normal development, and without permanent neurologic deficits; (2) 2 patients with genetic generalized epilepsy without febrile seizures and cognitive deficits; (3) 13 patients or families with intractable seizures, developmental regression after seizure onset and additional neuropsychiatric symptoms; (4) 2 patients with focal epilepsy. More often, we found loss-of-function mutations in benign syndromes, whereas missense variants in the SNARE motif of syntaxin-1B were associated with more severe phenotypes. CONCLUSION: These data expand the genetic and phenotypic spectrum of STX1B-related epilepsies to a diverse range of epilepsies that span the International League Against Epilepsy classification. Variants in STX1B are protean and contribute to many different epilepsy phenotypes, similar to SCN1A, the most important gene associated with fever-associated epilepsies.

3.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 27(5): 738-746, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30679813

RESUMO

Determining pathogenicity of genomic variation identified by next-generation sequencing techniques can be supported by recurrent disruptive variants in the same gene in phenotypically similar individuals. However, interpretation of novel variants in a specific gene in individuals with mild-moderate intellectual disability (ID) without recognizable syndromic features can be challenging and reverse phenotyping is often required. We describe 24 individuals with a de novo disease-causing variant in, or partial deletion of, the F-box only protein 11 gene (FBXO11, also known as VIT1 and PRMT9). FBXO11 is part of the SCF (SKP1-cullin-F-box) complex, a multi-protein E3 ubiquitin-ligase complex catalyzing the ubiquitination of proteins destined for proteasomal degradation. Twenty-two variants were identified by next-generation sequencing, comprising 2 in-frame deletions, 11 missense variants, 1 canonical splice site variant, and 8 nonsense or frameshift variants leading to a truncated protein or degraded transcript. The remaining two variants were identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization and consisted of a partial deletion of FBXO11. All individuals had borderline to severe ID and behavioral problems (autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, aggression) were observed in most of them. The most relevant common facial features included a thin upper lip and a broad prominent space between the paramedian peaks of the upper lip. Other features were hypotonia and hyperlaxity of the joints. We show that de novo variants in FBXO11 cause a syndromic form of ID. The current series show the power of reverse phenotyping in the interpretation of novel genetic variances in individuals who initially did not appear to have a clear recognizable phenotype.

4.
Am J Med Genet A ; 176(12): 2846-2849, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30549423

RESUMO

Exome sequencing is being used increasingly to evaluate patients with intellectual disability. YY1 is a ubiquitously distributed transcription factor belonging to the GLIKruppel class of zinc finger proteins recently recognized as the causative gene in 23 patients for the Gabriele-de Vries syndrome. We report a new case with similar features and a novel variant in YY1, in a region of the gene, which has not previously been reported. A 25 year old female was referred to clinical genetics with a diagnosis of autoimmune myasthenia gravis, facial dysmorphism and learning disability. Chromosomal microarray and gene panel test for congenital myasthenic syndrome was negative. Whole exome sequencing (WES) revealed a presumed pathogenic de novo novel, heterozygous, truncating variant in the YY1 gene, c.860_864delTTAAAA, p.Ile287Argfs*3. The Ile287 residue is conserved across species and is situated in the transcription repressor domain of the protein. This variant is novel and lies in a domain of the protein where no previously reported variants occur. The phenotypic features of our case closely match those of the reported patients. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis has not been reported in these patients and may constitute an expansion of this phenotypic spectrum or perhaps more likely a second unrelated diagnosis.


Assuntos
Estudos de Associação Genética , Transtornos de Aprendizagem/diagnóstico , Transtornos de Aprendizagem/genética , Miastenia Gravis/complicações , Fator de Transcrição YY1/genética , Adulto , Biomarcadores , Aberrações Cromossômicas , Facies , Feminino , Heterozigoto , Humanos , Miastenia Gravis/diagnóstico , Fenótipo , Radiografia Torácica , Síndrome , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X , Sequenciamento Completo do Exoma
5.
Clin Immunol ; 2018 Sep 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30282051

RESUMO

We report a 34-year-old male patient with a novel variant in KMT2D gene, which finally ended a quest for a diagnosis that was clinically suspected in the past, prior the molecular basis of Kabuki Syndrome (KS) was known. The patient showcases the multisystemic features, with involvement of all previously associated with KS body systems, presence of immune deficiency as well as autoimmune disorders, requiring three pancreatic transplants. We also report, for the first time to our knowledge, the presence of epidural lipomatosis and Hodgkin Lymphoma in a patient with KS.

6.
Brain ; 140(9): 2337-2354, 2017 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29050392

RESUMO

Recently, de novo mutations in the gene KCNA2, causing either a dominant-negative loss-of-function or a gain-of-function of the voltage-gated K+ channel Kv1.2, were described to cause a new molecular entity within the epileptic encephalopathies. Here, we report a cohort of 23 patients (eight previously described) with epileptic encephalopathy carrying either novel or known KCNA2 mutations, with the aim to detail the clinical phenotype associated with each of them, to characterize the functional effects of the newly identified mutations, and to assess genotype-phenotype associations. We identified five novel and confirmed six known mutations, three of which recurred in three, five and seven patients, respectively. Ten mutations were missense and one was a truncation mutation; de novo occurrence could be shown in 20 patients. Functional studies using a Xenopus oocyte two-microelectrode voltage clamp system revealed mutations with only loss-of-function effects (mostly dominant-negative current amplitude reduction) in eight patients or only gain-of-function effects (hyperpolarizing shift of voltage-dependent activation, increased amplitude) in nine patients. In six patients, the gain-of-function was diminished by an additional loss-of-function (gain-and loss-of-function) due to a hyperpolarizing shift of voltage-dependent activation combined with either decreased amplitudes or an additional hyperpolarizing shift of the inactivation curve. These electrophysiological findings correlated with distinct phenotypic features. The main differences were (i) predominant focal (loss-of-function) versus generalized (gain-of-function) seizures and corresponding epileptic discharges with prominent sleep activation in most cases with loss-of-function mutations; (ii) more severe epilepsy, developmental problems and ataxia, and atrophy of the cerebellum or even the whole brain in about half of the patients with gain-of-function mutations; and (iii) most severe early-onset phenotypes, occasionally with neonatal onset epilepsy and developmental impairment, as well as generalized and focal seizures and EEG abnormalities for patients with gain- and loss-of-function mutations. Our study thus indicates well represented genotype-phenotype associations between three subgroups of patients with KCNA2 encephalopathy according to the electrophysiological features of the mutations.


Assuntos
Encefalopatias/diagnóstico , Encefalopatias/genética , Epilepsia/diagnóstico , Canal de Potássio Kv1.2/genética , Animais , Encefalopatias/complicações , Epilepsia/complicações , Epilepsia/genética , Estudos de Associação Genética , Mutação , Oócitos/fisiologia , Fenótipo , Xenopus
7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28963436

RESUMO

Bosch-Boonstra-Schaaf optic atrophy syndrome (BBSOAS) is a recently described autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the NR2F1 gene. There are presently 28 cases of BBSOAS described in the literature. Its common features include developmental delay, intellectual disability, hypotonia, optic nerve atrophy, attention deficit disorder, autism spectrum disorder, seizures, hearing defects, spasticity, and thinning of the corpus callosum. Here we report two unrelated probands with novel, de novo, missense variants in NR2F1 The first is a 14-yr-old male patient with hypotonia, intellectual disability, optic nerve hypoplasia, delayed bone age, short stature, and altered neurotransmitter levels on cerebrospinal fluid testing. The second is a 5-yr-old female with severe developmental delay, motor and speech delay, and repetitive motion behavior. Whole-exome sequencing identified a novel missense NR2F1 variant in each case, Cys86Phe in the DNA-binding domain in Case 1, and a Leu372Pro in the ligand-binding domain in Case 2. The presence of clinical findings compatible with BBSOAS along with structural analysis at atomic resolution using homology-based molecular modeling and molecular dynamic simulations, support the pathogenicity of these variants for BBSOAS. Short stature, abnormal CNS neurotransmitters, and macrocephaly have not been previously reported for this syndrome and may represent a phenotypic expansion of BBSOAS. A review of published cases along with new evidence from this report support genotype-phenotype correlations for this disorder.


Assuntos
Fator I de Transcrição COUP/genética , Fator I de Transcrição COUP/metabolismo , Atrofias Ópticas Hereditárias/genética , Adolescente , Transtorno do Espectro Autista/genética , Criança , Pré-Escolar , DNA , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Exoma/genética , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/genética , Masculino , Modelos Moleculares , Hipotonia Muscular/genética , Mutação/genética , Atrofias Ópticas Hereditárias/metabolismo , Atrofia Óptica/genética , Convulsões/genética , Sequenciamento Completo do Exoma
8.
Mol Genet Metab Rep ; 13: 46-51, 2017 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28831385

RESUMO

Lysosomal diseases (LD) comprise a group of approximately 60 hereditary conditions caused by progressive accumulation of metabolites due to defects in lysosomal enzymes and degradation pathways, which lead to a wide range of clinical manifestations. The estimated combined incidence of LD is between 1 in 4000 to 1 in 13,000 live births, with recent data from pilot newborn screening studies showing even higher incidence. We aimed to determine the prevalence of the classical LD and other diseases caused by lysosome-related genes in our cohort of diagnostic odyssey patients. The Individualized Medicine Clinic at Mayo Clinic is increasingly utilizing whole exome sequencing (WES) to determine the genetic etiology of undiagnosed Mendelian disease. From September 2012 to April 2017, WES results from 350 patients with unexplained symptoms were reviewed. Disease-causing variants were identified in MYO6, CLN6, LRBA, KCTD7, and ARSB revealing a genetic diagnosis of a LD in 8 individuals from 5 families. Based on our findings, lysosome-related disorders may be collectively common, reaching up to 1.5% prevalence in a cohort of patients with undiagnosed diseases presenting to a genetics clinic.

9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28736585

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a hereditary cancer syndrome associated with several endocrine as well as non-endocrine tumors and is caused by mutations in the MEN1 gene. Primary hyperparathyroidism affects the majority of MEN1 individuals by age 50 years. Additionally, MEN1 mutations trigger familial isolated hyperparathyroidism. We describe a seemingly unaffected 76-year-old female who presented to our Genetics Clinic with a family history of primary hyperparathyroidism and the identification of a pathogenic MEN1 variant. CASE PRESENTATION: The patient was a 76 year-old woman who appeared to be unaffected. She had a family history of a known MEN1 pathogenic variant. Molecular testing for the known MEN1 mutation c.1A > G, as well as, biochemical testing, MRI of the brain and abdomen were all performed using standard methods. Molecular testing revealed our patient possessed the MEN1 pathogenic variant previously identified in her two offspring. Physical exam revealed red facial papules with onset in her seventies, involving her cheeks, nose and upper lip. Formerly, she was diagnosed with rosacea by a dermatologist and noted no improvement with treatment. Clinically, these lesions appeared to be facial angiofibromas. Brain MRI was normal. However, an MRI of her abdomen revealed a 1.5 cm lesion at the tail of the pancreas with normal adrenal glands. Glucagon was mildly elevated and pancreatic polypeptide was nearly seven times the upper limit of the normal range. The patient underwent spleen sparing distal pancreatectomy and subsequent pathology was consistent with a well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET). CONCLUSIONS: Age-related penetrance and variable expressivity are well documented in families with MEN1. It is thought that nearly all individuals with MEN1 manifest disease by age 40. We present a case of late-onset MEN1 in the absence of the most common feature, primary hyperparathyroidism, but with the presence of a pNET and cutaneous findings. This family expands the phenotype associated with the c.1A > G pathogenic variant and highlights the importance of providing comprehensive assessment of MEN1 mutation carriers in families that at first blush may appear to have isolated hyperparathyroidism.

10.
Cold Spring Harb Mol Case Stud ; 3(3): a001743, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28487885

RESUMO

Pathogenic variants in EBF3 were recently described in three back-to-back publications in association with a novel neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, speech delay, ataxia, and facial dysmorphisms. In this report, we describe an additional patient carrying a de novo missense variant in EBF3 (c.487C>T, p.(Arg163Trp)) that falls within a conserved residue in the zinc knuckle motif of the DNA binding domain. Without a solved structure of the DNA binding domain, we generated a homology-based atomic model and performed molecular dynamics simulations for EBF3, which predicted decreased DNA affinity for p.(Arg163Trp) compared with wild-type protein and control variants. These data are in agreement with previous experimental studies of EBF1 showing the paralogous residue is essential for DNA binding. The conservation and experimental evidence existing for EBF1 and in silico modeling and dynamics simulations to validate comparable behavior of multiple variants in EBF3 demonstrates strong support for the pathogenicity of p.(Arg163Trp). We show that our patient presents with phenotypes consistent with previously reported patients harboring EBF3 variants and expands the phenotypic spectrum of this newly identified disorder with the additional feature of a bicornuate uterus.


Assuntos
Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Pré-Escolar , DNA/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Exoma , Feminino , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Transtornos do Desenvolvimento da Linguagem/genética , Mutação/genética , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Fenótipo , Fatores de Transcrição/metabolismo
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