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1.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 2: CD006080, 2020 02 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32032439

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Fracture of the distal radius is a common clinical problem. A key method of surgical fixation is percutaneous pinning, involving the insertion of wires through the skin to stabilise the fracture. This is an update of a Cochrane Review published in 2007. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of percutaneous pinning versus cast immobilisation alone and of different methods and techniques of percutaneous pinning, modalities or duration of immobilisation after pinning, and methods or timing of pin or wire removal for treating fractures of the distal radius in adults. Our primary focus was on dorsally displaced fractures. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Embase, trial registers, conference proceedings and reference lists of articles up to June 2019. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials involving adults with a fracture of the distal radius, which compared percutaneous pinning with non-surgical treatment or different aspects of percutaneous pinning. Our main outcomes were patient-reported function at the short term (up to three months), medium term (three up to 12 months) and long term (greater than 12 months); overall numbers of participants with complications requiring secondary treatment and any complication; grip strength and health-related quality of life at 12 months. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors independently performed study screening and selection, 'Risk of bias' assessment and data extraction. We pooled data where appropriate and used GRADE for assessing the quality of evidence for each outcome. MAIN RESULTS: We included 21 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and five quasi-RCTs, involving 1946 generally older and female adults with dorsally displaced and potentially or evidently unstable distal radial fractures. Trial populations varied but the majority of studies reported mean ages in the sixth decade or older. All trials were at high risk of bias, invariably performance bias - which for most trials reflected the impracticality of blinding care providers or participants to treatment allocation - and often detection bias and selective reporting bias. Allocation concealment was secure in one trial only. All trials reported outcomes incompletely. The studies tested one of 10 comparisons. In the following, we report on those of the main outcomes for which evidence was available. No subgroup analysis, such as by pinning methods, was viable. Eleven heterogeneous trials involving 917 participants compared percutaneous pinning with plaster cast immobilisation after closed reduction of the fracture. The quality of the evidence was very low for all reported outcomes. Thus, we are uncertain if percutaneous pinning compared with plaster cast alone makes any difference to patient-reported function, measured using the DASH questionnaire, at six weeks or six months (incomplete data from one trial). Overall numbers of participants with complications were not reported. Redisplacement resulting in secondary treatment occurred on average in 12% (range 3.3% to 75%) of participants treated by cast alone (six trials) whereas pin tract infection requiring antibiotics and, often, early wire removal, occurred on average in 7.7% (range 0% to 15%) of pinning group participants (seven trials). We are uncertain whether pinning makes a difference to the incidence of complex regional pain syndrome, reported in four studies. Although two studies found finger stiffness after cast removal was less common after pinning (20% versus 36%), the treatment implications were not reported. Other reported complications were mainly surgery-related. Based on incomplete data or qualitative statements from only four studies, we are uncertain of the effects of pinning on grip strength at 12 months. We are uncertain if percutaneous pinning compared with plaster cast alone makes any difference to patient-reported quality of life at four months (one study). Five comparisons of different pinning methods were made by six trials in all. One of these trials, which reported results for 96 participants, compared Kapandji intrafocal pinning (2 or 3 wires) with early mobilisation versus trans-styloid fixation (2 wires) with six weeks cast immobilisation. We are uncertain whether Kapandji pinning slightly increases the risk of superficial radial nerve symptoms or complex regional pain syndrome, or whether it makes a difference in grip strength at 12 months (very low-quality evidence). Two small trials using two distinct pinning techniques compared biodegradable pins versus metal pins in 70 participants. Although very low-quality evidence, the extra demands at surgery of insertion of biodegradable pins and excess of serious complications (e.g. severe osteolytic reactions) associated with biodegradable material are important findings. Three poorly-reported trials involving 168 participants compared burying of wire ends versus leaving them exposed. We are uncertain whether burying of wires reduces the incidence of superficial infection (very low-quality evidence). There is low-quality evidence that burying of wires may be associated with a higher risk of requiring more invasive treatment for wire removal. Four small trials compared different types or duration of postoperative immobilisation. Very low-quality evidence of small between-group differences in individual complications and grip strength at 17 weeks, means we are uncertain of the effects of positioning the wrist in dorsiflexion versus palmar flexion during cast immobilisation following pinning of redisplaced fractures (one trial; 60 participants). Three small heterogeneous trials compared cast immobilisation for one week (early mobilisation) versus four or six weeks after percutaneous pinning in 170 people. Although we note one trial using Kapandji pinning reported more complications in the early group, the very low-quality evidence means there is uncertainty of the effects of early mobilisation on overall and individual complications, or grip strength at 12 months. No trials tested different methods for, or timing of, pin/wire removal. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there is insufficient RCT evidence to inform on the role of percutaneous pinning versus cast immobilisation alone or associated treatment decisions such as method of pinning, burying or not of wire ends, wrist position and duration of immobilisation after pinning. Although very low-quality evidence, the serious complications associated with biodegradable materials is noteworthy. We advise waiting on the results of a large ongoing study comparing pinning with plaster cast treatment as these could help inform future research.

2.
J Hand Surg Eur Vol ; 45(2): 111-118, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31382799

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to identify and assess all existing randomized studies on treatment interventions for hand fractures and joint injuries, to inform practice and plan future research. PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase were searched. We identified 78 randomized controlled trials published over 35 years, covering seven anatomical areas of the hand. We report on sources of bias, sample size, follow-up length and retention, outcome measures and reporting. In terms of interventions studied, the trials were extremely heterogeneous, so it is difficult to draw conclusions on individual treatments. The published randomized controlled clinical trial evidence for hand fractures and joint injuries is narrow in scope and of generally low methodological quality. Mapping provides a useful resource and stepping-stone for planning further research. There is a need for high-quality, collaborative research to guide management of a wider range of common hand injuries.

3.
J Hand Surg Eur Vol ; 44(7): 676-684, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31109228

RESUMO

Data on 806 patients undergoing bone graft surgery for a scaphoid fracture nonunion were retrospectively collected at 19 centres in the United Kingdom. Each centre contributed at least 30 cases. Sufficient data were available in 462 cases to study factors that influenced the outcome of surgery. Overall union occurred in at least 69%, and nonunion in at least 22%, with 9% of cases having 'uncertain union status'. Union appeared to be adversely influenced by smoking and the time between acute scaphoid fracture and nonunion surgery, with adjusted odds ratios of 1.8 and 2.4, respectively, but neither achieved the pre-determined significance level of 0.003. The type of bone graft (vascular vs non-vascular; iliac crest vs distal radius) did not appear to influence outcome. Further large multicentre prospective studies with clear definitions of 'union' and other factors are needed to clarify whether modification of surgical technique can influence union. Level of evidence: IV.

4.
J Hand Surg Eur Vol ; 44(6): 572-581, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30741080

RESUMO

There is lack of consensus on the management of triangular fibrocartilage injuries. The aim of this study was to investigate wrist surgeons' experiences and perceptions regarding treatment of triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries and to explore the rationale behind clinical decision-making. A purposive sample of consultant wrist surgeons (n = 10) was recruited through 'snow-balling' until data saturation was reached. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Two researchers independently analysed data using an iterative/thematic approach. Findings suggest that surgeons rely more on their own training and experience, and patient-related factors such as individual expectations, to inform their decision-making, rather than on published material. Current classification systems are largely considered to be unhelpful. Level of evidence: V.

5.
Hand (N Y) ; : 1558944718815244, 2019 Jan 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30667271

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Peripheral 1B tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) can result in distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. In the context of associated DRUJ instability, combined evidence supports successful outcomes for peripheral tear repair. METHODS: The aim of this systematic review (SR) was to compare the surgical treatment of 1B TFCC tears via arthroscopic versus open methods of repair. The primary outcome measure was restored DRUJ stability. The secondary outcome measures included patient-reported outcomes and clinical outcome measures. An electronic database search of Ovid Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed to cover a 20-year period. Two authors independently screened records for eligibility and extracted data. RESULTS: Only 3 studies met the strict inclusion criteria, highlighting the poor evidence base for TFCC 1B repairs. Hence, a "secondary analysis" group was developed with modified inclusion criteria which included a further 7 studies for analysis. Pooled data from the primary and secondary analysis groups demonstrated that postoperative DRUJ stability was achieved following open repair in 84% (76/90) of cases and following arthroscopic repair in 86% (129/150) of cases. CONCLUSIONS: This SR demonstrates a current lack of high-quality evidence required to draw firm conclusions on the merits of arthroscopic versus open repair of 1B TFCC tears. There is no scientific evidence to suggest superiority of one technique over the other, albeit some surgeons and authors may express a strong personal view.

6.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 12: CD012470, 2018 12 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30566764

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Wrist fractures, involving the distal radius, are the most common fractures in children. Most are buckle fractures, which are stable fractures, unlike greenstick and other usually displaced fractures. There is considerable variation in practice, such as the extent of immobilisation for buckle fractures and use of surgery for seriously displaced fractures. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of interventions for common distal radius fractures in children, including skeletally immature adolescents. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group's Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Embase, trial registries and reference lists to May 2018. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs comparing interventions for treating distal radius fractures in children. We sought data on physical function, treatment failure, adverse events, time to return to normal activities (recovery time), wrist pain, and child (and parent) satisfaction. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors independently performed study screening and selection, 'Risk of bias' assessment and data extraction. We pooled data where appropriate and used GRADE for assessing the quality of evidence for each outcome. MAIN RESULTS: Of the 30 included studies, 21 were RCTs, seven were quasi-RCTs and two did not describe their randomisation method. Overall, 2930 children were recruited. Typically, trials included more male children and reported mean ages between 8 and 10 years. Eight studies recruited buckle fractures, five recruited buckle and other stable fractures, three recruited minimally displaced fractures and 14 recruited displaced fractures, typically requiring closed reduction, typically requiring closed reduction. All studies were at high risk of bias, mainly reflecting lack of blinding. The studies made 14 comparisons. Below we consider five prespecified comparisons:Removable splint versus below-elbow cast for predominantly buckle fractures (6 studies, 695 children)One study (66 children) reported similar Modified Activities Scale for Kids - Performance scores (0 to 100; no disability) at four weeks (median scores: splint 99.04; cast 99.11); low-quality evidence. Thirteen children needed a change or reapplication of device (splint 5/225; cast 8/219; 4 studies); very low-quality evidence. One study (87 children) reported no refractures at six months. One study (50 children) found no between-group difference in pain during treatment; very low-quality evidence. Evidence was absent (recovery time), insufficient (children with minor complications) or contradictory (child or parent satisfaction). Two studies estimated lower healthcare costs for removable splints.Soft or elasticated bandage versus below-elbow cast for buckle or similar fractures (4 studies, 273 children)One study (53 children) reported more children had no or only limited disability at four weeks in the bandage group; very low-quality evidence. Eight children changed device or extended immobilisation for delayed union (bandage 5/90; cast 3/91; 3 studies); very low-quality evidence. Two studies (139 children) reported no serious adverse events at four weeks. Evidence was absent, insufficient or contradictory for recovery time, wrist pain, children with minor complications, and child and parent satisfaction. More bandage-group participants found their treatment convenient (39 children).Removal of casts at home by parents versus at the hospital fracture clinic by clinicians (2 studies, 404 children, mainly buckle fractures)One study (233 children) found full restoration of physical function at four weeks; low-quality evidence. There were five treatment changes (home 4/197; hospital 1/200; 2 studies; very low-quality evidence). One study found no serious adverse effects at six months (288 children). Recovery time and number of children with minor complications were not reported. There was no evidence of a difference in pain at four weeks (233 children); low-quality evidence. One study (80 children) found greater parental satisfaction in the home group; low-quality evidence. One UK study found lower healthcare costs for home removal.Below-elbow versus above-elbow casts for displaced or unstable both-bone fractures (4 studies, 399 children)Short-term physical function data were unavailable but very low-quality evidence indicated less dependency when using below-elbow casts. One study (66 children with minimally displaced both-bone fractures) found little difference in ABILHAND-Kids scores (0 to 42; no problems) (mean scores: below-elbow 40.7; above-elbow 41.8); very low-quality evidence. Overall treatment failure data are unavailable, but nine of the 11 remanipulations or secondary reductions (366 children, 4 studies) were in the above-elbow group; very low-quality evidence. There was no refracture or compartment syndrome at six months (215 children; 2 studies). Recovery time and overall numbers of children with minor complications were not reported. There was little difference in requiring physiotherapy for stiffness (179 children, 2 studies); very low-quality evidence. One study (85 children) found less pain at one week for below-elbow casts; low-quality evidence. One study found treatment with an above-elbow cast cost three times more in Nepal.Surgical fixation with percutaneous wiring and cast immobilisation versus cast immobilisation alone after closed reduction of displaced fractures (5 studies, 323 children)Where reported, above-elbow casts were used. Short-term functional outcome data were unavailable. One study (123 children) reported similar ABILHAND-Kids scores indicating normal physical function at six months (mean scores: surgery 41.9; cast only 41.4); low-quality evidence. There were fewer treatment failures, defined as early or problematic removal of wires or remanipulation for early loss in position, after surgery (surgery 20/124; cast only 41/129; 4 studies; very low-quality evidence). Similarly, there were fewer serious advents after surgery (surgery 28/124; cast only 43/129; 4 studies; very low-quality evidence). Recovery time, wrist pain, and satisfaction were not reported. There was lower referral for physiotherapy for stiffness after surgery (1 study); very low-quality evidence. One USA study found similar treatment costs in both groups. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Where available, the quality of the RCT-based evidence on interventions for treating wrist fractures in children is low or very low. However, there is reassuring evidence of a full return to previous function with no serious adverse events, including refracture, for correctly-diagnosed buckle fractures, whatever the treatment used. The review findings are consistent with the move away from cast immobilisation for these injuries. High-quality evidence is needed to address key treatment uncertainties; notably, some priority topics are already being tested in ongoing multicentre trials, such as FORCE.


Assuntos
Bandagens/estatística & dados numéricos , Fixação de Fratura/métodos , Fraturas do Rádio/terapia , Contenções/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Criança , Feminino , Fixação de Fratura/efeitos adversos , Consolidação da Fratura , Humanos , Imobilização/métodos , Imobilização/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Medição da Dor , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Fatores de Tempo , Falha de Tratamento , Traumatismos do Punho
7.
JB JS Open Access ; 3(3): e0065, 2018 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30533597

RESUMO

Background: The purpose of the present study was to systematically evaluate the completeness of trial registration and the extent of outcome-reporting bias in modern randomized controlled trials (RCTs) relating to the treatment of distal radial fracture. Methods: With use of 4 databases (PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL, Embase, and PEDro), this systematic review identified all RCTs of distal radial fracture treatment published from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2015. We independently determined the registration status of these trials in a public trial registry and compared the characteristics of registered and non-registered trials. We assessed the quality and consistency of primary outcome measure (POM) reporting between the registration data and the final published studies. Results: Ninety studies met the inclusion criteria. Of those, only 28 (31%) were registered, and only 3 (3%) were "appropriately registered" (i.e., prospectively registered and identifying and fully describing the POM). Registered trials had larger sample sizes and were more likely to be multicenter, to report funding sources, and to be published in higher-impact-factor journals. Sixteen (18%) of the 90 registered RCTs named a POM in the registry; 7 (44%) of those 16 registered RCTs stated a different POM, an additional POM, or no POM at all in the final publication than was stated in the registry data. Additionally, 13 (81%) of those 16 registered RCTs had discrepancies in the time point reported for the POM. Conclusions: In an attempt to address publication and outcome-reporting bias, prospective trial registration in a public registry has been deemed a condition for publication by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) since 2005. This study shows poor registration rates as well as inconsistencies in the reporting of POMs of recent trials relating to the treatment of distal radial fracture, one of the most common and most investigated injuries in orthopaedic practice. Clinical Relevance: The problems of registration and outcome-reporting bias in RCTs are important to highlight and address, and to find a solution will require the cooperation of researchers, reviewers, and journal editors. Increasing the transparency and consistency of reporting will help to increase the quality of research, which can impact patient care through evidence-based guidelines.

9.
Trials ; 18(1): 392, 2017 08 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28841903

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Dupuytren's contractures are fibrous cords under the skin of the palm of the hand. The contractures are painless but cause one or more fingers to curl into the palm, resulting in loss of function. Standard treatment within the NHS is surgery to remove (fasciectomy) or divide (fasciotomy) the contractures, and the treatment offered is frequently determined by surgeon preference. This study aims to determine the feasibility of conducting a large, multicentre randomised controlled trial to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of needle fasciotomy versus limited fasciectomy for the treatment of Dupuytren's contracture. METHODS/DESIGN: HAND-1 is a parallel, two-arm, multicentre, randomised feasibility trial. Eligible patients aged 18 years or over who have one or more fingers with a Dupuytren's contracture of more than 30° in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and/or proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints, well-defined cord(s) causing contracture, and have not undergone previous surgery for Dupuytren's on the same hand will be randomised (1:1) to treatment with either needle fasciotomy or limited fasciectomy. Participants will be followed-up for up to 6 months post surgery. Feasibility outcomes include number of patients screened, consented and randomised, adherence with treatment, completion of follow-up and identification of an appropriate patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) to use as primary outcome for a main trial. Embedded qualitative research, incorporating a QuinteT Recruitment Intervention, will focus on understanding and optimising the recruitment process, and exploring patients' experiences of trial participation and the interventions. DISCUSSION: This study will assess whether a large multicentre trial comparing the clinical and cost-effectiveness of needle fasciotomy and limited fasciectomy for the treatment of Dupuytren's contractures is feasible, and if so will provide data to inform its design and successful conduct. TRIAL REGISTRATION: International Standard Registered Clinical/soCial sTudy Number: ISRCTN11164292 . Registered on 28 August 2015.


Assuntos
Contratura de Dupuytren/cirurgia , Fasciotomia/instrumentação , Protocolos Clínicos , Análise Custo-Benefício , Contratura de Dupuytren/diagnóstico , Contratura de Dupuytren/economia , Contratura de Dupuytren/fisiopatologia , Inglaterra , Fasciotomia/efeitos adversos , Fasciotomia/economia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Custos de Cuidados de Saúde , Humanos , Agulhas , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Projetos de Pesquisa , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento
10.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 95(19): 1737-44, 2013 Oct 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24088965

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of displaced distal radial fractures treated with a volar locking plate with the results of such fractures treated with a conventional method of closed reduction and percutaneous wire fixation with supplemental bridging external fixation when required. Our aim was to ascertain whether the use of a volar locking plate improves functional outcomes. METHODS: A single-center, pragmatic, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a tertiary care institution. One hundred and thirty patients (eighteen to seventy-three years of age) who had a displaced distal radial fracture were randomized to treatment with either a volar locking plate (n = 66) or a conventional percutaneous fixation method (n = 64). Outcome assessments were conducted at six weeks, twelve weeks, and one year. Outcomes were measured on the basis of scores on the Patient Evaluation Measure (PEM) and QuickDASH questionnaire (a shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand, or DASH, Outcome Measure), EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) scores, wrist range of motion, grip strength, and radiographic parameters. RESULTS: The rate of follow-up at one year was 95%. Patients in the volar locking-plate group had significantly better PEM and QuickDASH scores and range of motion at six weeks compared with patients in the conventional-treatment group, but there were no significant differences between the two groups at twelve weeks or one year. Grip strength was better in the plate group at all time points. The volar locking plate was better at restoring palmar tilt and radial height. Significantly more patients in the plate group were driving at the end of six weeks, but this did not translate to a significant difference between groups in terms of those returning to work by that time. CONCLUSIONS: Use of a volar locking plate resulted in a faster early recovery of function compared with use of conventional methods. However, no functional advantage was demonstrated at or beyond twelve weeks. Use of the volar locking plate resulted in better anatomical reduction and grip strength, but there was no significant difference in function between the groups at twelve weeks or one year. The earlier recovery of function may be of advantage to some patients. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Assuntos
Placas Ósseas , Fixação Interna de Fraturas/instrumentação , Fraturas do Rádio/cirurgia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Remoção de Dispositivo/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoas com Deficiência/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Seguimentos , Fixação Interna de Fraturas/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Satisfação do Paciente , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Qualidade de Vida , Radiografia , Fraturas do Rádio/diagnóstico por imagem , Fraturas do Rádio/fisiopatologia , Amplitude de Movimento Articular/fisiologia , Reoperação/estatística & dados numéricos , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
13.
Clin Orthop Relat Res ; 468(4): 951-7, 2010 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19609630

RESUMO

UNLABELLED: Ankle arthroplasty is increasingly used to treat advanced ankle arthritis. Earlier prostheses have given way to second-generation implants, on which we are accumulating medium-term data. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR) is a three-component uncemented implant in wide use in Europe and the only mobile-bearing prosthesis with conditional approval in the United States. We retrospectively reviewed 45 patients (52 ankles) who had primary total ankle replacements using STAR prostheses, in order to assess survivorship and add to the pool of clinical data provided by independent practitioners required to establish this treatment as a viable alternative to arthrodesis. The minimum followup was 60 months (range, 60-110 months). Clinical outcome was determined using the AOFAS score. We determined the rate of radiographic loosening and recorded complications and the need for further surgery. Survival was 90% (95% CI 76.8 to 95.5) at 5 years and 84% (95% CI 68.9 to 92.2) at 8 years. Six of 52 ankles (11%) had component revision and two were converted to fusion. The mean postoperative AOFAS score was 78. The complication rate was 21%. Subsequent surgery, excluding component revision, was performed in nine of 52 (17%) ankles. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Assuntos
Articulação do Tornozelo/cirurgia , Artroplastia de Substituição/métodos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Articulação do Tornozelo/diagnóstico por imagem , Artrite Reumatoide/cirurgia , Artroplastia de Substituição/efeitos adversos , Artroplastia de Substituição/instrumentação , Feminino , Humanos , Prótese Articular/efeitos adversos , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Osteoartrite/cirurgia , Satisfação do Paciente , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Desenho de Prótese , Falha de Prótese , Radiografia , Reoperação , Estudos Retrospectivos , Países Escandinavos e Nórdicos/epidemiologia , Resultado do Tratamento
14.
Hip Int ; 19(2): 109-13, 2009.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19462366

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Dislocation is one of the commonest complications of total hip arthroplasty with an incidence of between 0.5 and 9.2%. Despite this, little is known of the outcome of treatment strategies for dislocation. The aim of this study was to establish the optimal strategy for the operative management of recurrent dislocation following THA taking account of the surgical approach employed in the replacement that became unstable and the direction of the instability that followed. METHODS: We reviewed 70 patients who underwent revision surgery for recurrent dislocation after total hip arthroplasty (THA), 38 through the transgluteal (Hardinge) and 32 through the posterior approach.52 of these followed primary and 18 followed revision THA for reasons other than instability.We recorded the surgical approach, the direction of dislocation and the operative strategy employed for each case. RESULTS: We achieved stability in 75% of patients who dislocated after primary and 50% after revision THA. 77% of dislocations performed initially through the transgluteal approach were anterior and 88% through the posterior approach were posterior. Following the transgluteal approach, we stabilised anterior dislocation in 54% of cases. Following the posterior approach we stabilised posterior dislocation in 79%. The most successful operative strategy overall was cup augmentation which conferred stability in 90% of cases. INTERPRETATION: Instability after primary total hip replacement is easier to treat (75% chance of success) than after revision total hip replacement (50% chance of success). Although previous studies have shown that the posterior approach has a slightly higher risk of dislocation, this study has shown that achieving stability after a posterior dislocation is more likely than after an anterior dislocation. The outcome of revision for instability depends on the surgical approach used initially, and the direction of dislocation.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Quadril/efeitos adversos , Artroplastia de Quadril/métodos , Articulação do Quadril/patologia , Luxações Articulares/etiologia , Falha de Prótese , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Articulação do Quadril/cirurgia , Humanos , Instabilidade Articular/etiologia , Instabilidade Articular/cirurgia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Reoperação/métodos , Estudos Retrospectivos
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