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1.
J Knee Surg ; 2020 Mar 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32131100

RESUMO

The articulating antibiotic spacer is a treatment utilized for two-stage revision of an infected total knee arthroplasty. The original femoral component is retained and reused in one described variation of this technique. The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of flash sterilization of the femoral component for reimplantation in an articulating antibiotic spacer for the treatment of chronic periprosthetic joint infection. A total of 10 patients were identified prospectively with a culture positive infected total knee arthroplasty. The patients underwent explantation, debridement, and placement of an articulating antibiotic spacer consisting of the explanted and sterilized femoral component and a new polyethylene tibial insert. The explanted tibial components were cleaned and flash-sterilized with the femoral components, but the components were then aseptically packaged and sent to our microbiology laboratory for sonication and culture of the sonicate for 14 days. Ten of 10 cleaned tibial components were negative for bacterial growth of the infecting organism after final testing and analysis. At 18-month follow-up, 9 of 10 of patients remained clear of infection. Among the 10 patients, 7 were pleased with their articulating spacer construct and had no intention of electively pursuing reimplantation. Also, 3 of 10 of patients were successfully reimplanted at a mean of 6.5 months after explantation. Autoclave sterilization and reimplantation of components may be a safe and potentially resource-sparing method of articulating spacer placement in two-stage treatment of PJI. Patient follow-up demonstrated clinical eradication of infection in 90% of cases with good patient tolerance of the antibiotic spacer.

2.
Am J Sports Med ; 47(11): 2584-2588, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31336053

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Microfracture is a commonly utilized cartilage restoration technique for articular cartilage defects. While the removal of the calcified cartilage layer (CCL) has been shown to be critical with in vivo models, little is known with regard to surgeon reliability to adequately perform the technique. PURPOSE: To evaluate surgeon reliability in removing the CCL utilizing open and arthroscopic techniques. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study. METHODS: Eleven cadaveric knees were utilized to create four 12-mm diameter defects in the anterior and posterior medial femoral condyles. Eleven fellowship-trained surgeons were asked to perform the following procedures: remove the CCL open, retain the CCL open, remove the CCL arthroscopically, and retain the CCL arthroscopically. Samples underwent histologic staining and analysis with 3-dimensional micro-computed tomography. The latter was used to calculate the percentage of the CCL that was removed or retained across the entire defect. RESULTS: When surgeons were asked to retain the CCL arthroscopically, 48% ± 41% (mean ± SD) remained. When surgeons were asked to remove the CCL arthroscopically, 24% ± 35% remained. There was no statistical difference between these groups (P > .05). When the CCL was retained during open preparation, 60% ± 39% remained. During attempts to remove the CCL in an open manner, 19% ± 28% remained. There was a significant difference in the amount of CCL remaining between the open removal and open retaining groups (P = .03). There were no significant differences in the percentage of CCL remaining between the open and arthroscopic preservation groups and between the open and arthroscopic removal groups. CONCLUSION/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This study highlights the significant variability in surgeon ability to reliably retain or remove the CCL. However, there appears to be improved ability of surgeons to more reliably remove or retain the CCL in an open fashion as compared with the arthroscopic approach.

3.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(10): 2392-2397, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31178387

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients between 45 and 54 years old will be the fastest-growing cohort seeking total knee arthroplasty (TKA) over the next 15 years. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the clinical outcomes of TKA in patients less than 50 years old at a minimum of 10 years. We hypothesized that this patient population would have a high rate of survivorship that is similar to that of older patients. METHODS: We reviewed 298 consecutive TKAs on 242 patients at a minimum of 10 years postoperatively. Twenty patients died and 30 TKAs were lost to follow-up leaving 248 TKAs in 202 patients (91 male, 111 female) with a mean age of 45.7 years (range, 26-49) at the time of surgery. Patient-reported outcomes, survivorship, causes of reoperation, and initial postoperative radiographic parameters were collected. RESULTS: At a mean of 13.0 years, there were 9 revisions for tibial loosening (3.6%), 8 for deep infection (3.2%), 7 for polyethylene wear (2.8%), and 3 for failed ingrowth of a cementless femoral component (1.2%). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated 92.0% survivorship with failures defined as aseptic component revision and 83.9% survivorship for all-cause reoperation at 13 years. Patients with tibial alignment of 4° or more of varus or 10° or more of posterior slope were found to have increased rate of failure. CONCLUSION: While overall durability was good in this young patient population, tibial fixation and deep infection were relatively common causes of failure. In addition, increased tibial varus and slope were found to increase the rate of failure. Furthermore, the nearly 3% risk of revision for wear suggests that the use of more wear-resistant bearing surfaces may reduce the risk of failure in this patient population.

4.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(7): 1307-1311, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31031153

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Rapid-pathway outpatient (OTJA) and one-night inpatient (ITJA) arthroplasty require close follow-up by the surgeon. We quantify and characterize the total perioperative touches required in the first 7 days, and compare OTJA and ITJA patients. METHODS: We reviewed 103 consecutive primary total joint arthroplasty (TJA) patients from April 2014 without exclusion; all patients were discharged either within 5 hours or the morning after surgery. All telephone and office visits during the first 7 days following surgery were studied. Specialized outpatient TJA education was included. We measured the frequency, duration, and subject matter of phone calls. Simple Poisson regression analysis and t-tests were used to determine significance. RESULTS: None of the 103 rapid pathway patients were lost to follow-up. Average age was 61.2 years (range 26.9-83.0), with 49 females (47.6%), 78 total knee arthroplasties, average Charlson Comorbidity Index score of 2.1, and average body mass index of 29.5 kg/m2. There were 253 touches required, averaging 2.5/patient. One hundred sixty were outgoing phone calls by the surgical team and 93 were incoming calls from patients. The average duration of each call was 4.74 minutes (SD 3.7). The entire group required 19 hours and 35 minutes of telephone contact. After including specialized education time, this cohort required 83.1 hours of clinical time, or 48.4 minutes per patient. CONCLUSION: Postoperative care after rapid pathway TJA requires a significant burden of resources, shifted from the hospital to the surgeon. We found that both rapid pathway groups require similar work by the surgeon's team. This additional work should be considered by policymakers.

5.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(7S): S238-S241, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30935803

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to evaluate clinical and radiographic outcomes of patients less than 50 years of age undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) at a minimum of 10 years. METHODS: Three hundred nine consecutive THAs performed on 273 patients were reviewed. At a minimum of 10 years, 13 were deceased and 23 were lost to follow-up leaving 273 THAs in 237 patients who were followed for a mean of 16 years (range 10-19.9). The cohort consisted of 116 females (49%) and 121 males (51%), with a mean age of 42.3 years at the time of surgery (range 19-49). The majority of preoperative diagnoses included osteoarthritis in 149 (63%) and avascular necrosis in 55 (23%). Two hundred sixteen had highly crosslinked polyethylene (HXLPE) and 57 had non-HXLPE acetabular liners. The femoral stems were cementless in 98% (266/273) and the acetabular components were cementless in all cases. Femoral head composition was cobalt-chromium in all cases and the majority of sizes in the non-HXLPE cohort were 28 mm (52/57; 91%), while the HXLPE group primarily consisted of 28 mm (141/216; 65%) and 32 mm (74/216; 34%) heads. Analysis involved Kaplan-Meier survivorship with a log-rank test for equivalence, Fisher's exact test for pairwise comparisons, and a paired t-test for Harris Hip Score, with alpha = 0.05 being statistically significant. RESULTS: There were 6 revisions for wear in the non-HXLPE group (10.5%) compared to none in the HXLPE group (P < .001). Similarly, survivorship with revision for any reason as the endpoint at 16 years was significantly higher at 93.0% in the XLPE group (95% confidence interval 88.7-95.7) compared to 85.7% (95% confidence interval 73.5-92.6) in the non-HXLPE group (P = .023). Additional revisions in the HXLPE group included 6 for instability (2.8%), 5 secondary to infection (2.4%), and 3 stem failures (1.4%). Non-wear-related revisions in the non-HXLPE group included 5 due to instability (8.8%) and 3 due to stem failures (5.3%). The mean Harris Hip Scores for the entire cohort improved from a mean of 46.2 points preoperatively to 89.8 points at most recent follow-up (P < .001). CONCLUSION: The use of HXLPE has led to a significant reduction in the risk of failure in patients <50 years old, with over 93% survivorship at 16 years. Instability and infection, however, remain substantial causes of failure. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level III.

6.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(7S): S168-S172, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30948289

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Routine laboratory studies are generally obtained following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and often continued daily until discharge. This study aims to investigate the utility and cost-effectiveness of complete blood count (CBC) tests following TKA. METHODS: Retrospective review identified 484 patients who underwent primary TKA under a tourniquet at a single institution. Preoperative and postoperative CBC values were collected along with demographic data, use of tranexamic acid (TXA), and transfusion rates. Logistic regression models were calculated for all variables. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients required transfusion following TKA (5.2%). Patients requiring transfusion had significantly lower preoperative hemoglobin compared to patients who did not require transfusion (11.47 vs 13.58 g/dL, P = .005). Risk of transfusion was 5.2 times higher in patients with preoperative anemia (95% confidence interval 2.90-9.35, P < .001). Without TXA, patients were 2.75 times more likely to receive transfusion (95% confidence interval 1.43-5.30, P < .001). An average of 2.9 CBC tests were collected per patient who did not receive medical intervention, costing a total of $144,773.80 in associated hospital charges ($316.10 per patient). CONCLUSION: Ensuring quality, cost-effective patient care following total joint arthroplasty is essential in the era of bundled payments. Routine postoperative CBCs do not add value for patients with normal preoperative hemoglobin who receive TXA during TKA performed under tourniquet. Patients who are anemic preoperatively or do not receive TXA should obtain a postoperative CBC test. Daily CBCs are unnecessary if the first postoperative CBC does not prompt intervention.

8.
Foot Ankle Int ; 40(2): 210-217, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30345807

RESUMO

BACKGROUND:: The Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model provides bundled payments for in-hospital and 90-day postdischarge care of patients undergoing total ankle arthroplasty (TAA). Defining patient factors associated with increased costs during TAA could help identify modifiable preoperative patient factors that could be addressed prior to the patient entering the bundle, as well as determine targets for cost reduction in postoperative care. METHODS:: This study is part of an institutional review board-approved single-center observational study of patients undergoing TAA from January 1, 2012, to December 15, 2016. Patients were included if they met CJR criteria for inclusion into the bundled payment model. All Medicare payments beginning at the index procedure through 90 days postoperatively were identified. Patient, operative, and postoperative characteristics were associated with costs in adjusted, multivariable analyses. One hundred thirty-seven patients met inclusion criteria for the study. RESULTS:: Cerebrovascular disease (intracranial hemorrhages, strokes, or transient ischemic attacks) was initially associated with increased costs (mean, $5595.25; 95% CI, $1710.22-$9480.28) in adjusted analyses ( P = .005), though this variable did not meet a significance threshold adjusted for multiple comparisons. Increased length of stay, discharge to a skilled nursing facility (SNF), admissions, emergency department (ED) visits, and wound complications were significant postoperative drivers of payment. CONCLUSION:: Common comorbidities did not reliably predict increased costs. Increased length of stay, discharge to an SNF, readmission, ED visits, and wound complications were postoperative factors that considerably increased costs. Lastly, reducing the rates of SNF placement, readmission, ED visitation, and wound complications are targets for reducing costs for patients undergoing TAA. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:: Level II, prognostic prospective cohort study.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Substituição do Tornozelo/economia , Comorbidade , Gastos em Saúde , Medicare , Pacotes de Assistência ao Paciente/economia , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Tempo de Internação/economia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Readmissão do Paciente/economia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos
11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30180222

RESUMO

The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship of body mass index (BMI), age, smoking status, and other comorbid conditions to the rate and type of complications occurring in the perioperative period following periacetabular osteotomy. A retrospective review was performed on 80 hips to determine demographic information as well as pre- and postoperative pain scores, center-edge angle, Tönnis angle, intraoperative blood loss, and perioperative complications within 90 days of surgery. Patients were placed into high- (>30) and low- (<30) BMI groups to determine any correlation between complications and BMI. The high-BMI group had a significantly greater rate of perioperative complications than the low-BMI group (30% vs 8%) and, correspondingly, patients with complications had significantly higher BMI than those without (30.9 ± 9.5, 26.2 ± 5.6) (P = .03). Center-edge angle and Tönnis angle were corrected in both groups. Improvement in postoperative pain scores and radiographically measured acetabular correction can be achieved in high- and low-BMI patients. High-BMI patients have a higher rate of perioperative wound complications.


Assuntos
Acetábulo/cirurgia , Índice de Massa Corporal , Luxação do Quadril/cirurgia , Complicações Intraoperatórias/etiologia , Obesidade/complicações , Osteotomia/efeitos adversos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Feminino , Luxação do Quadril/complicações , Humanos , Masculino , Recuperação de Função Fisiológica , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
12.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 100(15): 1289-1297, 2018 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30063591

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model provides bundled payments for in-hospital care and care within 90 days following discharge for Medicare beneficiaries undergoing lower-extremity joint replacement involving the hip, knee, or ankle (total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty, or total ankle arthroplasty [TAA]). The study hypothesis was that patient comorbidities are associated with readmissions, emergency department (ED) utilization, and subspecialist wound-healing consultation, which are examples of costly contributors to postoperative health-care spending. METHODS: The medical records for 1,024 patients undergoing TAAs between June 2007 and December 2016 at a single academic center in the southeastern United States were reviewed for the outcomes of readmissions, ED visitations, and subspecialist wound-healing consultation within the 90-day post-discharge period. All patients undergoing TAA (n = 1,365) were eligible. Of the 1,037 patients who consented to participation in the study and underwent TAA, 1,024 (98.7%) completed the study. Medical comorbidities according to the Elixhauser and Charlson-Deyo comorbidity indices that were present prior to TAA were recorded. Univariate and multivariable tests of significance were used to relate patient and operative characteristics to outcomes. RESULTS: Four hundred and ninety-six (48.4%) of the 1,024 patients were female, and 964 (94.1%) were white/Caucasian, with an average age (and standard deviation) of 63 ± 10.5 years. Hypertension, obesity, solid tumor, depression, rheumatic disease, cardiac arrhythmia, hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, and chronic pulmonary disease had a prevalence of >10%. Fifty-three (5.2%) of the 1,024 patients were readmitted for any cause. Thirty-six (3.5%) of the 1,024 returned to the ED but were not admitted to the hospital. Readmission or ED visitation was most commonly for a wound complication, followed by deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) evaluation, while urgent medical evaluations composed the majority of non-TAA-related ED visitations. No patient comorbidities were significantly associated with 90-day readmission, ED visitation, or wound complications in multivariable models. CONCLUSIONS: Patient comorbidities were not associated with 90-day hospital readmissions or ED visitation for patients undergoing TAA. Readmissions were dominated by evaluation of wound compromise as well as DVT and PE. These data suggest that there may be considerable differences between TAA and total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty that cause surgeons to question the inclusion of TAA in CJR bundled payment models. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Substituição do Tornozelo , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência/estatística & dados numéricos , Utilização de Instalações e Serviços/estatística & dados numéricos , Osteoartrite/cirurgia , Pacotes de Assistência ao Paciente , Readmissão do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Artroplastia de Substituição do Tornozelo/economia , Comorbidade , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência/economia , Utilização de Instalações e Serviços/economia , Feminino , Gastos em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Osteoartrite/economia , Pacotes de Assistência ao Paciente/economia , Readmissão do Paciente/economia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/economia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/terapia , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Sudeste dos Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Cicatrização
13.
J Arthroplasty ; 33(9): 2752-2758, 2018 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29858101

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Routine laboratory studies are often obtained daily after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) regardless of medical management. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of routine basic metabolic panel (BMP) tests after TJA. Furthermore, the goal was to identify factors that may predispose patients to abnormal laboratory values that require medical intervention. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed on 767 patients who underwent primary TJA at a single institution. Preoperative and postoperative potassium, sodium, creatinine, and glucose values were collected along with demographic data, comorbidities, and procedural characteristics. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine independent risk factors for abnormal postoperative laboratory values. RESULTS: Diabetes was associated with abnormal glucose (odds ratio [OR] 23.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 10.7-51.0, P < .001), while chronic kidney disease was associated with abnormal creatinine (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.7-5.8, P < .001) and potassium (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-2.8, P = .014) requiring medical intervention. An abnormal preoperative laboratory value was also associated with medical treatment for each of sodium, potassium, and creatinine (all P < .001). Average number of BMP tests collected for patients who did not receive medical intervention was 2.8. This equated to $472,372.56 in total hospital charges. CONCLUSION: Cost containment while maintaining high-quality patient care is critical. Routine postoperative BMP tests in patients with normal preoperative values without major medical comorbidities do not contribute to actionable information. Patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or with abnormal preoperative values should obtain a BMP after TJA.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Quadril/efeitos adversos , Artroplastia do Joelho/efeitos adversos , Creatinina/sangue , Falência Renal Crônica/complicações , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Complicações do Diabetes/metabolismo , Feminino , Custos de Cuidados de Saúde , Testes Hematológicos/economia , Humanos , Falência Renal Crônica/sangue , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , Razão de Chances , Pacotes de Assistência ao Paciente , Potássio/sangue , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Sódio/sangue , Adulto Jovem
14.
J Arthroplasty ; 33(10): 3211-3214, 2018 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29908797

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Routine laboratory studies are often obtained following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Moreover, laboratory studies are often continued daily until the patient is discharged regardless of medical management. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of routine complete blood count (CBC) tests following THA. Secondarily, the purpose was to identify patient factors associated with abnormal postoperative lab values. METHODS: This retrospective review identified 352 patients who underwent primary THA at a single institution from 2012 to 2014. Preoperative and postoperative CBC values were collected along with demographic data, use of tranexamic acid (TXA), and transfusion rates. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with an abnormal postoperative lab and risk of transfusion. RESULTS: Of the 352 patients, 54 patients were transfused (15.3%). Patients who underwent transfusion had a significantly lower preoperative hemoglobin (Hb; 12.0 g/dL) compared to patients who did not undergo transfusion (13.5 g/dL; P < .001). Patients who did not receive TXA were 3.7 times more likely to receive a transfusion. No patients received medical intervention based on the outcome of postoperative platelet or white blood counts. A Hb value below 11.94 g/dL for patients who are anemic preoperative or did not receive TXA predicted transfusion after postoperative day 1. CONCLUSION: Under value-based care models, cost containment while maintaining high-quality patient care is critical. Routine postoperative CBC tests in patients with a normal preoperative Hb who receive TXA do not contribute to actionable information. Patients who are anemic before THA or do not receive TXA should at minimum obtain a CBC on postoperative day 1.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Quadril , Contagem de Células Sanguíneas , Testes Diagnósticos de Rotina , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Anemia/diagnóstico , Antifibrinolíticos/administração & dosagem , Perda Sanguínea Cirúrgica , Transfusão de Sangue , Feminino , Hemoglobinas/análise , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cuidados Pós-Operatórios , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Ácido Tranexâmico/administração & dosagem , Adulto Jovem
15.
J Arthroplasty ; 33(9): 2728-2733.e3, 2018 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29793850

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The shift toward value-based bundled payment models in total joint arthroplasty highlights the need for identification of modifiable risk factors for increased spending as well as opportunities to mitigate perioperative treatment of chronic disease. The purpose of this study was to identify preoperative comorbidities that result in an increased financial burden using institutional data at a single institution. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of total joint arthroplasty patients and collected payment data from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services for each patient up to 90 days after surgery in accordance with the regulations of the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement initiative. Statistical analysis and comparison of preoperative profile and Medicare payments as a surrogate for cost were completed. RESULTS: Six hundred ninety-four patients were identified over a 4-year time period who underwent surgery before adoption of the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement but that met criteria for inclusion. The median total payment per patient episode of care was $20,048. Preoperative diagnosis of alcoholism, anemia, diabetes, and obesity was found to have a statistically significant effect on total payments. The model predicted a geometric mean increase from $1425 to $9308 for patients bearing these comorbidities. CONCLUSION: With Medicare payments as a surrogate for cost, we demonstrate that specific patient comorbidities and a cumulative increase in comorbidities predict increased costs. This study was based on institutional data rather than administrative data to gain actionable information on an institutional level and highlight potential flaws in research based on administrative data.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Quadril/economia , Artroplastia do Joelho/economia , Gastos em Saúde , Medicare/economia , Pacotes de Assistência ao Paciente/economia , Idoso , Comorbidade , Feminino , Custos de Cuidados de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Período Pré-Operatório , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos
16.
J Arthroplasty ; 33(4): 973-975, 2018 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29273289

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) are implementing changes in hospital reimbursement models for total joint arthroplasty (TJA), moving to value-based bundled payments from the fee-for-service model. The purpose of this study is to identify consults and complications during the perioperative period that increase financial burden. METHODS: We combined CMS payment data for inpatient, professional, and postoperative with retrospective review of patients undergoing primary TJA and developed profiles of patients included in the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement bundle undergoing TJA. Statistical comparison of episode inpatient events and payments was conducted. Multiple regression analysis was adjusted for length of stay, disposition, and Charlson-Deyo comorbidity profile. RESULTS: Median total payment was $21,577.36, which exceeded the median bundle target payment of $20,625.00. Adjusted analyses showed that psychiatry consults (increase of $73,123.32; P < .001), internal medicine consults ($5789.38; P ≤ .001), pulmonary embolism ($35,273.68; P < .001), intensive care unit admission ($14,078.37; P < .001), and deep vein thrombosis ($9471.26; P = .019) resulted in increased payments using multivariate analysis adjusted for length of stay, Charlson-Deyo comorbidities, and discharge disposition. CONCLUSION: Patients with inpatient complications such as pulmonary embolism and/or deep vein thrombosis, intensive care unit admission, and medical/psychiatric consultation exceeded the CMS target. Although study results showed typical complication rates, acute inpatient consultation significantly increased utilization beyond the CMS target even when adjusted for length of stay, patient comorbidities, and discharge. Needed medical care should continue to be a priority for inpatients, and allowance for individual outliers should be considered in policy discussions.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Quadril/efeitos adversos , Artroplastia de Quadril/economia , Artroplastia do Joelho/efeitos adversos , Artroplastia do Joelho/economia , Gastos em Saúde , Pacientes Internados , Pacotes de Assistência ao Paciente/economia , Idoso , Comorbidade , Planos de Pagamento por Serviço Prestado , Feminino , Hospitais , Humanos , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Alta do Paciente , Embolia Pulmonar/etiologia , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos , Trombose Venosa/etiologia
17.
Arthrosc Tech ; 6(2): e319-e324, 2017 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28580248

RESUMO

Management of the stiff shoulder is a common and frequently daunting clinical scenario. Arthroscopic capsular release is usually an option for management of severe, chronic glenohumeral joint contractures when conservative treatment fails. Technical hurdles including a thickened capsule, reduction in joint volume, and difficulty with positioning the shoulder intraoperatively can make this procedure challenging. In addition, incomplete release and recalcitrant stiffness are frequent issues. We believe a complete release of the capsule entails special attention to the axillary pouch and requires identification and protection of the axillary nerve. We present a technique for a complete arthroscopic circumferential capsulotomy and detail our approach to safely dissect and protect the axillary nerve under arthroscopic visualization.

19.
Am J Sports Med ; 45(6): NP24-NP25, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28459646
20.
Am J Sports Med ; 45(2): 339-346, 2017 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28146403

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) has demonstrated mixed clinical outcomes in randomized controlled trials when compared with hyaluronic acid (HA), an accepted nonsurgical treatment for symptomatic OA. Biological analysis of PRP has demonstrated an anti-inflammatory effect on the intra-articular environment. PURPOSE: To compare the clinical and biological effects of an intra-articular injection of PRP with those of an intra-articular injection of HA in patients with mild to moderate knee OA. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. METHODS: A total of 111 patients with symptomatic unilateral knee OA received a series of either leukocyte-poor PRP or HA injections under ultrasound guidance. Clinical data were collected before treatment and at 4 time points across a 1-year period. Synovial fluid was also collected for analysis of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers before treatment and at 12 and 24 weeks after treatment. Several measures were used to assess results: (1) Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale; (2) International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and Lysholm knee score; and (3) difference in intra-articular biochemical marker concentrations. RESULTS: There were 49 patients randomized to treatment with PRP and 50 randomized to treatment with HA. No difference was seen between the groups in the primary outcome measure (WOMAC pain score). In the secondary outcome measure, linear contrasts identified a significantly higher IKDC score in the PRP group compared with the HA group at 24 weeks (mean ± standard error [SE], 65.5 ± 3.6 vs 55.8 ± 3.8, respectively; P = .013) and at final follow-up (52 weeks) (57.6 ± 3.37 vs 46.6 ± 3.76, respectively; P = .003). Linear contrasts also identified a statistically lower VAS score in the PRP group versus the HA group at 24 weeks (mean ± SE, 34.6 ± 3.24 vs 48.6 ± 3.7, respectively; P = .0096) and 52 weeks (44 ± 4.6 vs 57.3 ± 3.8, respectively; P = .0039). An examination of fixed effects showed that patients with mild OA and a lower body mass index had a statistically significant improvement in outcomes. In the biochemical analysis, differences between groups approached significance for interleukin-1ß (mean ± SE, 0.14 ± 0.05 pg/mL [PRP] vs 0.34 ± 0.16 pg/mL [HA]; P = .06) and tumor necrosis factor α (0.08 ± 0.01 pg/mL [PRP] vs 0.2 ± 0.18 pg/mL [HA]; P = .068) at 12-week follow-up. CONCLUSION: We found no difference between HA and PRP at any time point in the primary outcome measure: the patient-reported WOMAC pain score. Significant improvements were seen in other patient-reported outcome measures, with results favoring PRP over HA. Preceding a significant difference in subjective outcomes favoring PRP, there was a trend toward a decrease in 2 proinflammatory cytokines, which suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of PRP may contribute to an improvement of symptoms. Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT02588872).


Assuntos
Ácido Hialurônico/uso terapêutico , Osteoartrite do Joelho/terapia , Plasma Rico em Plaquetas , Líquido Sinovial/metabolismo , Adulto , Idoso , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Humanos , Ácido Hialurônico/administração & dosagem , Injeções Intra-Articulares , Escore de Lysholm para Joelho , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Medição da Dor , Plasma Rico em Plaquetas/metabolismo , Estudos Prospectivos , Líquido Sinovial/efeitos dos fármacos , Resultado do Tratamento
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