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1.
Health Educ Res ; 33(3): 256-259, 2018 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29788227

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a creating a smoke-free home (SFH) on cessation and reduction of cigarette smoking on low-income smokers. This secondary data analysis uses data from study participants who were originally recruited through 2-1-1 information and referral call centers in Atlanta (Georgia, 2013), North Carolina (2014) and the Texas Gulf Coast (2015) across three randomized controlled trials testing an intervention aimed at creating SFHs, pooling data from 941 smokers. Participants who reported adopting a SFH were more likely to report quitting smoking than those who did not adopt a SFH. This was true at 3-month follow-up and even more pronounced at 6-month follow-up and persisted when considering only those who consistently reported no smoking at 3 and 6 months. Among those who did not stop smoking, the number of cigarettes per day declined significantly more and quit attempts were more frequent for those who created a SFH compared with those who did not. Findings suggest that creating a SFH facilitates cessation, reduces cigarette consumption and increases quit attempts. Future studies should assess the long-term impact of SFHs on sustaining cessation.


Assuntos
Fumar Cigarros/prevenção & controle , Habitação/normas , Política Antifumo , Fumantes/psicologia , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/métodos , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/psicologia , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos
3.
Health educ. behav ; 34(3): 441-452, Jun. 2007. tab
Artigo em Inglês | CidSaúde - Cidades saudáveis | ID: cid-59746

RESUMO

Promoting a "broad view of health" is an important objective of the healthy cities movement, including recognition of the powerful role that social relations and living conditions play in the health of community members. This article presents a quantitative approach to assessing consensus and change in ideas about health determinants among local coalition members. A ranking of five determinants of health in the form of paired comparisons was included in a survey of coalition members of 20 local healthy communities projects in California. Findings revealed conflicting views among members in the planning year, with some respondents emphasizing the role of social factors and living conditions and others emphasizing the role of health care and lifestyle decisions. Data collected at the end of the funded intervention showed movement toward a broader view of health, with greater consensus on this view in select communities. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Cidade Saudável , Redes Comunitárias , Consenso , População Urbana , Coleta de Dados , Estilo de Vida , California
4.
Health Educ Behav ; 27(6): 760-79, 2000 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-11104374

RESUMO

More than 40 cities have participated in the California Healthy Cities Project since its inception in 1988. Because Healthy Cities efforts are community driven, these cities address diverse health and social issues using a wide variety of strategies. This complexity, in addition to the usual difficulties associated with evaluating community interventions, creates many challenges for evaluation. Given the community building and process orientation of Healthy Cities, it may be most appropriate to measure intermediate community changes that have been linked to health outcomes in previous research or, at a minimum, theoretically. The California Healthy Cities evaluation framework conceptualizes change at five levels: individual, civic participation, organizational, interorganizational, and community. The framework, developed collaboratively with Healthy Cities participants, attempts to synthesize current thinking and practice on evaluation of community projects by applying concepts from community capacity/competence, social ecology, and urban planning.


Assuntos
Participação da Comunidade , Promoção da Saúde/normas , Pesquisa sobre Serviços de Saúde/organização & administração , Modelos Organizacionais , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde/métodos , Serviços Urbanos de Saúde/normas , Saúde da População Urbana , California , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Prioridades em Saúde , Humanos , Inovação Organizacional , Objetivos Organizacionais
5.
Health Educ Res ; 15(5): 547-57, 2000 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-11184214

RESUMO

American Indians have the highest smoking rate of all major racial/ethnic groups in the US, despite significant variation across tribes and regions of the country. Yet, little research has been conducted on smoking initiation among American Indian adolescents. In an effort to identify the mechanisms through which families influence teen smoking, both positively and negatively, 20 focus groups were conducted with 144 non-reservation American Indian teens in Oklahoma. Findings indicated that most of the antismoking messages from family members were given by parents and grandparents, and focused on the long-term health consequences of smoking and addiction. Parental responses to teen smoking varied widely, with some responses sending mixed messages to the teens. Many teens discussed obtaining their first cigarette in a family setting and the teens felt that having smokers in their families influenced them to try smoking. Teens were able to discuss the traditional role of tobacco in their culture and were aware of its presence at Indian events, but felt ceremonial and traditional use was distinct from recreational use. Additional research is necessary to assess whether these results are generalizable to other tribes and regions, and to other racial/ethnic groups.


Assuntos
Família/etnologia , Índios Norte-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Prevenção do Hábito de Fumar , Fumar/etnologia , Adolescente , Comportamento Ritualístico , Criança , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Oklahoma/epidemiologia
6.
Health Educ Behav ; 25(3): 338-53, 1998 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-9615243

RESUMO

The purpose of this study was to identify factors that contribute to the effectiveness of community health promotion coalitions. Member survey data from 10 coalitions formed as part of North Carolina Project ASSIST were analyzed at the coalition level to identify factors related to member participation, member satisfaction, quality of the action plan, resource mobilization, and implementation. The results suggest that coalitions with good communication and skilled members had higher levels of member participation. Coalitions with skilled staff, skilled leadership, good communication, and more of a task focus had higher levels of member satisfaction. Coalitions with more staff time devoted to them and more complex structures had greater resource mobilization, and coalitions with more staff time, good communication, greater cohesion, and more complex structures had higher levels of implementation. Neither member participation nor member satisfaction correlated with the other measures of coalition effectiveness.


Assuntos
Coalizão em Cuidados de Saúde/organização & administração , Implementação de Plano de Saúde/organização & administração , Promoção da Saúde/organização & administração , Neoplasias/prevenção & controle , Prevenção do Hábito de Fumar , Comunicação , Tomada de Decisões Gerenciais , Eficiência Organizacional , Análise Fatorial , Humanos , Liderança , North Carolina , Cultura Organizacional , Gestão de Recursos Humanos
7.
Health Educ Res ; 13(2): 225-38, 1998 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-10181021

RESUMO

Community health promotion relies heavily on coalitions to address a multitude of public health issues. In spite of their widespread use, there have been very few studies of coalitions at various stages of coalition development. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that facilitated or impeded coalition effectiveness in the implementation stage of coalition development. The research design was a multiple case study with cross-case comparisons. Each of the 10 local North Carolina Project ASSIST coalitions constituted a case. Data collection included: semi-structured interviews, observation, document review, and surveys of members and staff. Some of the major factors that facilitated implementation included: the ability of the coalition to provide its own vision, staff with the skills and time to work with the coalition, frequent and productive communication, cohesion or a sense of belonging on the coalition, and complexity of the coalition structure during the intervention phase. Barriers to effective implementation included: staff turnover and staff lacking community organization skills, dependence on the state-level staff during the planning phase and lack of member input into the action plan. Conflict contributed to staff turnover, reluctance to conduct certain activities and difficulty in recruiting members, all of which had implications for implementation.


Assuntos
Coalizão em Cuidados de Saúde/organização & administração , Implementação de Plano de Saúde , Prevenção do Hábito de Fumar , Comunicação , Eficiência Organizacional , Humanos , Liderança , North Carolina , Admissão e Escalonamento de Pessoal , Fumar/legislação & jurisprudência
9.
Patient Educ Couns ; 22(1): 27-34, 1993 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-8134319

RESUMO

Typical computer programs for patient education are didactic and fail to tailor information to an individual's specific needs. New technology greatly enhances the potential of computers in patient education. Computer-assisted instruction programs can now elicit information from users before leading them through problem-solving exercises. New authoring systems enable health professionals to develop their own programs. The capacity to elicit and report back information about factors that influence patients' health behaviors give the newest computer programs one of the strengths of face-to-face patient counseling: the ability to tailor an educational message for an individual patient. These programs are not intended to replace but rather to enhance personal interaction between providers and patients. This article describes the advantages of using computers for individualizing patient education and assessing trends across groups of patients. Innovative programs and features to look for in programs and equipment selection are also described.


Assuntos
Instrução por Computador , Planejamento de Assistência ao Paciente , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Humanos
10.
Minn Med ; 74(2): 25-9, 1991 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-2017121

RESUMO

To assess the impact of diabetes and its complications, state statistics and rates adjusted to Minnesota's population were reported for 1988. We estimate that there were 87,110 persons with diagnosed diabetes and an additional 82,920 with undiagnosed diabetes. There were 556 deaths for which diabetes was reported as the underlying cause. Although diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in Minnesota, its full impact is not measured by mortality alone, but in combination with the morbidity and disability that it causes. Several statistics and estimates help portray the full impact of the disease and its complications.


Assuntos
Causas de Morte , Diabetes Mellitus/mortalidade , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Minnesota/epidemiologia , Gravidez , Gravidez em Diabéticas/mortalidade
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