Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 37
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol ; 33(2): 229-245, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31582102

RESUMO

The postoperative ward is considered an ideal nursing environment for stable patients transitioning out of the hospital. However, approximately half of all in-hospital cardiorespiratory arrests occur here and are associated with poor outcomes. Current monitoring practices on the hospital ward mandate intermittent vital sign checks. Subtle changes in vital signs often occur at least 8-12 h before an acute event, and continuous monitoring of vital signs would allow for effective therapeutic interventions and potentially avoid an imminent cardiorespiratory arrest event. It seems tempting to apply continuous monitoring to every patient on the ward, but inherent challenges such as artifacts and alarm fatigue need to be considered. This review looks to the future where a continuous, smarter, and portable platform for monitoring of vital signs on the hospital ward will be accompanied with a central monitoring platform and machine learning-based pattern detection solutions to improve safety for hospitalized patients.

2.
Anesth Analg ; 2019 Sep 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31569164

RESUMO

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in the perioperative period. Previously considered a benign and self-limited entity, recent data suggest that perioperative AF is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality and may predict long-term AF and stroke risk in some patients. Despite known risk factors, AF remains largely unpredictable, especially after noncardiac surgery. As a consequence, strategies to minimize perioperative risk are mostly supportive and include avoiding potential arrhythmogenic triggers and proactively treating patient- and surgery-related factors that might precipitate AF. In addition to managing AF itself, clinicians must also address the hemodynamic perturbations that result from AF to prevent end-organ dysfunction. This review will discuss current evidence with respect to causes, risk factors, and outcomes of patients with AF, and address current controversies in the perioperative setting.

4.
Anesth Analg ; 2019 Sep 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31490816

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Continuous blood pressure monitoring may facilitate early detection and prompt treatment of hypotension. We tested the hypothesis that area under the curve (AUC) mean arterial pressure (MAP) <65 mm Hg is reduced by continuous invasive arterial pressure monitoring. METHODS: Adults having noncardiac surgery were randomly assigned to continuous invasive arterial pressure or intermittent oscillometric blood pressure monitoring. Arterial catheter pressures were recorded at 1-minute intervals; oscillometric pressures were typically recorded at 5-minute intervals. We estimated the arterial catheter effect on AUC-MAP <65 mm Hg using a multivariable proportional odds model adjusting for imbalanced baseline variables and duration of surgery. Pressures <65 mm Hg were categorized as 0, 1-17, 18-91, and >91 mm Hg × minutes of AUC-MAP <65 mm Hg (ie, no hypotension and 3 equally sized groups of increasing hypotension). RESULTS: One hundred fifty-two patients were randomly assigned to arterial catheter use and 154 to oscillometric monitoring. For various clinical reasons, 143 patients received an arterial catheter, while 163 were monitored oscillometrically. There were a median [Q1, Q3] of 246 [187, 308] pressure measurements in patients with arterial catheters versus 55 (46, 75) measurements in patients monitored oscillometrically. In the primary intent-to-treat analysis, catheter-based monitoring increased detection of AUC-MAP <65 mm Hg, with an estimated proportional odds ratio (ie, odds of being in a worse hypotension category) of 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-2.70; P = .006). The result was robust over an as-treated analysis and for sensitivity analyses with thresholds of 60 and 70 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Intraoperative blood pressure monitoring with arterial catheters detected nearly twice as much hypotension as oscillometric measurements.

6.
Br J Anaesth ; 123(3): 378-391, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31331649

RESUMO

Respiratory depression is common in patients recovering from surgery and anaesthesia. Failure to recognise and lack of timely institution of intervention can lead to catastrophic cardiorespiratory arrest, anoxic brain injury, and mortality. Opioid-induced respiratory depression (OIRD) is a common and often under-diagnosed cause of postoperative respiratory depression. Other causes include residual anaesthesia, residual muscle paralysis, concurrent use of other sedatives, splinting from inadequate pain control, and obstructive sleep apnoea. Currently used methods to identify and monitor respiratory safety events in the post-surgical setting have serious limitations leading to lack of universal adoption. New tools and technologies currently under development are expected to improve the prediction of respiratory depression especially in patients requiring opioids to alleviate acute postoperative pain. In this narrative review, we discuss the various causes of postoperative respiratory depression, and highlight the advances in monitoring and early recognition of patients who develop this condition with an emphasis on OIRD.


Assuntos
Monitorização Fisiológica/métodos , Cuidados Pós-Operatórios/métodos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/diagnóstico , Insuficiência Respiratória/diagnóstico , Analgésicos Opioides/efeitos adversos , Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Diagnóstico Precoce , Humanos , Monitorização Fisiológica/tendências , Dor Pós-Operatória/tratamento farmacológico , Cuidados Pós-Operatórios/tendências , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/terapia , Insuficiência Respiratória/etiologia , Insuficiência Respiratória/terapia
7.
Crit Care ; 23(1): 194, 2019 May 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31146792

RESUMO

Automated continuous noninvasive ward monitoring may enable subtle changes in vital signs to be recognized. There is already some evidence that automated ward monitoring can improve patient outcome. Before automated continuous noninvasive ward monitoring can be implemented in clinical routine, several challenges and problems need to be considered and resolved; these include the meticulous validation of the monitoring systems with regard to their measurement performance, minimization of artifacts and false alarms, integration and combined analysis of massive amounts of data including various vital signs, and technical problems regarding the connectivity of the systems.

9.
Crit Care Med ; 47(7): 910-917, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30985388

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Hypotension thresholds that provoke renal injury, myocardial injury, and mortality in critical care patients remain unknown. We primarily sought to determine the relationship between hypotension and a composite of myocardial injury (troponin T ≥ 0.03 ng/mL without nonischemic cause) and death up to 7 postoperative days. Secondarily, we considered acute kidney injury (creatinine concentration ≥ 0.3 mg/dL or 1.5 times baseline). DESIGN: Retrospective cohort. SETTING: Surgical ICU at an academic medical center. PATIENTS: Two-thousand eight-hundred thirty-three postoperative patients admitted to the surgical ICU. INTERVENTIONS: A Cox proportional hazard survival model was used to assess the association between lowest mean arterial pressure on each intensive care day, considered as a time-varying covariate, and outcomes. In sensitivity analyses hypotension defined as pressures less than 80 mm Hg and 70 mm Hg were also considered. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: There was a strong nonlinear (quadratic) association between the lowest mean arterial pressure and the primary outcome of myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery or mortality, with estimated risk increasing at lower pressures. The risk of myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery or mortality was an estimated 23% higher at the 25th percentile (78 mm Hg) of lowest mean arterial pressure compared with at the median of 87 mm Hg, with adjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) of 1.23 (1.12-1.355; p < 0.001). Overall results were generally similar in sensitivity analyses based on every hour of mean arterial pressure less than 80 mm Hg and any mean arterial pressure less than 70 mm Hg. Post hoc analyses showed that the relationship between ICU hypotension and outcomes depended on the amount of intraoperative hypotension. The risk of acute kidney injury increased over a range of minimum daily pressures from 110 mm Hg to 50 mm Hg, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.27 (95% CI, 1.18-1.37; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Increasing amounts of hypotension (defined by lowest mean arterial pressures per day) were strongly associated with myocardial injury, mortality, and renal injury in postoperative critical care patients.

10.
Anesthesiology ; 130(4): 550-559, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30875354

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Intraoperative and postoperative hypotension are associated with myocardial and kidney injury and 30-day mortality. Intraoperative blood pressure is measured frequently, but blood pressure on surgical wards is usually measured only every 4 to 6 h, leaving long intervals during which hypotension and hypertension may be undetected. This study evaluated the incidence and severity of postoperative hypotension and hypertension in adults recovering from abdominal surgery and the extent to which serious perturbations were missed by routine vital-sign assessments. METHODS: Blood pressure was recorded at 1-min intervals during the initial 48 h in adults recovering from abdominal surgery using a continuous noninvasive monitor. Caregivers were blinded to these measurements and depended on routine vital-sign assessments. Hypotension and hypertension were characterized as time under and above various mean arterial pressure thresholds. RESULTS: Of 502 available patients, 312 patients with high-quality records were analyzed, with a median measurement time of 48 [interquartile range: 41, 48] postoperative hours. Nearly a quarter experienced an episode of mean arterial pressure of less than 70 mm Hg lasting at least 30 min (24%; 95% CI, 20%, 29%), and 18% had an episode of mean arterial pressure of less than 65 mm Hg lasting at least 15 min. Nearly half the patients who had mean arterial pressure of less than 65 mm Hg for at least 15 min (47%; 95% CI, 34%, 61%) were undetected by routine vital-sign assessments. Episodes of mean arterial pressure greater than 110 mm Hg lasting at least 30 min were observed in 42% (95% CI, 37%, 48%) of patients; 7% had mean arterial pressure greater than 130 mm Hg for at least 30 min, 96% of which were missed by routine assessments. Episodes of mean arterial pressure less than 65 mm Hg and mean arterial pressure greater than 110 mm Hg captured by routine vital-sign assessments but not by continuous monitoring occurred in 34 and 8 patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative hypotension and hypertension were common, prolonged, profound, and largely undetected by routine vital-sign assessments in a cohort of adults recovering from abdominal surgery. Frequent or continuous blood pressure monitoring may detect hemodynamic perturbations more effectively and potentially facilitate treatment.

11.
Crit Care Clin ; 35(2): 229-245, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30784606

RESUMO

The Angiotensin II for the Treatment of Vasodilatory Shock (ATHOS-3) trial demonstrated the vasopressor effects and catecholamine-sparing properties of angiotensin II. As a result, the Food and Drug Administration has approved angiotensin II for the treatment of vasodilatory shock. This review details the goals of treatment of vasodilatory shock in addition to the history, current use, and recent research regarding the use of angiotensin II. An illustrative case of the use of angiotensin II is also incorporated for understanding the clinical utility of the drug.


Assuntos
Angiotensina II/uso terapêutico , Choque/diagnóstico , Choque/tratamento farmacológico , Vasoconstritores/uso terapêutico , Vasodilatação/efeitos dos fármacos , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Resultado do Tratamento
12.
Anesth Analg ; 128(3): 396-398, 2019 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30789408
13.
14.
Crit Care Med ; 47(2): 288-290, 2019 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30653057
15.
J Crit Care ; 50: 188-194, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30553989

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Despite international guidelines, regional differences in treatment of vasodilatory shock remain. We characterized these differences using data from Angiotensin II in High Output Shock (ATHOS-3) trial. METHODS: The 321 patients treated in the ATHOS-3 trial were included. Baseline and hour-48 data were analyzed for differences in demographics, clinical characteristics, and treatment patterns, and grouped into four geographical areas: United States, Canada, Europe, and Australasia. Differences were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis tests for continuous, and chi-square tests for categorical data. Temporal analysis compared changes in the treatment of shock during the treatment period. RESULTS: Differences in baseline characteristics across geographic areas were noted in BMI, albumin, CVP, MELD score, APACHE II score, and total SOFA score. Baseline norepinephrine and norepinephrine equivalent doses (NED) were higher (p < .0001 and p = .0494, respectively), and vasopressin use was lower (p < .0001) in Europe. Baseline steroids were utilized more in the US and Canada (p = .0011). CONCLUSIONS: Management of vasodilatory shock differs globally with respect to utilization of steroids and vasopressors. This practice heterogeneity may influence shock trials interpretation and patient outcomes, though more definitive evidence would require larger prospective intervention data.

17.
Ann Intensive Care ; 8(1): 112, 2018 Nov 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30467807

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Vasoactive medications are essential in septic shock, but are not fully incorporated into current mortality prediction risk scores. We sought to develop a novel mortality prediction model for septic shock incorporating quantitative vasoactive medication usage. METHODS: Quantitative vasopressor use was calculated in a cohort of 5352 septic shock patients and compared using norepinephrine equivalents (NEE), cumulative vasopressor index and the vasoactive inotrope score models. Having best discrimination prediction, log10NEE was selected for further development of a novel prediction model for 28-day and 1-year mortality via backward stepwise logistic regression. This model termed 'MAVIC' (Mechanical ventilation, Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation-III, Vasopressors, Inotropes, Charlson comorbidity index) was then compared to Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation-III (APACHE-III) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores in an independent validation cohort for its accuracy in predicting 28-day and 1-year mortality. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The MAVIC model was superior to the APACHE-III and SOFA scores in its ability to predict 28-day mortality (area under receiver operating characteristic curve [AUROC] 0.73 vs. 0.66 and 0.60) and 1-year mortality (AUROC 0.74 vs. 0.66 and 0.60), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The incorporation of quantitative vasopressor usage into a novel 'MAVIC' model results in superior 28-day and 1-year mortality risk prediction in a large cohort of patients with septic shock.

18.
Anesthesiology ; 129(6): 1101-1110, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30300157

RESUMO

WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THIS TOPIC: WHAT THIS ARTICLE TELLS US THAT IS NEW: BACKGROUND:: Beta (ß) blockers reduce the risk of postoperative atrial fibrillation and should be restarted after surgery, but it remains unclear when best to resume ß blockers postoperatively. The authors thus evaluated the relationship between timing of resumption of ß blockers and atrial fibrillation in patients recovering from noncardiothoracic and nonvascular surgery. METHODS: The authors evaluated 8,201 adult ß-blocker users with no previous history of atrial fibrillation who stayed at least two nights after noncardiothoracic and nonvascular surgery as a retrospective observational cohort. After propensity score matching on baseline and intraoperative variables, 1,924 patients who did resume ß blockers by the end of postoperative day 1 were compared with 973 patients who had not resumed by that time on postoperative atrial fibrillation using logistic regression. A secondary matched analysis compared 3,198 patients who resumed ß blockers on the day of surgery with 3,198 who resumed thereafter. RESULTS: Of propensity score-matched patients who resumed ß blockers by end of postoperative day 1, 4.9% (94 of 1,924) developed atrial fibrillation, compared with 7.0% (68 of 973) of those who resumed thereafter (adjusted odds ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.50-0.95; P = 0.026). Patients who resumed ß blockers on day of surgery had an atrial fibrillation incidence of 4.9% versus 5.8% for those who started thereafter (odds ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.67-1.04; P = 0.104). CONCLUSIONS: Resuming ß blockers in chronic users by the end of the first postoperative day may be associated with lower odds of in-hospital atrial fibrillation. However, there seems to be little advantage to restarting on the day of surgery itself.

19.
J Crit Care ; 47: 80-87, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29936327

RESUMO

Predicting episodes or severity of cardiorespiratory decompensation has proved to be challenging in patients with stable surgical or medical conditions, recovering on the general care floor (ward). Critical cardiorespiratory events on hospital floors may be prevented by early detection of deterioration using continuous, electronic cardiorespiratory monitoring (CEM). The PRediction of Opioid-induced Respiratory Depression In Patients Monitored by capnoGraphY (PRODIGY) trial investigates CEM using pulse oximetry and capnography in 1650 patients at 16 centers in North America, Europe, and Asia (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02811302). The primary goal of the study is to derive a risk prediction score for respiratory depression (RD) on the ward. The validation-derivation cohort design will derive this score from RD detected by continuous, blinded, multiparameter cardiorespiratory (heart rate, respiratory rate, end tidal carbon dioxide, and pulse oximetry) monitoring of patients on the ward receiving parenteral (including epidural) opioids for primary analgesia. This review provides a comprehensive synopsis on respiratory compromise in lower acuity hospital settings (ward) and describes the protocol of the PRODIGY trial as a means to enable prediction and early response to these events.

20.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 24(4): 277-285, 2018 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29877879

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There are limited vasoactive options to utilize for patients presenting with vasodilatory shock. This review discusses vasoactive agents in vasodilatory, specifically, septic shock and focuses on angiotensin II as a novel, noncatecholamine agent and describes its efficacy, safety, and role in the armamentarium of vasoactive agents utilized in this patient population. RECENT FINDINGS: The Angiotensin II for the Treatment of High-Output Shock 3 study evaluated angiotensin II use in patients with high-output, vasodilatory shock and demonstrated reduced background catecholamine doses and improved ability to achieve blood pressure goals associated with the use of angiotensin II. A subsequent analysis showed that patients with a higher severity of illness and relative deficiency of intrinsic angiotensin II and who received angiotensin II had improved mortality rates. In addition, a systematic review showed infrequent adverse reactions with angiotensin II demonstrating its safety for use in patients with vasodilatory shock. SUMMARY: With the approval and release of angiotensin II, a new vasoactive agent is now available to utilize in these patients. Overall, the treatment for vasodilatory shock should not be a one-size fits all approach and should be individualized to each patient. A multimodal approach, integrating angiotensin II as a noncatecholamine option should be considered for patients presenting with this disease state.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA