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1.
J Pathol Transl Med ; 53(6): 386-392, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31606978

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis is becoming increasingly important in many types of tumor including colorectal cancer (CRC). The commonly used MSI tests are either time-consuming or labor-intensive. A fully automated MSI test, the Idylla MSI assay, has recently been introduced. However, its diagnostic performance has not been extensively validated in clinical CRC samples. METHODS: We evaluated 133 samples whose MSI status had been rigorously validated by standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR), clinical nextgeneration sequencing (NGS) cancer panel test, or both. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the Idylla MSI assay in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values, as well as various sample requirements, such as minimum tumor purity and the quality of paraffin blocks. RESULTS: Compared with the gold standard results confirmed through both PCR MSI test and NGS, the Idylla MSI assay showed 99.05% accuracy (104/105), 100% sensitivity (11/11), 98.94% specificity (93/94), 91.67% positive predictive value (11/12), and 100% negative predictive value (93/93). In addition, the Idylla MSI assay did not require macro-dissection in most samples and reliably detected MSI-high in samples with approximately 10% tumor purity. The total turnaround time was about 150 minutes and the hands-on time was less than 2 minutes. CONCLUSIONS: The Idylla MSI assay shows good diagnostic performance that is sufficient for its implementation in the clinic to determine the MSI status of at least the CRC samples. In addition, the fully automated procedure requires only a few slices of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and might greatly save time and labor.

4.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 160(2): 187-205, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30921525

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This update of a 2011 guideline developed by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations on the pre-, intra-, and postoperative care and management of children 1 to 18 years of age under consideration for tonsillectomy. Tonsillectomy is defined as a surgical procedure performed with or without adenoidectomy that completely removes the tonsil, including its capsule, by dissecting the peritonsillar space between the tonsil capsule and the muscular wall. Tonsillectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures in the United States, with 289,000 ambulatory procedures performed annually in children <15 years of age, based on the most recent published data. This guideline is intended for all clinicians in any setting who interact with children who may be candidates for tonsillectomy. PURPOSE: The purpose of this multidisciplinary guideline is to identify quality improvement opportunities in managing children under consideration for tonsillectomy and to create explicit and actionable recommendations to implement these opportunities in clinical practice. Specifically, the goals are to educate clinicians, patients, and/or caregivers regarding the indications for tonsillectomy and the natural history of recurrent throat infections. Additional goals include the following: optimizing the perioperative management of children undergoing tonsillectomy, emphasizing the need for evaluation and intervention in special populations, improving the counseling and education of families who are considering tonsillectomy for their children, highlighting the management options for patients with modifying factors, and reducing inappropriate or unnecessary variations in care. Children aged 1 to 18 years under consideration for tonsillectomy are the target patient for the guideline. For this guideline update, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation selected a panel representing the fields of nursing, anesthesiology, consumers, family medicine, infectious disease, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, pediatrics, and sleep medicine. KEY ACTION STATEMENTS: The guideline update group made strong recommendations for the following key action statements (KASs): (1) Clinicians should recommend watchful waiting for recurrent throat infection if there have been <7 episodes in the past year, <5 episodes per year in the past 2 years, or <3 episodes per year in the past 3 years. (2) Clinicians should administer a single intraoperative dose of intravenous dexamethasone to children undergoing tonsillectomy. (3) Clinicians should recommend ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or both for pain control after tonsillectomy. The guideline update group made recommendations for the following KASs: (1) Clinicians should assess the child with recurrent throat infection who does not meet criteria in KAS 2 for modifying factors that may nonetheless favor tonsillectomy, which may include but are not limited to multiple antibiotic allergies/intolerance, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis), or history of >1 peritonsillar abscess. (2) Clinicians should ask caregivers of children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing and tonsillar hypertrophy about comorbid conditions that may improve after tonsillectomy, including growth retardation, poor school performance, enuresis, asthma, and behavioral problems. (3) Before performing tonsillectomy, the clinician should refer children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing for polysomnography if they are <2 years of age or if they exhibit any of the following: obesity, Down syndrome, craniofacial abnormalities, neuromuscular disorders, sickle cell disease, or mucopolysaccharidoses. (4) The clinician should advocate for polysomnography prior to tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing in children without any of the comorbidities listed in KAS 5 for whom the need for tonsillectomy is uncertain or when there is discordance between the physical examination and the reported severity of obstructive sleep-disordered breathing. (5) Clinicians should recommend tonsillectomy for children with obstructive sleep apnea documented by overnight polysomnography. (6) Clinicians should counsel patients and caregivers and explain that obstructive sleep-disordered breathing may persist or recur after tonsillectomy and may require further management. (7) The clinician should counsel patients and caregivers regarding the importance of managing posttonsillectomy pain as part of the perioperative education process and should reinforce this counseling at the time of surgery with reminders about the need to anticipate, reassess, and adequately treat pain after surgery. (8) Clinicians should arrange for overnight, inpatient monitoring of children after tonsillectomy if they are <3 years old or have severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥10 obstructive events/hour, oxygen saturation nadir <80%, or both). (9) Clinicians should follow up with patients and/or caregivers after tonsillectomy and document in the medical record the presence or absence of bleeding within 24 hours of surgery (primary bleeding) and bleeding occurring later than 24 hours after surgery (secondary bleeding). (10) Clinicians should determine their rate of primary and secondary posttonsillectomy bleeding at least annually. The guideline update group made a strong recommendation against 2 actions: (1) Clinicians should not administer or prescribe perioperative antibiotics to children undergoing tonsillectomy. (2) Clinicians must not administer or prescribe codeine, or any medication containing codeine, after tonsillectomy in children younger than 12 years. The policy level for the recommendation about documenting recurrent throat infection was an option: (1) Clinicians may recommend tonsillectomy for recurrent throat infection with a frequency of at least 7 episodes in the past year, at least 5 episodes per year for 2 years, or at least 3 episodes per year for 3 years with documentation in the medical record for each episode of sore throat and ≥1 of the following: temperature >38.3°C (101°F), cervical adenopathy, tonsillar exudate, or positive test for group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus. DIFFERENCES FROM PRIOR GUIDELINE: Incorporating new evidence profiles to include the role of patient preferences, confidence in the evidence, differences of opinion, quality improvement opportunities, and any exclusion to which the action statement does not apply. There were 1 new clinical practice guideline, 26 new systematic reviews, and 13 new randomized controlled trials included in the current guideline update. Inclusion of 2 consumer advocates on the guideline update group. Changes to 5 KASs from the original guideline: KAS 1 (Watchful waiting for recurrent throat infection), KAS 3 (Tonsillectomy for recurrent infection with modifying factors), KAS 4 (Tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing), KAS 9 (Perioperative pain counseling), and KAS 10 (Perioperative antibiotics). Seven new KASs: KAS 5 (Indications for polysomnography), KAS 6 (Additional recommendations for polysomnography), KAS 7 (Tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea), KAS 12 (Inpatient monitoring for children after tonsillectomy), KAS 13 (Postoperative ibuprofen and acetaminophen), KAS 14 (Postoperative codeine), and KAS 15a (Outcome assessment for bleeding). Addition of an algorithm outlining KASs. Enhanced emphasis on patient and/or caregiver education and shared decision making.


Assuntos
Adenoidectomia/normas , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Melhoria de Qualidade , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/etiologia , Tonsilectomia/normas , Tonsilite/complicações , Adenoidectomia/métodos , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Medicina Baseada em Evidências , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Medição de Risco , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/fisiopatologia , Tonsilectomia/métodos , Tonsilite/diagnóstico , Tonsilite/cirurgia , Resultado do Tratamento , Estados Unidos
5.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 160(1_suppl): S1-S42, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30798778

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This update of a 2011 guideline developed by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations on the pre-, intra-, and postoperative care and management of children 1 to 18 years of age under consideration for tonsillectomy. Tonsillectomy is defined as a surgical procedure performed with or without adenoidectomy that completely removes the tonsil, including its capsule, by dissecting the peritonsillar space between the tonsil capsule and the muscular wall. Tonsillectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures in the United States, with 289,000 ambulatory procedures performed annually in children <15 years of age based on the most recent published data. This guideline is intended for all clinicians in any setting who interact with children who may be candidates for tonsillectomy. PURPOSE: The purpose of this multidisciplinary guideline is to identify quality improvement opportunities in managing children under consideration for tonsillectomy and to create explicit and actionable recommendations to implement these opportunities in clinical practice. Specifically, the goals are to educate clinicians, patients, and/or caregivers regarding the indications for tonsillectomy and the natural history of recurrent throat infections. Additional goals include the following: optimizing the perioperative management of children undergoing tonsillectomy, emphasizing the need for evaluation and intervention in special populations, improving the counseling and education of families who are considering tonsillectomy for their children, highlighting the management options for patients with modifying factors, and reducing inappropriate or unnecessary variations in care. Children aged 1 to 18 years under consideration for tonsillectomy are the target patient for the guideline. For this guideline update, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation selected a panel representing the fields of nursing, anesthesiology, consumers, family medicine, infectious disease, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, pediatrics, and sleep medicine. KEY ACTION STATEMENTS: The guideline update group made strong recommendations for the following key action statements (KASs): (1) Clinicians should recommend watchful waiting for recurrent throat infection if there have been <7 episodes in the past year, <5 episodes per year in the past 2 years, or <3 episodes per year in the past 3 years. (2) Clinicians should administer a single intraoperative dose of intravenous dexamethasone to children undergoing tonsillectomy. (3) Clinicians should recommend ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or both for pain control after tonsillectomy. The guideline update group made recommendations for the following KASs: (1) Clinicians should assess the child with recurrent throat infection who does not meet criteria in KAS 2 for modifying factors that may nonetheless favor tonsillectomy, which may include but are not limited to multiple antibiotic allergies/intolerance, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis), or history of >1 peritonsillar abscess. (2) Clinicians should ask caregivers of children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing and tonsillar hypertrophy about comorbid conditions that may improve after tonsillectomy, including growth retardation, poor school performance, enuresis, asthma, and behavioral problems. (3) Before performing tonsillectomy, the clinician should refer children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing for polysomnography if they are <2 years of age or if they exhibit any of the following: obesity, Down syndrome, craniofacial abnormalities, neuromuscular disorders, sickle cell disease, or mucopolysaccharidoses. (4) The clinician should advocate for polysomnography prior to tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing in children without any of the comorbidities listed in KAS 5 for whom the need for tonsillectomy is uncertain or when there is discordance between the physical examination and the reported severity of oSDB. (5) Clinicians should recommend tonsillectomy for children with obstructive sleep apnea documented by overnight polysomnography. (6) Clinicians should counsel patients and caregivers and explain that obstructive sleep-disordered breathing may persist or recur after tonsillectomy and may require further management. (7) The clinician should counsel patients and caregivers regarding the importance of managing posttonsillectomy pain as part of the perioperative education process and should reinforce this counseling at the time of surgery with reminders about the need to anticipate, reassess, and adequately treat pain after surgery. (8) Clinicians should arrange for overnight, inpatient monitoring of children after tonsillectomy if they are <3 years old or have severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥10 obstructive events/hour, oxygen saturation nadir <80%, or both). (9) Clinicians should follow up with patients and/or caregivers after tonsillectomy and document in the medical record the presence or absence of bleeding within 24 hours of surgery (primary bleeding) and bleeding occurring later than 24 hours after surgery (secondary bleeding). (10) Clinicians should determine their rate of primary and secondary posttonsillectomy bleeding at least annually. The guideline update group made a strong recommendation against 2 actions: (1) Clinicians should not administer or prescribe perioperative antibiotics to children undergoing tonsillectomy. (2) Clinicians must not administer or prescribe codeine, or any medication containing codeine, after tonsillectomy in children younger than 12 years. The policy level for the recommendation about documenting recurrent throat infection was an option: (1) Clinicians may recommend tonsillectomy for recurrent throat infection with a frequency of at least 7 episodes in the past year, at least 5 episodes per year for 2 years, or at least 3 episodes per year for 3 years with documentation in the medical record for each episode of sore throat and ≥1 of the following: temperature >38.3°C (101°F), cervical adenopathy, tonsillar exudate, or positive test for group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus. DIFFERENCES FROM PRIOR GUIDELINE: (1) Incorporating new evidence profiles to include the role of patient preferences, confidence in the evidence, differences of opinion, quality improvement opportunities, and any exclusion to which the action statement does not apply. (2) There were 1 new clinical practice guideline, 26 new systematic reviews, and 13 new randomized controlled trials included in the current guideline update. (3) Inclusion of 2 consumer advocates on the guideline update group. (4) Changes to 5 KASs from the original guideline: KAS 1 (Watchful waiting for recurrent throat infection), KAS 3 (Tonsillectomy for recurrent infection with modifying factors), KAS 4 (Tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing), KAS 9 (Perioperative pain counseling), and KAS 10 (Perioperative antibiotics). (5) Seven new KASs: KAS 5 (Indications for polysomnography), KAS 6 (Additional recommendations for polysomnography), KAS 7 (Tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea), KAS 12 (Inpatient monitoring for children after tonsillectomy), KAS 13 (Postoperative ibuprofen and acetaminophen), KAS 14 (Postoperative codeine), and KAS 15a (Outcome assessment for bleeding). (6) Addition of an algorithm outlining KASs. (7) Enhanced emphasis on patient and/or caregiver education and shared decision making.


Assuntos
Doenças Faríngeas/cirurgia , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/cirurgia , Tonsilectomia , Criança , Humanos , Tonsilectomia/efeitos adversos , Tonsilectomia/métodos
6.
Anesthesiology ; 130(1): 41-54, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30550426

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although dantrolene effectively treats malignant hyperthermia (MH), discrepant recommendations exist concerning dantrolene availability. Whereas Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States guidelines state dantrolene must be available within 10 min of the decision to treat MH wherever volatile anesthetics or succinylcholine are administered, a Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia protocol permits Class B ambulatory facilities to stock succinylcholine for airway rescue without dantrolene. The authors investigated (1) succinylcholine use rates, including for airway rescue, in anesthetizing/sedating locations; (2) whether succinylcholine without volatile anesthetics triggers MH warranting dantrolene; and (3) the relationship between dantrolene administration and MH morbidity/mortality. METHODS: The authors performed focused analyses of the Multicenter Perioperative Outcomes Group (2005 through 2016), North American MH Registry (2013 through 2016), and Anesthesia Closed Claims Project (1970 through 2014) databases, as well as a systematic literature review (1987 through 2017). The authors used difficult mask ventilation (grades III and IV) as a surrogate for airway rescue. MH experts judged dantrolene treatment. For MH morbidity/mortality analyses, the authors included U.S. and Canadian cases that were fulminant or scored 20 or higher on the clinical grading scale and in which volatile anesthetics or succinylcholine were given. RESULTS: Among 6,368,356 queried outcomes cases, 246,904 (3.9%) received succinylcholine without volatile agents. Succinylcholine was used in 46% (n = 710) of grade IV mask ventilation cases (median dose, 100 mg, 1.2 mg/kg). Succinylcholine without volatile anesthetics triggered 24 MH cases, 13 requiring dantrolene. Among 310 anesthetic-triggered MH cases, morbidity was 20 to 37%. Treatment delay increased complications every 10 min, reaching 100% with a 50-min delay. Overall mortality was 1 to 10%; 15 U.S. patients died, including 4 after anesthetics in freestanding facilities. CONCLUSIONS: Providers use succinylcholine commonly, including during difficult mask ventilation. Succinylcholine administered without volatile anesthetics may trigger MH events requiring dantrolene. Delayed dantrolene treatment increases the likelihood of MH complications. The data reported herein support stocking dantrolene wherever succinylcholine or volatile anesthetics may be used.


Assuntos
Dantroleno/uso terapêutico , Hipertermia Maligna/tratamento farmacológico , Hipertermia Maligna/etiologia , Relaxantes Musculares Centrais/uso terapêutico , Fármacos Neuromusculares Despolarizantes/efeitos adversos , Succinilcolina/efeitos adversos , Bases de Dados Factuais , Humanos
7.
J Mol Diagn ; 21(2): 241-250, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30389464

RESUMO

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels are widely used for defining tumor mutation profiles and determining treatment approaches. We performed targeted NGS with 382 colorectal cancer genes with known microsatellite instability (MSI). After exclusion of germline alterations, the load of somatic mutations and small insertion/deletion (indel) alterations were determined. In the test set, 79 patients with 41 microsatellite-stable (MSS) and 38 MSI tumors were included. There were 120 MSS and eight MSI-high tumors in the validation set. The number of somatic mutations of whole samples were distinguished into three groups: mutant functional polymerase epsilon catalytic subunit, MSI, and MSS tumors. The median numbers of somatic and indel mutations in MSI tumors were higher. The indel mutation to whole mutation ratio (I index) was higher in MSI tumors. Hypermutation and low I index of polymerase epsilon catalytic subunit mutant tumors, a somatic mutation load cut-off of ≥40, and an I index of ≥9% were selected as the criteria for detecting MSI tumors with high sensitivity and specificity. With the analysis of alteration patterns of homopolymer genes, a higher median number of homopolymer mutations in MSI tumors was observed. Mutated homopolymer ≥5 was selected as the criterion for detecting MSI tumors. MSI in colorectal cancer can be detected by targeted NGS panels with high sensitivity and specificity using somatic mutation load and I index.

8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 96(7): e6174, 2017 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28207557

RESUMO

This study aimed to determine the prognostic effects of preoperative chemotherapy for colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CLM).We retrospectively evaluated 2 groups of patients between January 2006 and August 2012. A total of 53 patients who had ≥3 hepatic metastases underwent resection after preoperative chemotherapy (preoperative chemotherapy group), whereas 96 patients who had ≥3 hepatic metastases underwent resection with a curative intent before chemotherapy for CLM (primary resection group). A propensity score (PS) model was used to compare the both groups.The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 31.7% and 20.4% in the preoperative chemotherapy and primary resection groups, respectively (log-rank = 0.015). Analyzing 32 PS matched pairs, we found that the DFS rate was significantly higher in the preoperative chemotherapy group than in the primary resection group (3-year DFS rates were 34.2% and 16.8%, respectively [log-rank = 0.019]). Preoperative chemotherapy group patients had better DFSs than primary resection group patients in various multivariate analyses, including crude, multivariable, average treatment effect with inverse probability of treatment weighting model and PS matching.Responses to chemotherapy are as important as achieving complete resection in cases of multiple hepatic metastases. Preoperative chemotherapy may therefore be preferentially considered for patients who experience difficulty undergoing complete resection for multiple hepatic metastases.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais/patologia , Hepatectomia/métodos , Neoplasias Hepáticas/secundário , Neoplasias Hepáticas/cirurgia , Quimioterapia Adjuvante , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Neoplasias Hepáticas/tratamento farmacológico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Pontuação de Propensão , Estudos Retrospectivos
9.
Int J Cancer ; 140(2): 431-439, 2017 Jan 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27681944

RESUMO

Limited data are available on the efficacy of anti-IGF-1R agents in KRAS mutant colorectal cancer (CRC). We analysed the outcome of 69 chemorefractory, KRAS exon 2 mutant CRC patients who were enrolled in a double-blind, randomised, phase II/III study of irinotecan and cetuximab plus dalotuzumab 10 mg/kg once weekly (arm A), dalotuzumab 7.5 mg/kg every second week (arm B) or placebo (arm C). Objective response rate (5.6% vs. 3.1% vs. 4.8%), median progression-free survival (2.7 vs. 2.6 vs. 1.4 months) and overall survival (7.8 vs. 10.3 vs. 7.8 months) were not statistically significantly different between treatment groups. Most common grade ≥3 treatment-related toxicities included neutropenia, diarrhoea, hyperglycaemia, fatigue and dermatitis acneiform. Expression of IGF-1R, IGF-1, IGF-2 and EREG by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was assessed in 351 patients from the same study with available data on KRAS exon 2 mutational status. Median cycle threshold values for all biomarkers were significantly lower (i.e., higher expression, p < 0.05) among patients with KRAS wild-type compared to those with KRAS exon 2 mutant tumours. No significant changes were found according to location of the primary tumour with only a trend towards lower expression of IGF-1 in colon compared to rectal cancers (p = 0.06). Albeit limited by the small sample size, this study does not appear to support a potential role for anti-IGF-1R agents in KRAS exon 2 mutant CRC. Data on IGF-1R, IGF-1 and IGF-2 expression here reported may be useful for patient stratification in future trials with inhibitors of the IGF pathway.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados/uso terapêutico , Anticorpos Monoclonais/uso terapêutico , Neoplasias Colorretais/tratamento farmacológico , Mutação/genética , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas p21(ras)/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/uso terapêutico , Camptotecina/administração & dosagem , Camptotecina/análogos & derivados , Cetuximab/administração & dosagem , Neoplasias Colorretais/genética , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Método Duplo-Cego , Éxons/genética , Feminino , Humanos , Fator de Crescimento Insulin-Like I/genética , Fator de Crescimento Insulin-Like II/genética , Irinotecano , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Receptor IGF Tipo 1/genética
10.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 107(12): djv258, 2015 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26405092

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) mediates resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition and may represent a therapeutic target. We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double blind, phase II/III trial of dalotuzumab, an anti-IGF-1R monoclonal antibody, with standard therapy in chemo-refractory, KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer. METHODS: Eligible patients were randomly assigned to dalotuzumab 10mg/kg weekly (arm A), dalotuzumab 7.5mg/kg every alternate week (arm B), or placebo (arm C) in combination with cetuximab and irinotecan. Primary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints included exploratory biomarker analyses. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: The trial was prematurely discontinued for futility after 344 eligible KRAS wild-type patients were included in the primary efficacy population (arm A = 116, arm B = 117, arm C = 111). Median PFS was 3.9 months in arm A (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.98 to 1.83, P = .07) and 5.4 months in arm B (HR = 1.13, 95% CI = 0.83 to 1.55, P = .44) compared with 5.6 months in arm C. Median OS was 10.8 months in arm A (HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.99 to 2.00, P = .06) and 11.6 months in arm B (HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.89 to 1.79, P = .18) compared with 14.0 months in arm C. Grade 3 or higher asthenia and hyperglycaemia occurred more frequently with dalotuzumab compared with placebo. In exploratory biomarker analyses, patients with high IGF-1 mRNA tumors in arm A had numerically better PFS (5.6 vs 3.6 months, HR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.28 to 1.23, P = .16) and OS (17.9 vs 9.4 months, HR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.31 to 1.45, P = .31) compared with those with high IGF-1 mRNA tumors in arm C. In contrast, in arm C high IGF-1 mRNA expression predicted lower response rate (17.6% vs 37.3%, P = .04), shorter PFS (3.6 vs 6.6 months, HR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.15 to 4.02, P = .02), and shorter OS (9.4 vs 15.5 months, HR = 2.42, 95% CI = 1.21 to 4.82, P = .01). CONCLUSIONS: Adding dalotuzumab to irinotecan and cetuximab was feasible but did not improve survival outcome. IGF-1R ligands are promising biomarkers for differential response to anti-EGFR and anti-IGF-1R therapies.


Assuntos
Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/uso terapêutico , Neoplasias Colorretais/tratamento farmacológico , Receptores ErbB/antagonistas & inibidores , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas/genética , Receptor IGF Tipo 1/metabolismo , Proteínas ras/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Anticorpos Monoclonais/administração & dosagem , Anticorpos Monoclonais/efeitos adversos , Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados , Astenia/induzido quimicamente , Camptotecina/administração & dosagem , Camptotecina/efeitos adversos , Camptotecina/análogos & derivados , Cetuximab/administração & dosagem , Cetuximab/efeitos adversos , Neoplasias Colorretais/genética , Neoplasias Colorretais/patologia , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Método Duplo-Cego , Esquema de Medicação , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Humanos , Hiperglicemia/induzido quimicamente , Irinotecano , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteínas Proto-Oncogênicas p21(ras) , Regulação para Cima/efeitos dos fármacos
11.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 24(12): 1212-6, 2014 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24974921

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Malignant Hyperthermia (MH) is a potentially fatal metabolic disorder. Due to its rarity, limited evidence exists about risk factors, morbidity, and mortality especially in children. METHODS: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and the Kid's Inpatient Database (KID), admissions with the ICD-9 code for MH (995.86) were extracted for patients 0-17 years of age. Demographic characteristics were analyzed. Logistic regression was performed to identify patient and hospital characteristics associated with mortality. A subset of patients with a surgical ICD-9 code in the KID was studied to calculate the prevalence of MH in the dataset. RESULTS: A total of 310 pediatric admissions were seen in 13 nonoverlapping years of data. Patients had a mortality of 2.9%. Male sex was predominant (64.8%), and 40.5% of the admissions were treated at centers not identified as children's hospitals. The most common associated diagnosis was rhabdomyolysis, which was present in 26 cases. Regression with the outcome of mortality did not yield significant differences between demographic factors, age, sex race, or hospital type, pediatric vs nonpediatric. Within a surgical subset of 530,449 admissions, MH was coded in 55, giving a rate of 1.04 cases per 10,000 cases. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to combine two large databases to study MH in the pediatric population. The analysis provides an insight into the risk factors, comorbidities, mortality, and prevalence of MH in the United States population. Until more methodologically rigorous, large-scale studies are done, the use of databases will continue to be the optimal method to study rare diseases.


Assuntos
Hipertermia Maligna/epidemiologia , Hipertermia Maligna/mortalidade , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Comorbidade , Bases de Dados Factuais , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Classificação Internacional de Doenças , Masculino , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
12.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 23(12): 1124-30, 2013 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23947944

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIM: Malignant hyperthermia susceptible patients may experience a fatal reaction to volatile anesthetic gases. This study sought to determine the washout characteristics of desflurane, sevoflurane, and isoflurane from the Aisys® , Avance® , and Aestiva® anesthesia machines. (GE Healthcare, Madison, WI, USA). METHODS: All machines were inspected by a GE Healthcare engineer prior to testing. The machines were primed with desflurane 7 vol%, sevoflurane 2.5 vol%, and isoflurane 1.2 vol% on three separate occasions for 2 h each with each gas. The Aisys® and Avance® were tested with and without an Advanced Breathing System (ABS™ , GE Healthcare, Madison, WI, USA). The Aestiva® was tested without modification to its breathing system. Additionally, the Aisys was evaluated with desflurane 1.2 vol% and the Avance with a preflushed fresh gas line was tested with an autoclaved ABS. After priming, disposable components of the patient breathing system were replaced. The fresh gas flow was increased to 15 lpm. Gas measurements were recorded until the concentration was 4 parts per million (p.p.m). RESULTS: The fastest median washout time was achieved by the Avance in 3 min or less without an ABS or with an autoclaved ABS. The longest median time was 35 min for the Aestiva® . Clearance of desflurane was the most time consuming for all machines. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that saturated vapor pressure and priming concentration exert a greater effect on washout times than gas solubility. The Aisys utilizes an electronic vaporizer system that may expose the breathing system to retained saturated vapor. The breathing systems for all machines may hinder washout of gases.


Assuntos
Anestesiologia/instrumentação , Anestésicos Inalatórios/análise , Isoflurano/análogos & derivados , Isoflurano/análise , Éteres Metílicos/análise , Desflurano , Gases/química , Respiração Artificial/instrumentação , Sevoflurano , Solubilidade , Pressão de Vapor
13.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 149(1): 8-16, 2013 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23818537

RESUMO

The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Tympanostomy Tubes in Children. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 12 recommendations developed address patient selection, surgical indications for and management of tympanostomy tubes in children. The development group broadly discussed indications for tube placement, perioperative management, care of children with indwelling tubes, and outcomes of tympanostomy tube surgery. Given the lack of current published guidance on surgical indications, the group focused on situations in which tube insertion would be optional, recommended, or not recommended. Additional emphasis was placed on opportunities for quality improvement, particularly regarding shared decision making and care of children with existing tubes.


Assuntos
Ventilação da Orelha Média , Otite Média/terapia , Seleção de Pacientes , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Humanos , Lactente , Ventilação da Orelha Média/efeitos adversos , Ventilação da Orelha Média/instrumentação , Otite Média/diagnóstico , Otite Média/etiologia
14.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 149(1 Suppl): S1-35, 2013 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23818543

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Insertion of tympanostomy tubes is the most common ambulatory surgery performed on children in the United States. Tympanostomy tubes are most often inserted because of persistent middle ear fluid, frequent ear infections, or ear infections that persist after antibiotic therapy. Despite the frequency of tympanostomy tube insertion, there are currently no clinical practice guidelines in the United States that address specific indications for surgery. This guideline is intended for any clinician involved in managing children, aged 6 months to 12 years, with tympanostomy tubes or being considered for tympanostomy tubes in any care setting, as an intervention for otitis media of any type. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to provide clinicians with evidence-based recommendations on patient selection and surgical indications for and management of tympanostomy tubes in children. The development group broadly discussed indications for tube placement, perioperative management, care of children with indwelling tubes, and outcomes of tympanostomy tube surgery. Given the lack of current published guidance on surgical indications, the group focused on situations in which tube insertion would be optional, recommended, or not recommended. Additional emphasis was placed on opportunities for quality improvement, particularly regarding shared decision making and care of children with existing tubes. ACTION STATEMENTS: The development group made a strong recommendation that clinicians should prescribe topical antibiotic eardrops only, without oral antibiotics, for children with uncomplicated acute tympanostomy tube otorrhea. The panel made recommendations that (1) clinicians should not perform tympanostomy tube insertion in children with a single episode of otitis media with effusion (OME) of less than 3 months' duration; (2) clinicians should obtain an age-appropriate hearing test if OME persists for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) or prior to surgery when a child becomes a candidate for tympanostomy tube insertion; (3) clinicians should offer bilateral tympanostomy tube insertion to children with bilateral OME for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) and documented hearing difficulties; (4) clinicians should reevaluate, at 3- to 6-month intervals, children with chronic OME who did not receive tympanostomy tubes until the effusion is no longer present, significant hearing loss is detected, or structural abnormalities of the tympanic membrane or middle ear are suspected; (5) clinicians should not perform tympanostomy tube insertion in children with recurrent acute otitis media (AOM) who do not have middle ear effusion in either ear at the time of assessment for tube candidacy; (6) clinicians should offer bilateral tympanostomy tube insertion to children with recurrent AOM who have unilateral or bilateral middle ear effusion at the time of assessment for tube candidacy; (7) clinicians should determine if a child with recurrent AOM or with OME of any duration is at increased risk for speech, language, or learning problems from otitis media because of baseline sensory, physical, cognitive, or behavioral factors; (8) in the perioperative period, clinicians should educate caregivers of children with tympanostomy tubes regarding the expected duration of tube function, recommended follow-up schedule, and detection of complications; (9) clinicians should not encourage routine, prophylactic water precautions (use of earplugs, headbands; avoidance of swimming or water sports) for children with tympanostomy tubes. The development group provided the following options: (1) clinicians may perform tympanostomy tube insertion in children with unilateral or bilateral OME for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) and symptoms that are likely attributable to OME including, but not limited to, vestibular problems, poor school performance, behavioral problems, ear discomfort, or reduced quality of life and (2) clinicians may perform tympanostomy tube insertion in at-risk children with unilateral or bilateral OME that is unlikely to resolve quickly as reflected by a type B (flat) tympanogram or persistence of effusion for 3 months or longer (chronic OME).


Assuntos
Ventilação da Orelha Média , Otite Média/cirurgia , Fatores Etários , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Desenho de Equipamento , Perda Auditiva/diagnóstico , Perda Auditiva/etiologia , Perda Auditiva/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Lactente , Ventilação da Orelha Média/efeitos adversos , Ventilação da Orelha Média/instrumentação , Otite Média/diagnóstico , Otite Média/etiologia , Seleção de Pacientes , Medição de Risco , Prevenção Secundária , Resultado do Tratamento
15.
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys ; 86(2): 350-7, 2013 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23490283

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Studies aimed at predicting individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) are urgently needed, especially considering the risks associated with poorly responsive patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A 3-step strategy for the determination of CRT sensitivity is proposed based on (1) the screening of a human genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade (TRG); (2) clinical association analysis of 113 patients treated with preoperative CRT; and (3) a cell-based functional assay for biological validation. RESULTS: Genome-wide screening identified 9 SNPs associated with preoperative CRT responses. Positive responses (TRG 1-3) were obtained more frequently in patients carrying the reference allele (C) of the SNP CORO2A rs1985859 than in those with the substitution allele (T) (P=.01). Downregulation of CORO2A was significantly associated with reduced early apoptosis by 27% (P=.048) and 39% (P=.023) in RKO and COLO320DM colorectal cancer cells, respectively, as determined by flow cytometry. Reduced radiosensitivity was confirmed by colony-forming assays in the 2 colorectal cancer cells (P=.034 and .015, respectively). The SNP FAM101A rs7955740 was not associated with radiosensitivity in the clinical association analysis. However, downregulation of FAM101A significantly reduced early apoptosis by 29% in RKO cells (P=.047), and it enhanced colony formation in RKO cells (P=.001) and COLO320DM cells (P=.002). CONCLUSION: CRT-sensitive SNP markers were identified using a novel 3-step process. The candidate marker CORO2A rs1985859 and the putative marker FAM101A rs7955740 may be of value for the prediction of radiosensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts.


Assuntos
Biomarcadores Tumorais/genética , Quimiorradioterapia/métodos , Proteínas dos Microfilamentos/genética , Tolerância a Radiação/genética , Neoplasias Retais/genética , Neoplasias Retais/terapia , Alelos , Protocolos de Quimioterapia Combinada Antineoplásica/uso terapêutico , Apoptose , Capecitabina , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Quimiorradioterapia/efeitos adversos , Desoxicitidina/administração & dosagem , Desoxicitidina/análogos & derivados , Feminino , Fluoruracila/administração & dosagem , Fluoruracila/análogos & derivados , Marcadores Genéticos/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Técnicas de Genotipagem , Humanos , Leucovorina/administração & dosagem , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cuidados Pré-Operatórios , Neoplasias Retais/patologia , Neoplasias Retais/cirurgia
16.
Int J Colorectal Dis ; 28(4): 493-501, 2013 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23053680

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The current study aimed to compare the oncologic outcome and pattern of metastasis after abdominoperineal resection (APR) and low anterior resection (LAR) treating lower rectal cancer. METHODS: A total of 804 patients undergoing curative resection (R0) were enrolled prospectively. The APR and LAR groups (n = 402, respectively) were matched for gender, age, and stage, for a retrospectively comparative analysis. RESULTS: In a multivariate analysis with potential variables, APR itself was not a risk factor for increased local recurrence (LR) or reduced survival (P = 0.243-0.994). Circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement as an operation-related risk was 1.6-fold more frequent in the APR group and was significantly associated with LR and systemic recurrence (OR, 2.487-4.017; P < 0.01). Circumferential margin positivity (CRM+) was concurrently correlated with advanced stage, larger tumor (long diameter, >4 cm), and longer sagittal midpelvic diameter (>10 cm) in a multivariate analysis (P < 0.001-0.05). The site of metastasis did not differ between the two groups, with the exception of lung metastasis which was more frequent in the APR group (APR vs. LAR: 15.9 vs. 10 %, P = 0.015). In the APR group, CRM+ and the presence of an infiltrating tumor were correlated with disease-free survival (hazard ratio (HR), 1.644 and 1.654, respectively), whereas elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen and LVI+ were correlated with overall survival (HR, 1.57 and 1.671, respectively), in a multivariate analysis with potential variables (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: When performed with appropriate skill to achieve R0 resection, APR can be used safely without impairing oncological outcome, although sphincter-preserving surgery should remain the preferred option.


Assuntos
Abdome/cirurgia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos do Sistema Digestório/métodos , Períneo/cirurgia , Neoplasias Retais/cirurgia , Abdome/patologia , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos do Sistema Digestório/efeitos adversos , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Análise por Pareamento , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/patologia , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/cirurgia , Períneo/patologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Resultado do Tratamento , Sistema Urogenital/patologia , Sistema Urogenital/fisiopatologia
17.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 145(1 Suppl): S1-15, 2011 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21676944

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This guideline provides otolaryngologists with evidence-based recommendations for using polysomnography in assessing children, aged 2 to 18 years, with sleep-disordered breathing and are candidates for tonsillectomy, with or without adenoidectomy. Polysomnography is the electrographic recording of simultaneous physiologic variables during sleep and is currently considered the gold standard for objectively assessing sleep disorders. PURPOSE: There is no current consensus or guideline on when children 2 to 18 years of age, who are candidates for tonsillectomy, are recommended to have polysomnography. The primary purpose of this guideline is to improve referral patterns for polysomnography among these patients. In creating this guideline, the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation selected a panel representing the fields of anesthesiology, pulmonology medicine, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, pediatrics, and sleep medicine. RESULTS: The committee made the following recommendations: (1) before determining the need for tonsillectomy, the clinician should refer children with sleep-disordered breathing for polysomnography if they exhibit certain complex medical conditions such as obesity, Down syndrome, craniofacial abnormalities, neuromuscular disorders, sickle cell disease, or mucopolysaccharidoses. (2) The clinician should advocate for polysomnography prior to tonsillectomy for sleep-disordered breathing in children without any of the comorbidities listed in statement 1 for whom the need for surgery is uncertain or when there is discordance between tonsillar size on physical examination and the reported severity of sleep-disordered breathing. (3) Clinicians should communicate polysomnography results to the anesthesiologist prior to the induction of anesthesia for tonsillectomy in a child with sleep-disordered breathing. (4) Clinicians should admit children with obstructive sleep apnea documented on polysomnography for inpatient, overnight monitoring after tonsillectomy if they are younger than age 3 or have severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index of 10 or more obstructive events/hour, oxygen saturation nadir less than 80%, or both). (5) In children for whom polysomnography is indicated to assess sleep-disordered breathing prior to tonsillectomy, clinicians should obtain laboratory-based polysomnography, when available.


Assuntos
Adenoidectomia , Polissonografia , Cuidados Pré-Operatórios , Síndromes da Apneia do Sono/diagnóstico , Tonsilectomia , Adenoidectomia/normas , Adolescente , Anestesia/métodos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Medicina Baseada em Evidências , Humanos , Comunicação Interdisciplinar , Polissonografia/métodos , Cuidados Pré-Operatórios/métodos , Síndromes da Apneia do Sono/fisiopatologia , Síndromes da Apneia do Sono/cirurgia , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/diagnóstico , Tonsilectomia/normas , Resultado do Tratamento
18.
Clin Cancer Res ; 17(5): 1200-9, 2011 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21239504

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Methods for predicting individual responsiveness to targeted chemotherapy are urgently needed, considering the frequent resistance and extremely high cost. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A chemosensitive single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery schema is presented that utilizes (i) genome-wide SNP screening with a human SNP array and an in vitro chemosensitivity assay in 118 colorectal cancers, (ii) clinical association analysis in the other 98 patients who had received chemotherapy for metastatic cancer, and (iii) biological utility assessment using cell viability assays of transfected colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. RESULTS: Nine SNPs related to bevacizumab and cetuximab regimen sensitivity were chosen during screening. Overall responses for bevacizumab regimens revealed that patients carrying the TT genotype at ANXA11 rs1049550 or at least one G allele at LINS1 rs11247226 seemed greater chemosensitive than those carrying at least one C allele or the AA genotype, respectively (P < 0.05). For cetuximab regimens, patients carrying the GG genotype at DFNB31 rs2274159 or LIFR rs3729740 seemed greater chemosensitive than those carrying at least one A allele (P = 0.025 and P = 0.07). Cytotoxicity analyses showed that all RKO and HCT116 CRC clones transfected with the G allele at LIFR rs3729740 and the C allele at ISX rs361863 were more sensitive to cetuximab regimens than those with the A and T allele, respectively (P ≤ 0.001-0.024). CONCLUSIONS: Chemosensitive SNP markers were identified using a novel three-step process. The candidate marker LIFR rs3729740 and possibly ISX rs361863 will hopefully predict responsive patients to cetuximab regimens, although further validation is needed in large cohorts.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Monoclonais/uso terapêutico , Biomarcadores Tumorais/genética , Neoplasias Colorretais/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias Colorretais/genética , Resistencia a Medicamentos Antineoplásicos/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Alelos , Anticorpos Monoclonais/genética , Anticorpos Monoclonais Humanizados , Antineoplásicos/uso terapêutico , Bevacizumab , Cetuximab , Neoplasias Colorretais/patologia , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Terapia de Alvo Molecular , Metástase Neoplásica , Prognóstico , Resultado do Tratamento
19.
Anesthesiology ; 114(1): 205-12, 2011 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21169802

RESUMO

Patients with malignant hyperthermia experience an exaggerated metabolic response when exposed to volatile anesthetic gases and succinylcholine. The minimum concentration of anesthetic gas needed to trigger a malignant hyperthermia crisis in humans is unknown and may remain so because of the inherent risks associated with studying the complex nature of this rare and lethal genetic disorder. The Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States provides specific instructions on purging anesthesia machines of volatile agents to reduce the risk of exposure. However, these recommendations were developed from studies of older generation machines. Modern anesthesia workstations are more complex and contain more gas absorbing materials. A review of the literature found the current guidelines inadequate to prepare newer generation workstations, which require more time for purging anesthetic gases, autoclaving or replacement of parts, and modifications to the gas delivery system. Protocols must be developed to prepare newer generation anesthesia machines.


Assuntos
Anestesia/métodos , Anestesiologia/instrumentação , Hipertermia Maligna/prevenção & controle , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Contaminação de Equipamentos/prevenção & controle , Humanos
20.
Cancer Sci ; 101(4): 1007-13, 2010 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20085586

RESUMO

Improved methods for predicting chemoresponsiveness involving the identification of polymorphic markers is highly desirable, considering narrow therapeutic index and frequent resistance to anti-cancer regimens. The genome-wide screening of chemosensitive single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was undertaken in association with in vitro chemosensitivity assays in 104 colorectal cancer patients for the initial screening step. Allele frequency, linkage disequilibrium, potential function, and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of the candidate SNPs were then determined for the identifying step. Finally, clinical association analysis in the other 260 evaluable patients or cell viability assays of transfected RKO cells was used to verify candidate SNPs for the validation step. In total, 12 SNPs to six regimens were initially chosen during the screening and identifying steps. In patients receiving fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy, the substitution alleles of GPC5 rs553717 (AA) correlated significantly with tumor recurrence and shorter disease-free survival (P = 0.019 and 0.023, respectively). Interestingly, RKO cells expressing mutant GPC5 showed enhanced cell death in response to 5-FU in cytotoxicity assays. Patients that were homozygous for the reference alleles SSTR4 rs2567608 (AA) and EPHA7 rs2278107 (TT) showed lower disease control rates in response to irinotecan and oxaliplatin regimens, respectively, than those with substitution alleles (P = 0.022 and 0.014, respectively). Thus, we identified chemosensitive SNP markers using a novel three step process of genome-wide analysis consisting of in vitro screening, identification, and validation. The candidate chemosensitive SNP markers identified in our study, including those identified in vitro, can now be further verified in a large cohort study.


Assuntos
Antineoplásicos/uso terapêutico , Biomarcadores , Neoplasias Colorretais/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias Colorretais/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Idoso , Quimioterapia Adjuvante , Estudos de Coortes , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Feminino , Fluoruracila/uso terapêutico , Frequência do Gene , Humanos , Desequilíbrio de Ligação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
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