Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 40
Filtrar
1.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244873, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33400700

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Multiple studies have highlighted the negative impact of COVID-19 and its particular effects on vulnerable sub-populations. Complementing this work, here, we report on the social patterning of self-reported positive changes experienced during COVID-19 national lockdown in Scotland. METHODS: The CATALYST study collected data from 3342 adults in Scotland during weeks 9-12 of a national lockdown. Using a cross-sectional design, participants completed an online questionnaire providing data on key sociodemographic and health variables, and completed a measure of positive change. The positive change measure spanned diverse domains (e.g., more quality time with family, developing new hobbies, more physical activity, and better quality of sleep). We used univariate analysis and stepwise regression to examine the contribution of a range of sociodemographic factors (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, educational attainment, and employment status) in explaining positive change. RESULTS: There were clear sociodemographic differences across positive change scores. Those reporting higher levels of positive change were female, from younger age groups, married or living with their partner, employed, and in better health. CONCLUSION: Overall our results highlight the social patterning of positive changes during lockdown in Scotland. These findings begin to illuminate the complexity of the unanticipated effects of national lockdown and will be used to support future intervention development work sharing lessons learned from lockdown to increase positive health change amongst those who may benefit.


Assuntos
/psicologia , Quarentena/psicologia , Isolamento Social/psicologia , Adulto , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Ansiedade/prevenção & controle , /prevenção & controle , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Estudos Transversais , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Família/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Escócia/epidemiologia , Sono/fisiologia , Higiene do Sono , Estresse Psicológico/prevenção & controle , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
2.
Pilot Feasibility Stud ; 6(1): 168, 2020 Nov 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33292712

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Co-production of interventions is reliant on good communication and consensus between participants and researchers, but attending in-person meetings and workshops is hard for time-constrained groups such as new mums, who may be geographically dispersed without reliable transport. Discussions with a lay advisory group resulted in the decision to hold a workshop over a secret Facebook group. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of a secret Facebook group for co-production activities. In the example presented, the population was women with previous gestational diabetes, the topic was physical inactivity, and the purpose was to develop an acceptable physical activity intervention. METHODS: The researchers created a secret Facebook group with content similar to an in-person workshop that sequentially progressed to develop a programme theory for an intervention. The researcher posted 1-2 times per day for 14 days, and members of the group were invited to comment and discuss the content. Feasibility and acceptability of the group were analysed using Facebook analytics and a post-workshop survey. RESULTS: Twenty-one participants took part. In total, 521 comments were provided in response to 18 posts of varying types (average = 28.9 comments per post). The total word count of participant comments was 21,142 words. The workshop was viewed positively, with 20 of 21 participants saying they liked the workshop "somewhat" or "a great deal", and felt the group was a safe and open environment to share opinions. When asked if they would take part in something like this again, 15 of 21 said "Yes". Participants mentioned the format was convenient; it allowed them to reflect on their experiences, and they liked helping research progress. Those who say "maybe" said it was difficult finding time and depended on what else was going on. CONCLUSION: Using a secret Facebook group as a method of co-production or as a workshop in the research process is a feasible and acceptable method. Social media holds significant potential for co-production and involvement in research for populations who are geographically dispersed or time-constrained, with an uncommon condition or other circumstances where in-person meetings are either not appropriate or not possible.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33327556

RESUMO

We examine the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak and concomitant restrictions (i.e., lockdown) on 24-hour movement behaviors (i.e., physical activity, sitting, sleep) in a purposive sample of people (n = 3230) reporting change recruited online. Participants' self-reported time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), walking, sitting and sleep prior to lockdown (T1), during the first national lockdown (T2) and as restrictions initially started to ease (T3). For each 24-hour movement behavior, category-shifts are reported (positive, negative or did not change), as well as the percentage of participants recording positive/negative changes across clusters of behaviors and the percentage of participants recording improvement or maintenance of change across time. From T1 to T2 walking decreased, whereas MVPA, sitting and sleep increased, from T2 to T3 levels returned to pre-lockdown for all but MVPA. Participants who changed one behavior positively were more likely to report a positive change in another and 50% of those who reported positive changes from T1 to T2 maintained or improved further when restrictions started to ease. The current study showed that a large proportion of the sample reported positive changes, most notably those displaying initially poor levels of each behavior. These findings will inform salutogenic intervention development.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico , Pandemias , Comportamento Sedentário , Sono , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Escócia , Postura Sentada , Adulto Jovem
4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32784956

RESUMO

Welbot is a nudge-based digital intervention that aims to reduce sedentary behaviour and improve physical and mental wellbeing at work. The purpose of this study was to pilot test the Welbot intervention. Forty-one (6M/35F) University staff (M age = 43-years) participated in this study, which was a single arm repeated measures trial conducted over three weeks of intervention. The primary outcome was sedentary behaviour (measured subjectively and objectively) and secondary outcomes included: mental wellbeing, procrastination, depression, anxiety and stress, and work engagement. A subset of participants (n = 6) wore an ActivPAL to objectively measure activity data, while another subset of participants (n = 6) completed a qualitative semi-structured interview to ascertain experiences of using Welbot. Following the intervention, a Friedman non-parametric test revealed that participants self-reported significantly less time sitting and more time standing and objectively recorded more steps at the week-1 follow-up. A series of paired t-tests exhibited that changes in all secondary outcomes were in the expected direction. However, only improvements in depression, anxiety, and stress were significant. After using Welbot, thematic analysis demonstrated that participants perceived they had a positive behaviour change, increased awareness of unhealthy behaviours at work, and provided suggestions for intervention improvement. Overall, findings provided indications of the potential positive impact Welbot may have on employees' wellbeing, however, limitations are noted. Recommendations for intervention improvement including personalisation (e.g., individual preferences for nudges and the option to sync Welbot with online calendars) and further research into how users engage with Welbot are provided.

5.
J Sci Med Sport ; 23(11): 1074-1079, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32646745

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To investigate diurnal patterns of sedentary time and interruptions to sedentary time and their associations with achievement of pre-meal glucose, post-meal glucose, bedtime glucose and the dawn phenomenon targets and with duration of hypoglycaemia, euglycaemia, hyperglycaemia and above target range. DESIGN: Intensive longitudinal study. METHODS: In 37 adults with type 2 diabetes, the FreeStyle Libre and activPAL3 were used to monitor glucose and sedentary time and interruptions to sedentary time in the morning (07:00-12:00), afternoon (12:00-17:00) and evening (17:00-23:00) for 14 days. Diurnal patterns of sedentary behaviour and associations with glycaemic indices were assessed using repeated measures ANOVA and linear regressions. RESULTS: Sedentary time was significantly higher in the evening (43.47±7.37min/h) than the morning (33.34±8.44min/h) and afternoon (37.26±8.28min/h). Interruptions to sedentary time were significantly lower in the evening (2.64±0.74n/h) than the morning (3.69±1.08n/h) and afternoon (3.06±0.87n/h). Sedentary time in the morning and afternoon was associated with lower achievement of the dawn phenomenon target. Sedentary time in the evening was associated with lower achievement of post-lunch glucose target. Interruptions to sedentary time in the morning and afternoon were associated with higher achievement of pre-dinner glucose target. Interruptions to sedentary time in the evening showed beneficial associations with achievement of post-dinner glucose and bedtime glucose targets and euglycaemia. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged sedentary behaviour is high in the evening. Interruptions to sedentary time, particularly in the evening, have beneficial associations with glycaemic indices. Interventions targeting interruptions to sedentary time in the evening may be more clinically relevant.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32599730

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prolonged sedentary behaviour (SB) is associated with risk of chronic diseases. Digital interventions in SB require mixed method evaluations to understand potential for impact in real-world settings. In this study, the RE-AIM QuEST evaluation framework will be used to understand the potential of a digital health promotion application which targets reducing and breaking up SB across multiple workplace settings. METHODS: Four companies and 80 employees were recruited to use a digital application. Questionnaires were used to measure SB, and additional health and work-related outcomes at baseline, one month, three month and six month follow-up. Qualitative data was collected through focus groups with employees and interviews with stakeholders. Questionnaire data was analysed using Wilcoxon Sign Rank tests and qualitative data was thematically analysed. RESULTS: The digital application significantly increased standing time at one month for the total group and transitions per hour in one of the companies. Facilitators and barriers were identified across RE-AIM. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing the barriers which have been identified, while maintaining the positive attributes will be critical to producing an effective digital application which also has the potential for impact in the real world.


Assuntos
Promoção da Saúde , Saúde do Trabalhador , Comportamento Sedentário , Local de Trabalho , Adulto , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Posição Ortostática , Adulto Jovem
7.
Prosthet Orthot Int ; 44(4): 192-201, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32449462

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals play a key role in supporting physical activity participation for people with lower limb absence. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to survey healthcare professionals' views of people with lower limb absence in the United Kingdom, explore their awareness and knowledge of physical activity recommendations and investigate their current and desirable practice towards physical activity promotion. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Potential participants were identified from open-access health-related databases, educational institution databases, and the authors' professional networks. An online 40-item questionnaire was distributed electronically and by post. Survey items were multiple choice, Likert-type scale or open-ended questions to explore the characteristics of healthcare professionals, awareness/knowledge of physical activity guidelines, current and desired practice and views on physical activity promotion. RESULTS: In total, 106 people responded. Physiotherapists had greater awareness/knowledge of physical activity guidelines compared to prosthetists/orthotists and other respondents. Awareness/knowledge of guidelines decreased as age, experience and time since qualification increased. The most common source of knowledge was self-directed learning. CONCLUSION: Continuing and improving education on the content of physical activity guidelines may be helpful for healthcare professionals in promoting physical activity to those with lower limb absence. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This research aims to inform prosthetic rehabilitation professionals and academics about an under-researched area within physical activity for health. This knowledge could help develop interventions with the aim of improving physical activity promotion and participation, and ultimately the health and well-being of people with limb absence.

8.
Eur J Appl Physiol ; 120(1): 171-179, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31705275

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To investigate how the pattern of sedentary behaviour affects intra-day glucose regulation in type 2 diabetes. METHODS: This intensive longitudinal study was conducted in 37 participants with type 2 diabetes (age, 62.8 ± 10.5 years). Glucose and sedentary behaviour/physical activity were assessed with a continuous glucose monitoring (Abbott FreeStyle Libre) and an activity monitor (activPAL3) for 14 days. Multiple regression models with generalised estimating equations (GEEs) approach were used to assess the associations of sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time with pre-breakfast glucose, pre-lunch glucose, pre-dinner glucose, post-breakfast glucose, post-lunch glucose, post-dinner glucose, bedtime glucose, the dawn phenomenon, time in target glucose range (TIR, glucose 3.9-10 mmol/L) and time above target glucose range (TAR, glucose > 10 mmol/L). RESULTS: Sedentary time was associated with higher pre-breakfast glucose (p = 0.001), pre-dinner glucose (p < 0.001), post-lunch glucose (p = 0.005), post-dinner glucose (p = 0.013) and the dawn phenomenon (p < 0.001). Breaks in sedentary time were associated with lower pre-breakfast glucose (p = 0.023), pre-dinner glucose (p = 0.023), post-breakfast glucose (p < 0.001) and the dawn phenomenon (p = 0.004). The association between sedentary time and less TIR (p = 0.022) and the association between breaks in sedentary time and more TIR (p = 0.001) were also observed. CONCLUSIONS: Reducing sedentary time and promoting breaks in sedentary time could be clinically relevant to improve intra-day glucose regulation in type 2 diabetes.


Assuntos
Glicemia/metabolismo , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/sangue , Comportamento Sedentário , Idoso , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Período Pós-Prandial
9.
J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab ; 32(10): 1121-1129, 2019 Oct 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31539362

RESUMO

Introduction Growing evidence indicates that circulating concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), along with IGF-I relative to IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP), are associated with an increased risk of cancer. In accord, regular exercise is linked with a lower risk of cancer. Purpose To assess the effects of a 16-week home-based strength training (HBST) program on serum IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3. Methods A total of 32 obese Latino adolescent males (aged 14-18 years) were randomized into a twice-weekly HBST (n = 16) or a control group (C, n = 16) for 16 weeks. The following were measured at pre- and post-intervention: IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3, glucose/insulin indices by oral and/or intravenous (IV) glucose tolerance tests, strength by one-repetition maximum (1RM), dietary intake by 3-d records, body composition by DEXA and physical activity using the Actigraph GT1X. The generalized linear model (GLM) was used to assess differences in changes among outcome measures between the HBST and C groups. Results Exercise adherence in the HBST group was 89%. IGF-1 showed a trend for significant within-subject improvements (p = 0.078) but no significant within-subject or between-subject differences for IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3 two-glucose, fasting glucose or 2-h glucose (p > 0.05). There was a significant decrease (p > 0.05) in fasting glucose in the C group (p = 0.02) and also in the intervention group (p = 0.03) between baseline and follow-up testing. A significant difference was also found in the C group for 2-h glucose with an increase at follow-up testing (p = 0.04). Conclusions Though not statistically significant (p < 0.05), the results indicated that a 16-week HBST program decreased IGF-I and increased IGFBP-1, along with IGFBP-3, concentrations among overweight/obese Latino boys. However, further studies should consider increasing either the dose or the duration of the intervention to elicit greater improvements in this at-risk pediatric population.


Assuntos
Biomarcadores/sangue , Exercício Físico , Proteína 1 de Ligação a Fator de Crescimento Semelhante à Insulina/sangue , Proteína 3 de Ligação a Fator de Crescimento Semelhante à Insulina/sangue , Fator de Crescimento Insulin-Like I/análise , Obesidade/sangue , Treinamento de Resistência , Adolescente , Composição Corporal , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Seguimentos , Teste de Tolerância a Glucose , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Obesidade/fisiopatologia , Obesidade/terapia , Prognóstico
10.
J Sci Med Sport ; 22(7): 808-813, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30770192

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate dose-response between frequency of breaks in sedentary time and glucose control. DESIGN: Randomised three-treatment, two-period balanced incomplete block trial. METHODS: Twelve adults with type 2 diabetes (age, 60±11years; body mass index, 30.2±4.7kg/m2) participated in two of the following treatment conditions: sitting for 7h interrupted by 3min light-intensity walking breaks every (1) 60min (Condition 1), (2) 30min (Condition 2), and (3) 15min (Condition 3). Postprandial glucose incremental area under the curves (iAUCs) and 21-h glucose total area under the curve (AUC) were measured using continuous glucose monitoring. Standardised meals were provided. RESULTS: Compared with Condition 1 (6.7±0.8mmolL-1×3.5h-1), post-breakfast glucose iAUC was reduced for Condition 3 (3.5±0.9 mmolL-1×3.5h-1, p˂0.04). Post-lunch glucose iAUC was lower in Condition 3 (1.3±0.9mmolL-1×3.5h-1, p˂0.03) and Condition 2 (2.1±0.7mmolL-1×3.5h-1, p˂0.05) relative to Condition 1 (4.6±0.8mmolL-1×3.5h-1). Condition 3 (1.0±0.7mmolL-1×3.5h-1, p=0.02) and Condition 2 (1.6±0.6mmolL-1×3.5h-1, p˂0.04) attenuated post-dinner glucose iAUC compared with Condition 1 (4.0±0.7mmolL-1×3.5h-1). Cumulative 10.5-h postprandial glucose iAUC was lower in Condition 3 than Condition 1 (p=0.02). Condition 3 reduced 21-h glucose AUC compared with Condition 1 (p<0.001) and Condition 2 (p=0.002). However, post-breakfast glucose iAUC, cumulative 10.5-h postprandial glucose iAUC and 21-h glucose AUC were not different between Condition 2 and Condition 1 (p˃0.05). CONCLUSIONS: There could be dose-response between frequency of breaks in sedentary time and glucose. Interrupting sedentary time every 15min could produce better glucose control.


Assuntos
Glicemia/metabolismo , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/sangue , Comportamento Sedentário , Caminhada/fisiologia , Idoso , Biomarcadores/metabolismo , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Período Pós-Prandial , Estudo de Prova de Conceito , Postura Sentada , Posição Ortostática , Fatores de Tempo
11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31905751

RESUMO

Background: Interventions targeting a reduction in sedentary behaviour in office workers need to be scaled-up to have impact. In this study, the RE-AIM QuEST framework was used to evaluate the potential for further implementation and scale-up of a consultation based workplace intervention which targeted both the reduction, and breaking up of sitting time. Methods: To evaluate the Springfield College sedentary behaviour intervention across multiple RE-AIM QuEST indicators; intervention participant, non-participant (employees who did not participate) and key informant (consultation delivery team; members of the research team and stakeholders in workplace health promotion) data were collected using interviews, focus groups and questionnaires. Questionnaires were summarized using descriptive statistics and interviews and focus groups were transcribed verbatim, and thematically analysed. Results: Barriers to scale-up were: participant burden of activity monitoring; lack of management support; influence of policy; flexibility (scheduling/locations); time and cost. Facilitators to scale up were: visible leadership; social and cultural changes in the workplace; high acceptability; existing health and wellbeing programmes; culture and philosophy of the participating college. Conclusions: There is potential for scale-up, however adaptations will need to be made to address the barriers to scale-up. Future interventions in office workers should evaluate for scalability during the pilot phases of research.


Assuntos
Guias como Assunto , Promoção da Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Promoção da Saúde/normas , Saúde do Trabalhador/normas , Comportamento Sedentário , Postura Sentada , Local de Trabalho/normas , Adulto , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Masculino , Massachusetts , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Saúde do Trabalhador/estatística & dados numéricos , Local de Trabalho/estatística & dados numéricos
12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30558258

RESUMO

Sedentary behaviour is associated with poor health outcomes, and office-based workers are at significant health risk, as they accumulate large proportions of their overall sitting time at work. The aim of this integrated systematic review was to collate and synthesize published research on sedentary behaviour interventions in the workplace that have reported on at least one an aspect of the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. Studies were included if they involved adult office workers, were conducted in an office setting, and changes in sedentary behaviour had been measured as a primary outcome. Five electronic databases were searched yielding 7234 articles, with 75 articles (61 individual interventions) meeting the inclusion criteria. Reach indicators were the most frequently reported RE-AIM dimensions, which were reported on average 59% of the time. Efficacy/effectiveness was the second most reported dimension at 49% reporting across all of the indicators. Implementation indicators were reported an average of 44% of the time, with indicators of adoption and maintenance reported as the lowest of all indicators at 13% and 8%, respectively. Recommendations are provided to improve reporting across all RE-AIM dimensions, which is an important first step to enable the effective translation of interventions into real world settings.


Assuntos
Promoção da Saúde/métodos , Saúde do Trabalhador , Pesquisa , Comportamento Sedentário , Humanos , Local de Trabalho
13.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 146: 289-299, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30399393

RESUMO

AIMS: To assess continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) derived intra-day glucose profiles using global guideline for type 2 diabetes recommended by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). METHODS: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL and Science Direct were searched to identify observational studies reporting intra-day glucose profiles using CGM in people with type 2 diabetes on any anti-diabetes agents. Overall and subgroup analyses were conducted to summarise mean differences between reported glucose profiles (fasting glucose, pre-meal glucose, postprandial glucose and post-meal glucose spike/excursion) and the IDF targets. RESULTS: Twelve observational studies totalling 731 people were included. Pooled fasting glucose (0.81 mmol/L, 95% CI, 0.53-1.09 mmol/L), postprandial glucose after breakfast (1.63 mmol/L, 95% CI, 0.79-2.48 mmol/L) and post-breakfast glucose spike (1.05 mmol/L, 95% CI, 0.13-1.96 mmol/L) were significantly higher than the IDF targets. Pre-lunch glucose, pre-dinner glucose and postprandial glucose after lunch and dinner were above the IDF targets but not significantly. Subgroup analysis showed significantly higher fasting glucose and postprandial glucose after breakfast in all groups: HbA1c <7% and ≥7% (53 mmol/mol) and duration of diabetes <10 years and ≥10 years. CONCLUSIONS: Independent of HbA1c, fasting glucose and postprandial glucose after breakfast are not well-controlled in type 2 diabetes.


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/terapia , Adulto , Idoso , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
14.
Prev Med Rep ; 12: 94-100, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30214853

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of accelerometer-assessed sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time with 24-h events and duration of hypoglycaemia (<3.9 mmol/l), euglycaemia (3.9-7.8 mmol/l), hyperglycaemia (>7.8 mmol/l) and above target glucose (>9 mmol/l). Thirty-seven participants with type 2 diabetes (age, 62.8 ±â€¯10.5 years; body mass index, 29.6 ±â€¯6.8 kg/m2) in Glasgow, United Kingdom were enrolled between February 2016 and February 2017. Participants wore an activity monitor (activPAL3) recording the time and pattern of sedentary behaviour and a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM, Abbott FreeStyle Libre) for up to 14 days. Linear regression analyses were used to investigate the associations. Participants spent 3.7%, 64.7%, 32.1% and 19.2% of recording h/day in hypoglycaemia, euglycaemia, hyperglycaemia and above target, respectively. There was a negative association between sedentary time and time in euglycaemia (ß = -0.44, 95% CI -0.86; -0.03, p = 0.04). There was a trend towards a positive association between sedentary time and time in hyperglycaemia (ß = 0.36, 95% CI -0.05; 0.78, p = 0.08). Breaks in sedentary time was associated with higher time in euglycaemia (ß = 0.38, 95% CI 0.00; 0.75, p = 0.04). To conclude, in individuals with type 2 diabetes, more time spent in unbroken and continuous sedentary behaviour was associated with poorer glucose control. Conversely, interrupting sedentary time with frequent breaks appears to improve glycaemic control. Therefore, this should be considered as a simple adjunct therapy to improve clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes.

15.
J Rehabil Assist Technol Eng ; 5: 2055668318782805, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31191946

RESUMO

Aims: To present the novel application of combining continuously measured glucose with continuous accelerometer measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour data and discusses the principles used and challenges faced in combining and analysing these two sets of data in the context of diabetes management. Methods: The background and rationale for exploring glucose, physical activity and sedentary behaviour in people with Type 2 diabetes is presented, the paper outlines the technologies used, the individual data extraction and finally the combined data analysis. A case study approach is used to illustrate the application of the combined data processing and analysis. Results: The data analytic principles used could be transferred to different conditions where continuous data sets are being combined to help individuals or health professionals better manage and care for people with long term conditions. Conclusions: Future work should focus on generating validated techniques to visualise combined data sets and explore ways to present data back to the individual in an effective way to support health care management and rehabilitation.

16.
Child Soc ; 32(1): 14-26, 2018 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31656369

RESUMO

This study aims to understand how children perceive their environment, exploring the affordances children perceive to influence their physical activity (PA) behaviour when outside. Participants included boys and girls aged 10-12 years (n = 15) living in Scotland. Children's visual and verbal representations of their perceived environment were analysed to assess environmental determinants of PA. The findings suggested that physical affordances that offer a sense of risk were important to children's play spaces. Social affordances influenced where the children went in their environment and the features they utilised as part of play behaviour; strangers were considered threatening depending on whether the activity was recognised.

17.
Pediatr Diabetes ; 19(3): 443-449, 2018 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29171135

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have lower levels of physical activity (PA) than the general population. The ActivPals intervention aimed to support youth with T1D to lead an active lifestyle. METHODS: Twenty youth aged 7 to 16 years with T1D were recruited to a pilot randomized controlled trial. PA and quality of life (QoL) were measured using Actigraph GT3X+ monitor and Pediatric QoL scales at baseline and 1-month follow-up. A two-way, mixed ANOVA showed indicative effects of the intervention. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 16 participants to explore perceptions of the intervention. RESULTS: An increase in moderate to vigorous PA was reported in intervention and control groups from baseline to follow-up (F(1, 14) = 5.83; P = .03), with no significance between group differences. Participants in both groups reported significantly less overall diabetes "problems" (F(1, 16) = 7.93; P = .012) and significantly less lifestyle "problems" (F(1, 16) = 7.39; P = .015) at follow-up. However, both groups also reported significant increases in "problems" with the day-to-day diabetes routine (F(1,16) = 6.48; P = .022) at follow-up. Parents reported significant increased worry about their child's diabetes at follow-up, in both groups (F(1, 14) = 5.83; P = .046). There was no significant increase in reported hypoglycemic occurrences despite increased PA. The qualitative data highlight that goal setting, self-monitoring, and social support were effective motivators for increasing PA. CONCLUSIONS: A larger trial with longer follow-up should be conducted to explore the effect of the intervention on PA in youth with T1D.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/psicologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/terapia , Exercício Físico , Estilo de Vida , Actigrafia , Adolescente , Criança , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Projetos Piloto , Qualidade de Vida , Comportamento de Redução do Risco , Apoio Social
18.
PLoS One ; 12(9): e0185143, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28934319

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Limited research has explored the links between sedentary behaviour, mental health and quality of life. This study examines objectively measured sedentary behaviour and perceived mental health and quality of life across week days and weekends. METHODS: 42 adults (19M, 23F; mean age 38yrs (range 18-67) & BMI 24.8kg/m2 (range 18.7-33.8) wore an activPAL monitor 24h/day for one week and completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and SF12 Health Survey. Average weekday and weekend day sitting time was computed. Differences between sitting (Group 1 = <8hrs/day, Group 2 = 8-10 hrs/day, Group 3 = >10hrs/day) and components of the HADS and SF12 health survey were examined using an ANCOVA with a measure of physical activity (step count) included as a covariate. RESULTS: Average sitting time on a weekday was 9hrs 29mins (range 5hrs 52mins to 12hrs 55mins) and 8hrs 59mins (range 4hrs, 07mins to 14hrs, 40mins) on a weekend day. There was a main effect (p<0.05) for weekday sitting time on total anxiety and depression (HADS) and mental health and vitality (SF12). Planned contrasts identified individuals in group 1 had lower anxiety and depression and higher mental health and vitality scores than individuals in groups 2 or 3 (p<0.05). No difference was found between individuals in group 2 and group 3 (p>0.05). No main effects were found for weekend sitting (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Weekday sitting time below 8 hours/day is associated with better perceived mental health and quality of life.


Assuntos
Saúde Mental , Comportamento Sedentário , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Qualidade de Vida , Fatores de Tempo , Adulto Jovem
19.
J Diabetes Sci Technol ; 11(2): 299-307, 2017 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27334301

RESUMO

AIM: The aim was to review studies examining the effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility of mobile-based technology for promoting active lifestyles in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). BACKGROUND: Benefits of leading an active lifestyle following a diagnosis of T2D, including improved glycemic control, have been reported. Studies examining the specific use of mobile-based technologies to promote an active lifestyle in T2D have not previously been reviewed. METHODS: Research studies examining effectiveness, feasibility or acceptability of mobile-based technology for active lifestyle promotion for T2D management were included (n = 9). The databases searched included PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect, and ACM Digital Library (January 2005 to October 2015). Studies were categorized as (1) informing, (2) monitoring, (3) provoking, or (4) sustaining behavior change. RESULTS: Technologies used included smartphone or tablet apps, diabetes personal digital assistant, continuous glucose monitor and accelerometer, pedometer, and a website delivered by a smartphone. No articles examined the effectiveness of mobile-based technology in monitoring health behaviors and behavior change. Four of the studies found mobile-based technology to be motivational and supportive for behavior change. The visual reinforcement was identified as motivational. The feasibility and acceptability of using mobile-based technology to provide sustained lifestyle change and the effectiveness of mobile-based technology in monitoring health behaviors and behavior change have not been investigated. No studies examined all 3 of the outcomes or focused decreasing the participants' sedentary behavior. CONCLUSIONS: Limited research has examined the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of mobile-based technology to promote active lifestyles and subsequently good diabetes management in people with T2D.


Assuntos
Computadores de Mão , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Aplicativos Móveis , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Smartphone , Humanos , Estilo de Vida
20.
JMIR Diabetes ; 2(2): e26, 2017 Oct 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30291091

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Research supports the use of Web-based interventions to promote physical activity in diabetes management. However, previous interventions have found poor levels of engagement or have not included health professionals and people with diabetes in the design of the tool. OBJECTIVE: To develop and explore the feasibility and indicative effect of a Web-based physical activity promotion intervention in people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes living in remote or rural locations. METHODS: A qualitative approach using focus groups that included patients with diabetes and health professionals were run to identify key concepts, ideas, and features, which resulted in the design of a physical activity website. This site was tested using a quantitative approach with a qualitative 6-month pilot study that adopted a three-armed approach. Participants were randomized into three groups: a control group who received written diabetes-specific physical activity advice; an information Web group, a Web-based group who received the information online; and an intervention Web group, an interactive Web-based group who received online information plus interactive features, such as an activity log, personalized advice, and goal setting. RESULTS: A website was designed based on patient and health professional ideas for effective physical activity promotion. This website was tested with 31 participants, 61% (19/31) male, who were randomized into the groups. Website log-ins decreased over time: 4.5 times in month 1, falling to 3 times in month 6. Both the information Web group-mean 134.6 (SD 123.9) to mean 154.9 (SD 144.2) min-and the control group-mean 118.9 (SD 103.8) to mean 126.1 (SD 93.4) min, d=0.07-increased time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, but this decreased in the intervention Web group-mean 131.9 (SD 126.2) to mean 116.8 (SD 107.4) min. CONCLUSIONS: Access to online diabetes-specific physical information was effective in promoting physical activity in people with type 2 diabetes; access to interactive features was not associated with increases in activity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 96266587; http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN96266587 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6tzX6YesZ).

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA