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1.
Open Vet J ; 9(4): 327-330, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32042654

RESUMO

Background: Few reports of post-surgical evisceration, with or without autocannibalism, in dogs exist. Aims: To collect a large case series of dogs experiencing post-surgical evisceration, with or without autocannibalism. Methods: We surveyed practicing veterinarians who were members of the Veterinary Information Network about their experiences with post-surgical evisceration in dogs, variably accompanied by autocannibalism (ingestion of eviscerated organs or tissues). Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: We identified 333 cases with sufficient information for analysis: 221 with evisceration and autocannibalism, and 112 with just evisceration. Most cases occurred following surgery for reproductive reasons (desexing, cesarean section, and pyometra). Most occurred in young adult or adult dogs. Most dogs received analgesia perioperatively had routine closure (simple interrupted or simple continuous muscle layer closure) and most did not wear an E-collar post-surgically. Most dogs eviscerated within 3 days of the initial surgery. Approximately 64% underwent surgical repair and survived long-term without complications, more frequently if the evisceration was not accompanied by autocannibalism. Conclusion: Our study suggests that post-surgical evisceration and autocannibalism can generally be successfully managed by practitioners and do not confer a uniformly poor outcome for the dog.

2.
J Vet Med Educ ; 46(4): 438-448, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31756148

RESUMO

The stress of veterinary school and the high prevalence of psychological distress among veterinary students have been well documented. Pet ownership is known to improve overall health and reduce stress among the public. Yet, for veterinary students, owning a pet (especially a dog) can offer both rewards and challenges. The academic schedule for veterinary students often comprises long hours that can make caring for a dog challenging. This study explores the area of veterinary students' dog care options and perspectives by examining two aspects of this issue: (a) currently available options, as reported by academic administrators, and (b) perceived need for these options, as reported by veterinary students. A survey of associate deans for academic affairs (n = 30) found that routine on-site kenneling options for student-owned dogs are available at eight (26.6%) veterinary schools. Simultaneously, results of a student survey (n = 768) revealed a great desire for on-campus services. Among students who did not have access to on-campus kenneling facilities, 71.5% (453 of 634) felt that creating these options would be important or very important. Across all students surveyed, 76% (581 of 764) felt it would be important to have on-site dog housing/care available. Students experience considerable stress over having to find accommodations or care for their dogs while engaged in academic activities. Thus, providing on-site boarding and care options for student-owned dogs can play an important role in both recruiting prospective veterinary students and enhancing the well-being of those currently in the program.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Propriedade , Animais de Estimação/psicologia , Faculdades de Medicina Veterinária/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Animais , Cães , Humanos , Estudos Prospectivos , Inquéritos e Questionários
3.
Animals (Basel) ; 9(11)2019 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31731680

RESUMO

Available research on the link between domestic cats' environment and welfare has primarily been conducted in animal shelters or research facilities; a better understanding of the welfare of cats living in homes is needed. This study measured the attitudes of current U.S.-based cat owners towards cats as pets; owner knowledge about normal cat behavior and environmental needs; current trends in cat care; cats' behavior in the home; and the human-animal bond. The primary hypothesis was that owners with a more accurate understanding of cat behavior and a stronger reported bond with their cats would report fewer behavior problems. Data from an online, anonymous, cross-sectional survey of 547 cat owners supported the primary hypothesis: owner knowledge, along with two measures of the human-animal bond (owner-pet interactions, and perceptions of affordability of cat ownership), were significant predictors of the number of reported behavior problems. In addition to fewer reported behavior problems, greater owner knowledge about cats was correlated with less use of positive-punishment-based responses to misbehavior, and increased tolerance of potential behavior problems when present. Owners' agreement with certain misconceptions about cats and perception of high costs of care were correlated with the use of positive punishment in response to misbehavior. Based on the survey results, many cats living in private homes may be receiving only minimal environmental enrichment. Collectively, these results suggest the need for better education of cat owners. Topics could include: understanding normal cat behavior and correcting misconceptions; enrichment needs (particularly of indoor-only cats) and the risk of behavior problems when cats' needs are not met; welfare risks associated with declawing; and the importance of sufficient resources to minimize social and territorial conflict.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31652882

RESUMO

Dog aggression directed towards humans is a common and serious behavioral and public health issue. This cross-sectional study was designed to gain insights into U.S. small animal veterinarians' views and experiences with the most common dog breeds in the U.S., dog aggression, and breed-specific legislation. An electronic survey was distributed via email to an online veterinary community, and responses were summarized and compared by means of χ2 and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests. Most respondents were concerned about the risks of dog bite injuries, but the majority were not in favor of banning specific breeds of dogs in order to enhance public safety. When participants rated the perceived bite risk associated with popular dog breeds, Chow Chows were perceived as the highest risk, with pit bull types categorized as a moderate risk. Golden Retrievers were seen as the most appropriate for families with children. Public education about animal behavior was the most frequently endorsed policy intervention to increase public safety. These findings suggest that most veterinarians feel that banning an entire dog breed is not an effective way to ensure human safety. Instead, most respondents endorsed alternative initiatives, such as public education and stricter leash laws, to reduce the risk of dog bites.

5.
Prev Vet Med ; 170: 104714, 2019 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31421492

RESUMO

Although dogs routinely travel in motor vehicles, there is a lack of evidence on if, how, and why people choose to restrain their dogs when travelling. A lack of restraint is likely to be associated with an increased risk of serious injury or death in the case of an accident, and in some cases may even precipitate an accident. The aim of the present study was to determine the frequency in which dog restraints are used in the US, UK and Australia in a convenience sample, and the factors associated with whether or not a dog is restrained. Online surveys using SurveyMonkey® were distributed in the US, UK and Australia during 2017-2018. The survey consisted of questions related to owning a dog, owner and dog demographics, use of restraint when driving with the dog, reasons for restraining/not restraining the dog, and attitudes to restraint of dogs in vehicles. A logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with the use of restraint. There were 706, 692 and 637 completed surveys from the US, UK and Australia, respectively. A little over half of respondents restrained their dog in the US (55%) compared to 67% in Australia and 72% in the UK. The most common method of restraint in the US and UK was a cage/crate in the cargo area in the back of the vehicle; in Australia it was a harness and tether attached to a seat buckle. In the generalised linear model, country, dog size, owner age, dog age and vehicle type were all significant factors associated with the use of restraint for dogs in cars. Younger dog owners from the US who drove a pickup truck or utility van, had a large dog, and drove with their dogs less frequently were least likely to restrain their dogs. This research highlights the need for improved education and information regarding the use of restraints for dogs traveling in vehicles, although the limitations in the convenience sample used mean further research is needed, including use of a more representative sample.


Assuntos
Cães , Veículos Automotores/normas , Equipamentos de Proteção/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Idoso , Animais , Austrália , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Veículos Automotores/classificação , Reino Unido , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
6.
Can Vet J ; 60(7): 749-755, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31281193

RESUMO

The legal market for recreational and medicinal cannabis for human consumption is growing worldwide. At the same time, marketing of cannabis products for use in pets is expanding. Yet, there is little research exploring the effects of cannabis use in veterinary medicine. This study used an anonymous, online survey to assess Canadian pet owners' reasons for purchasing cannabis products for their dogs, and their perceptions regarding efficacy of these treatments. Owners purchased cannabis products for treatment of pain, inflammation, and anxiety in dogs, and perceived these preparations to be equally or more effective than conventional medications. Most owners reported only minimal side effects in their dogs. Despite indicating comfort in discussing canine cannabis administration with their veterinarian, most owners relied on commercial websites for product information. The main reasons for choosing cannabis products were the ability to use as an adjuvant to other therapies, and the perception of it being a natural substance. Given this information, it is incumbent upon veterinarians to appropriately counsel their clients, and also to advocate for evidence-based studies to evaluate the efficacy of cannabis use in non-human species.

7.
J Vet Med Educ ; : 1-12, 2019 Apr 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31009279

RESUMO

Studies of US animal shelters consistently indicate that behavior is often a major reason for relinquishment and, thereby, euthanasia of millions of dogs and cats annually. Even though this is an area in which veterinarians can intervene to support the human-animal bond, prior research has documented that they frequently do not bring the topic up during appointments. This study explored veterinarians' training in animal behavior and behavioral medicine, along with their level of comfort in treating common behavioral problems. An online survey of practicing veterinarians (N = 1,085) found that only 42.8% felt they'd received a significant amount of training in this field during veterinary school, but the majority reported participating in continuing education sessions about behavior. Almost all respondents reported seeing patients with behavioral issues (99.6%), even when the initial appointment was made for other reasons. Participants felt most comfortable discussing inappropriate elimination and begging for food but were least comfortable treating issues involving aggression. Most veterinarians treat their own behavior cases, using a combination of behavior modification techniques and medication. Only 22.1% refer cases needing behavioral therapy to a specialist. Given the prevalence of behavioral problems in companion animals and the potential for early veterinary intervention to play a significant role in animal health, it is important for veterinary schools to include this topic in their curricula. At present, 73% of schools require a course in animal behavior. The release of the new Competency-Based Veterinary Education framework is anticipated to support a greater teaching emphasis in this area.

8.
Front Vet Sci ; 6: 87, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30972344

RESUMO

While animal shelters have made significant progress in reducing the number of euthanized dogs and cats, millions of unclaimed pets are still euthanized every year. Cats, in particular, face bleak prospects, with ~70% of those that enter animal shelters euthanized. Many factors influence potential cat adopters' decisions, including a cat's physical appearance and perceived personality. To explore elements related to the perception of cat personality, this study examined whether videos and pictures highlight different characteristics felt to potentially affect perceived cat adoptability. An online survey was used to assess perceptions regarding videos and pictures of cats. The survey consisted of three adult cats viewed in a short video and as a still picture. Participants were asked to view the media and rate how well these images depicted 12 separate characteristics (from extremely well to not well at all). Respondents were then asked how likely they would be to adopt this cat if they "were in the market to adopt a cat." A total of 555 surveys were analyzed to answer two questions. The first question was whether cats were perceived as more adoptable when viewed in a still photo or in an action video. A statistically significant difference was found between median photo and video adoption scores for all three cats, with video scores consistently higher than photo scores. The next question was how video footage might alter perception of cats when compared to still photos. For all three cats, the traits "Playful," "Aggressive," "Active," and "Curious" received higher scores when the cats were viewed in videos vs. photos. All of these traits can be associated with active behaviors, best demonstrated via motion. The cats, however, were seen as more "Loving," "Shy," "Quiet," and "Likes to be held" in photos compared to videos. The results suggest that there is an advantage of videos over pictures in perceived adoptability, as determined by response to the question "how likely would you be to adopt this cat," but this difference is small and likely does not justify additional resources. Exceptions might be for active, outgoing cats in order to highlight these attributes.

9.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 254(1): 88-92, 2019 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30668288

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE To understand the experiences of owners of dogs with chronic pain and explore owner perceptions of their pets' pain. DESIGN Observational study. SAMPLE 10 owners of dogs with chronic pain. PROCEDURES Owners were interviewed by means of a semistructured and conversational technique. Interviews were then transcribed and analyzed with standard qualitative methodology to code for major themes. RESULTS Major themes that were identified included changes in owner schedule, effects on owner relationships, and necessary resources when owning a pet with chronic pain. Owners discussed their perceptions of their pets' pain, and several participants referred to empathizing with their pet owing to their own experiences with pain. Owners also suggested ways that veterinarians can support them during the experience of owning a dog with chronic pain. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE By understanding the impact of chronic pain on dog owners and appreciating how owners perceive pain in their pets, veterinarians may be able to provide better care for patients and clients.


Assuntos
Dor Crônica/veterinária , Propriedade , Medição da Dor/veterinária , Animais , Cães , Feminino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino
10.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 254(1): 133-144, 2019 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30668296

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE To develop and validate a Burden Transfer Inventory (BTI) of stressful client behaviors and to evaluate whether those behaviors are associated with client caregiver burden and contribute to veterinarian stress and burnout. DESIGN 3-stage cross-sectional psychometric validation study. SAMPLE 1,151 small animal veterinarians and 372 dog and cat owners. PROCEDURES During stage 1, a pool of 34 items representing stressful client behaviors was created through open-ended surveys of practicing veterinarians and 3 phases of pilot testing. During stage 2, 1,151 veterinarians recruited through the Veterinary Information Network completed a survey including those behavior items and validated measures of stress and burnout. Completed surveys were randomly assigned to either a measure development or validation database for factor and item analyses. Data were then combined to determine whether the BTI was correlated with measures of stress and burnout. During stage 3, owners of dogs and cats with a serious illness completed an online survey to assess how frequently they engaged in each BTI item as well as a validated measure of caregiver burden. RESULTS For dog and cat owners, there was a significant positive correlation between caregiver burden and the frequency that those owners reported engaging in BTI items. The frequency that veterinarians reported encountering BTI items was positively correlated with measures of stress and burnout, which suggested burden transfer from owners to veterinarians. The extent to which veterinarians reported being bothered by BTI items was a more robust predictor of stress and burnout than the frequency with which those items occurred. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated the BTI can be used to understand how client behaviors associated with caregiver burden affect veterinarian stress and burnout. The BTI may be useful to identify specific stressors affecting individual veterinarians and how they react to those stressors.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/terapia , Efeitos Psicossociais da Doença , Doenças do Cão/terapia , Propriedade , Psicometria , Médicos Veterinários/psicologia , Animais , Gatos , Cães , Feminino , Humanos , Relações Interpessoais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Ohio , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Inquéritos e Questionários
11.
J Feline Med Surg ; 21(10): 902-909, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30382770

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This study assessed cat owners' perceptions of the use of psychoactive medications and alternative products for the treatment of behavioral problems in their cats. Factors that potentially impact these perceptions were explored and discussed. METHODS: An online, anonymous, cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess US-based cat owners' experiences with behavior problems of their cats, familiarity with psychoactive medications for treatment of behavior problems and comfort levels using the following products for treatment of feline behavior problems: fast-acting or situational prescription medications, slow-acting or long-term prescription medications, herbal/nutritional supplements, pheromone products and cannabinoid products. RESULTS: Many respondents reported that their cats had behavioral problems, but few had ever sought behavioral help for their cats. Only half were aware of the availability of psychoactive medications for cat behavior problems. Respondents who had personally used a prescription psychoactive medication in the past were more comfortable with giving fast- and slow-acting prescription medications, pheromone products and cannabinoids to their cats than respondents who had never used a prescription psychoactive medication. No difference in comfort level was seen for herbal/nutritional supplements. Overall, owners tended to be more comfortable with the situational vs long-term medications. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Given the prevalence of feline behavior problems reported in this study, the lack of awareness of either the availability or potential benefits of psychoactive medications for the treatment of feline behavior problems, and the fact that very few owners had ever sought help for behavior problems with their cats, are concerning. These results suggest a missed opportunity for veterinarians to help clients identify, understand and treat feline behavior problems. Many owners appear open to these treatment options for their cats; it is suggested that, when warranted, educating cat owners about the potential benefits and risks of these medications would be of value.

12.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 253(9): 1151-1157, 2018 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30311532

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE To evaluate owner satisfaction with a home-based, synchronous videoconferencing telemedicine application as an alternative to in-clinic appointments for conducting recheck examinations after surgical sterilization in dogs. DESIGN Randomized controlled clinical trial. ANIMALS 30 client-owned dogs undergoing elective surgical sterilization and postsurgical recheck examination between September 27, 2017, and February 23, 2018. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to have their recheck examinations performed remotely (the telemedicine group) or at the veterinary clinic (the control group). After the recheck examination, owners completed a survey regarding their satisfaction with the recheck examination and their dogs' behavior during it. Information regarding the surgery and recheck examination was obtained from the electronic medical record. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare results between the telemedicine and control groups. RESULTS Owners were equally satisfied with recheck examinations performed by videoconference and in-clinic appointments. Owners of dogs in the telemedicine group indicated that their dogs were less afraid during the virtual appointment, compared with what was typical for them during in-clinic appointments, but the difference was not statistically significant. Most owners who completed a postsurgical recheck examination by videoconferencing preferred this method for similar appointments in the future. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that owners were satisfied with videoconferencing as a means of conducting a postsurgical recheck examination. Further research is needed to assess videoconferencing's ability to reduce signs of fear in dogs during veterinary examinations, its economic feasibility, and the willingness of veterinarians and animal owners to adopt the technology.


Assuntos
Assistência ao Convalescente/métodos , Hospitais Veterinários , Exame Físico/veterinária , Esterilização Reprodutiva/veterinária , Videoconferência , Animais , Cães , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Propriedade , Satisfação Pessoal , Distribuição Aleatória , Médicos Veterinários
13.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 252(5): 586-595, 2018 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29461160

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE To assess the prevalence of medical errors (specifically, near misses [NMs] and adverse events [AEs]) and their personal and professional impact on veterinarians. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SAMPLE Members of the Veterinary Information Network (n = 46,481). PROCEDURES An electronic survey regarding veterinarians' experiences with NMs and AEs was distributed via email to an online veterinary community between September 24 and October 21, 2015. Responses were summarized and compared between genders by means of the χ2 test. RESULTS 606 veterinarians completed the survey (1.3% response rate). Overall, 447 (73.8%) respondents reported involvement in ≥ 1 NM (n = 389 [64.2%]) or AE (179 [29.5%]). The NMs had a short-term (≤ 1 week) adverse impact on professional life for 68.0% (261/384) of respondents and longer-term negative impact for 36.4% (140/385). The impact on respondents' personal lives was similar (63.6% [245/385] and 33.5% [129/385], respectively). For AEs, these numbers were 84.1% (148/176), 56.2% (99/177), 77.8% (137/176), and 50.6% (89/175), respectively. Both NMs and AEs were more likely to negatively impact female veterinarians than male veterinarians. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE These findings suggested that many veterinarians experience emotional distress after a medical error. Support should be provided to mitigate this adverse impact on the wellbeing of veterinarians and, potentially, their future patients.


Assuntos
Erros Médicos , Padrões de Prática Médica , Médicos Veterinários/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , América do Norte , Inquéritos e Questionários
14.
J Vet Med Educ ; 45(2): 188-194, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28960127

RESUMO

Professional DVM training is inherently stressful and challenging for students. This study evaluated a simple intervention-short breaks during a veterinary pharmacology lecture course in the form of funny/cute animal videos (Mood Induction Procedures, or MIP)-to assess for potential impact on students' mood, interest in material, and perceived understanding of material. Ten YouTube video clips showing cats or dogs were selected to influence students' affective states. The videos were shown in a required pharmacology class offered during the fall semester of the second year of the DVM program at a large, land-grant institution in the western US. The student cohort consisted of 133 students (20 males, 113 females). Twenty days of the course were randomly chosen for the study and ranged from weeks 2 to 13 of the semester. Sessions in which the videos were played were alternated with sessions in which no video was played, for a total of 10 video days and 10 control days. There were significant differences in all three post-class assessment measures between the experimental (video) days and the control days. Results suggest that showing short cute animal videos in the middle of class positively affected students' mood, interest in material, and self-reported understanding of material. While the results of this study are limited to one student cohort at one institution, the ease of implementation of the technique and relatively low stakes support incorporation of the MIP technique across a variety of basic and clinical science courses.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária/métodos , Farmacologia Clínica/educação , Estudantes de Medicina , Gravação em Vídeo , Animais , Gatos , Cães , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Inquéritos e Questionários
15.
Front Vet Sci ; 4: 180, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29098148

RESUMO

The Internet is a commonly used resource for accessing health information. Despite the Internet's popularity in the human health field, little is known about the Internet's impact on veterinarians, their clients, and the veterinarian-client relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate the perception of veterinarians from the United Kingdom of clients' use of the Internet and the perceived impact on pet health and the veterinarian-client relationship. A survey was distributed between January 4 and March 3, 2017, via an online link. In total, 100 veterinarians completed the survey. This study found that most UK veterinarians feel their clients access the Internet to find pet health information, yet often do not understand what they read online. Importantly, 40% of veterinarians stated that the Internet has a negative impact on companion animal health. This small-scale study found mixed opinions regarding veterinarians' perceptions of their clients' use of the Internet and the potential impact it has on the client-veterinarian relationship. Research on clients' actual use of the Internet and their associated perceptions is a next logical step.

16.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 250(6): 688-696, 2017 Mar 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28263111

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE To survey practicing veterinarians regarding their perceptions of and experiences with cases of suspected or confirmed animal abuse and related state laws. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. POPULATION Members of the Veterinary Information Network (VIN; n = 34,144) who were in veterinary practice at the time of the survey. PROCEDURES A survey was designed and distributed online to all VIN members from January 26 to February 28, 2015. Responses were compiled, and binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors that influenced decisions or perceptions regarding animal abuse encounters and related legislation. RESULTS 1,209 completed surveys were received (3.5% response rate); 1,155 (95.5%) surveys were submitted by currently practicing veterinarians. One thousand five (87.0%) practicing veterinarians reported having encountered at least 1 case of animal abuse while in practice; 561 (55.8%) of these veterinarians indicated that they had reported at least 1 case. The most common reasons selected for reporting abuse were to protect the animal, ethical beliefs, and to protect other animals in the household. The most common reasons selected for not reporting the abuse were uncertainty that the animal had been abused, belief that client education would be better, and belief that the injury or illness was accidental versus intentional. Most respondents were unaware of the current status of laws in their state regarding animal abuse reporting. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested a need for state and national veterinary and humane-law enforcement organizations to increase communication and education efforts on recognition and reporting by veterinarians of animal abuse and the related laws.


Assuntos
Bem-Estar do Animal/estatística & dados numéricos , Bem-Estar do Animal/legislação & jurisprudência , Animais , Animais Domésticos , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Coleta de Dados , Humanos , Notificação de Abuso , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos , Médicos Veterinários
17.
J Vet Med Educ ; 44(1): 63-71, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28206845

RESUMO

Clinical empathy is a multi-dimensional concept characterized by four dimensions: (1) affective-the ability to experience patients' or clients' emotions and perspectives, (2) moral-the internal motivation to empathize, (3) cognitive-the intellectual ability to identify and comprehend others' perspective and emotions, and (4) behavioral-the ability to convey understanding of those emotions and perspectives back to the patient or client. The Davis Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) was used to examine the affective and cognitive facets of empathy in veterinary practitioners. The IRI consists of four subscales that measure cognitive (perspective taking and fantasy) and affective (emphatic concern and personal distress) components of empathy. Data from a cross-sectional sample of practicing veterinarians (n=434) were collected. Veterinarians' fantasy scores were lowest for those with the most clinical experience. Personal distress scores were highest among new veterinarians and lowest for those with 26 or more years in practice. High levels of personal distress in the early years of practice are concerning for the professional wellness of veterinarians. To combat this trend, the implementation of resilience-building interventions should be considered to support veterinary practitioners.


Assuntos
Empatia , Médicos Veterinários/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Cognição , Colorado , Estudos Transversais , Emoções , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , North Carolina , Adulto Jovem
18.
J Vet Med Educ ; 44(1): 166-178, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27689948

RESUMO

Given the unique nature of programs in professional veterinary medicine (PVM), the increasing numbers of students requesting accommodations for emotional support animals (ESAs) in higher education settings is of growing interest to student affairs and administrative staff in PVM settings. Since the legislation pertaining to this type of support animal differs from the laws governing disability service animals, colleges and universities now need to develop new policies and guidelines. Representatives from a sample of 28 PVM programs completed a survey about the prevalence of student requests for ESAs and service animals. PVM associate deans for academic affairs also reported their perceptions of this issue and the challenges these requests might pose within veterinary teaching laboratories and patient treatment areas. Responses indicated that approximately one third of PVM programs have received requests for ESAs (32.1%) in the last 2 years, 17.9% have had requests for psychiatric service animals, and 17.9% for other types of service animals. Despite this, most associate deans reported not having or not being aware of university or college policies pertaining to these issues. Most associate deans are interested in learning more about this topic. This paper provides general recommendations for establishing university or PVM program policies.


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência/legislação & jurisprudência , Pessoas com Deficiência/reabilitação , Percepção , Animais de Estimação/psicologia , Formulação de Políticas , Faculdades de Medicina Veterinária , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Animais , Pessoas com Deficiência/psicologia , Cães , Faculdades de Medicina Veterinária/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
19.
J Vet Med Educ ; 44(2): 364-368, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27779917

RESUMO

Cognitive functioning is often compromised with increasing levels of stress and fatigue, both of which are often experienced by veterinarians. Many high-stress fields have implemented checklists to reduce human error. The use of these checklists has been shown to improve the quality of medical care, including adherence to evidence-based best practices and improvement of patient safety. Although it has been recognized that veterinary medicine would likely demonstrate similar benefits, there have been no published studies to date evaluating the use of checklists for improving quality of care in veterinary medicine. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the impact of checklists during wellness and post-elective surgery appointments conducted by fourth-year veterinary students within their Community Practice rotation at a US veterinary teaching hospital. Students were randomly assigned to one of two groups: those who were specifically asked to use the provided checklists during appointments, and those who were not asked to use the checklists but had them available. Two individuals blinded to the study reviewed the tapes of all appointments in each study group to determine the amount and type of medical information offered by veterinary students. Students who were specifically asked to use the checklists provided significantly more information to owners, with the exception of keeping the incision clean. Results indicate the use of checklists helps students provide more complete information to their clients, thereby potentially enhancing animal care.


Assuntos
Agendamento de Consultas , Comunicação , Educação em Veterinária , Relações Médico-Paciente , Cuidados Pós-Operatórios/veterinária , Animais , Doenças do Gato/cirurgia , Gatos/cirurgia , Colorado , Doenças do Cão/cirurgia , Cães/cirurgia , Hospitais de Ensino , Humanos
20.
Can Vet J ; 57(9): 969-75, 2016 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27587890

RESUMO

The objective of the study was to determine the proportion of practitioners from Ontario, Canada who perform onychectomy, identify the techniques utilized, and obtain practitioners views on the procedure. An anonymous survey was distributed to Ontario Veterinary Medical Association members. Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to compare responses of opinion questions related to declawing between respondents who indicated they perform declawing procedures and those who do not. Of 500 respondents, 75.8% reported performing onychectomy, with 60.1% of those reporting performing the procedure less than monthly and 73.3% only performing the procedure after recommending alternatives. Statistically significant differences were found between those who do and those who do not perform onychectomy for perception of procedural pain, concept of mutilation, perception of procedural necessity for behavior modification or prevention of euthanasia, and support of province-wide procedural bans.


Assuntos
Gatos/cirurgia , Casco e Garras/cirurgia , Cirurgia Veterinária , Animais , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Ontário , Cirurgia Veterinária/métodos , Cirurgia Veterinária/estatística & dados numéricos , Médicos Veterinários
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