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1.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(6): 1223-1232, 2019 Jun 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31130282

RESUMO

Aberrant signaling through pathways controlling cell response to extracellular stimuli constitutes a central theme in disorders affecting development. Signaling through RAS and the MAPK cascade controls a variety of cell decisions in response to cytokines, hormones, and growth factors, and its upregulation causes Noonan syndrome (NS), a developmental disorder whose major features include a distinctive facies, a wide spectrum of cardiac defects, short stature, variable cognitive impairment, and predisposition to malignancies. NS is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in more than ten genes have been reported to underlie this disorder. Despite the large number of genes implicated, about 10%-20% of affected individuals with a clinical diagnosis of NS do not have mutations in known RASopathy-associated genes, indicating that additional unidentified genes contribute to the disease, when mutated. By using a mixed strategy of functional candidacy and exome sequencing, we identify RRAS2 as a gene implicated in NS in six unrelated subjects/families. We show that the NS-causing RRAS2 variants affect highly conserved residues localized around the nucleotide binding pocket of the GTPase and are predicted to variably affect diverse aspects of RRAS2 biochemical behavior, including nucleotide binding, GTP hydrolysis, and interaction with effectors. Additionally, all pathogenic variants increase activation of the MAPK cascade and variably impact cell morphology and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Finally, we provide a characterization of the clinical phenotype associated with RRAS2 mutations.

2.
Clin Genet ; 96(3): 246-253, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31090057

RESUMO

Two distinct genomic disorders have been linked to Xq28-gains, namely Xq28-duplications including MECP2 and Int22h1/Int22h2-mediated duplications involving RAB39B. Here, we describe six unrelated patients, five males and one female, with Xq28-gains distal to MECP2 and proximal to the Int22h1/Int22h2 low copy repeats. Comparison with patients carrying overlapping duplications in the literature defined the MidXq28-duplication syndrome featuring intellectual disability, language impairment, structural brain malformations, microcephaly, seizures and minor craniofacial features. The duplications overlapped for 108 kb including FLNA, RPL10 and GDI1 genes, highly expressed in brain and candidates for the neurologic phenotype.

4.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(1): 139-156, 2019 01 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30595372

RESUMO

Type 2A protein phosphatases (PP2As) are highly expressed in the brain and regulate neuronal signaling by catalyzing phospho-Ser/Thr dephosphorylations in diverse substrates. PP2A holoenzymes comprise catalytic C-, scaffolding A-, and regulatory B-type subunits, which determine substrate specificity and physiological function. Interestingly, de novo mutations in genes encoding A- and B-type subunits have recently been implicated in intellectual disability (ID) and developmental delay (DD). We now report 16 individuals with mild to profound ID and DD and a de novo mutation in PPP2CA, encoding the catalytic Cα subunit. Other frequently observed features were severe language delay (71%), hypotonia (69%), epilepsy (63%), and brain abnormalities such as ventriculomegaly and a small corpus callosum (67%). Behavioral problems, including autism spectrum disorders, were reported in 47% of individuals, and three individuals had a congenital heart defect. PPP2CA de novo mutations included a partial gene deletion, a frameshift, three nonsense mutations, a single amino acid duplication, a recurrent mutation, and eight non-recurrent missense mutations. Functional studies showed complete PP2A dysfunction in four individuals with seemingly milder ID, hinting at haploinsufficiency. Ten other individuals showed mutation-specific biochemical distortions, including poor expression, altered binding to the A subunit and specific B-type subunits, and impaired phosphatase activity and C-terminal methylation. Four were suspected to have a dominant-negative mechanism, which correlated with severe ID. Two missense variants affecting the same residue largely behaved as wild-type in our functional assays. Overall, we found that pathogenic PPP2CA variants impair PP2A-B56(δ) functionality, suggesting that PP2A-related neurodevelopmental disorders constitute functionally converging ID syndromes.


Assuntos
Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Mutação , Proteína Fosfatase 2/genética , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Feminino , Células HEK293 , Haploinsuficiência/genética , Humanos , Masculino , Ligação Proteica/genética , Subunidades Proteicas/química , Subunidades Proteicas/metabolismo , Síndrome
5.
Front Genet ; 9: 355, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30319683

RESUMO

We report the case of a 19-years-old patient who presented with a perplexing variety of symptoms which included remarkable facial features, intellectual disability, granulomatous upper lip swelling (previously diagnosed as Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome), Crohn's-like disease, non-productive cough, and a granulomatous mass localized in the left lung. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) was diagnosed using dihydrorhodamine 123 assay that showed low levels of phagocytic NADPH-oxidase. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous mutation in the NCF-1 gene on chromosome 7. As remarkable facial features and psychomotor retardation are not associated with CGD, a more detailed genetic work-up using fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed. A microdeletion in 7q11.23 on one allele indicated Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS). The NCF-1 gene and its two pseudogenes are part of a highly repetitive region within 7q11.23 and are prone to recombination events and deletions. Such deletions can involve both the WBS critical region and the NCF-1 wildtype gene, as was the case for our patient. The second allele of the NCF-1 gene was affected by the frequent c.75.76delGT mutation that stems from a recombination of the NCF-1 wildtype gene with one of its pseudogenes. In conclusion, patients with NCF-1-deficient CGD may also harbor microdeletions that result in WBS or other hereditary disorders; therefore, it is important to perform a thorough genetic analysis in order to initiate appropriate therapy for these patients.

6.
Hum Genet ; 137(9): 753-768, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30167850

RESUMO

NALCN is a conserved cation channel, which conducts a permanent sodium leak current and regulates resting membrane potential and neuronal excitability. It is part of a large ion channel complex, the "NALCN channelosome", consisting of multiple proteins including UNC80 and UNC79. The predominant neuronal expression pattern and its function suggest an important role in neuronal function and disease. So far, biallelic NALCN and UNC80 variants have been described in a small number of individuals leading to infantile hypotonia, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facies 1 (IHPRF1, OMIM 615419) and 2 (IHPRF2, OMIM 616801), respectively. Heterozygous de novo NALCN missense variants in the S5/S6 pore-forming segments lead to congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and developmental delay (CLIFAHDD, OMIM 616266) with some clinical overlap. In this study, we present detailed clinical information of 16 novel individuals with biallelic NALCN variants, 1 individual with a heterozygous de novo NALCN missense variant and an interesting clinical phenotype without contractures, and 12 individuals with biallelic UNC80 variants. We report for the first time a missense NALCN variant located in the predicted S6 pore-forming unit inherited in an autosomal-recessive manner leading to mild IHPRF1. We show evidence of clinical variability, especially among IHPRF1-affected individuals, and discuss differences between the IHPRF1- and IHPRF2 phenotypes. In summary, we provide a comprehensive overview of IHPRF1 and IHPRF2 phenotypes based on the largest cohort of individuals reported so far and provide additional insights into the clinical phenotypes of these neurodevelopmental diseases to help improve counseling of affected families.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Transporte/genética , Canalopatias/genética , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Marcadores Genéticos , Variação Genética , Proteínas de Membrana/genética , Canais de Sódio/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Canalopatias/patologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Fenótipo , Adulto Jovem
7.
Brain ; 2018 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29985992

RESUMO

The transcription factor BCL11B is essential for development of the nervous and the immune system, and Bcl11b deficiency results in structural brain defects, reduced learning capacity, and impaired immune cell development in mice. However, the precise role of BCL11B in humans is largely unexplored, except for a single patient with a BCL11B missense mutation, affected by multisystem anomalies and profound immune deficiency. Using massively parallel sequencing we identified 13 patients bearing heterozygous germline alterations in BCL11B. Notably, all of them are affected by global developmental delay with speech impairment and intellectual disability; however, none displayed overt clinical signs of immune deficiency. Six frameshift mutations, two nonsense mutations, one missense mutation, and two chromosomal rearrangements resulting in diminished BCL11B expression, arose de novo. A further frameshift mutation was transmitted from a similarly affected mother. Interestingly, the most severely affected patient harbours a missense mutation within a zinc-finger domain of BCL11B, probably affecting the DNA-binding structural interface, similar to the recently published patient. Furthermore, the most C-terminally located premature termination codon mutation fails to rescue the progenitor cell proliferation defect in hippocampal slice cultures from Bcl11b-deficient mice. Concerning the role of BCL11B in the immune system, extensive immune phenotyping of our patients revealed alterations in the T cell compartment and lack of peripheral type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), consistent with the findings described in Bcl11b-deficient mice. Unsupervised analysis of 102 T lymphocyte subpopulations showed that the patients clearly cluster apart from healthy children, further supporting the common aetiology of the disorder. Taken together, we show here that mutations leading either to BCL11B haploinsufficiency or to a truncated BCL11B protein clinically cause a non-syndromic neurodevelopmental delay. In addition, we suggest that missense mutations affecting specific sites within zinc-finger domains might result in distinct and more severe clinical outcomes.

8.
Hum Genet ; 137(5): 401-411, 2018 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29796876

RESUMO

Intellectual disability (ID) has an estimated prevalence of 1.5-2%. In most affected individuals, its genetic basis remains unclear. Whole exome sequencing (WES) studies have identified a multitude of novel causative gene defects and have shown that a large proportion of sporadic ID cases results from de novo mutations. Here, we present two unrelated individuals with similar clinical features and deleterious de novo variants in FBXO11 detected by WES. Individual 1, a 14-year-old boy, has mild ID as well as mild microcephaly, corrected cleft lip and alveolus, hyperkinetic disorder, mild brain atrophy and minor facial dysmorphism. WES detected a heterozygous de novo 1 bp insertion in the splice donor site of exon 3. Individual 2, a 3-year-old boy, showed ID and pre- and postnatal growth retardation, postnatal mild microcephaly, hyperkinetic and restless behaviour, as well as mild dysmorphism. WES detected a heterozygous de novo frameshift mutation. While ten individuals with ID and de novo variants in FBXO11 have been reported as part of larger studies, only one of the reports has some additional clinical data. Interestingly, the latter individual carries the identical mutation as our individual 2 and also displays ID, intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, behavioural anomalies, and dysmorphisms. Thus, we confirm deleterious de novo mutations in FBXO11 as a cause of ID and start the delineation of the associated clinical picture which may also comprise postnatal microcephaly or borderline small head size and behavioural anomalies.

9.
Ann Neurol ; 83(5): 926-934, 2018 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29630738

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Cut homeodomain transcription factor CUX2 plays an important role in dendrite branching, spine development, and synapse formation in layer II to III neurons of the cerebral cortex. We identify a recurrent de novo CUX2 p.Glu590Lys as a novel genetic cause for developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (DEE). METHODS: The de novo p.Glu590Lys variant was identified by whole-exome sequencing (n = 5) or targeted gene panel (n = 4). We performed electroclinical and imaging phenotyping on all patients. RESULTS: The cohort comprised 7 males and 2 females. Mean age at study was 13 years (0.5-21.0). Median age at seizure onset was 6 months (2 months to 9 years). Seizure types at onset were myoclonic, atypical absence with myoclonic components, and focal seizures. Epileptiform activity on electroencephalogram was seen in 8 cases: generalized polyspike-wave (6) or multifocal discharges (2). Seizures were drug resistant in 7 or controlled with valproate (2). Six patients had a DEE: myoclonic DEE (3), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (2), and West syndrome (1). Two had a static encephalopathy and genetic generalized epilepsy, including absence epilepsy in 1. One infant had multifocal epilepsy. Eight had severe cognitive impairment, with autistic features in 6. The p.Glu590Lys variant affects a highly conserved glutamine residue in the CUT domain predicted to interfere with CUX2 binding to DNA targets during neuronal development. INTERPRETATION: Patients with CUX2 p.Glu590Lys display a distinctive phenotypic spectrum, which is predominantly generalized epilepsy, with infantile-onset myoclonic DEE at the severe end and generalized epilepsy with severe static developmental encephalopathy at the milder end of the spectrum. Ann Neurol 2018;83:926-934.

10.
Mol Cytogenet ; 11: 20, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29541160

RESUMO

Background: Copy number variants (CNVs) are the genetic bases for microdeletion/ microduplication syndromes (MMSs). Couples with an affected child and desire to have further children are routinely tested for a potential parental origin of a specific CNV either by molecular karyotyping or by two color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), yet. In the latter case a critical region probe (CRP) is combined with a control probe for identification of the chromosome in question. However, CNVs can arise also due to other reasons, like a recombination-event based on a submicroscopic, cryptic inversion in one of the parents. Results: Seventy-four patients with different MMSs and overall 81 CNVs were studied here by a novel three color FISH approach. The way how three locus-specific probes are selected (one is the CRP and two are flanking it in a distance of 5-10 Mb) enables to detect or exclude two possible parental conditions as origins of the CNV seen in the index: (i) direct parental origin of the CNV (deletion or duplication) or (ii) a parental cryptic inversion. Thus, for overall 51/81 CNVs (63%) a parental origin could be determined. 36/51 (70.5%) inherited the CNV directly from one of the parents, but 15/51 (29.5%) were due to an exclusively by three color FISH detectable parental inversion. A 2:1 ratio of maternal versus paternal inheritance was found. Also almost two times more male than female were among the index patients. Conclusion: The new, here suggested three color FISH approach is suited for more comprehensive parental studies of patients with MMS. The detection rate for parental origin was increased by 140% in this study. Still, for 30/81 cases (37%) no reason for the 'de novo' MMS in the affected index patient could be found by the here suggested FISH-probe set.

11.
Genet Med ; 20(10): 1175-1185, 2018 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29469822

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To characterize the molecular genetics of autosomal recessive Noonan syndrome. METHODS: Families underwent phenotyping for features of Noonan syndrome in children and their parents. Two multiplex families underwent linkage analysis. Exome, genome, or multigene panel sequencing was used to identify variants. The molecular consequences of observed splice variants were evaluated by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Twelve families with a total of 23 affected children with features of Noonan syndrome were evaluated. The phenotypic range included mildly affected patients, but it was lethal in some, with cardiac disease and leukemia. All of the parents were unaffected. Linkage analysis using a recessive model supported a candidate region in chromosome 22q11, which includes LZTR1, previously shown to harbor mutations in patients with Noonan syndrome inherited in a dominant pattern. Sequencing analyses of 21 live-born patients and a stillbirth identified biallelic pathogenic variants in LZTR1, including putative loss-of-function, missense, and canonical and noncanonical splicing variants in the affected children, with heterozygous, clinically unaffected parents and heterozygous or normal genotypes in unaffected siblings. CONCLUSION: These clinical and genetic data confirm the existence of a form of Noonan syndrome that is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern and identify biallelic mutations in LZTR1.

12.
Brain ; 140(9): 2322-2336, 2017 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29050398

RESUMO

De novo in-frame deletions and duplications in the SPTAN1 gene, encoding the non-erythrocyte αII spectrin, have been associated with severe West syndrome with hypomyelination and pontocerebellar atrophy. We aimed at comprehensively delineating the phenotypic spectrum associated with SPTAN1 mutations. Using different molecular genetic techniques, we identified 20 patients with a pathogenic or likely pathogenic SPTAN1 variant and reviewed their clinical, genetic and imaging data. SPTAN1 de novo alterations included seven unique missense variants and nine in-frame deletions/duplications of which 12 were novel. The recurrent three-amino acid duplication p.(Asp2303_Leu2305dup) occurred in five patients. Our patient cohort exhibited a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes, comprising six patients with mild to moderate intellectual disability, with or without epilepsy and behavioural disorders, and 14 patients with infantile epileptic encephalopathy, of which 13 had severe neurodevelopmental impairment and four died in early childhood. Imaging studies suggested that the severity of neurological impairment and epilepsy correlates with that of structural abnormalities as well as the mutation type and location. Out of seven patients harbouring mutations outside the α/ß spectrin heterodimerization domain, four had normal brain imaging and three exhibited moderately progressive brain and/or cerebellar atrophy. Twelve of 13 patients with mutations located within the spectrin heterodimer contact site exhibited severe and progressive brain, brainstem and cerebellar atrophy, with hypomyelination in most. We used fibroblasts from five patients to study spectrin aggregate formation by Triton-X extraction and immunocytochemistry followed by fluorescence microscopy. αII/ßII aggregates and αII spectrin in the insoluble protein fraction were observed in fibroblasts derived from patients with the mutations p.(Glu2207del), p.(Asp2303_Leu2305dup) and p.(Arg2308_Met2309dup), all falling in the nucleation site of the α/ß spectrin heterodimer region. Molecular modelling of the seven SPTAN1 amino acid changes provided preliminary evidence for structural alterations of the A-, B- and/or C-helices within each of the mutated spectrin repeats. We conclude that SPTAN1-related disorders comprise a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes ranging from mild to severe and progressive. Spectrin aggregate formation in fibroblasts with mutations in the α/ß heterodimerization domain seems to be associated with a severe neurodegenerative course and suggests that the amino acid stretch from Asp2303 to Met2309 in the α20 repeat is important for α/ß spectrin heterodimer formation and/or αII spectrin function.


Assuntos
Encefalopatias/genética , Encéfalo/patologia , Proteínas de Transporte/genética , Epilepsia/genética , Proteínas dos Microfilamentos/genética , Adolescente , Atrofia/complicações , Atrofia/patologia , Encéfalo/anormalidades , Encefalopatias/complicações , Proteínas de Transporte/metabolismo , Células Cultivadas , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Progressão da Doença , Epilepsia/complicações , Feminino , Fibroblastos/metabolismo , Humanos , Masculino , Proteínas dos Microfilamentos/metabolismo , Modelos Moleculares , Mutação , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/complicações , Transtornos do Neurodesenvolvimento/genética , Fenótipo , Agregação Patológica de Proteínas/metabolismo , Adulto Jovem
14.
Eur Radiol ; 27(12): 5080-5092, 2017 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28677066

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the neuroimaging pattern of cerebellar dysplasia (CD) and other posterior fossa morphological anomalies associated with mutations in tubulin genes and to perform clinical and genetic correlations. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients harbouring 23 heterozygous pathogenic variants (ten novel) in tubulin genes TUBA1A (n = 10), TUBB2B (n = 8) or TUBB3 (n = 5) were studied by a brain MRI scan performed either on a 1.5 T (n = 10) or 3 T (n = 18) MR scanner with focus on the posterior fossa. RESULTS: Cerebellar anomalies were detected in 24/28 patients (86%). CD was recognised in 19/28 (68%) including cortical cerebellar dysplasia (CCD) in 18/28, either involving only the cerebellar hemispheres (12/28) or associated with vermis dysplasia (6/28). CCD was located only in the right hemisphere in 13/18 (72%), including four TUBB2B-, four TUBB3- and five TUBA1A-mutated patients, while in the other five TUBA1A cases it was located only in the left hemisphere or in both hemispheres. The postero-superior region of the cerebellar hemispheres was most frequently affected. CONCLUSIONS: The cerebellar involvement in tubulinopathies shows specific features that may be labelled as 'tubulin-related CD'. This pattern is unique and differs from other genetic causes of cerebellar dysplasia. KEY POINTS: • Cortical cerebellar dysplasia without cysts is suggestive of tubulin-related disorder. • Cerebellar dysplasia in tubulinopathies shows specific features labelled as 'tubulin-related CD'. • Focal and unilateral involvement of cerebellar hemispheres has important implications for counselling.


Assuntos
Cerebelo/anormalidades , Mutação , Malformações do Sistema Nervoso/diagnóstico por imagem , Neuroimagem/métodos , Tubulina (Proteína)/genética , Adulto , Tronco Encefálico/diagnóstico por imagem , Cerebelo/diagnóstico por imagem , Cerebelo/patologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/diagnóstico por imagem , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Malformações do Sistema Nervoso/genética , Malformações do Sistema Nervoso/patologia , Adulto Jovem
15.
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol ; 126(8): 611-614, 2017 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28681609

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Whether the origin of severe hearing loss in Refsum's syndrome is caused by cochlear impairment or retrocochlear degeneration remains unclear. This case report aims to investigate hearing performance before and after cochlear implantation to shed light on this question. Also, identification of new mutations causing Refsum's syndrome would be helpful in generating additional means of diagnosis. METHODS: A family of 4 individuals was subjected to genetic testing. Two siblings (56 and 61 years old) suffered from severe hearing and vision loss and received bilateral cochlear implants. Genetic analysis, audiological outcome, and clinical examinations were performed. RESULTS: One new mutation in the PHYH gene (c.768del63bp) causing Refsum's disease was found. Preoperative distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPAOEs) were absent. Postoperative speech perception in Freiburger speech test was 100% for bisyllabic words and 85% (patient No. 1) and 65% (patient No. 2), respectively, for monosyllabic words. Five years after implantation, speech perception remained stable for bisyllabic words but showed decreasing capabilities for monosyllabic words. DISCUSSION: A new mutation causing Refsum's disease is presented. Cochlear implantation in case of severe hearing loss leads to an improvement in speech perception and should be recommended for patients with Refsum's disease, especially when the hearing loss is combined with a severe loss of vision. Decrease of speech perception in the long-term follow-up could indicate an additional retrocochlear degeneration.


Assuntos
Implante Coclear , Perda Auditiva Neurossensorial/cirurgia , Oxigenases de Função Mista/genética , Doença de Refsum/genética , Audiometria de Resposta Evocada , Audiometria de Tons Puros , Feminino , Perda Auditiva Neurossensorial/etiologia , Perda Auditiva Neurossensorial/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Emissões Otoacústicas Espontâneas , Doença de Refsum/complicações , Irmãos , Percepção da Fala
16.
Hum Genet ; 136(7): 821-834, 2017 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28393272

RESUMO

Pathogenic variants in genes encoding subunits of the spliceosome are the cause of several human diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases. The RNA splicing process is facilitated by the spliceosome, a large RNA-protein complex consisting of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), and many other proteins, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). The HNRNPU gene (OMIM *602869) encodes the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U, which plays a crucial role in mammalian development. HNRNPU is expressed in the fetal brain and adult heart, kidney, liver, brain, and cerebellum. Microdeletions in the 1q44 region encompassing HNRNPU have been described in patients with intellectual disability (ID) and other clinical features, such as seizures, corpus callosum abnormalities (CCA), and microcephaly. Recently, pathogenic HNRNPU variants were identified in large ID and epileptic encephalopathy cohorts. In this study, we provide detailed clinical information of five novels and review two of the previously published individuals with (likely) pathogenic de novo variants in the HNRNPU gene including three non-sense and two missense variants, one small intragenic deletion, and one duplication. The phenotype in individuals with variants in HNRNPU is characterized by early onset seizures (6/7), severe ID (6/6), severe speech impairment (6/6), hypotonia (6/7), and central nervous system (CNS) (5/6), cardiac (4/6), and renal abnormalities (3/4). In this study, we broaden the clinical and mutational HNRNPU-associated spectrum, and demonstrate that heterozygous HNRNPU variants cause epilepsy, severe ID with striking speech impairment and variable CNS, cardiac, and renal anomalies.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/genética , Ribonucleoproteínas Nucleares Heterogêneas Grupo U/genética , Heterozigoto , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Idade de Início , Agenesia do Corpo Caloso/genética , Sistema Nervoso Central/anormalidades , Sistema Nervoso Central/patologia , Deleção Cromossômica , Cromossomos Humanos Par 1 , Epilepsia/diagnóstico , Feminino , Variação Genética , Humanos , Lactente , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Rim/anormalidades , Masculino , Microcefalia/diagnóstico , Microcefalia/genética , Hipotonia Muscular/diagnóstico , Hipotonia Muscular/genética , Fenótipo , Processamento de RNA , Ribonucleoproteínas Nucleares Pequenas/genética , Convulsões/diagnóstico , Convulsões/genética
17.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 25(2): 183-191, 2017 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27901041

RESUMO

Truncating ASXL3 mutations were first identified in 2013 by Bainbridge et al. as a cause of syndromic intellectual disability in four children with similar phenotypes using whole-exome sequencing. The clinical features - postulated by Bainbridge et al. to be overlapping with Bohring-Opitz syndrome - were developmental delay, severe feeding difficulties, failure to thrive and neurological abnormalities. This condition was included in OMIM as 'Bainbridge-Ropers syndrome' (BRPS, #615485). To date, a total of nine individuals with BRPS have been published in the literature in four reports (Bainbridge et al., Dinwiddie et al, Srivastava et al. and Hori et al.). In this report, we describe six unrelated patients with newly diagnosed heterozygous de novo loss-of-function variants in ASXL3 and concordant clinical features: severe muscular hypotonia with feeding difficulties in infancy, significant motor delay, profound speech impairment, intellectual disability and a characteristic craniofacial phenotype (long face, arched eyebrows with mild synophrys, downslanting palpebral fissures, prominent columella, small alae nasi, high, narrow palate and relatively little facial expression). The majority of key features characteristic for Bohring-Opitz syndrome were absent in our patients (eg, the typical posture of arms, intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, trigonocephaly, typical facial gestalt with nevus flammeus of the forehead and exophthalmos). Therefore we emphasize that BRPS syndrome, caused by ASXL3 loss-of-function variants, is a clinically distinct intellectual disability syndrome with a recognizable phenotype distinguishable from that of Bohring-Opitz syndrome.


Assuntos
Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Insuficiência de Crescimento/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Adolescente , Pré-Escolar , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/diagnóstico , Insuficiência de Crescimento/diagnóstico , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Mutação , Fenótipo , Síndrome
18.
Am J Med Genet A ; 170(10): 2644-51, 2016 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27240540

RESUMO

Baraitser-Winter cerebrofrontofacial syndrome is caused by heterozygous missense mutations in one of the two ubiquitous cytoplasmic actin-encoding genes ACTB and ACTG1. Recently, we characterized the large cohort of 41 patients presenting with this condition. Our series contained 34 patients with mutations in ACTB and only nine with ACTG1 mutations. Here, we report on seven unrelated patients with six mutations in ACTG1-four novel and two previously reported. Only one of seven patients was clinically diagnosed with this disorder and underwent ACTB/ACTG1 targeted sequencing, four patients were screened as a part of the large lissencephaly cohort and two were tested with exome sequencing. Retrospectively, facial features were compatible with the diagnosis but significantly milder than previously reported in four patients, and non-specific in one. The pattern of malformations of cortical development was highly similar in four of six patients with available MRI images and encompassed frontal predominant pachygyria merging with the posterior predominant band heterotopia. Two remaining patients showed mild involvement consistent with bilaterally simplified gyration over the frontal lobes. Taken together, we expand the clinical spectrum of the ACTG1-associated Baraitser-Winter cerebrofrontofacial syndrome demonstrating the mild end of the facial and brain manifestations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Múltiplas/diagnóstico , Anormalidades Múltiplas/genética , Actinas/genética , Anormalidades Craniofaciais/diagnóstico , Anormalidades Craniofaciais/genética , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Biomarcadores , Encéfalo/patologia , Pré-Escolar , Análise Mutacional de DNA , Exoma , Facies , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Heterozigoto , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Humanos , Lactente , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Fenótipo
19.
Am J Med Genet A ; 170A(1): 94-102, 2016 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26358559

RESUMO

The clinical diagnosis of Lujan-Fryns syndrome (LFS) comprises X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) with marfanoid habitus, distinct combination of minor facial anomalies and nasal speech. However the definition of syndrome was significantly broadened since the original report and implies ID with marfanoid habitus. Mutations of three genes (MED12, UPF3B, and ZDHHC9) have been reported in "broadly defined" LFS. We examined these genes in 28 individuals with a tentative clinical diagnosis of LFS but we did not identify any causative mutation. By molecular karyotyping we detected other disorders, i.e., Phelan-McDermid syndrome and 16p11.2 microduplication, each in one patient. One affected individual was carrier of a different recurrent duplication on 16p11.2 that has been reported several times to the DECIPHER and ISCA databases in individuals with autism, intellectual disability (ID), and developmental delay. It may represent a new duplication syndrome. We also identified previously unreported de novo duplication on chromosome 12p13.31 which we considered to be disease-causing. X-exome sequencing of four individuals revealed private or non-recurrent mutations in NKAP and LAS1L in one patient each. While LFS is defined as a form of XLID, there seem to be various conditions that have rather similar phenotypes. Therefore, the combination of ID and marfanoid habitus in a male patient is not sufficient for the diagnosis of LFS. We suggest that the diagnosis of LFS in patients with ID and marfanoid habitus should be made only in presence of specific facial features, nasal speech and obvious X-linked segregation of the disorder or an unambiguously pathogenic mutation in the MED12.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Múltiplas/diagnóstico , Anormalidades Craniofaciais/diagnóstico , Genes Ligados ao Cromossomo X/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Síndrome de Marfan/diagnóstico , Retardo Mental Ligado ao Cromossomo X/diagnóstico , Mutação/genética , Anormalidades Múltiplas/genética , Aciltransferases/genética , Anormalidades Craniofaciais/genética , Feminino , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Masculino , Síndrome de Marfan/genética , Complexo Mediador/genética , Retardo Mental Ligado ao Cromossomo X/genética , Linhagem , Proteínas de Ligação a RNA/genética
20.
Mol Cell Probes ; 29(5): 330-4, 2015 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26184463

RESUMO

Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) are clinically related autosomal dominant systemic connective tissue disorders. Although mutations in several genes of the TGF-beta signalling and related pathways have been identified in the past (e.g. FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, SMAD3, TGFB2), there are still many individuals with "marfanoid" phenotypes in whom no causative mutations are identified. We performed whole exome sequencing in two of three affected individuals from a family with phenotypic features overlapping MFS and LDS. The two affected children and their affected father had tall stature, arachnodactyly, hyperextensible joints, hypertelorism, bifid uvula, but no cardiac involvement, aortic dilation or eye involvement. We detected a novel heterozygous mutation in TGFB3, c.898C>G, predicting the missense substitution p.Arg300Gly. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation and its segregation with the phenotype. The first two TGFB3 mutations were reported previously in two unrelated individuals with marfanoid features: one individual with growth retardation carried a heterozygous loss-of-function mutation (c.1226G>A; p.Cys409Tyr; Rienhoff et al., 2013), whereas a child with overgrowth carried a mutation in the same codon as the mutation identified in the three affected individuals reported here (c.899G>A; p.Arg300Gln; Matyas et al., 2014). The mutations at codon Arg300 presumably lead to increased TGF-beta signalling, suggesting that the short or tall stature seen in patients with TGFB3 mutations may result from opposing effects of mutations on TGF-beta signalling. Thus, we add a novel human TGFB3 mutation, contribute to the clinical delineation of the emerging connective tissue disorder tentatively called Rienhoff syndrome and compare the data with a very recent report (Bertoli-Avella et al., 2015) on TGFB3 mutations associated with aortic aneurysms or dissections.


Assuntos
Síndrome de Loeys-Dietz/genética , Síndrome de Marfan/genética , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Fator de Crescimento Transformador beta3/genética , Adolescente , Criança , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Heterozigoto , Humanos , Masculino , Linhagem , Análise de Sequência de DNA/métodos
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