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1.
Cancer Res ; 2021 Feb 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33574088

RESUMO

Germline variation and smoking are independently associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We conducted genome-wide smoking interaction analysis of PDAC using genotype data from four previous genome-wide association studies in individuals of European ancestry (7,937 cases and 11,774 controls). Examination of expression quantitative trait loci data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project followed by colocalization analysis was conducted to determine if there was support for common SNP(s) underlying the observed associations. Statistical tests were two sided and P-values < 5 x 10-8 were considered statistically significant. Genome-wide significant evidence of qualitative interaction was identified on chr2q21.3 in intron 5 of the transmembrane protein 163 (TMEM163) and upstream of the cyclin T2 (CCNT2). The most significant SNP using the Empirical Bayes method, in this region which included 45 significantly associated SNPs, was rs1818613 (per allele OR in never smokers 0.87, 95% CI 0.82-0.93; former smokers 1.00, 95 CI 0.91-1.07; current smokers 1.25, 95%CI 1.12-1.40, interaction P-value=3.08x10-9). Examination of the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project data demonstrated an expression quantitative trait locus in this region for TMEM163 and CCNT2 in several tissue types. Colocalization analysis supported a shared SNP, rs842357, in high LD with rs1818613 (r2=0. 94) driving both the observed interaction and the expression quantitative trait loci signals. Future studies are needed to confirm and understand the differential biologic mechanisms by smoking status that contribute to our PDAC findings.

2.
Hum Mutat ; 2020 Nov 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33169439

RESUMO

PALB2 has been identified as a breast and pancreatic cancer susceptibility gene. Utilizing a targeted sequencing approach, we discovered two novel germline missense PALB2 variants c.191C>T and c.311C>T, encoding p.Ser64Leu and p.Pro104Leu, respectively, in individuals in a pancreatic cancer registry. No missense PALB2 variants from familial pancreatic cancer patients, and few PALB2 variants overall, have been functionally characterized. Given the known role of PALB2, we tested the impact of p.Ser64Leu and p.Pro104Leu variants on DNA damage responses. Neither p.Ser64Leu nor p.Pro104Leu had clear effects on interactions with BRCA1 and KEAP1, which are mediated by adjacent motifs in PALB2. However, both variants are associated with defective recruitment of PALB2, and the RAD51 recombinase downstream, to DNA damage foci. Further, p.Ser64Leu and p.Pro104Leu both largely compromise DNA double-strand break-initiated homologous recombination, and confer increased cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR) and the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor Olaparib. Taken together, our results represent the first demonstration of functionally deleterious PALB2 missense variants associated with familial pancreatic cancer and of deleterious variants in the N-terminus outside of the coiled-coil domain. Further, our results suggest the possibility of personalized treatments, using IR or PARP inhibitor, of pancreatic and other cancers that carry a deleterious PALB2 variant. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

3.
BMC Cancer ; 20(1): 856, 2020 Sep 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32894098

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Germline copy number variants (CNVs) increase risk for many diseases, yet detection of CNVs and quantifying their contribution to disease risk in large-scale studies is challenging due to biological and technical sources of heterogeneity that vary across the genome within and between samples. METHODS: We developed an approach called CNPBayes to identify latent batch effects in genome-wide association studies involving copy number, to provide probabilistic estimates of integer copy number across the estimated batches, and to fully integrate the copy number uncertainty in the association model for disease. RESULTS: Applying a hidden Markov model (HMM) to identify CNVs in a large multi-site Pancreatic Cancer Case Control study (PanC4) of 7598 participants, we found CNV inference was highly sensitive to technical noise that varied appreciably among participants. Applying CNPBayes to this dataset, we found that the major sources of technical variation were linked to sample processing by the centralized laboratory and not the individual study sites. Modeling the latent batch effects at each CNV region hierarchically, we developed probabilistic estimates of copy number that were directly incorporated in a Bayesian regression model for pancreatic cancer risk. Candidate associations aided by this approach include deletions of 8q24 near regulatory elements of the tumor oncogene MYC and of Tumor Suppressor Candidate 3 (TUSC3). CONCLUSIONS: Laboratory effects may not account for the major sources of technical variation in genome-wide association studies. This study provides a robust Bayesian inferential framework for identifying latent batch effects, estimating copy number, and evaluating the role of copy number in heritable diseases.

4.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(12): 2735-2739, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32967863

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Whether circulating polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels are associated with pancreatic cancer risk is uncertain. Mendelian randomization (MR) represents a study design using genetic instruments to better characterize the relationship between exposure and outcome. METHODS: We utilized data from genome-wide association studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, involving approximately 9,269 cases and 12,530 controls of European descent, to evaluate associations between pancreatic cancer risk and genetically predicted plasma n-6 PUFA levels. Conventional MR analyses were performed using individual-level and summary-level data. RESULTS: Using genetic instruments, we did not find evidence of associations between genetically predicted plasma n-6 PUFA levels and pancreatic cancer risk [estimates per one SD increase in each PUFA-specific weighted genetic score using summary statistics: linoleic acid odds ratio (OR) = 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.98-1.02; arachidonic acid OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.99-1.01; and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.87-1.02]. The OR estimates remained virtually unchanged after adjustment for covariates, using individual-level data or summary statistics, or stratification by age and sex. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that variations of genetically determined plasma n-6 PUFA levels are not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. IMPACT: These results suggest that modifying n-6 PUFA levels through food sources or supplementation may not influence risk of pancreatic cancer.

5.
Eur J Cancer Prev ; 2020 Sep 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32925512

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The association between height and risk of gastric cancer has been studied in several epidemiological studies with contrasting results. The aim of this study is to examine the association between adult height and gastric cancer within a large pooled analysis of case-control studies members of the Stomach cancer Pooling (StoP) Project consortium. METHODS: Data from 18 studies members of the StoP consortium were collected and analyzed. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to estimate the study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between 10-cm increase in height and risk of gastric cancer. Age, sex, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, social class, geographical area and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) status were included in the regression model. Resulting estimates were then pooled with random-effect model. Analyses were conducted overall and in strata of selected variables. RESULTS: A total of 7562 cases and 19 033 controls were included in the analysis. The pooled OR was 0.96 (95% CI 0.87-1.05). A sensitivity analysis was performed restricting the results to the studies with information on H. pylori status, resulting in an OR of 0.97 (95% CI 0.79-1.20). CONCLUSION: Our study does not support a strong and consistent association between adult height and gastric cancer.

6.
Genet Epidemiol ; 44(8): 880-892, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32779232

RESUMO

It is of great scientific interest to identify interactions between genetic variants and environmental exposures that may modify the risk of complex diseases. However, larger sample sizes are usually required to detect gene-by-environment interaction (G × E) than required to detect genetic main association effects. To boost the statistical power and improve the understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms, we incorporate functional genomics information, specifically, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), into a data-adaptive G × E test, called aGEw. This test adaptively chooses the best eQTL weights from multiple tissues and provides an extra layer of weighting at the genetic variant level. Extensive simulations show that the aGEw test can control the Type 1 error rate, and the power is resilient to the inclusion of neutral variants and noninformative external weights. We applied the proposed aGEw test to the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (discovery cohort of 3,585 cases and 3,482 controls) and the PanScan II genome-wide association study data (replication cohort of 2,021 cases and 2,105 controls) with smoking as the exposure of interest. Two novel putative smoking-related pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes, TRIP10 and KDM3A, were identified. The aGEw test is implemented in an R package aGE.

7.
Cancer Res ; 80(18): 4004-4013, 2020 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32641412

RESUMO

Registry-based epidemiologic studies suggest associations between chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). As genetic susceptibility contributes to a large proportion of chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases, we hypothesize that the genomic regions surrounding established genome-wide associated variants for these chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with PDAC. We examined the association between PDAC and genomic regions (±500 kb) surrounding established common susceptibility variants for ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, chronic pancreatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. We analyzed summary statistics from genome-wide association studies data for 8,384 cases and 11,955 controls of European descent from two large consortium studies using the summary data-based adaptive rank truncated product method to examine the overall association of combined genomic regions for each inflammatory disease group. Combined genomic susceptibility regions for ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and chronic pancreatitis were associated with PDAC at P values < 0.05 (0.0040, 0.0057, 0.011, and 3.4 × 10-6, respectively). After excluding the 20 PDAC susceptibility regions (±500 kb) previously identified by GWAS, the genomic regions for ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, and inflammatory bowel disease remained associated with PDAC (P = 0.0029, 0.0057, and 0.0098, respectively). Genomic regions for celiac disease (P = 0.22) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (P = 0.078) were not associated with PDAC. Our results support the hypothesis that genomic regions surrounding variants associated with inflammatory intestinal diseases, particularly, ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and chronic pancreatitis are associated with PDAC. SIGNIFICANCE: The joint effects of common variants in genomic regions containing susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and chronic pancreatitis are associated with PDAC and may provide insights to understanding pancreatic cancer etiology.

8.
Hum Genet ; 2020 Jul 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32671597

RESUMO

Jews are estimated to be at increased risk of pancreatic cancer compared to non-Jews, but their observed 50-80% excess risk is not explained by known non-genetic or genetic risk factors. We conducted a GWAS in a case-control sample of American Jews, largely Ashkenazi, including 406 pancreatic cancer patients and 2332 controls, identified in the dbGaP, PanScan I/II, PanC4 and GERA data sets. We then examined resulting SNPs with P < 10-7 in an expanded sample set, of 539 full- or part-Jewish pancreatic cancer patients and 4117 full- or part-Jewish controls from the same data sets. Jewish ancestries were genetically determined using seeded FastPCA. Among the full Jews, a novel genome-wide significant association was detected on chromosome 19p12 (rs66562280, per-allele OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.33-1.81, P = 10-7.6). A suggestive relatively independent association was detected on chromosome 19p13.3 (rs2656937, OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.31-1.78, P = 10-7.0). Similar associations were seen for these SNPs among the full and part Jews combined. This is the first GWAS conducted for pancreatic cancer in the increased-risk Jewish population. The SNPs rs66562280 and rs2656937 are located in introns of ZNF100-like and ARRDC5, respectively, and are known to alter regulatory motifs of genes that play integral roles in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

9.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(9): 1784-1791, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32546605

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Obesity and diabetes are major modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Interactions between genetic variants and diabetes/obesity have not previously been comprehensively investigated in pancreatic cancer at the genome-wide level. METHODS: We conducted a gene-environment interaction (GxE) analysis including 8,255 cases and 11,900 controls from four pancreatic cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets (Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium I-III and Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium). Obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) and diabetes (duration ≥3 years) were the environmental variables of interest. Approximately 870,000 SNPs (minor allele frequency ≥0.005, genotyped in at least one dataset) were analyzed. Case-control (CC), case-only (CO), and joint-effect test methods were used for SNP-level GxE analysis. As a complementary approach, gene-based GxE analysis was also performed. Age, sex, study site, and principal components accounting for population substructure were included as covariates. Meta-analysis was applied to combine individual GWAS summary statistics. RESULTS: No genome-wide significant interactions (departures from a log-additive odds model) with diabetes or obesity were detected at the SNP level by the CC or CO approaches. The joint-effect test detected numerous genome-wide significant GxE signals in the GWAS main effects top hit regions, but the significance diminished after adjusting for the GWAS top hits. In the gene-based analysis, a significant interaction of diabetes with variants in the FAM63A (family with sequence similarity 63 member A) gene (significance threshold P < 1.25 × 10-6) was observed in the meta-analysis (P GxE = 1.2 ×10-6, P Joint = 4.2 ×10-7). CONCLUSIONS: This analysis did not find significant GxE interactions at the SNP level but found one significant interaction with diabetes at the gene level. A larger sample size might unveil additional genetic factors via GxE scans. IMPACT: This study may contribute to discovering the mechanism of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer.

10.
Int J Cancer ; 147(11): 3090-3101, 2020 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32525569

RESUMO

A low intake of fruits and vegetables is a risk factor for gastric cancer, although there is uncertainty regarding the magnitude of the associations. In our study, the relationship between fruits and vegetables intake and gastric cancer was assessed, complementing a previous work on the association betweenconsumption of citrus fruits and gastric cancer. Data from 25 studies (8456 cases and 21 133 controls) with information on fruits and/or vegetables intake were used. A two-stage approach based on random-effects models was used to pool study-specific adjusted (sex, age and the main known risk factors for gastric cancer) odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Exposure-response relations, including linear and nonlinear associations, were modeled using one- and two-order fractional polynomials. Gastric cancer risk was lower for a higher intake of fruits (OR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.64-0.90), noncitrus fruits (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.73-1.02), vegetables (OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.56-0.84), and fruits and vegetables (OR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.49-0.75); results were consistent across sociodemographic and lifestyles categories, as well as study characteristics. Exposure-response analyses showed an increasingly protective effect of portions/day of fruits (OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.57-0.73 for six portions), noncitrus fruits (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.61-0.83 for six portions) and vegetables (OR: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.43-0.60 for 10 portions). A protective effect of all fruits, noncitrus fruits and vegetables was confirmed, supporting further dietary recommendations to decrease the burden of gastric cancer.

11.
Int J Epidemiol ; 49(2): 422-434, 2020 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31965145

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Gastric cancer pathogenesis represents a complex interaction of host genetic determinants, microbial virulence factors and environmental exposures. Our primary aim was to determine the association between occupations/occupational exposures and odds of gastric cancer. METHODS: We conducted a pooled-analysis of individual-level data harmonized from 11 studies in the Stomach cancer Pooling Project. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of gastric cancer adjusted for relevant confounders. RESULTS: A total of 5279 gastric cancer cases and 12 297 controls were analysed. There were higher odds of gastric cancer among labour-related occupations, including: agricultural and animal husbandry workers [odds ratio (OR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.68]; miners, quarrymen, well-drillers and related workers (OR 1.70, 95% CI: 1.01-2.88); blacksmiths, toolmakers and machine-tool operators (OR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.05-1.89); bricklayers, carpenters and construction workers (OR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.06-1.60); and stationary engine and related equipment operators (OR 6.53, 95% CI: 1.41-30.19). The ORs for wood-dust exposure were 1.51 (95% CI: 1.01-2.26) for intestinal-type and 2.52 (95% CI: 1.46-4.33) for diffuse-type gastric cancer. Corresponding values for aromatic amine exposure were 1.83 (95% CI: 1.09-3.06) and 2.92 (95% CI: 1.36-6.26). Exposure to coal derivatives, pesticides/herbicides, chromium, radiation and magnetic fields were associated with higher odds of diffuse-type, but not intestinal-type gastric cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Based on a large pooled analysis, we identified several occupations and related exposures that are associated with elevated odds of gastric cancer. These findings have potential implications for risk attenuation and could be used to direct investigations evaluating the impact of targeted gastric cancer prevention/early detection programmes based on occupation.

12.
Int J Cancer ; 147(1): 45-55, 2020 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31584199

RESUMO

The consumption of processed meat has been associated with noncardia gastric cancer, but evidence regarding a possible role of red meat is more limited. Our study aims to quantify the association between meat consumption, namely white, red and processed meat, and the risk of gastric cancer, through individual participant data meta-analysis of studies participating in the "Stomach cancer Pooling (StoP) Project". Data from 22 studies, including 11,443 cases and 28,029 controls, were used. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were pooled through a two-stage approach based on random-effects models. An exposure-response relationship was modeled, using one and two-order fractional polynomials, to evaluate the possible nonlinear association between meat intake and gastric cancer. An increased risk of gastric cancer was observed for the consumption of all types of meat (highest vs. lowest tertile), which was statistically significant for red (OR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.00-1.53), processed (OR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.06-1.43) and total meat (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.09-1.55). Exposure-response analyses showed an increasing risk of gastric cancer with increasing consumption of both processed and red meat, with the highest OR being observed for an intake of 150 g/day of red meat (OR: 1.85; 95% CI: 1.56-2.20). This work provides robust evidence on the relation between the consumption of different types of meat and gastric cancer. Adherence to dietary recommendations to reduce meat consumption may contribute to a reduction in the burden of gastric cancer.

13.
Int J Cancer ; 146(3): 671-681, 2020 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30919464

RESUMO

Low socioeconomic position (SEP) is a strong risk factor for incidence and premature mortality from several cancers. Our study aimed at quantifying the association between SEP and gastric cancer (GC) risk through an individual participant data meta-analysis within the "Stomach cancer Pooling (StoP) Project". Educational level and household income were used as proxies for the SEP. We estimated pooled odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) across levels of education and household income by pooling study-specific ORs through random-effects meta-analytic models. The relative index of inequality (RII) was also computed. A total of 9,773 GC cases and 24,373 controls from 25 studies from Europe, Asia and America were included. The pooled OR for the highest compared to the lowest level of education was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.44-0.84), while the pooled RII was 0.45 (95% CI, 0.29-0.69). A strong inverse association was observed both for noncardia (OR 0.39, 95% CI, 0.22-0.70) and cardia GC (OR 0.47, 95% CI, 0.22-0.99). The relation was stronger among H. pylori negative subjects (RII 0.14, 95% CI, 0.04-0.48) as compared to H. pylori positive ones (RII 0.29, 95% CI, 0.10-0.84), in the absence of a significant interaction (p = 0.28). The highest household income category showed a pooled OR of 0.65 (95% CI, 0.48-0.89), while the corresponding RII was 0.40 (95% CI, 0.22-0.72). Our collaborative pooled-analysis showed a strong inverse relationship between SEP indicators and GC risk. Our data call for public health interventions to reduce GC risk among the more vulnerable groups of the population.


Assuntos
Escolaridade , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Infecções por Helicobacter/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Gástricas/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Ásia/epidemiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Mucosa Gástrica/microbiologia , Helicobacter pylori/isolamento & purificação , Humanos , Incidência , Renda/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , América do Norte/epidemiologia , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Populações Vulneráveis/estatística & dados numéricos
14.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila) ; 12(9): 599-608, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31337648

RESUMO

Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 are risk factors for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether results of surveillance for PDAC in high risk individuals (HRI) differ between those with and without a pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutation. This prospective study was conducted within the Pancreatic Tumor Registry at a major cancer center. There were 83 HRIs with ≥1 first-degree relative with PDAC who underwent surveillance and testing for pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA1/2 A secondary analysis includes 18 HRIs with known mutations in BRCA1/2 but with weaker family history. HRIs were evaluated over time using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and endoscopic ultrasound when indicated by MRCP findings. We reviewed imaging results, blinded to mutation status. Demographic information was obtained from interviewer-administered questionnaires. The outcome was the proportion with any pancreatic abnormality identified at initial or follow-up surveillance. Among the 83 HRIs in the main analysis, 48 had a mutation in BRCA1/2 and 35 did not. Overall, 16 of 48 (33%) BRCA1/2-positive and 13 of 35 (37%) BRCA1/2-negative participants had pancreatic abnormalities on imaging; in each group, all but one finding was an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Among those with pathogenic mutations but weaker family history, results were similar: 7 of 18 (39%) with pancreatic abnormalities. Results of surveillance for pancreatic abnormalities on imaging are similar regardless of BRCA1/2 mutation status. While the results from this small study need confirmation in other studies, at present there does not appear to be increased yield from targeting individuals with BRCA1/2 mutations for surveillance.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Proteína BRCA2/genética , Carcinoma Ductal Pancreático/genética , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/genética , Vigilância da População/métodos , Idoso , Carcinoma Ductal Pancreático/diagnóstico , Carcinoma Ductal Pancreático/patologia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Testes Genéticos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/patologia , Prognóstico , Sistema de Registros , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco
15.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 28(7): 1238-1245, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31015203

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. The currently identified common susceptibility loci account for a small fraction of estimated heritability. We sought to estimate overall heritability of pancreatic cancer and partition the heritability by variant frequencies and functional annotations. METHODS: Analysis using the genome-based restricted maximum likelihood method (GREML) was conducted on Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from 3,568 pancreatic cancer cases and 3,363 controls of European Ancestry. RESULTS: Applying linkage disequilibrium- and minor allele frequency-stratified GREML (GREML-LDMS) method to imputed GWAS data, we estimated the overall heritability of pancreatic cancer to be 21.2% (SE = 4.8%). Across the functional groups (intronic, intergenic, coding, and regulatory variants), intronic variants account for most of the estimated heritability (12.4%). Previously identified GWAS loci explained 4.1% of the total phenotypic variation of pancreatic cancer. Mutations in hereditary pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes are present in 4% to 10% of patients with pancreatic cancer, yet our GREML-LDMS results suggested these regions explain only 0.4% of total phenotypic variance for pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Although higher than previous studies, our estimated 21.2% overall heritability may still be downwardly biased due to the inherent limitation that the contribution of rare variants in genes with a substantive overall impact on disease are not captured when applying these commonly used methods to imputed GWAS data. IMPACT: Our work demonstrated the importance of rare and common variants in pancreatic cancer risk.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Pancreáticas/genética , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/patologia
16.
Int J Cancer ; 144(12): 2936-2944, 2019 06 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30521095

RESUMO

Diets rich in vegetables and fruit have been associated with reduced risk of gastric cancer, and there is suggestive evidence that citrus fruits have a protective role. Our study aimed at evaluating and quantifying the association between citrus fruit intake and gastric cancer risk. We conducted a one-stage pooled analysis including 6,340 cases and 14,490 controls from 15 case-control studies from the stomach cancer pooling (StoP) project consortium. Odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of gastric cancer across study-specific tertiles of citrus fruit intake (grams/week) were estimated by generalized linear mixed effect models, with logistic link function and random intercept for each study. The models were adjusted for sex, age, and the main recognized risk factors for gastric cancer. Compared to the first third of the distribution, the adjusted pooled OR (95% CI) for the highest third was 0.80 (0.73-0.87). The favourable effect of citrus fruits increased progressively until three servings/week and leveled off thereafter. The magnitude of the association was similar between cancer sub-sites and histotypes. The analysis by geographic area showed no association in studies from the Americas. Our data confirm an inverse association between citrus fruits and gastric cancer and provide precise estimates of the magnitude of the association. However, the null association found in studies from America and in some previous cohort studies prevent to draw definite conclusions on a protective effect of citrus fruit consumption.


Assuntos
Citrus , Dieta/estatística & dados numéricos , Sucos de Frutas e Vegetais/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias Gástricas/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Ásia/epidemiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Lineares , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , América do Norte/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Gástricas/etiologia
17.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 111(6): 557-567, 2019 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30541042

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identify associations of individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with cancer risk but usually only explain a fraction of the inherited variability. Pathway analysis of genetic variants is a powerful tool to identify networks of susceptibility genes. METHODS: We conducted a large agnostic pathway-based meta-analysis of GWAS data using the summary-based adaptive rank truncated product method to identify gene sets and pathways associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in 9040 cases and 12 496 controls. We performed expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis and functional annotation of the top SNPs in genes contributing to the top associated pathways and gene sets. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: We identified 14 pathways and gene sets associated with PDAC at a false discovery rate of less than 0.05. After Bonferroni correction (P ≤ 1.3 × 10-5), the strongest associations were detected in five pathways and gene sets, including maturity-onset diabetes of the young, regulation of beta-cell development, role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor transactivation by G protein-coupled receptors in cardiac hypertrophy pathways, and the Nikolsky breast cancer chr17q11-q21 amplicon and Pujana ATM Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) network gene sets. We identified and validated rs876493 and three correlating SNPs (PGAP3) and rs3124737 (CASP7) from the Pujana ATM PCC gene set as eQTLs in two normal derived pancreas tissue datasets. CONCLUSION: Our agnostic pathway and gene set analysis integrated with functional annotation and eQTL analysis provides insight into genes and pathways that may be biologically relevant for risk of PDAC, including those not previously identified.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Ductal Pancreático/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Modelos Estatísticos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
18.
Cancer Epidemiol ; 54: 125-132, 2018 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29727805

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Individual participant data pooled analyses allow access to non-published data and statistical reanalyses based on more homogeneous criteria than meta-analyses based on systematic reviews. We quantified the impact of publication-related biases and heterogeneity in data analysis and presentation in summary estimates of the association between alcohol drinking and gastric cancer. METHODS: We compared estimates obtained from conventional meta-analyses, using only data available in published reports from studies that take part in the Stomach Cancer Pooling (StoP) Project, with individual participant data pooled analyses including the same studies. RESULTS: A total of 22 studies from the StoP Project assessed the relation between alcohol intake and gastric cancer, 19 had specific data for levels of consumption and 18 according to cancer location; published reports addressing these associations were available from 18, 5 and 5 studies, respectively. The summary odds ratios [OR, (95%CI)] estimate obtained with published data for drinkers vs. non-drinkers was 10% higher than the one obtained with individual StoP data [18 vs. 22 studies: 1.21 (1.07-1.36) vs. 1.10 (0.99-1.23)] and more heterogeneous (I2: 63.6% vs 54.4%). In general, published data yielded less precise summary estimates (standard errors up to 2.6 times higher). Funnel plot analysis suggested publication bias. CONCLUSION: Meta-analyses of the association between alcohol drinking and gastric cancer tended to overestimate the magnitude of the effects, possibly due to publication bias. Additionally, individual participant data pooled analyses yielded more precise estimates for different levels of exposure or cancer subtypes.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Gástricas/epidemiologia , Humanos , Razão de Chances
19.
Eur J Cancer Prev ; 27(3): 197-204, 2018 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29595756

RESUMO

Tobacco smoking is one of the main risk factors for gastric cancer, but the magnitude of the association estimated by conventional systematic reviews and meta-analyses might be inaccurate, due to heterogeneous reporting of data and publication bias. We aimed to quantify the combined impact of publication-related biases, and heterogeneity in data analysis or presentation, in the summary estimates obtained from conventional meta-analyses. We compared results from individual participant data pooled-analyses, including the studies in the Stomach Cancer Pooling (StoP) Project, with conventional meta-analyses carried out using only data available in previously published reports from the same studies. From the 23 studies in the StoP Project, 20 had published reports with information on smoking and gastric cancer, but only six had specific data for gastric cardia cancer and seven had data on the daily number of cigarettes smoked. Compared to the results obtained with the StoP database, conventional meta-analyses overvalued the relation between ever smoking (summary odds ratios ranging from 7% higher for all studies to 22% higher for the risk of gastric cardia cancer) and yielded less precise summary estimates (SE ≤2.4 times higher). Additionally, funnel plot asymmetry and corresponding hypotheses tests were suggestive of publication bias. Conventional meta-analyses and individual participant data pooled-analyses reached similar conclusions on the direction of the association between smoking and gastric cancer. However, published data tended to overestimate the magnitude of the effects, possibly due to publication biases and limited the analyses by different levels of exposure or cancer subtypes.


Assuntos
Viés de Publicação , Neoplasias Gástricas/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Gástricas/epidemiologia , Fumar Tabaco/efeitos adversos , Fumar Tabaco/epidemiologia , Humanos , Viés de Publicação/tendências , Fatores de Risco , Fumar Tabaco/tendências
20.
Pancreas ; 47(3): 314-320, 2018 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29401167

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: It is unclear whether long-standing diabetes or new-onset pancreatogenic diabetes contributes to poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: We investigated the influence of diabetes diagnosed shortly before PDAC and long-term diabetes on overall survival in 2792 PDAC patients who had participated in 3 PDAC case-control studies in the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. There were 300 patients with long-term diabetes of more than 3 years' duration (11%) and 418 patients with recently diagnosed diabetes of 3-year duration or less (15%). We performed Cox regression to determine the association of long-term diabetes and recently diagnosed diabetes with overall survival, adjusting for study site, age, sex, race, stage of disease, surgery, chemotherapy, smoking history, and body mass index at diagnosis. RESULTS: In the overall population, neither long-term diabetes (hazard ratio [HR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97-1.26) nor recently diagnosed diabetes (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.94-1.18) was associated with shorter survival. When stratified by stage of disease, long-term diabetes was associated with 42% increase in rate of death in persons with resectable PDAC (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.13-1.78), whereas it was not associated with survival in PDAC patients with more advanced disease. CONCLUSION: Long-term diabetes was associated with increased rate of death in patients with resectable PDAC.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Ductal Pancreático/patologia , Diabetes Mellitus/patologia , Pâncreas/patologia , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/patologia , Idoso , Carcinoma Ductal Pancreático/terapia , Feminino , Humanos , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde/métodos , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/terapia , Prognóstico , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Fatores de Risco , Fatores de Tempo
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