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1.
Transl Behav Med ; 11(11): 2009-2017, 2021 Nov 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34850933

RESUMO

The very first issue of the journal of Translational Behavioral Medicine (TBM) was dedicated, in part, to the theme of Health Information Technology as a platform for evidence implementation. The topic was timely: legislation in the USA was passed with the intent of stimulating the adoption of electronic health records; mobile smartphones, tablets, and other devices were gaining traction in the consumer market, while members within the Society of Behavioral Medicine were gaining scientific understanding on how to use these tools to effect healthy behavior change. For the anniversary issue of TBM, we evaluated the progress and problems associated with deploying digital health technologies to support cancer treatment, prevention, and control over the last decade. We conducted a narrative review of published literature to identify the role that emerging digital technologies may take in achieving national and international objectives in the decade to come. We tracked our evaluation of the literature across three phases in the cancer control continuum: (a) prevention, (b) early detection/screening, and (c) treatment/survivorship. From our targeted review and analyses, we noted that significant progress had been made in the adoption of digital health technologies in the cancer space over the past decade but that significant work remains to be done to integrate these technologies effectively into the cancer control systems needed to improve outcomes equitably across populations. The challenge for the next 10 years is inherently translational.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34832023

RESUMO

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has devastated the world, and its mental health impact has been recognized in the general population. However, little is known about the mental health impact of COVID-19 on fly-in fly-out (FIFO) workers, who are flown to temporarily stay and work in remote areas, during this pandemic. This study examined the mental well-being of FIFO workers in the mining industry during COVID-19 restrictions in Western Australia. An online survey was conducted between May to November 2020 among (N = 842) FIFO workers who underwent COVID-19 screening at a large mining company in Western Australia. The mental well-being score among workers was higher than population norms. One-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc tests showed significant differences in mental well-being by age, being placed under travel quarantine, undertaking self-isolation, impact of social distance guidelines, and experience of COVID-19 related symptoms. Multiple linear regression analysis showed workers who were younger, placed under travel quarantine and experienced two or more COVID-19 related symptoms were more likely to have worse mental well-being. Acknowledging the negative emotions and distress experiences among the vulnerable groups could help in providing suitable support to help lessen these negative experiences in FIFO workers.

3.
Psychol Health ; : 1-23, 2021 Nov 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34779335

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Habitual behaviours are triggered automatically, with little conscious forethought. Theory suggests that making healthy behaviours habitual, and breaking the habits that underpin many ingrained unhealthy behaviours, promotes long-term behaviour change. This has prompted interest in incorporating habit formation and disruption strategies into behaviour change interventions. Yet, notable research gaps limit understanding of how to harness habit to change real-world behaviours. METHODS: Discussions among health psychology researchers and practitioners, at the 2019 European Health Psychology Society 'Synergy Expert Meeting', generated pertinent questions to guide further research into habit and health behaviour. RESULTS: In line with the four topics discussed at the meeting, 21 questions were identified, concerning: how habit manifests in health behaviour (3 questions); how to form healthy habits (5 questions); how to break unhealthy habits (4 questions); and how to develop and evaluate habit-based behaviour change interventions (9 questions). CONCLUSIONS: While our questions transcend research contexts, accumulating knowledge across studies of specific health behaviours, settings, and populations will build a broader understanding of habit change principles and how they may be embedded into interventions. We encourage researchers and practitioners to prioritise these questions, to further theory and evidence around how to create long-lasting health behaviour change.

4.
Int J Behav Med ; 2021 Nov 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34843096

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Effective hand washing (for at least 20 s, with water and soap) is one of the health behaviors protecting against infection transmissions. Behavior change interventions supporting the initiation and maintenance of hand washing are crucial to prevent infection transmissions. Based on the Health Action Process Approach, the aim of this research was to conduct a pre-post analysis of hand washing and related cognitions (i.e., intention, self-efficacy, self-monitoring), measured up to 100 days following an intervention. METHODS: A convenience sample of N = 123 participants (age: M = 23.96 years; SD = 5.82; 80% women) received a brief intervention (key behavior change techniques: information about health consequences of hand washing; action planning) and responded to daily diaries and questionnaires up to a 100-day follow-up. Two-level models were used to analyze data of n = 89 participants who provided longitudinal data. RESULTS: Hand washing and self-monitoring increased, whereas intention and self-efficacy decreased over time. Only self-monitoring was a consistent positive correlate of hand washing on a between-person level. CONCLUSIONS: Hand washing and self-monitoring considerably increased over several weeks following the intervention. Future research testing the intervention against a control condition is needed to rule out that changes in behavior and cognitions might have been prompted by completing the daily diaries. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German Clinical Trials Register;  https://www.drks.de ; registration number: DRKS00022067.

5.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 191-199, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34479391

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To describe the use and promise of conversational agents in digital health-including health promotion andprevention-and how they can be combined with other new technologies to provide healthcare at home. METHOD: A narrative review of recent advances in technologies underpinning conversational agents and their use and potential for healthcare and improving health outcomes. RESULTS: By responding to written and spoken language, conversational agents present a versatile, natural user interface and have the potential to make their services and applications more widely accessible. Historically, conversational interfaces for health applications have focused mainly on mental health, but with an increase in affordable devices and the modernization of health services, conversational agents are becoming more widely deployed across the health system. We present our work on context-aware voice assistants capable of proactively engaging users and delivering health information and services. The proactive voice agents we deploy, allow us to conduct experience sampling in people's homes and to collect information about the contexts in which users are interacting with them. CONCLUSION: In this article, we describe the state-of-the-art of these and other enabling technologies for speech and conversation and discuss ongoing research efforts to develop conversational agents that "live" with patients and customize their service offerings around their needs. These agents can function as 'digital companions' who will send reminders about medications and appointments, proactively check in to gather self-assessments, and follow up with patients on their treatment plans. Together with an unobtrusive and continuous collection of other health data, conversational agents can provide novel and deeply personalized access to digital health care, and they will continue to become an increasingly important part of the ecosystem for future healthcare delivery.


Assuntos
Promoção da Saúde , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Interface para o Reconhecimento da Fala , Telemedicina , Comunicação , Humanos , Monitorização Fisiológica/métodos , Interface Usuário-Computador
6.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(7)2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34301674

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Rotation work, characterised by travelling long distances to work in isolated areas where workers typically rotate consecutive days working and living on-site with periods at home, is increasingly used in the resources and construction sectors globally. Such employment practices may have an impact on workers' health and well-being. This systematic review explores the impact rotation work has on mental and physical outcomes in rotation workers in the resources and construction sectors. METHOD: The PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Scopus databases were systematically searched on 1 May 2020 to identify quantitative, qualitative and mixed-method studies addressing the health of rotation workers published in peer-reviewed journals. Findings from the studies were summarised narratively. RESULTS: Of 6268 studies retrieved, 90 studies were included in the review. Studies suggested higher prevalence of psychological distress in onshore rotation workers and higher overweight/obesity rates among rotation workers as compared with the general population. We found more sleep problems and higher levels of smoking during work periods compared with off-site days; and higher alcohol intake during off-site days compared with on-site days. Workers generally perceived their physical health status as good. High-perceived job demands (such as workload, repetitive work) were associated with mental distress and exhaustion, sleep problems and perceived poor physical health status, while high-perceived job resources (such as job clarity/control, support) were associated with low mental distress and exhaustion, less smoking and alcohol intake, and better sleep. CONCLUSION: Rotation work is associated with several poorer health behaviours and outcomes, such as sleep problems, smoking, alcohol consumption and overweight/obesity. Interventions needed to improve rotation workers' health should include maximising available job resources and reducing job demands. Further longitudinal studies are needed to explore the long-term health effects of rotation work and the short-term contextual effects of the different aspects of rotation work.


Assuntos
Indústria da Construção , Saúde do Trabalhador , Humanos , Rotação , Carga de Trabalho
7.
BMJ Open ; 11(7): e046435, 2021 07 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34272218

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) involves repeated, real-time assessments of phenomena (eg, cognitions, emotions, behaviours) over a period of time in naturalistic settings. EMA is increasingly used to study both within-person and between-person processes. We will review EMA studies investigating key health behaviours and synthesise: (1) study characteristics (eg, frequency of assessments, adherence, incentives), (2) associations between psychological predictors and behaviours and (3) moderators of adherence to EMA protocols. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This review will focus on EMA studies conducted across five public health behaviours in adult, non-clinical populations: movement behaviour (including physical activity and sedentary behaviour), dietary behaviour, alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking and preventive sexual health behaviours. Studies need to have assessed at least one psychological or contextual predictor of these behaviours. Studies reporting exclusively on physiological outcomes (eg, cortisol) or those not conducted under free-living conditions will be excluded. We will search OVID MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Web of Science using terms relevant to EMA and the selected health behaviours. Reference lists of existing systematic reviews of EMA studies will be hand searched. Identified articles will be screened by two reviewers. This review is expected to provide a comprehensive summary of EMA studies assessing psychological or contextual predictors of five public health behaviours. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and presentations. Data from included studies will be made available to other researchers. No ethics are required. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020168314.


Assuntos
Avaliação Momentânea Ecológica , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Adulto , Exercício Físico , Humanos , Comportamento Sedentário , Comportamento Sexual , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto
8.
Psychol Health ; 36(7): 787-791, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34180340

RESUMO

Current research funding models for health psychologists tend to be biased toward support for large-scale 'definitive' behavioural trials. This approach emphasizes rigorous tests of one or more key questions, but, unintentionally, may lead to the funding of interventions that are based on myriad untested assumptions. We propose that future funding models should provide support for 'iterative' research that tests assumptions at each stage of the intervention development process, including design, deployment, efficacy, implementation, and sustainability. More funding should be allocated to these developmental stages with funding allocated to testing the efficacy of definitive trials only when it is appropriately supported by research that indicates that key assumptions have been met. This shift should foster more robust behavioural interventions that have appropriate efficacy and effectiveness, and 'work' in the 'real world' contexts. Funders should support assumption testing using a diversity of methods (e.g., qualitative, quantitative, expert consensus), and encourage behavioural researchers to adjust their assumptions according the data produced. We contend that time is now to shift funding models to support assumption-testing research and ensure that funding applications for research testing 'definitive' behavioural trials has clear evidence supporting underlying assumptions.


Assuntos
Terapia Comportamental , Previsões , Humanos
9.
Psychol Health ; : 1-20, 2021 Mar 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33719789

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This process evaluation aimed to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of Aussie-FIT, a group-based weight loss intervention for men with overweight and obesity in Australia. DESIGN: Process data and data collected from: (1) six-participant focus groups (n= 24), (2) coach interviews (n = 4), (3) audio recordings of Aussie-FIT sessions and (4) post-program participant surveys (n= 93) were analysed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We explored the feasibility and acceptability of program setting and context, recruitment strategies, factors impacting implementation and mechanisms of impact. RESULTS: Recruitment via Australian Football League (AFL) clubs was highly effective; 426 men expressed interest within 3 days of advertising, 130 men took part. Program attendance was not consistently recorded by coaches. Coach interviews indicated a 'core group of men' participated in each session (typically 10-12 of 15 men). Program delivery proved feasible in the AFL context. Program acceptability and satisfaction were high. Internalisation of autonomous motives was identified as driving behaviour change. Behaviour change to support maintained weight loss was facilitated through habit formation, goal setting and effective management of multiple goals. CONCLUSION: Aussie-FIT sets a blueprint for future weight loss interventions that utilise behaviour change strategies and principles of self-determined motivation to support men to lose weight. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12617000515392.© 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

10.
BMJ Open ; 11(3): e044888, 2021 03 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33722873

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Type 2 diabetes is a global health priority. People with diabetes are more likely to experience mental health problems relative to people without diabetes. Diabetes guidelines recommend assessment of depression and diabetes distress during diabetes care. This systematic review will examine the effect of routinely assessing and addressing depression and diabetes distress using patient-reported outcome measures in improving outcomes among adults with type 2 diabetes. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL Complete, PsycInfo, The Cochrane Library and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials will be searched using a prespecified strategy using a prespecified Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcomes, Setting and study design strategy. The date range of the search of all databases will be from inception to 3 August 2020. Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time-series studies, prospective and retrospective cohort studies, case-control studies and analytical cross-sectional studies published in peer-reviewed journals in the English language will be included. Two review authors will independently screen abstracts and full texts with disagreements resolved by a third reviewer, if required, using Covidence software. Two reviewers will undertake risk of bias assessment using checklists appropriate to study design. Data will be extracted using prespecified template. A narrative synthesis will be conducted, with a meta-analysis, if appropriate. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval is not required for this review of published studies. Presentation of results will follow the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidance. Findings will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020200246.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/diagnóstico , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/complicações , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/terapia , Humanos , Metanálise como Assunto , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Estudos Prospectivos , Projetos de Pesquisa , Estudos Retrospectivos , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto
11.
Obes Facts ; 14(2): 246-258, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33662958

RESUMO

There is substantial evidence documenting the effects of behavioural interventions on weight loss (WL). However, behavioural approaches to initial WL are followed by some degree of longer-term weight regain, and large trials focusing on evidence-based approaches to weight loss maintenance (WLM) have generally only demonstrated small beneficial effects. The current state-of-the-art in behavioural interventions for WL and WLM raises questions of (i) how we define the relationship between WL and WLM, (ii) how energy balance (EB) systems respond to WL and influence behaviours that primarily drive weight regain, (iii) how intervention content, mode of delivery and intensity should be targeted to keep weight off, (iv) which mechanisms of action in complex interventions may prevent weight regain and (v) how to design studies and interventions to maximise effective longer-term weight management. In considering these issues a writing team within the NoHoW Consortium was convened to elaborate a position statement, and behaviour change and obesity experts were invited to discuss these positions and to refine them. At present the evidence suggests that developing the skills to self-manage EB behaviours leads to more effective WLM. However, the effects of behaviour change interventions for WL and WLM are still relatively modest and our understanding of the factors that disrupt and undermine self-management of eating and physical activity is limited. These factors include physiological resistance to weight loss, gradual compensatory changes in eating and physical activity and reactive processes related to stress, emotions, rewards and desires that meet psychological needs. Better matching of evidence-based intervention content to quantitatively tracked EB behaviours and the specific needs of individuals may improve outcomes. Improving objective longitudinal tracking of energy intake and energy expenditure over time would provide a quantitative framework in which to understand the dynamics of behaviour change, mechanisms of action of behaviour change interventions and user engagement with intervention components to potentially improve weight management intervention design and evaluation.


Assuntos
Obesidade , Perda de Peso , Terapia Comportamental , Metabolismo Energético , Exercício Físico , Humanos , Obesidade/terapia
13.
Br J Health Psychol ; 26(3): 807-824, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33405284

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Habit formation has been identified as one of the key determinants of behaviour change. To initiate habit formation, self-regulation interventions can support individuals to form a cue-behaviour plan and to repeatedly enact the plan in the same context. This randomized controlled trial aimed to model habit formation of an everyday nutrition behaviour and examined whether habit formation and plan enactment differ when individuals plan to enact their behaviour in response to a routine-based versus time-based cue. DESIGN: Following a baseline assessment, N = 192 adults (aged 18-77 years) were randomly assigned to a routine-based cue or a time-based cue planning intervention, in which they selected an everyday nutrition behaviour and linked it to a daily routine or a time cue. METHODS: Participants responded to daily questionnaires over 84 days assessing plan enactment and the behaviour's automaticity (as an indicator of habit formation). Multilevel models with days nested in participants were fitted. RESULTS: As indicated by asymptotic curves, it took a median of 59 days for participants who successfully formed habits to reach peak automaticity. Group-level analyses revealed that both routine-based and time-based cue planning led to increases in automaticity and plan enactment, but no between-condition differences were found. Repeated plan enactment was a key predictor for automaticity. CONCLUSIONS: Linking one's nutrition behaviour to a daily routine or a specific time was similarly effective for habit formation. Interventions should encourage persons to repeatedly carry out their planned behaviour in response to the planned cue to facilitate habit formation.


Assuntos
Sinais (Psicologia) , Hábitos , Adulto , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários
14.
Health Psychol Rev ; : 1-28, 2021 Jan 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33446062

RESUMO

Health psychology is at the forefront of developing and disseminating evidence, theories, and methods that have improved the understanding of health behaviour change. However, current dissemination approaches may be insufficient for promoting broader application and impact of this evidence to benefit the health of patients and the public. Nevertheless, behaviour change theory/methods typically directed towards health behaviours are now used in implementation science to understand and support behaviour change in individuals at different health system levels whose own behaviour impacts delivering evidence-based health behaviour change interventions. Despite contributing to implementation science, health psychology is perhaps doing less to draw from it. A redoubled focus on implementation science in health psychology could provide novel prospects for enhancing the impact of health behaviour change evidence. We report a Health Psychology Review-specific review-of-reviews of trials of health behaviour change interventions published from inception to April 2020. We identified 34 reviews and assessed whether implementation readiness of behaviour change interventions was discussed. We then narratively review how implementation science has integrated theory/methods from health psychology and related discipline. Finally, we demonstrate how greater synergy between implementation science and health psychology could promote greater follow-through on advances made in the science of health behaviour change.

15.
Health Psychol Rev ; 15(1): 51-55, 2021 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32608326

RESUMO

This commentary expands on the recent critical review by Swann et al. (2020) which aimed to update the applications of Goal-Setting Theory (Locke & Latham, 2019) in physical activity promotion. Drawing from other work on goal striving and behaviour change, we make four key points to further elaborate on Swann et al.'s review. First, goals are more likely to be enacted if they are specific, personally relevant and pursued for autonomous motives; performance goals can be useful for inactive individuals if set appropriately and self-endorsed. Second, goal striving needs to be flexible and adjustable, and to consider goal priorities and time factors relevant to goal engagement and disengagement. Goal-Setting Theory would therefore benefit from being expanded to add the factors of goal priority, context, and time. Third, research on goal setting in physical activity could benefit from embracing idiographic designs and interventions. Fourth, other theoretical approaches to goal striving should be considered when discussing goal setting in physical activity promotion.


Assuntos
Objetivos , Motivação , Exercício Físico , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Comportamento Sedentário
16.
Addiction ; 116(7): 1725-1733, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33372333

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Within the context of Scotland's policy change to implement a minimum unit price (MUP) per unit of alcohol sold in licensed premises, this study used an N-of-1 design to assess between-person differences in the psychological and social factors associated with daily alcohol consumption. DESIGN AND SETTING: A mixed-methods approach combined N-of-1 observational studies, comprising daily surveys followed by qualitative social network interviews (not reported here). Peer researchers with lived experience of substance use were involved in the study design and fieldwork was conducted in towns and rural areas in the East of Scotland. PARTICIPANTS/CASES: Twenty-five adults with current or recent history of alcohol dependence recruited for three 12-week waves: 11 in wave 1 (pre-MUP), 11 in wave 2 (pre- and post-MUP) and three in wave 3 (post MUP). MEASUREMENTS: Gender, age, alcohol and other drug use history. Daily surveys for 12 weeks captured information about factors in the last 24 hours, e.g. amount and type of alcohol consumed, stress, social contact. FINDINGS: Each participant was in the daily survey for a mean of 64 days [standard deviation (SD) = 42; median = 59], with a response rate of 48%; 15 participants provided sufficient data for analysis. Factors related to daily alcohol consumption differed between individuals. Models suggested that some individuals with high initial consumption reduced drinking after MUP, but explanatory factors differed, e.g. changing motivation was important for some, while alcohol availability was important for others. CONCLUSIONS: Adapting N-of-1 methods for an observational study uncovered differences in alcohol consumption change before and after minimum unit pricing implementation in Scotland, evidence of individual differences in the factors relating to alcohol consumption patterns and some evidence that post-MUP consumption changes may be related to changing psychosocial factors.


Assuntos
Bebidas Alcoólicas , Comércio , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Custos e Análise de Custo , Humanos , Escócia/epidemiologia
17.
BMJ Open ; 10(11): e040183, 2020 11 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33234638

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Digital behavioural weight loss interventions have the potential to improve public health; however, these interventions are often not adequately tailored to the needs of the participants. This is the protocol for a trial that aims to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Choosing Health programme as a means to promote weight loss and weight loss maintenance among overweight/obese adults. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The proposed study is a two-group randomised controlled trial with a nested interrupted time series (ITS) within-person design. Participants (n=285) will be randomly assigned to either the Choosing Health digital intervention or a control group. For intervention participants, ecological momentary assessment will be used to identify behavioural determinants for each individual in order to tailor evidence-based behaviour change techniques and intervention content.Control group participants will receive non-tailored weight loss advice via e-book and generic emails. The primary outcome is the mean difference in weight loss between groups at 6 months controlled for baseline. Secondary outcomes include blood pressure and percentage of body fat; self-reported measures of physical activity, sitting time, quality of life, cost and theory-derived correlates of weight loss. Secondary outcomes will be measured at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome for ITS will be daily weight loss plan adherence. Data will be analysed using regression and time series analyses. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval was granted by Faculty of Psychology, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Wroclaw, Poland, approval number 03/P/12/2019. The project results will be disseminated through structured strategy implemented in collaboration with the Ministry of Health. TRIAL REGISTRATION DETAILS: This trial was registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov; registration number NCT04291482.


Assuntos
Correio Eletrônico , Qualidade de Vida , Perda de Peso , Adulto , Humanos , Sobrepeso/terapia , Polônia , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
18.
Health Psychol Rev ; : 1-17, 2020 Nov 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33198583

RESUMO

The article describes a position statement and recommendations for actions that need to be taken to develop best practices for promoting scientific integrity through open science in health psychology endorsed at a Synergy Expert Group Meeting. Sixteen Synergy Meeting participants developed a set of recommendations for researchers, gatekeepers, and research end-users. The group process followed a nominal group technique and voting system to elicit and decide on the most relevant and topical issues. Seventeen priority areas were listed and voted on, 15 of them were recommended by the group. Specifically, the following priority actions for health psychology were endorsed: (1) for researchers: advancing when and how to make data open and accessible at various research stages and understanding researchers' beliefs and attitudes regarding open data; (2) for educators: integrating open science in research curricula, e.g., through online open science training modules, promoting preregistration, transparent reporting, open data and applying open science as a learning tool; (3) for journal editors: providing an open science statement, and open data policies, including a minimal requirements submission checklist. Health psychology societies and journal editors should collaborate in order to develop a coordinated plan for research integrity and open science promotion across behavioural disciplines.

20.
PLoS Med ; 17(8): e1003136, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32760144

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Recent evidence shows that sport settings can act as a powerful draw to engage men in weight loss. The primary objective of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of delivering and to evaluate preliminary efficacy of Aussie-FIT, a weight-loss program for men with overweight/obesity delivered in Australian Football League (AFL) settings, in preparation for a future definitive trial. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This 6-month pilot trial took place in Perth, Australia. Participants were overweight/obese (Body Mass Index [BMI] ≥ 28 kg/m2), middle-aged (35-65 years old) men. Participants were recruited in May 2018, and the intervention took place between June and December 2018. The intervention involved 12 weekly 90-min face-to-face sessions, incorporating physical activity, nutrition, and behaviour change information and practical activities delivered by coaches at 2 clubs. Data were collected at baseline and immediately postintervention. For trial feasibility purposes, 6-month follow-ups were completed. Outcomes were differences in weight loss (primary outcome) and recruitment and retention rates, self-reported measures (for example, psychological well-being), device-measured physical activity, waist size, and blood pressure at 3 months. Within 3 days of advertising at each club, 426 men registered interest; 306 (72%) were eligible. Men were selected on a first-come first-served basis (n = 130; M age = 45.8, SD = 8; M BMI = 34.48 kg/m2, SD = 4.87) and randomised by a blinded researcher. Trial retention was 86% and 63% at 3- and 6-month follow-ups (respectively). No adverse events were reported. At 3 months, mean difference in weight between groups, adjusted for baseline weight and group, was 3.3 kg (95% CI 1.9, 4.8) in favour of the intervention group (p < 0.001). The intervention group's moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was higher than the control group by 8.54 min/day (95% CI 1.37, 15.71, p = 0.02). MVPA among men attracted to Aussie-FIT was high at baseline (intervention arm 35.61 min/day, control arm 38.38 min/day), which may have limited the scope for improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Aussie-FIT was feasible to deliver; participants increased physical activity, decreased weight, and reported improvements in other outcomes. Issues with retention were a limitation of this trial. In a future, fully powered randomised controlled trial (RCT), retention could be improved by conducting assessments outside of holiday seasons. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12617000515392.


Assuntos
Estilo de Vida Saudável/fisiologia , Sobrepeso/terapia , Futebol/fisiologia , Perda de Peso/fisiologia , Programas de Redução de Peso/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Obesidade/fisiopatologia , Obesidade/terapia , Sobrepeso/epidemiologia , Sobrepeso/fisiopatologia , Projetos Piloto , Fatores Sexuais , Método Simples-Cego , Austrália Ocidental/epidemiologia
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