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1.
Genet Med ; 2019 Oct 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31649276

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare autosomal dominant mandibulofacial dysostosis, with a prevalence of 0.2-1/10,000. Features include bilateral and symmetrical malar and mandibular hypoplasia and facial abnormalities due to abnormal neural crest cell (NCC) migration and differentiation. To date, three genes have been identified: TCOF1, POLR1C, and POLR1D. Despite a large number of patients with a molecular diagnosis, some remain without a known genetic anomaly. METHODS: We performed exome sequencing for four individuals with TCS but who were negative for pathogenic variants in the known causative genes. The effect of the pathogenic variants was investigated in zebrafish. RESULTS: We identified three novel pathogenic variants in POLR1B. Knockdown of polr1b in zebrafish induced an abnormal craniofacial phenotype mimicking TCS that was associated with altered ribosomal gene expression, massive p53-associated cellular apoptosis in the neuroepithelium, and reduced number of NCC derivatives. CONCLUSION: Pathogenic variants in the RNA polymerase I subunit POLR1B might induce massive p53-dependent apoptosis in a restricted neuroepithelium area, altering NCC migration and causing cranioskeletal malformations. We identify POLR1B as a new causative gene responsible for a novel TCS syndrome (TCS4) and establish a novel experimental model in zebrafish to study POLR1B-related TCS.

2.
Clin Genet ; 96(3): 246-253, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31090057

RESUMO

Two distinct genomic disorders have been linked to Xq28-gains, namely Xq28-duplications including MECP2 and Int22h1/Int22h2-mediated duplications involving RAB39B. Here, we describe six unrelated patients, five males and one female, with Xq28-gains distal to MECP2 and proximal to the Int22h1/Int22h2 low copy repeats. Comparison with patients carrying overlapping duplications in the literature defined the MidXq28-duplication syndrome featuring intellectual disability, language impairment, structural brain malformations, microcephaly, seizures and minor craniofacial features. The duplications overlapped for 108 kb including FLNA, RPL10 and GDI1 genes, highly expressed in brain and candidates for the neurologic phenotype.

3.
Cell ; 176(3): 505-519.e22, 2019 01 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30612738

RESUMO

Genomic instability can be a hallmark of both human genetic disease and cancer. We identify a deleterious UBQLN4 mutation in families with an autosomal recessive syndrome reminiscent of genome instability disorders. UBQLN4 deficiency leads to increased sensitivity to genotoxic stress and delayed DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The proteasomal shuttle factor UBQLN4 is phosphorylated by ATM and interacts with ubiquitylated MRE11 to mediate early steps of homologous recombination-mediated DSB repair (HRR). Loss of UBQLN4 leads to chromatin retention of MRE11, promoting non-physiological HRR activity in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, UBQLN4 overexpression represses HRR and favors non-homologous end joining. Moreover, we find UBQLN4 overexpressed in aggressive tumors. In line with an HRR defect in these tumors, UBQLN4 overexpression is associated with PARP1 inhibitor sensitivity. UBQLN4 therefore curtails HRR activity through removal of MRE11 from damaged chromatin and thus offers a therapeutic window for PARP1 inhibitor treatment in UBQLN4-overexpressing tumors.

4.
Hum Genet ; 137(9): 753-768, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30167850

RESUMO

NALCN is a conserved cation channel, which conducts a permanent sodium leak current and regulates resting membrane potential and neuronal excitability. It is part of a large ion channel complex, the "NALCN channelosome", consisting of multiple proteins including UNC80 and UNC79. The predominant neuronal expression pattern and its function suggest an important role in neuronal function and disease. So far, biallelic NALCN and UNC80 variants have been described in a small number of individuals leading to infantile hypotonia, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facies 1 (IHPRF1, OMIM 615419) and 2 (IHPRF2, OMIM 616801), respectively. Heterozygous de novo NALCN missense variants in the S5/S6 pore-forming segments lead to congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and developmental delay (CLIFAHDD, OMIM 616266) with some clinical overlap. In this study, we present detailed clinical information of 16 novel individuals with biallelic NALCN variants, 1 individual with a heterozygous de novo NALCN missense variant and an interesting clinical phenotype without contractures, and 12 individuals with biallelic UNC80 variants. We report for the first time a missense NALCN variant located in the predicted S6 pore-forming unit inherited in an autosomal-recessive manner leading to mild IHPRF1. We show evidence of clinical variability, especially among IHPRF1-affected individuals, and discuss differences between the IHPRF1- and IHPRF2 phenotypes. In summary, we provide a comprehensive overview of IHPRF1 and IHPRF2 phenotypes based on the largest cohort of individuals reported so far and provide additional insights into the clinical phenotypes of these neurodevelopmental diseases to help improve counseling of affected families.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Transporte/genética , Canalopatias/genética , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Marcadores Genéticos , Variação Genética , Proteínas de Membrana/genética , Canais de Sódio/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Canalopatias/patologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Fenótipo , Adulto Jovem
5.
Brain ; 2018 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29985992

RESUMO

The transcription factor BCL11B is essential for development of the nervous and the immune system, and Bcl11b deficiency results in structural brain defects, reduced learning capacity, and impaired immune cell development in mice. However, the precise role of BCL11B in humans is largely unexplored, except for a single patient with a BCL11B missense mutation, affected by multisystem anomalies and profound immune deficiency. Using massively parallel sequencing we identified 13 patients bearing heterozygous germline alterations in BCL11B. Notably, all of them are affected by global developmental delay with speech impairment and intellectual disability; however, none displayed overt clinical signs of immune deficiency. Six frameshift mutations, two nonsense mutations, one missense mutation, and two chromosomal rearrangements resulting in diminished BCL11B expression, arose de novo. A further frameshift mutation was transmitted from a similarly affected mother. Interestingly, the most severely affected patient harbours a missense mutation within a zinc-finger domain of BCL11B, probably affecting the DNA-binding structural interface, similar to the recently published patient. Furthermore, the most C-terminally located premature termination codon mutation fails to rescue the progenitor cell proliferation defect in hippocampal slice cultures from Bcl11b-deficient mice. Concerning the role of BCL11B in the immune system, extensive immune phenotyping of our patients revealed alterations in the T cell compartment and lack of peripheral type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), consistent with the findings described in Bcl11b-deficient mice. Unsupervised analysis of 102 T lymphocyte subpopulations showed that the patients clearly cluster apart from healthy children, further supporting the common aetiology of the disorder. Taken together, we show here that mutations leading either to BCL11B haploinsufficiency or to a truncated BCL11B protein clinically cause a non-syndromic neurodevelopmental delay. In addition, we suggest that missense mutations affecting specific sites within zinc-finger domains might result in distinct and more severe clinical outcomes.

6.
Am J Hum Genet ; 102(6): 1195-1203, 2018 06 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29861108

RESUMO

Next-generation sequencing is a powerful tool for the discovery of genes related to neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Here, we report the identification of a distinct syndrome due to de novo or inherited heterozygous mutations in Tousled-like kinase 2 (TLK2) in 38 unrelated individuals and two affected mothers, using whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing technologies, matchmaker databases, and international collaborations. Affected individuals had a consistent phenotype, characterized by mild-borderline neurodevelopmental delay (86%), behavioral disorders (68%), severe gastro-intestinal problems (63%), and facial dysmorphism including blepharophimosis (82%), telecanthus (74%), prominent nasal bridge (68%), broad nasal tip (66%), thin vermilion of the upper lip (62%), and upslanting palpebral fissures (55%). Analysis of cell lines from three affected individuals showed that mutations act through a loss-of-function mechanism in at least two case subjects. Genotype-phenotype analysis and comparison of computationally modeled faces showed that phenotypes of these and other individuals with loss-of-function variants significantly overlapped with phenotypes of individuals with other variant types (missense and C-terminal truncating). This suggests that haploinsufficiency of TLK2 is the most likely underlying disease mechanism, leading to a consistent neurodevelopmental phenotype. This work illustrates the power of international data sharing, by the identification of 40 individuals from 26 different centers in 7 different countries, allowing the identification, clinical delineation, and genotype-phenotype evaluation of a distinct NDD caused by mutations in TLK2.

7.
Hum Mutat ; 39(8): 1126-1138, 2018 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29851191

RESUMO

Highly conserved TREX-mediated mRNA export is emerging as a key pathway in neuronal development and differentiation. TREX subunit variants cause neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) by interfering with mRNA export from the cell nucleus to the cytoplasm. Previously we implicated four missense variants in the X-linked THOC2 gene in intellectual disability (ID). We now report an additional six affected individuals from five unrelated families with two de novo and three maternally inherited pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants in THOC2 extending the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum. These comprise three rare missense THOC2 variants that affect evolutionarily conserved amino acid residues and reduce protein stability and two with canonical splice-site THOC2 variants that result in C-terminally truncated THOC2 proteins. We present detailed clinical assessment and functional studies on a de novo variant in a female with an epileptic encephalopathy and discuss an additional four families with rare variants in THOC2 with supportive evidence for pathogenicity. Severe neurocognitive features, including movement and seizure disorders, were observed in this cohort. Taken together our data show that even subtle alterations to the canonical molecular pathways such as mRNA export, otherwise essential for cellular life, can be compatible with life, but lead to NDDs in humans.

8.
Am J Hum Genet ; 102(3): 468-479, 2018 03 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29429572

RESUMO

Variants affecting the function of different subunits of the BAF chromatin-remodelling complex lead to various neurodevelopmental syndromes, including Coffin-Siris syndrome. Furthermore, variants in proteins containing PHD fingers, motifs recognizing specific histone tail modifications, have been associated with several neurological and developmental-delay disorders. Here, we report eight heterozygous de novo variants (one frameshift, two splice site, and five missense) in the gene encoding the BAF complex subunit double plant homeodomain finger 2 (DPF2). Affected individuals share common clinical features described in individuals with Coffin-Siris syndrome, including coarse facial features, global developmental delay, intellectual disability, speech impairment, and hypoplasia of fingernails and toenails. All variants occur within the highly conserved PHD1 and PHD2 motifs. Moreover, missense variants are situated close to zinc binding sites and are predicted to disrupt these sites. Pull-down assays of recombinant proteins and histone peptides revealed that a subset of the identified missense variants abolish or impaire DPF2 binding to unmodified and modified H3 histone tails. These results suggest an impairment of PHD finger structural integrity and cohesion and most likely an aberrant recognition of histone modifications. Furthermore, the overexpression of these variants in HEK293 and COS7 cell lines was associated with the formation of nuclear aggregates and the recruitment of both wild-type DPF2 and BRG1 to these aggregates. Expression analysis of truncating variants found in the affected individuals indicated that the aberrant transcripts escape nonsense-mediated decay. Altogether, we provide compelling evidence that de novo variants in DPF2 cause Coffin-Siris syndrome and propose a dominant-negative mechanism of pathogenicity.

9.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 25(8): 935-945, 2017 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28635951

RESUMO

The chromosomal region 14q32 contains several imprinted genes, which are expressed either from the paternal (DLK1 and RTL1) or the maternal (MEG3, RTL1as and MEG8) allele only. Imprinted expression of these genes is regulated by two differentially methylated regions (DMRs), the germline DLK1/MEG3 intergenic (IG)-DMR (MEG3/DLK1:IG-DMR) and the somatic MEG3-DMR (MEG3:TSS-DMR), which are methylated on the paternal and unmethylated on the maternal allele. Disruption of imprinting in the 14q32 region results in two clinically distinct imprinting disorders, Temple syndrome (TS14) and Kagami-Ogata syndrome (KOS14). Another DMR with a yet unknown function is located in intron 2 of MEG8 (MEG8-DMR, MEG8:Int2-DMR). In contrast to the IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR, this somatic DMR is methylated on the maternal chromosome and unmethylated on the paternal chromosome. We have performed extensive methylation analyses by deep bisulfite sequencing of the IG-DMR, MEG3-DMR and MEG8-DMR in different prenatal tissues including amniotic fluid cells and chorionic villi. In addition, we have studied the methylation pattern of the MEG8-DMR in different postnatal tissues. We show that the MEG8-DMR is hypermethylated in each of 13 non-deletion TS14 patients (seven newly identified and six previously published patients), irrespective of the underlying molecular cause, and is always hypomethylated in the four patients with KOS14, who have different deletions not encompassing the MEG8-DMR itself. The size and the extent of the deletions and the resulting methylation pattern suggest that transcription starting from the MEG3 promoter may be necessary to establish the methylation imprint at the MEG8-DMR.


Assuntos
Transtornos Cromossômicos/genética , Cromossomos Humanos Par 14/genética , Metilação de DNA , Impressão Genômica , RNA Nucleolar Pequeno/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Transtornos Cromossômicos/diagnóstico , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , RNA Longo não Codificante/genética , RNA Nucleolar Pequeno/metabolismo
10.
Hum Genet ; 136(7): 821-834, 2017 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28393272

RESUMO

Pathogenic variants in genes encoding subunits of the spliceosome are the cause of several human diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases. The RNA splicing process is facilitated by the spliceosome, a large RNA-protein complex consisting of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), and many other proteins, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). The HNRNPU gene (OMIM *602869) encodes the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U, which plays a crucial role in mammalian development. HNRNPU is expressed in the fetal brain and adult heart, kidney, liver, brain, and cerebellum. Microdeletions in the 1q44 region encompassing HNRNPU have been described in patients with intellectual disability (ID) and other clinical features, such as seizures, corpus callosum abnormalities (CCA), and microcephaly. Recently, pathogenic HNRNPU variants were identified in large ID and epileptic encephalopathy cohorts. In this study, we provide detailed clinical information of five novels and review two of the previously published individuals with (likely) pathogenic de novo variants in the HNRNPU gene including three non-sense and two missense variants, one small intragenic deletion, and one duplication. The phenotype in individuals with variants in HNRNPU is characterized by early onset seizures (6/7), severe ID (6/6), severe speech impairment (6/6), hypotonia (6/7), and central nervous system (CNS) (5/6), cardiac (4/6), and renal abnormalities (3/4). In this study, we broaden the clinical and mutational HNRNPU-associated spectrum, and demonstrate that heterozygous HNRNPU variants cause epilepsy, severe ID with striking speech impairment and variable CNS, cardiac, and renal anomalies.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/genética , Ribonucleoproteínas Nucleares Heterogêneas Grupo U/genética , Heterozigoto , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Idade de Início , Agenesia do Corpo Caloso/genética , Sistema Nervoso Central/anormalidades , Sistema Nervoso Central/patologia , Deleção Cromossômica , Cromossomos Humanos Par 1 , Epilepsia/diagnóstico , Feminino , Variação Genética , Humanos , Lactente , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Rim/anormalidades , Masculino , Microcefalia/diagnóstico , Microcefalia/genética , Hipotonia Muscular/diagnóstico , Hipotonia Muscular/genética , Fenótipo , Processamento de RNA , Ribonucleoproteínas Nucleares Pequenas/genética , Convulsões/diagnóstico , Convulsões/genética
11.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 25(7): 889-893, 2017 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28422131

RESUMO

For a large number of individuals with intellectual disability (ID), the molecular basis of the disorder is still unknown. However, whole-exome sequencing (WES) is providing more and more insights into the genetic landscape of ID. In the present study, we performed trio-based WES in 311 patients with unsolved ID and additional clinical features, and identified homozygous CPLX1 variants in three patients with ID from two unrelated families. All displayed marked developmental delay and migrating myoclonic epilepsy, and one showed a cerebellar cleft in addition. The encoded protein, complexin 1, is crucially involved in neuronal synaptic regulation, and homozygous Cplx1 knockout mice have the earliest known onset of ataxia seen in a mouse model. Recently, a homozygous truncating variant in CPLX1 was suggested to be causative for migrating epilepsy and structural brain abnormalities. ID was not reported although it cannot be completely ruled out. However, the currently limited knowledge on CPLX1 suggests that loss of complexin 1 function may lead to a complex but variable clinical phenotype, and our findings encourage further investigations of CPLX1 in patients with ID, developmental delay and myoclonic epilepsy to unravel the phenotypic spectrum of carriers of CPLX1 variants.


Assuntos
Proteínas Adaptadoras de Transporte Vesicular/genética , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Mutação , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Epilepsias Mioclônicas/diagnóstico , Feminino , Genes Recessivos , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Masculino , Fenótipo , Síndrome
12.
Am J Med Genet A ; 173(2): 435-443, 2017 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27862890

RESUMO

Loss-of-function mutations and deletions of the SOX2 gene are known to cause uni- and bilateral anophthalmia and microphthalmia as well as related disorders such as anophthalmia-esophageal-genital syndrome. Thus, anophthalmia/microphthalmia is the primary indication for targeted, "phenotype first" analyses of SOX2. However, SOX2 mutations are also associated with a wide range of non-ocular abnormalities, such as postnatal growth retardation, structural brain anomalies, hypogenitalism, and developmental delay. The present report describes three patients without anophthalmia/microphthalmia and loss-of-function mutations or microdeletions of SOX2 who had been investigated in a "genotype first" manner due to intellectual disability/developmental delay using whole exome sequencing or chromosomal microarray analyses. This result prompted us to perform SOX2 Sanger sequencing in 192 developmental delay/intellectual disability patients without anophthalmia or microphthalmia. No additional SOX2 loss-of-function mutations were detected in this cohort, showing that SOX2 is clearly not a major cause of intellectual disability without anophthalmia/microphthalmia. In our three patients and four further, reported "genotype first" SOX2 microdeletion patients, anophthalmia/microphthalmia was present in less than half of the patients. Thus, SOX2 is another example of a gene whose clinical spectrum is broadened by the generation of "genotype first" findings using hypothesis-free, genome-wide methods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Assuntos
Estudos de Associação Genética , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Fenótipo , Mutação Puntual , Fatores de Transcrição SOXB1/genética , Deleção de Sequência , Encéfalo/anormalidades , Pré-Escolar , Hibridização Genômica Comparativa , Exoma , Anormalidades do Olho/diagnóstico , Anormalidades do Olho/genética , Facies , Feminino , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética/métodos , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Sistema de Registros
13.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 25(2): 183-191, 2017 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27901041

RESUMO

Truncating ASXL3 mutations were first identified in 2013 by Bainbridge et al. as a cause of syndromic intellectual disability in four children with similar phenotypes using whole-exome sequencing. The clinical features - postulated by Bainbridge et al. to be overlapping with Bohring-Opitz syndrome - were developmental delay, severe feeding difficulties, failure to thrive and neurological abnormalities. This condition was included in OMIM as 'Bainbridge-Ropers syndrome' (BRPS, #615485). To date, a total of nine individuals with BRPS have been published in the literature in four reports (Bainbridge et al., Dinwiddie et al, Srivastava et al. and Hori et al.). In this report, we describe six unrelated patients with newly diagnosed heterozygous de novo loss-of-function variants in ASXL3 and concordant clinical features: severe muscular hypotonia with feeding difficulties in infancy, significant motor delay, profound speech impairment, intellectual disability and a characteristic craniofacial phenotype (long face, arched eyebrows with mild synophrys, downslanting palpebral fissures, prominent columella, small alae nasi, high, narrow palate and relatively little facial expression). The majority of key features characteristic for Bohring-Opitz syndrome were absent in our patients (eg, the typical posture of arms, intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, trigonocephaly, typical facial gestalt with nevus flammeus of the forehead and exophthalmos). Therefore we emphasize that BRPS syndrome, caused by ASXL3 loss-of-function variants, is a clinically distinct intellectual disability syndrome with a recognizable phenotype distinguishable from that of Bohring-Opitz syndrome.


Assuntos
Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Insuficiência de Crescimento/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Adolescente , Pré-Escolar , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/diagnóstico , Insuficiência de Crescimento/diagnóstico , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Mutação , Fenótipo , Síndrome
14.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 24(12): 1724-1729, 2016 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27406249

RESUMO

In approximately 20% of individuals with Kagami-Ogata syndrome (KOS14, MIM 608149), characterized by a bell-shaped thorax with coat-hanger configuration of the ribs, joint contractures, abdominal wall defects and polyhydramnios during the pregnancy, the syndrome is caused by a maternal deletion of the imprinted gene cluster in chromosome 14q32.2. Most deletions reported so far included one or both of the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) - DLK1/MEG3 IG-DMR and MEG3-DMR. We present two unrelated families with two affected siblings each, presenting with classical KOS14 due to maternally inherited microdeletions. Interestingly, all four patients have lived through to adulthood, even though mortality rates for patients with KOS14 due to a microdeletion are relatively high. In the first family, none of the DMRs is included in the deletion and the methylation status is identical to that of controls. Deletions that do not encompass the DMRs in this region are thus sufficient to elicit the full KOS14 phenotype. In the second family, a partially overlapping deletion including both DMRs and MEG3 was detected. In summary, we show that patients with KOS14 can live into adulthood, that causal deletions do not have to include the DMRs and that consequently a normal methylation pattern does not exclude KOS14.


Assuntos
Transtornos Cromossômicos/genética , RNA não Traduzido/genética , Deleção de Sequência , Dissomia Uniparental/genética , Transtornos Cromossômicos/diagnóstico , Cromossomos Humanos Par 14/genética , Humanos , Linhagem , Fenótipo , Síndrome , Dissomia Uniparental/diagnóstico
15.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 24(9): 1280-6, 2016 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26839037

RESUMO

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS; OMIM #130650) is an overgrowth syndrome caused by different genetic or epigenetic alterations affecting imprinted regions on chromosome 11p15.5. Here we report a family with multiple offspring affected with BWS including giant omphalocoeles in which maternal transmission of a chromosomal rearrangement including an inversion and two deletions leads to hypomethylation of the imprint control region 2 (ICR2). As the deletion includes the promoter and 5' part of the KCNQ1 gene, we suggest that transcription of this gene may be involved in establishing the maternal methylation imprint of the ICR2, which is located in intron 10 of KCNQ1.


Assuntos
Síndrome de Beckwith-Wiedemann/genética , Deleção Cromossômica , Inversão Cromossômica , Cromossomos Humanos Par 11/genética , Metilação de DNA , Impressão Genômica , Herança Paterna , Adulto , Síndrome de Beckwith-Wiedemann/diagnóstico , Feminino , Humanos , Canal de Potássio KCNQ1/genética , Masculino , Linhagem
16.
BMC Med Genet ; 16: 30, 2015 May 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25943194

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a rare pediatric overgrowth disorder with a variable clinical phenotype caused by deregulation affecting imprinted genes in the chromosomal region 11p15. Alterations of the imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) at the IGF2/H19 locus resulting in biallelic expression of IGF2 and biallelic silencing of H19 account for approximately 10% of patients with BWS. The majority of these patients have epimutations of the ICR1 without detectable DNA sequence changes. Only a few patients were found to have deletions. Most of these deletions are small affecting different parts of the ICR1 differentially methylated region (ICR1-DMR) removing target sequences for CTCF. Only a very few deletions reported so far include the H19 gene in addition to the CTCF binding sites. None of these deletions include IGF2. CASE PRESENTATION: A male patient was born with hypotonia, facial dysmorphisms and hypoglycemia suggestive of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Using methylation-specific (MS)-MLPA (Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) we have identified a maternally inherited large deletion of the ICR1 region in a patient and his mother. The deletion results in a variable clinical expression with a classical BWS in the mother and a more severe presentation of BWS in her son. By genome-wide SNP array analysis the deletion was found to span ~100 kb genomic DNA including the ICR1DMR, H19, two adjacent non-imprinted genes and two of three predicted enhancer elements downstream to H19. Methylation analysis by deep bisulfite next generation sequencing revealed hypermethylation of the maternal allele at the IGF2 locus in both, mother and child, although IGF2 is not affected by the deletion. CONCLUSIONS: We here report on a novel large familial deletion of the ICR1 region in a BWS family. Due to the deletion of the ICR1-DMR CTCF binding cannot take place and the residual enhancer elements have access to the IGF2 promoters. The aberrant methylation (hypermethylation) of the maternal IGF2 allele in both affected family members may reflect the active state of the normally silenced maternal IGF2 copy and can be a consequence of the deletion. The deletion results in a variable clinical phenotype and expression.


Assuntos
Síndrome de Beckwith-Wiedemann/genética , Elementos Facilitadores Genéticos/genética , Loci Gênicos/genética , Deleção de Sequência , Adulto , Análise Citogenética , Metilação de DNA , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Fator de Crescimento Insulin-Like II/genética , Masculino , Fenótipo , Gravidez
17.
Hum Genet ; 134(6): 553-68, 2015 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25724810

RESUMO

Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) and Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NCBRS) are rare intellectual disability/congenital malformation syndromes that represent distinct entities but show considerable clinical overlap. They are caused by mutations in genes encoding members of the BRG1- and BRM-associated factor (BAF) complex. However, there are a number of patients with the clinical diagnosis of CSS or NCBRS in whom the causative mutation has not been identified. In this study, we performed trio-based whole-exome sequencing (WES) in ten previously described but unsolved individuals with the tentative diagnosis of CSS or NCBRS and found causative mutations in nine out of ten individuals. Interestingly, our WES analysis disclosed overlapping differential diagnoses including Wiedemann-Steiner, Kabuki, and Adams-Oliver syndromes. In addition, most likely causative de novo mutations were identified in GRIN2A and SHANK3. Moreover, trio-based WES detected SMARCA2 and SMARCA4 deletions, which had not been annotated in a previous Haloplex target enrichment and next-generation sequencing of known CSS/NCBRS genes emphasizing the advantages of WES as a diagnostic tool. In summary, we discuss the phenotypic and diagnostic challenges in clinical genetics, establish important differential diagnoses, and emphasize the cardinal features and the broad clinical spectrum of BAF complex disorders and other disorders caused by mutations in epigenetic landscapers.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Múltiplas/diagnóstico , Anormalidades Múltiplas/genética , Exoma , Face/anormalidades , Deformidades Congênitas do Pé/diagnóstico , Deformidades Congênitas do Pé/genética , Deformidades Congênitas da Mão/diagnóstico , Deformidades Congênitas da Mão/genética , Hipotricose/diagnóstico , Hipotricose/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Micrognatismo/diagnóstico , Micrognatismo/genética , Mutação , Pescoço/anormalidades , Adulto , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , DNA Helicases/genética , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Facies , Feminino , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Receptores de N-Metil-D-Aspartato/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética
18.
Eur J Med Genet ; 58(5): 279-92, 2015 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25792522

RESUMO

Tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is characterized by craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities, and subdivided in TRPS I, caused by mutations in TRPS1, and TRPS II, caused by a contiguous gene deletion affecting (amongst others) TRPS1 and EXT1. We performed a collaborative international study to delineate phenotype, natural history, variability, and genotype-phenotype correlations in more detail. We gathered information on 103 cytogenetically or molecularly confirmed affected individuals. TRPS I was present in 85 individuals (22 missense mutations, 62 other mutations), TRPS II in 14, and in 5 it remained uncertain whether TRPS1 was partially or completely deleted. Main features defining the facial phenotype include fine and sparse hair, thick and broad eyebrows, especially the medial portion, a broad nasal ridge and tip, underdeveloped nasal alae, and a broad columella. The facial manifestations in patients with TRPS I and TRPS II do not show a significant difference. In the limbs the main findings are short hands and feet, hypermobility, and a tendency for isolated metacarpals and metatarsals to be shortened. Nails of fingers and toes are typically thin and dystrophic. The radiological hallmark are the cone-shaped epiphyses and in TRPS II multiple exostoses. Osteopenia is common in both, as is reduced linear growth, both prenatally and postnatally. Variability for all findings, also within a single family, can be marked. Morbidity mostly concerns joint problems, manifesting in increased or decreased mobility, pain and in a minority an increased fracture rate. The hips can be markedly affected at a (very) young age. Intellectual disability is uncommon in TRPS I and, if present, usually mild. In TRPS II intellectual disability is present in most but not all, and again typically mild to moderate in severity. Missense mutations are located exclusively in exon 6 and 7 of TRPS1. Other mutations are located anywhere in exons 4-7. Whole gene deletions are common but have variable breakpoints. Most of the phenotype in patients with TRPS II is explained by the deletion of TRPS1 and EXT1, but haploinsufficiency of RAD21 is also likely to contribute. Genotype-phenotype studies showed that mutations located in exon 6 may have somewhat more pronounced facial characteristics and more marked shortening of hands and feet compared to mutations located elsewhere in TRPS1, but numbers are too small to allow firm conclusions.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Múltiplas/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Síndrome de Langer-Giedion/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Anormalidades Múltiplas/patologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Lactente , Síndrome de Langer-Giedion/patologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Adulto Jovem
19.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 23(6): 753-60, 2015 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25138099

RESUMO

Intellectual disability (ID) has an estimated prevalence of 2-3%. Due to its extreme heterogeneity, the genetic basis of ID remains elusive in many cases. Recently, whole exome sequencing (WES) studies revealed that a large proportion of sporadic cases are caused by de novo gene variants. To identify further genes involved in ID, we performed WES in 250 patients with unexplained ID and their unaffected parents and included exomes of 51 previously sequenced child-parents trios in the analysis. Exome analysis revealed de novo intragenic variants in SET domain-containing 5 (SETD5) in two patients. One patient carried a nonsense variant, and the other an 81 bp deletion located across a splice-donor site. Chromosomal microarray diagnostics further identified four de novo non-recurrent microdeletions encompassing SETD5. CRISPR/Cas9 mutation modelling of the two intragenic variants demonstrated nonsense-mediated decay of the resulting transcripts, pointing to a loss-of-function (LoF) and haploinsufficiency as the common disease-causing mechanism of intragenic SETD5 sequence variants and SETD5-containing microdeletions. In silico domain prediction of SETD5, a predicted SET domain-containing histone methyltransferase (HMT), substantiated the presence of a SET domain and identified a novel putative PHD domain, strengthening a functional link to well-known histone-modifying ID genes. All six patients presented with ID and certain facial dysmorphisms, suggesting that SETD5 sequence variants contribute substantially to the microdeletion 3p25.3 phenotype. The present report of two SETD5 LoF variants in 301 patients demonstrates a prevalence of 0.7% and thus SETD5 variants as a relatively frequent cause of ID.


Assuntos
Códon sem Sentido , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Metiltransferases/genética , Fenótipo , Adolescente , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Deleção Cromossômica , Cromossomos Humanos Par 3/genética , Exoma , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Metiltransferases/química , Dados de Sequência Molecular , Linhagem , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Estrutura Terciária de Proteína , Síndrome , Adulto Jovem
20.
Hum Genet ; 134(1): 97-109, 2015 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25326669

RESUMO

Recently, de novo heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in beta-catenin (CTNNB1) were described for the first time in four individuals with intellectual disability (ID), microcephaly, limited speech and (progressive) spasticity, and functional consequences of CTNNB1 deficiency were characterized in a mouse model. Beta-catenin is a key downstream component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Somatic gain-of-function mutations have already been found in various tumor types, whereas germline loss-of-function mutations in animal models have been shown to influence neuronal development and maturation. We report on 16 additional individuals from 15 families in whom we newly identified de novo loss-of-function CTNNB1 mutations (six nonsense, five frameshift, one missense, two splice mutation, and one whole gene deletion). All patients have ID, motor delay and speech impairment (both mostly severe) and abnormal muscle tone (truncal hypotonia and distal hypertonia/spasticity). The craniofacial phenotype comprised microcephaly (typically -2 to -4 SD) in 12 of 16 and some overlapping facial features in all individuals (broad nasal tip, small alae nasi, long and/or flat philtrum, thin upper lip vermillion). With this detailed phenotypic characterization of 16 additional individuals, we expand and further establish the clinical and mutational spectrum of inactivating CTNNB1 mutations and thereby clinically delineate this new CTNNB1 haploinsufficiency syndrome.


Assuntos
Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Microcefalia/genética , Mutação/genética , beta Catenina/genética , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Seguimentos , Haploinsuficiência , Humanos , Lactente , Deficiência Intelectual/patologia , Masculino , Microcefalia/patologia , Fenótipo , Síndrome
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