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1.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 299, 2021 Mar 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33757450

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Because birth size appears to be positively associated with breast cancer risk, we have studied whether this risk may differ according to molecular breast cancer subtypes. METHODS: A cohort of 22,931 women born 1920-1966 were followed up for breast cancer occurrence from 1961 to 2012, and 870 were diagnosed during follow-up. Archival diagnostic material from 537 patients was available to determine molecular breast cancer subtype, specified as Luminal A, Luminal B (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-), Luminal B (HER2+), HER2 type, and Triple negative (TN) breast cancer. Information on the women's birth weight, birth length and head circumference at birth was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each molecular subtype, applying Cox regression, and stratified by maternal height. RESULTS: Birth length (per 2 cm increments) was positively associated with Luminal A (HR = 1.2, 95% CI, 1.0-1.3), Luminal B (HER2+) (HR = 1.3, 95% CI, 1.0-1.7), and TN breast cancer (HR = 1.4, 95% CI, 1.0-1.9). No clear association was found for birth weight and head circumference. The positive associations of birth length were restricted to women whose mothers were relatively tall (above population median). CONCLUSION: We found a positive association of birth length with risk of Luminal A, Luminal B (HER2+) and TN breast cancer that appears to be restricted to women whose mothers were relatively tall. This may support the hypothesis that breast cancer risk is influenced by determinants of longitudinal growth and that this finding deserves further scrutiny.

2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33622804

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The association between socioeconomic disadvantage (low education and/or income) and head and neck cancer is well established, with smoking and alcohol consumption explaining up to three-quarters of the risk. We aimed to investigate the nature of and explanations for head and neck cancer risk associated with occupational socioeconomic prestige (a perceptual measure of psychosocial status), occupational socioeconomic position and manual-work experience, and to assess the potential explanatory role of occupational exposures. METHODS: Pooled analysis included 5818 patients with head and neck cancer (and 7326 control participants) from five studies in Europe and South America. Lifetime job histories were coded to: (1) occupational social prestige-Treiman's Standard International Occupational Prestige Scale (SIOPS); (2) occupational socioeconomic position-International Socio-Economic Index (ISEI); and (3) manual/non-manual jobs. RESULTS: For the longest held job, adjusting for smoking, alcohol and nature of occupation, increased head and neck cancer risk estimates were observed for low SIOPS OR=1.88 (95% CI: 1.64 to 2.17), low ISEI OR=1.74 (95% CI: 1.51 to 1.99) and manual occupations OR=1.49 (95% CI: 1.35 to 1.64). Following mutual adjustment by socioeconomic exposures, risk associated with low SIOPS remained OR=1.59 (95% CI: 1.30 to 1.94). CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that low occupational socioeconomic prestige, position and manual work are associated with head and neck cancer, and such risks are only partly explained by smoking, alcohol and occupational exposures. Perceptual occupational psychosocial status (SIOPS) appears to be the strongest socioeconomic factor, relative to socioeconomic position and manual/non-manual work.

4.
Ann Neurol ; 2020 Nov 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33219563

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Emerging data indicate an increased risk of cerebrovascular events with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and highlight the potential impact of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) on the management and outcomes of acute stroke. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the aforementioned considerations. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis of observational cohort studies reporting on the occurrence and/or outcomes of patients with cerebrovascular events in association with their SARS-CoV-2 infection status. We used a random-effects model. Summary estimates were reported as odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: We identified 18 cohort studies including 67,845 patients. Among patients with SARS-CoV-2, 1.3% (95% CI = 0.9-1.6%, I2 = 87%) were hospitalized for cerebrovascular events, 1.1% (95% CI = 0.8-1.3%, I2 = 85%) for ischemic stroke, and 0.2% (95% CI = 0.1-0.3%, I2 = 64%) for hemorrhagic stroke. Compared to noninfected contemporary or historical controls, patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection had increased odds of ischemic stroke (OR = 3.58, 95% CI = 1.43-8.92, I2 = 43%) and cryptogenic stroke (OR = 3.98, 95% CI = 1.62-9.77, I2 = 0%). Diabetes mellitus was found to be more prevalent among SARS-CoV-2 stroke patients compared to noninfected historical controls (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.00-1.94, I2 = 0%). SARS-CoV-2 infection status was not associated with the likelihood of receiving intravenous thrombolysis (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 0.65-3.10, I2 = 0%) or endovascular thrombectomy (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.35-1.74, I2 = 0%) among hospitalized ischemic stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Odds of in-hospital mortality were higher among SARS-CoV-2 stroke patients compared to noninfected contemporary or historical stroke patients (OR = 5.60, 95% CI = 3.19-9.80, I2 = 45%). INTERPRETATION: SARS-CoV-2 appears to be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, and potentially cryptogenic stroke in particular. It may also be related to an increased mortality risk. ANN NEUROL 2020.

5.
Cancers (Basel) ; 12(10)2020 Oct 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33092262

RESUMO

Phenolic compounds may exert a favorable effect on the risk of several cancer types, including gastric cancer (GC). However, selected polyphenol classes have not been adequately investigated in relation to GC. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between the intake of polyphenols in relation to GC risk. We used data from the Stomach cancer Pooling (StoP) Project, including 10 studies from six countries (3471 GC cases and 8344 controls). We carried out an individual participant data pooled analysis using a two-stage approach. The summary odds ratios (ORs) of GC for each compound, and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), were computed by pooling study specific ORs obtained through multivariate logistic regression, using random effect models. Inverse associations with GC emerged for total polyphenols (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.54-0.81, for the highest versus lowest quartile of intake), total flavonoids (OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.55-0.90), anthocyanidins (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.56-0.92), flavanols (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.66-0.88), flavanones (OR = 0.57, 95%CI = 0.44-0.69), total phenolic acids (OR = 0.75, 95%CI = 0.55-0.94), and hydroxybenzoic acids (OR = 0.73, 95%CI = 0.57-0.89). Results were consistent across strata of age, sex, social class, and smoking habit. Suggestive inverse associations were also found for flavonols (OR = 0.76, 95%CI = 0.51-1.01) and hydroxycinnamic acids (OR = 0.82, 95%CI = 0.58-1.06). Further investigations from longitudinal data are needed to confirm this association.

6.
Environ Res ; : 110348, 2020 Oct 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33127394

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have documented the adverse effects of long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) on health, while there has been less research on the effects of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), black carbon (BC) and especially ozone (O3). Furthermore, there is limited evidence for the synergistic effects of exposure to pollutants and greenness. We investigated the association of long-term exposure to air pollution and greenness with natural-cause, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality in Greece using an ecological study design. METHODS: Mortality and socioeconomic data were obtained from 1035 municipal units from the 2011 census data. Annual average PM2.5, NO2, BC and O3 concentrations for 2010 were derived from 100 × 100 m surfaces predicted by hybrid LUR models. The normalized difference vegetation index was used to assess greenness. We applied Poisson regression models on standardized mortality rates adjusted for socioeconomic indicators and lung cancer rates, accounting for spatial autocorrelation. The analysis was conducted initially for the whole country and then separately for urban and rural areas. We assessed interactions between pollutants and greenness and applied two-exposure models. RESULTS: An interquartile range (IQR) increase in PM2.5, NO2 and BC was associated with increases in natural-cause mortality (Relative Risk (RR) 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08, 1.11; RR 1.03 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.04) and RR 1.02 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.03), respectively), while PM2.5 and NO2 were also associated with cause-specific mortality. Greenness was associated with lower natural-cause (RR 0.95, 95% CI: 0.94, 0.96 per IQR) and cause-specific mortality. For all outcomes we estimated a protective association with O3 (natural-cause mortality RR 0.79, 95% CI: 0.76, 0.82 per IQR). All associations were stronger in urban areas. We estimated negative statistically significant interactions between air pollution and greenness for respiratory morality and positive ones for cardiovascular mortality. Estimates were mostly robust to co-exposure adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support associations of air pollution and greenness with mortality, both in urban and rural areas of Greece. Further research is needed to elaborate on the synergies in cause-specific mortality. Our results on the interactions between pollutants and greenness may imply differential biological mechanisms for cause-specific mortality and warrant further investigation.

7.
Eur J Cancer Prev ; 2020 Sep 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32925512

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The association between height and risk of gastric cancer has been studied in several epidemiological studies with contrasting results. The aim of this study is to examine the association between adult height and gastric cancer within a large pooled analysis of case-control studies members of the Stomach cancer Pooling (StoP) Project consortium. METHODS: Data from 18 studies members of the StoP consortium were collected and analyzed. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to estimate the study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between 10-cm increase in height and risk of gastric cancer. Age, sex, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, social class, geographical area and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) status were included in the regression model. Resulting estimates were then pooled with random-effect model. Analyses were conducted overall and in strata of selected variables. RESULTS: A total of 7562 cases and 19 033 controls were included in the analysis. The pooled OR was 0.96 (95% CI 0.87-1.05). A sensitivity analysis was performed restricting the results to the studies with information on H. pylori status, resulting in an OR of 0.97 (95% CI 0.79-1.20). CONCLUSION: Our study does not support a strong and consistent association between adult height and gastric cancer.

8.
Eur J Cancer Prev ; 29(5): 408-415, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32740166

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The association among gallbladder disease, cholecystectomy, and pancreatic cancer is unclear. Moreover, time interval between gallbladder disease or cholecystectomy and pancreatic cancer diagnosis is not considered in most previous studies. AIM: To quantify the association among gallbladder disease, cholecystectomy, and pancreatic cancer, considering time since first diagnosis of gallbladder disease or cholecystectomy. METHODS: We used data from nine case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, including 5760 cases of adenocarcinoma of the exocrine pancreas and 8437 controls. We estimated pooled odds ratios and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals by estimating study-specific odds ratios through multivariable unconditional logistic regression models, and then pooling the obtained estimates using fixed-effects models. RESULTS: Compared with patients with no history of gallbladder disease, the pooled odds ratio of pancreatic cancer was 1.69 (95% confidence interval, 1.51-1.88) for patients reporting a history of gallbladder disease. The odds ratio was 4.90 (95% confidence interval, 3.45-6.97) for gallbladder disease diagnosed <2 years before pancreatic cancer diagnosis and 1.11 (95% confidence interval, 0.96-1.29) when ≥2 years elapsed. The pooled odds ratio was 1.64 (95% confidence interval, 1.43-1.89) for patients who underwent cholecystectomy, as compared to those without cholecystectomy. The odds ratio was 7.00 (95% confidence interval, 4.13-11.86) for a surgery <2 years before pancreatic cancer diagnosis and 1.28 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.53) for a surgery ≥2 years before. CONCLUSIONS: There appears to be no long-term effect of gallbladder disease on pancreatic cancer risk, and at most a modest one for cholecystectomy. The strong short-term association can be explained by diagnostic bias and reverse causation.

9.
Br J Cancer ; 123(9): 1456-1463, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32830199

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Alcohol is a well-established risk factor for head and neck cancer (HNC). This study aims to explore the effect of alcohol intensity and duration, as joint continuous exposures, on HNC risk. METHODS: Data from 26 case-control studies in the INHANCE Consortium were used, including never and current drinkers who drunk ≤10 drinks/day for ≤54 years (24234 controls, 4085 oral cavity, 3359 oropharyngeal, 983 hypopharyngeal and 3340 laryngeal cancers). The dose-response relationship between the risk and the joint exposure to drinking intensity and duration was investigated through bivariate regression spline models, adjusting for potential confounders, including tobacco smoking. RESULTS: For all subsites, cancer risk steeply increased with increasing drinks/day, with no appreciable threshold effect at lower intensities. For each intensity level, the risk of oral cavity, hypopharyngeal and laryngeal cancers did not vary according to years of drinking, suggesting no effect of duration. For oropharyngeal cancer, the risk increased with durations up to 28 years, flattening thereafter. The risk peaked at the higher levels of intensity and duration for all subsites (odds ratio = 7.95 for oral cavity, 12.86 for oropharynx, 24.96 for hypopharynx and 6.60 for larynx). CONCLUSIONS: Present results further encourage the reduction of alcohol intensity to mitigate HNC risk.

10.
Public Health Nutr ; : 1-7, 2020 Jul 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32723406

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The current study aimed to develop a modified Mediterranean diet (MMD) score adjusted to the southern Mediterranean countries' cultural specificities and to evaluate associations between adherence to this modified score and overweight/obesity risk in Moroccan adults. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. SETTING: Rural and urban areas of the five greatest provinces of Morocco. PARTICIPANTS: In total, 1516 participants were recruited between September 2009 and February 2017. Dietary assessment was obtained using a validated Moroccan FFQ. We constructed a MMD score focusing on twelve components. The MMD score ranged from 0 (no adherence to the traditional southern Mediterranean diet (MD)) to 12 (maximal adherence) and was categorised as low (scores 0-4), moderate (scores 5-7) and high (scores 8-12). RESULTS: Among the whole population, 754 (50·5 %) were women and 738 (49·5 %) were men, and the mean age was about 55·60 ± 13·70. In total, 58 % of participants were moderately active. Regarding educational level, 50·7 % were illiterate. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 43·3 and 8·6 %, respectively. In multivariate analyses, close adherence to MMD (scores 8-12) was associated with reduced overweight/obesity risk (OR 0·61, 95 % CI 0·44, 0·84). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of overweight and obesity was very high among Moroccan adults. Adherence to the traditional southern MD may help prevent overweight and obesity.

11.
Int J Cancer ; 147(11): 3090-3101, 2020 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32525569

RESUMO

A low intake of fruits and vegetables is a risk factor for gastric cancer, although there is uncertainty regarding the magnitude of the associations. In our study, the relationship between fruits and vegetables intake and gastric cancer was assessed, complementing a previous work on the association betweenconsumption of citrus fruits and gastric cancer. Data from 25 studies (8456 cases and 21 133 controls) with information on fruits and/or vegetables intake were used. A two-stage approach based on random-effects models was used to pool study-specific adjusted (sex, age and the main known risk factors for gastric cancer) odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Exposure-response relations, including linear and nonlinear associations, were modeled using one- and two-order fractional polynomials. Gastric cancer risk was lower for a higher intake of fruits (OR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.64-0.90), noncitrus fruits (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.73-1.02), vegetables (OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.56-0.84), and fruits and vegetables (OR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.49-0.75); results were consistent across sociodemographic and lifestyles categories, as well as study characteristics. Exposure-response analyses showed an increasingly protective effect of portions/day of fruits (OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.57-0.73 for six portions), noncitrus fruits (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.61-0.83 for six portions) and vegetables (OR: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.43-0.60 for 10 portions). A protective effect of all fruits, noncitrus fruits and vegetables was confirmed, supporting further dietary recommendations to decrease the burden of gastric cancer.

12.
Eur J Cancer Prev ; 2020 Apr 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32324646

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The association among gallbladder disease, cholecystectomy, and pancreatic cancer is unclear. Moreover, time interval between gallbladder disease or cholecystectomy and pancreatic cancer diagnosis is not considered in most previous studies. AIM: To quantify the association among gallbladder disease, cholecystectomy, and pancreatic cancer, considering time since first diagnosis of gallbladder disease or cholecystectomy. METHODS: We used data from nine case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, including 5760 cases of adenocarcinoma of the exocrine pancreas and 8437 controls. We estimated pooled odds ratios and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals by estimating study-specific odds ratios through multivariable unconditional logistic regression models, and then pooling the obtained estimates using fixed-effects models. RESULTS: Compared with patients with no history of gallbladder disease, the pooled odds ratio of pancreatic cancer was 1.69 (95% confidence interval, 1.51-1.88) for patients reporting a history of gallbladder disease. The odds ratio was 4.90 (95% confidence interval, 3.45-6.97) for gallbladder disease diagnosed <2 years before pancreatic cancer diagnosis and 1.11 (95% confidence interval, 0.96-1.29) when ≥2 years elapsed. The pooled odds ratio was 1.64 (95% confidence interval, 1.43-1.89) for patients who underwent cholecystectomy, as compared to those without cholecystectomy. The odds ratio was 7.00 (95% confidence interval, 4.13-11.86) for a surgery <2 years before pancreatic cancer diagnosis and 1.28 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.53) for a surgery ≥2 years before. CONCLUSIONS: There appears to be no long-term effect of gallbladder disease on pancreatic cancer risk, and at most a modest one for cholecystectomy. The strong short-term association can be explained by diagnostic bias and reverse causation.

13.
Hellenic J Cardiol ; 61(1): 42-45, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32251729

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Colchicine has been utilized safely in a variety of cardiovascular clinical conditions. Among its potential mechanisms of action is the non-selective inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome which is thought to be a major pathophysiologic component in the clinical course of patients with COVID-19. GRECCO-19 will be a prospective, randomized, open-labeled, controlled study to assess the effects of colchicine in COVID-19 complications prevention. METHODS: Patients with laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection (under RT PCR) and clinical picture that involves temperature >37.5 oC and at least two out of the: i. sustained coughing, ii. sustained throat pain, iii. Anosmia and/or ageusia, iv. fatigue/tiredness, v. PaO2<95 mmHg will be included. Patients will be randomised (1:1) in colchicine or control group. RESULTS: Trial results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. CONCLUSION: GRECCO-19 trial aims to identify whether colchicine may positively intervene in the clinical course of COVID-19. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04326790).


Assuntos
Colchicina , Infecções por Coronavirus , Cardiopatias , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Antirreumáticos/administração & dosagem , Antirreumáticos/efeitos adversos , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Técnicas de Laboratório Clínico/métodos , Colchicina/administração & dosagem , Colchicina/efeitos adversos , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/fisiopatologia , Cardiopatias/sangue , Cardiopatias/etiologia , Cardiopatias/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/fisiopatologia , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Avaliação de Sintomas/métodos , Troponina/análise
14.
Surg Oncol ; 34: 1-6, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32103789

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Breast reconstruction is an option for women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer. Previous studies have reported underutilization of reconstructive surgery. This study aims to examine the role demographic, clinical and socio-economic factors may have on patients' decisions to undergo breast reconstruction. METHODS: We analyzed data from our institutional database. Using multivariable and multinomial logistic regression, we compared breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy-only to those who had immediate breast reconstruction (overall and by type of reconstruction). RESULTS: We analyzed data on 1459 women who underwent mastectomy during the period 2003-2015. Of these, 475 (32.6%) underwent mastectomy-only and 984 (67.4%) also underwent immediate breast reconstruction. After adjusting for potential confounders, older age (OR = 0.18, 95%CI:0.08-0.40), Asian race (OR = 0.29, 95%CI:0.19-0.45), bilateral mastectomy (OR = 0.71, 95%CI:0.56-0.90), and higher stage of disease (OR = 0.44, 95%CI:0.26-0.74) were independent risk factors for not receiving immediate breast reconstruction. Furthermore, patients with Medicare or Medicaid insurance were less likely than patients with private insurance to receive an autologous reconstruction. There was no evidence for changes over time in the way socio-demographic and clinical factors were related to receiving immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical characteristics, sociodemographic factors like age, race and insurance coverage affect the decision for reconstructive surgery following mastectomy.

15.
Int J Cancer ; 147(1): 45-55, 2020 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31584199

RESUMO

The consumption of processed meat has been associated with noncardia gastric cancer, but evidence regarding a possible role of red meat is more limited. Our study aims to quantify the association between meat consumption, namely white, red and processed meat, and the risk of gastric cancer, through individual participant data meta-analysis of studies participating in the "Stomach cancer Pooling (StoP) Project". Data from 22 studies, including 11,443 cases and 28,029 controls, were used. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were pooled through a two-stage approach based on random-effects models. An exposure-response relationship was modeled, using one and two-order fractional polynomials, to evaluate the possible nonlinear association between meat intake and gastric cancer. An increased risk of gastric cancer was observed for the consumption of all types of meat (highest vs. lowest tertile), which was statistically significant for red (OR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.00-1.53), processed (OR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.06-1.43) and total meat (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.09-1.55). Exposure-response analyses showed an increasing risk of gastric cancer with increasing consumption of both processed and red meat, with the highest OR being observed for an intake of 150 g/day of red meat (OR: 1.85; 95% CI: 1.56-2.20). This work provides robust evidence on the relation between the consumption of different types of meat and gastric cancer. Adherence to dietary recommendations to reduce meat consumption may contribute to a reduction in the burden of gastric cancer.

16.
Int J Cancer ; 146(3): 671-681, 2020 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30919464

RESUMO

Low socioeconomic position (SEP) is a strong risk factor for incidence and premature mortality from several cancers. Our study aimed at quantifying the association between SEP and gastric cancer (GC) risk through an individual participant data meta-analysis within the "Stomach cancer Pooling (StoP) Project". Educational level and household income were used as proxies for the SEP. We estimated pooled odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) across levels of education and household income by pooling study-specific ORs through random-effects meta-analytic models. The relative index of inequality (RII) was also computed. A total of 9,773 GC cases and 24,373 controls from 25 studies from Europe, Asia and America were included. The pooled OR for the highest compared to the lowest level of education was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.44-0.84), while the pooled RII was 0.45 (95% CI, 0.29-0.69). A strong inverse association was observed both for noncardia (OR 0.39, 95% CI, 0.22-0.70) and cardia GC (OR 0.47, 95% CI, 0.22-0.99). The relation was stronger among H. pylori negative subjects (RII 0.14, 95% CI, 0.04-0.48) as compared to H. pylori positive ones (RII 0.29, 95% CI, 0.10-0.84), in the absence of a significant interaction (p = 0.28). The highest household income category showed a pooled OR of 0.65 (95% CI, 0.48-0.89), while the corresponding RII was 0.40 (95% CI, 0.22-0.72). Our collaborative pooled-analysis showed a strong inverse relationship between SEP indicators and GC risk. Our data call for public health interventions to reduce GC risk among the more vulnerable groups of the population.


Assuntos
Escolaridade , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Infecções por Helicobacter/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Gástricas/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Ásia/epidemiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Conjuntos de Dados como Assunto , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Mucosa Gástrica/microbiologia , Helicobacter pylori/isolamento & purificação , Humanos , Incidência , Renda/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , América do Norte/epidemiologia , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Populações Vulneráveis/estatística & dados numéricos
17.
Epidemiology ; 31(1): 145-154, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31577634

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Various established occupational lung carcinogens are also suspected risk factors for laryngeal cancer. However, individual studies are often inadequate in size to investigate this relatively rare outcome. Other limitations include imprecise exposure assessment and inadequate adjustment for confounders. METHODS: This study applied a quantitative job exposure matrix (SYN-JEM) for four established occupational lung carcinogens to five case-control studies within the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. We used occupational histories for 2256 laryngeal cancer cases and 7857 controls recruited from 1989 to 2007. We assigned quantitative exposure levels for asbestos, respirable crystalline silica, chromium-VI, and chromium-VI and nickel combined (to address highly correlated exposures) via SYN-JEM. We assessed effects of occupational exposure on cancer risk for males (asbestos, respirable crystalline silica, chromium-VI, and chromium-VI and nickel combined) and females (asbestos and respirable crystalline silica), adjusting for age, study, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, and asbestos exposure where relevant. RESULTS: Among females, odds ratios (ORs) were increased for ever versus never exposed. Among males, P values for linear trend were <0.05 for estimated cumulative exposure (all agents) and <0.05 for exposure duration (respirable crystalline silica, chromium-VI, and chromium-VI and nickel combined); strongest associations were for asbestos at >90th percentile cumulative exposure (OR = 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0, 1.6), respirable crystalline silica at 30+ years duration (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.2, 1.7) and 75th-90th percentile cumulative exposure (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1, 1.8), chromium-VI at >75th percentile cumulative exposure (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.2, 3.0), and chromium-VI and nickel combined at 20-29 years duration (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1, 2.2). CONCLUSIONS: These findings support hypotheses of causal links between four lung carcinogens (asbestos, respirable crystalline silica, chromium-VI, and nickel) and laryngeal cancer.

18.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 144(2): 169e-177e, 2019 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31348330

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Concerns have been expressed about the oncologic safety of breast reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the association of breast reconstruction with breast cancer recurrence, and 5-year survival among breast cancer patients. METHODS: The authors analyzed data from The Johns Hopkins Hospital comprehensive cancer registry, comparing mastectomy-only to postmastectomy breast reconstruction in breast cancer patients to evaluate differences in breast cancer recurrence and 5-year survival. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare unadjusted estimates of survival or disease recurrence. Data were modeled through Cox proportional hazards regression, using as outcomes time to death from any cause or time to cancer recurrence. RESULTS: The authors analyzed data on 1517 women who underwent mastectomy for breast cancer at The Johns Hopkins hospital between 2003 and 2015. Of these, 504 (33.2 percent) underwent mastectomy only and 1013 (66.8 percent) underwent mastectomy plus immediate breast reconstruction. Women were followed up for a median of 5.1 years after diagnosis. There were 132 deaths and 100 breast cancer recurrences. A comparison of Kaplan-Meier survival estimates demonstrated a survival benefit among patients undergoing mastectomy plus reconstruction. After adjusting for various clinical and socioeconomic variables, there was still an overall survival benefit associated with breast reconstruction which, however, was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95 percent CI, 0.53 to 1.13). Patients who underwent reconstruction had a similar rate of recurrence compared to mastectomy-only patients (hazard ratio, 1.08; 95 percent CI, 0.69 to 1.69). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that breast reconstruction does not have a negative impact on either overall survival or breast cancer recurrence rates. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, III.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/mortalidade , Neoplasias da Mama/cirurgia , Mamoplastia/mortalidade , Mastectomia/métodos , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/epidemiologia , Sistema de Registros , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos , Adulto , Baltimore , Neoplasias da Mama/patologia , Intervalo Livre de Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Mamoplastia/métodos , Mastectomia/mortalidade , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/patologia , Prognóstico , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Retrospectivos , Medição de Risco , Análise de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento
19.
J Occup Environ Med ; 61(5): 397-404, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31268937

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations between head and neck cancer (HNC) risk and occupations. METHODS: We harmonized data on occupations in a pooled analysis of 8839 HNC cases and 13,730 controls in International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for associations of occupations and HNC risk. Population attributable fraction (PAF) for occupations was calculated using the formula PEC × (OR - 1)/OR. RESULTS: Trend of increasing HNC risk was found with increasing duration of employment for many occupations, including cooks (OR = 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09 to 1.68), cleaners (OR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.69), painters (OR = 1.82; 95% CI 1.42 to 2.35). The PAF for a priori occupations was 14.5% (95% CI 7.1% to 21.9%) for HNC. CONCLUSIONS: We found associations between certain occupations and HNC risks, including for subsites, with a duration-response relationship.


Assuntos
Bases de Dados Factuais , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/epidemiologia , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Humanos , América Latina/epidemiologia , Modelos Logísticos , América do Norte/epidemiologia , Doenças Profissionais/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco
20.
Oral Oncol ; 94: 47-57, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31178212

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at re-evaluating the strength and shape of the dose-response relationship between the combined (or joint) effect of intensity and duration of cigarette smoking and the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC). We explored this issue considering bivariate spline models, where smoking intensity and duration were treated as interacting continuous exposures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We pooled individual-level data from 33 case-control studies (18,260 HNC cases and 29,844 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium. In bivariate regression spline models, exposures to cigarette smoking intensity and duration (compared with never smokers) were modeled as a linear piecewise function within a logistic regression also including potential confounders. We jointly estimated the optimal knot locations and regression parameters within the Bayesian framework. RESULTS: For oral-cavity/pharyngeal (OCP) cancers, an odds ratio (OR) >5 was reached after 30 years in current smokers of ∼20 or more cigarettes/day. Patterns of OCP cancer risk in current smokers differed across strata of alcohol intensity. For laryngeal cancer, ORs >20 were found for current smokers of ≥20 cigarettes/day for ≥30  years. In former smokers who quit ≥10  years ago, the ORs were approximately halved for OCP cancers, and ∼1/3 for laryngeal cancer, as compared to the same levels of intensity and duration in current smokers. CONCLUSION: Referring to bivariate spline models, this study better quantified the joint effect of intensity and duration of cigarette smoking on HNC risk, further stressing the need of smoking cessation policies.


Assuntos
Fumar Cigarros/efeitos adversos , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/etiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço/patologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco
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