Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 21
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31641027

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD) is one of the causes of pulmonary hypertension. Its diagnosis is histological but new pathogenetic data have emerged. The aim of this study was to describe a French cohort of patients with ACD to improve the comprehension and the diagnosis of this pathology which is probably underdiagnosed. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was conducted in French hospitals. Patients born between 2005 and 2017, whose biological samples were sent to the French genetic reference centres, were included. Clinical, histological and genetic data were retrospectively collected. RESULTS: We presented a series of 21 patients. The mean of postmenstrual age at birth was 37.6 weeks. The first symptoms appeared on the median of 2.5 hours. Pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed in 20 patients out of 21. Two cases had prolonged survival (3.3 and 14 months). Histological analysis was done on lung tissue from autopsy (57.1% of cases) or from percutaneous biopsy (28.6%). FOXF1 was found abnormal in 15 patients (71.4%): 8 deletions and 7 point mutations. Two deletions were found by chromosomal microarray. CONCLUSION: This study is one of the largest clinically described series in literature. It seems crucial to integrate genetics early into diagnostic support. We propose a diagnostic algorithm for helping medical teams to improve diagnosis of this pathology.

2.
Front Immunol ; 10: 1871, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31474980

RESUMO

Background: We report here two new familial cases of associated del15q11 and del7p22, with the latter underlining the clinical variability of this deletion. Two siblings patients presented a similar familial imbalanced translocation, originating from a balanced maternal translocation, with deletions of 7p22 and of 15q11 [arr[GRCh37] 7p22.3-p22.2(42976-3736851)x1, 15q11.1-q11.2(20172544-24979427)x1]. Methods: We used aCGH array, FISH, and karyotype for studying the phenotype of the two patients. Results: The 7p22 deletion (3.5 Mb) contained 58 genes, including several OMIM genes. Patients 1 and 2 exhibited acquisition delays, morphological particularities, and hypogammaglobulinemia, which was more severe in patient 1. Patient 1 presented also with cerebral vasculitis. Conclusion: We discuss here how the PDGFa, CARD11, LFNG, GPER1, and MAFK genes, included in the deletion 7p22, could be involved in the clinical and biological features of the two patients.

3.
Calcif Tissue Int ; 104(4): 355-363, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30554334

RESUMO

Osteoporosis is a common complication of cerebral palsy and Rett's syndrome. It is responsible for multiple fractures, bone pain, and impaired quality of life. In case of Rett's syndrome, a specific dysfunction of osteoblasts causes bone fragility. We observed the effects of annual zoledronic acid (ZA) infusion in a cohort of children with cerebral palsy and Rett's syndrome. 27 children under 18 years (19 with cerebral palsy and 8 girls with Rett syndrome confirmed by MCEP2 mutation) were treated with an annual injection of 0.1 mg/kg (max 4 mg) of ZA. Calcium and vitamin D were combined in all patients from the first injection of ZA. Dental examination was performed before treatment. Data were analyzed retrospectively. Bone mineral density was measured at diagnosis and yearly thereafter. Bone mass density (BMD) is decreased in patient with cerebral palsy and RS. One year after injection of ZA, we observe an increase of Lumbar spine BMD from - 2.99 to - 2.14 SD (p < 0.0001) and femoral BMD from - 4.26 to - 3.32 SD (p < 0.001) In the subgroup of patient with Rett syndrome, we also observe an increase from - 3.27 to 2.50 SD (p = 0.018) of Lumbar spine BMD. No fractures have been observed in our cohort since the first infusion. Side effects (flu-like syndrome and hypocalcemia) were more common in younger patients and after the first infusion. No serious complications were noticed. This study confirms the efficacy and the safety of an annual injection of ZA to improve bone status in children with cerebral palsy and Rett syndrome. No severe adverse effects were observed.

5.
J Med Genet ; 55(6): 359-371, 2018 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29618507

RESUMO

The Xq28 duplication involving the MECP2 gene (MECP2 duplication) has been mainly described in male patients with severe developmental delay (DD) associated with spasticity, stereotypic movements and recurrent infections. Nevertheless, only a few series have been published. We aimed to better describe the phenotype of this condition, with a focus on morphological and neurological features. Through a national collaborative study, we report a large French series of 59 affected males with interstitial MECP2 duplication. Most of the patients (93%) shared similar facial features, which evolved with age (midface hypoplasia, narrow and prominent nasal bridge, thick lower lip, large prominent ears), thick hair, livedo of the limbs, tapered fingers, small feet and vasomotor troubles. Early hypotonia and global DD were constant, with 21% of patients unable to walk. In patients able to stand, lower limbs weakness and spasticity led to a singular standing habitus: flexion of the knees, broad-based stance with pseudo-ataxic gait. Scoliosis was frequent (53%), such as divergent strabismus (76%) and hypermetropia (54%), stereotypic movements (89%), without obvious social withdrawal and decreased pain sensitivity (78%). Most of the patients did not develop expressive language, 35% saying few words. Epilepsy was frequent (59%), with a mean onset around 7.4 years of age, and often (62%) drug-resistant. Other medical issues were frequent: constipation (78%), and recurrent infections (89%), mainly lung. We delineate the clinical phenotype of MECP2 duplication syndrome in a large series of 59 males. Pulmonary hypertension appeared as a cause of early death in these patients, advocating its screening early in life.

6.
Hum Mutat ; 39(6): 790-805, 2018 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29637653

RESUMO

Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) is an X-linked multiple congenital anomalies and overgrowth syndrome caused by a defect in the glypican-3 gene (GPC3). Until now, GPC3 mutations have been reported in isolated cases or small series and the global genotypic spectrum of these mutations has never been delineated. In this study, we review the 57 previously described GPC3 mutations and significantly expand this mutational spectrum with the description of 29 novel mutations. Compiling our data and those of the literature, we provide an overview of 86 distinct GPC3 mutations identified in 120 unrelated families, ranging from single nucleotide variations to complex genomic rearrangements and dispersed throughout the entire coding region of GPC3. The vast majority of them are deletions or truncating mutations (frameshift, nonsense mutations) predicted to result in a loss-of-function. Missense mutations are rare and the two which were functionally characterized, impaired GPC3 function by preventing GPC3 cleavage and cell surface addressing respectively. This report by describing for the first time the wide mutational spectrum of GPC3 could help clinicians and geneticists in interpreting GPC3 variants identified incidentally by high-throughput sequencing technologies and also reinforces the need for functional validation of non-truncating mutations (missense, in frame mutations, duplications).

7.
J Med Genet ; 55(6): 422-429, 2018 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29459493

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Segmentation defects of the vertebrae (SDV) are non-specific features found in various syndromes. The molecular bases of SDV are not fully elucidated due to the wide range of phenotypes and classification issues. The genes involved are in the Notch signalling pathway, which is a key system in somitogenesis. Here we report on mutations identified in a diagnosis cohort of SDV. We focused on spondylocostal dysostosis (SCD) and the phenotype of these patients in order to establish a diagnostic strategy when confronted with SDV. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used DNA samples from a cohort of 73 patients and performed targeted sequencing of the five known SCD-causing genes (DLL3, MESP2, LFNG, HES7 and TBX6) in the first 48 patients and whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 28 relevant patients. RESULTS: Ten diagnoses, including four biallelic variants in TBX6, two biallelic variants in LFNG and DLL3, and one in MESP2 and HES7, were made with the gene panel, and two diagnoses, including biallelic variants in FLNB and one variant in MEOX1, were made by WES. The diagnostic yield of the gene panel was 10/73 (13.7%) in the global cohort but 8/10 (80%) in the subgroup meeting the SCD criteria; the diagnostic yield of WES was 2/28 (8%). CONCLUSION: After negative array CGH, targeted sequencing of the five known SCD genes should only be performed in patients who meet the diagnostic criteria of SCD. The low proportion of candidate genes identified by WES in our cohort suggests the need to consider more complex genetic architectures in cases of SDV.

8.
Eur J Med Genet ; 60(11): 595-604, 2017 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28807864

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has now entered medical practice with powerful applications in the diagnosis of rare Mendelian disorders. Although the usefulness and cost-effectiveness of WES have been widely demonstrated, it is essential to reduce the diagnostic turnaround time to make WES a first-line procedure. Since 2011, the automation of laboratory procedures and advances in sequencing chemistry have made it possible to carry out diagnostic whole genome sequencing from the blood sample to molecular diagnosis of suspected genetic disorders within 50 h. Taking advantage of these advances, the main objective of the study was to improve turnaround times for sequencing results. METHODS: WES was proposed to 29 patients with severe undiagnosed disorders with developmental abnormalities and faced with medical situations requiring rapid diagnosis. Each family gave consent. The extracted DNA was sequenced on a NextSeq500 (Illumina) instrument. Data were analyzed following standard procedures. Variants were interpreted using in-house software. Each rare variant affecting protein sequences with clinical relevance was tested for familial segregation. RESULTS: The diagnostic rate was 45% (13/29), with a mean turnaround time of 40 days from reception of the specimen to delivery of results to the referring physician. Besides permitting genetic counseling, the rapid diagnosis for positive families led to two pre-natal diagnoses and two inclusions in clinical trials. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of rapid diagnostic WES in our primary genetics center. It reduced the diagnostic odyssey and helped provide support to families.


Assuntos
Exoma , Testes Genéticos/normas , Análise de Sequência de DNA/normas , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Diagnóstico Precoce , Feminino , Testes Genéticos/métodos , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Análise de Sequência de DNA/métodos , Fatores de Tempo
9.
J Med Genet ; 53(11): 743-751, 2016 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27317772

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Heterozygous NSD1 mutations were identified in 60%-90% of patients with Sotos syndrome. Recently, mutations of the SETD2 and DNMT3A genes were identified in patients exhibiting only some Sotos syndrome features. Both NSD1 and SETD2 genes encode epigenetic 'writer' proteins that catalyse methylation of histone 3 lysine 36 (H3K36me). The DNMT3A gene encodes an epigenetic 'reader' protein of the H3K36me chromatin mark. METHODS: We aimed at confirming the implication of DNMT3A and SETD2 mutations in an overgrowth phenotype, through a comprehensive targeted-next generation sequencing (NGS) screening in 210 well-phenotyped index cases with a Sotos-like phenotype and no NSD1 mutation, from a French cohort. RESULTS: Six unreported heterozygous likely pathogenic variants in DNMT3A were identified in seven patients: two nonsense variants and four de novo missense variants. One de novo unreported heterozygous frameshift variant was identified in SETD2 in one patient. All the four DNMT3A missense variants affected DNMT3A functional domains, suggesting a potential deleterious impact. DNMT3A-mutated index cases shared similar clinical features including overgrowth phenotype characterised by postnatal tall stature (≥+2SD), macrocephaly (≥+2SD), overweight or obesity at older age, intellectual deficiency and minor facial features. The phenotype associated with SETD2 mutations remains to be described more precisely. The p.Arg882Cys missense de novo constitutional DNMT3A variant found in two patients is the most frequent DNMT3A somatic mutation in acute leukaemia. CONCLUSIONS: Our results illustrate the power of targeted NGS to identify rare disease-causing variants. These observations provided evidence for a unifying mechanism (disruption of apposition and reading of the epigenetic chromatin mark H3K36me) that causes an overgrowth syndrome phenotype. Further studies are needed in order to assess the role of SETD2 and DNMT3A in intellectual deficiency without overgrowth.

10.
Am J Med Genet A ; 170A(1): 116-29, 2016 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26420639

RESUMO

Xq28 duplications encompassing MECP2 have been described in male patients with a severe neurodevelopmental disorder associated with hypotonia and spasticity, severe learning disability, stereotyped movements, and recurrent pulmonary infections. We report on standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 30 affected patients carrying an Xq28 duplication involving MECP2 of various sizes (228 kb to 11.7 Mb). The aim of this study was to seek recurrent malformations and attempt to determine whether variations in imaging features could be explained by differences in the size of the duplications. We showed that 93% of patients had brain MRI abnormalities such as corpus callosum abnormalities (n = 20), reduced volume of the white matter (WM) (n = 12), ventricular dilatation (n = 9), abnormal increased hyperintensities on T2-weighted images involving posterior periventricular WM (n = 6), and vermis hypoplasia (n = 5). The occipitofrontal circumference varied considerably between >+2SD in five patients and <-2SD in four patients. Among the nine patients with dilatation of the lateral ventricles, six had a duplication involving L1CAM. The only patient harboring bilateral posterior subependymal nodular heterotopia also carried an FLNA gene duplication. We could not demonstrate a correlation between periventricular WM hyperintensities/delayed myelination and duplication of the IKBKG gene. We thus conclude that patients with an Xq28 duplication involving MECP2 share some similar but non-specific brain abnormalities. These imaging features, therefore, could not constitute a diagnostic clue. The genotype-phenotype correlation failed to demonstrate a relationship between the presence of nodular heterotopia, ventricular dilatation, WM abnormalities, and the presence of FLNA, L1CAM, or IKBKG, respectively, in the duplicated segment.


Assuntos
Encefalopatias/genética , Cromossomos Humanos X/genética , Duplicação Gênica , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética/métodos , Retardo Mental Ligado ao Cromossomo X/genética , Proteína 2 de Ligação a Metil-CpG/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Encefalopatias/patologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Genótipo , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Retardo Mental Ligado ao Cromossomo X/patologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Linhagem , Fenótipo , Prognóstico , Adulto Jovem
11.
Genet Med ; 18(1): 49-56, 2016 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25790162

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Treacher Collins/Franceschetti syndrome (TCS; OMIM 154500) is a disorder of craniofacial development belonging to the heterogeneous group of mandibulofacial dysostoses. TCS is classically characterized by bilateral mandibular and malar hypoplasia, downward-slanting palpebral fissures, and microtia. To date, three genes have been identified in TCS:,TCOF1, POLR1D, and POLR1C. METHODS: We report a clinical and extensive molecular study, including TCOF1, POLR1D, POLR1C, and EFTUD2 genes, in a series of 146 patients with TCS. Phenotype-genotype correlations were investigated for 19 clinical features, between TCOF1 and POLR1D, and the type of mutation or its localization in the TCOF1 gene. RESULTS: We identified 92/146 patients (63%) with a molecular anomaly within TCOF1, 9/146 (6%) within POLR1D, and none within POLR1C. Among the atypical negative patients (with intellectual disability and/or microcephaly), we identified four patients carrying a mutation in EFTUD2 and two patients with 5q32 deletion encompassing TCOF1 and CAMK2A in particular. Congenital cardiac defects occurred more frequently among patients with TCOF1 mutation (7/92, 8%) than reported in the literature. CONCLUSION: Even though TCOF1 and POLR1D were associated with extreme clinical variability, we found no phenotype-genotype correlation. In cases with a typical phenotype of TCS, 6/146 (4%) remained with an unidentified molecular defect.


Assuntos
RNA Polimerases Dirigidas por DNA/genética , Disostose Mandibulofacial/genética , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Fosfoproteínas/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Sequência de Bases , Criança , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Masculino , Disostose Mandibulofacial/diagnóstico , Microcefalia/genética , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Dados de Sequência Molecular , Mutação , Fatores de Alongamento de Peptídeos/genética , Ribonucleoproteína Nuclear Pequena U5/genética , Deleção de Sequência , Adulto Jovem
12.
J Hum Genet ; 60(5): 267-71, 2015 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25716914

RESUMO

WWOX has been recently implicated in autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia type 12 (SCAR12) and severe early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE). By array comparative genomic hybridization, we identified a 0.6 Mb homozygous deletion in 16q23.1 in a fetus presenting with brain anomalies. His older sister who died at the age of 22 months from an EOEE was also homozygous for the copy number variations in 16q23.1. This deletion includes the first six exons of WWOX and results in a null genotype in homozygous patients. This family gives additional support for the implication of WWOX in severe EOEEs. We report for the first time prenatal ultrasound findings in a fetus with a WWOX-null genotype. Our study expands the range of brain abnormalities in WWOX-related EOEEs. This additional family confirms the genotype-phenotype correlation with WWOX-null alleles associated with the most severe form of WWOX-related epileptic encephalopathy with premature death.


Assuntos
Encefalopatias/diagnóstico por imagem , Epilepsia/diagnóstico por imagem , Oxirredutases/genética , Proteínas Supressoras de Tumor/genética , Encefalopatias/genética , Hibridização Genômica Comparativa , Epilepsia/genética , Evolução Fatal , Feminino , Genes Recessivos , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Gravidez , Ultrassonografia Pré-Natal , Oxidorredutase com Domínios WW
13.
J Med Genet ; 52(1): 61-70, 2015 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25411445

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Homozygous mutations in WWOX were reported in eight individuals of two families with autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia type 12 and in two siblings with infantile epileptic encephalopathy (IEE), including one who deceased prior to DNA sampling. METHODS: By combining array comparative genomic hybridisation, targeted Sanger sequencing and next generation sequencing, we identified five further patients from four families with IEE due to biallelic alterations of WWOX. RESULTS: We identified eight deleterious WWOX alleles consisting in four deletions, a four base-pair frameshifting deletion, one missense and two nonsense mutations. Genotype-phenotype correlation emerges from the seven reported families. The phenotype in four patients carrying two predicted null alleles was characterised by (1) little if any psychomotor acquisitions, poor spontaneous motility and absent eye contact from birth, (2) pharmacoresistant epilepsy starting in the 1st weeks of life, (3) possible retinal degeneration, acquired microcephaly and premature death. This contrasted with the less severe autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia type 12 phenotype due to hypomorphic alleles. In line with this correlation, the phenotype in two siblings carrying a null allele and a missense mutation was intermediate. CONCLUSIONS: Our results obtained by a combination of different molecular techniques undoubtedly incriminate WWOX as a gene for recessive IEE and illustrate the usefulness of high throughput data mining for the identification of genes for rare autosomal recessive disorders. The structure of the WWOX locus encompassing the FRA16D fragile site might explain why constitutive deletions are recurrently reported in genetic databases, suggesting that WWOX-related encephalopathies, although likely rare, may not be exceptional.


Assuntos
Oxirredutases/genética , Fenótipo , Espasmos Infantis/genética , Ataxias Espinocerebelares/genética , Proteínas Supressoras de Tumor/genética , Códon sem Sentido/genética , Hibridização Genômica Comparativa , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Humanos , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto/genética , Espasmos Infantis/patologia , Ataxias Espinocerebelares/patologia , Oxidorredutase com Domínios WW
14.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 72(3): 371-7, 2014 May-Jun.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24876149

RESUMO

49, XXXXY syndrome is a rare sex chromosome aneuploidy occurring in 1:80 000-1:100 000 male births. Data on this aneuploidy in adulthood are limited, with most of the literature data based on paediatric patients. We report a new male patient whose 49, XXXXY diagnosis was formally made at the age of 54 years. So far, no medical follow-up was performed specifically for his condition. This man presented with facial features (epicanthus, hypertelorism, up-slanting palpebral fissures), microorchidism and features of chronic hypoandrogenism with muscular weakness, sparse body hair, dry skin with abnormal healing of skin wounds. Endocrine evaluation confirmed a hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. He had moderate intellectual deficiency with more affected verbal skills. A recent deep vein thrombosis was diagnosed in his left leg. Unusually, in addition to moderate deafness, he developed progressively a severe vision impairment leading to blindness. There have been very few reports of adult individuals with 49, XXXXY syndrome and this kind of report may contribute to improved management of prospective medical healthcare associated with this condition in older individuals.


Assuntos
Síndrome de Klinefelter/diagnóstico , Aneuploidia , Cegueira/diagnóstico , Surdez/diagnóstico , Pálpebras/anormalidades , Facies , Humanos , Hipertelorismo/diagnóstico , Hipogonadismo/diagnóstico , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Síndrome de Klinefelter/genética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
15.
Eur J Paediatr Neurol ; 18(4): 475-81, 2014 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24703762

RESUMO

UNLABELLED: Mutation of the X-linked methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) has been first identified as the cause of Rett syndrome. More recently, MECP2 gene duplication syndrome has been identified in males. The MECP2 duplication syndrome is characterized by severe mental retardation, infantile hypotonia, progressive spasticity and recurrent infections. Epileptic seizures are inconstant but poorly described. The aim of the study is to describe the electroclinical features of epilepsy in MECP2 duplication patients in order to refine the epilepsy phenotype and its evolution. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study in four child neurology departments in France. Eight boys with a MECP2 gene duplication and epilepsy were retrospectively studied. We evaluated both clinical and electroencephalographic data before seizure onset, at seizure onset and during the follow-up. RESULTS: The patients started seizures at the median age of 6 years (range: 2.5-17 years). Half exhibits late onset epileptic spasms while the other exhibit either focal epilepsy or unclassified generalized epilepsy. Before seizure onset, EEGs were abnormal in all patients showing a slowing of the background or a normal background with fast activities, while EEG performed in epileptic patients, showed a slowing of the background in 6/8 and localized slow or sharp waves in 7/8. Most patients (6/8) have evolved to drug resistant epilepsy. CONCLUSION: Although late onset epileptic spasms are common in patients with MECP2 duplication, no specific electroclinical phenotype emerges, probably due to genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome. Further studies are needed to individualize specific epileptic subtype in larger cohort of patients.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/complicações , Epilepsia/genética , Duplicação Gênica , Proteína 2 de Ligação a Metil-CpG/genética , Espasmo/etiologia , Adolescente , Idade de Início , Ondas Encefálicas/genética , Criança , Eletroencefalografia , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Fenótipo , Adulto Jovem
16.
Hum Mutat ; 35(3): 356-67, 2014 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24375629

RESUMO

Mutations in the KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes encoding for Kv 7.2 (KCNQ2; Q2) and Kv 7.3 (KCNQ3; Q3) voltage-dependent K(+) channel subunits, respectively, cause neonatal epilepsies with wide phenotypic heterogeneity. In addition to benign familial neonatal epilepsy (BFNE), KCNQ2 mutations have been recently found in families with one or more family members with a severe outcome, including drug-resistant seizures with psychomotor retardation, electroencephalogram (EEG) suppression-burst pattern (Ohtahara syndrome), and distinct neuroradiological features, a condition that was named "KCNQ2 encephalopathy." In the present article, we describe clinical, genetic, and functional data from 17 patients/families whose electroclinical presentation was consistent with the diagnosis of BFNE. Sixteen different heterozygous mutations were found in KCNQ2, including 10 substitutions, three insertions/deletions and three large deletions. One substitution was found in KCNQ3. Most of these mutations were novel, except for four KCNQ2 substitutions that were shown to be recurrent. Electrophysiological studies in mammalian cells revealed that homomeric or heteromeric KCNQ2 and/or KCNQ3 channels carrying mutant subunits with newly found substitutions displayed reduced current densities. In addition, we describe, for the first time, that some mutations impair channel regulation by syntaxin-1A, highlighting a novel pathogenetic mechanism for KCNQ2-related epilepsies.


Assuntos
Epilepsia Neonatal Benigna/genética , Canal de Potássio KCNQ2/genética , Canal de Potássio KCNQ3/genética , Sintaxina 1/genética , Animais , Biotinilação , Células CHO , Estudos de Coortes , Cricetulus , Feminino , Deleção de Genes , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Humanos , Masculino , Mutagênese Insercional , Linhagem , Alinhamento de Sequência
17.
Eur J Hum Genet ; 22(1): 52-6, 2014 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23695276

RESUMO

Mandibulofacial dysostosis is part of a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of craniofacial development, which lead to malar and mandibular hypoplasia. Treacher Collins syndrome is the major cause of mandibulofacial dysostosis and is due to mutations in the TCOF1 gene. Usually patients with Treacher Collins syndrome do not present with intellectual disability. Recently, the EFTUD2 gene was identified in patients with mandibulofacial dysostosis associated with microcephaly, intellectual disability and esophageal atresia. We report on two patients presenting with mandibulofacial dysostosis characteristic of Treacher Collins syndrome, but associated with unexpected intellectual disability, due to a large deletion encompassing several genes including the TCOF1 gene. We discuss the involvement of the other deleted genes such as CAMK2A or SLC6A7 in the cognitive development delay of the patients reported, and we propose the systematic investigation for 5q32 deletion when intellectual disability is associated with Treacher Collins syndrome.


Assuntos
Proteína Quinase Tipo 2 Dependente de Cálcio-Calmodulina/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Disostose Mandibulofacial/genética , Proteínas Nucleares/genética , Fosfoproteínas/genética , Adolescente , Criança , Feminino , Deleção de Genes , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/etiologia , Deficiência Intelectual/patologia , Masculino , Disostose Mandibulofacial/etiologia , Disostose Mandibulofacial/patologia , Mutação
18.
Neurology ; 80(24): 2226-32, 2013 Jun 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23658383

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical presentation of children and adolescents with anti-Hu antibodies (Hu-Abs). METHODS: This was a retrospective study of children and adolescents with Hu-Abs collected by the French Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome (PNS) Reference Center between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011. RESULTS: The center identified 251 patients with Hu-Abs. Only 8 patients were younger than 18 years. All of the 243 adult patients had PNS. In contrast, of the 8 children, only 2 (25%, Fisher exact test p = 0.0003) had neuroblastoma and opsoclonus-myoclonus. The other 6 children (5 female and 1 male) presented with limbic encephalitis (progressive personality changes, memory loss, and seizure) and were free of cancer (mean follow-up time: 50 months; range: 34-72 months). Brain MRI scans were abnormal in 4 of the 6 patients, with left, right, or bitemporal T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintensity. Protein levels and cell counts in the CSF were normal in all patients, but numerous oligoclonal bands were observed in 4 patients. All 6 patients received antiepileptic drugs and immunotherapy, but management of epilepsy was difficult in all of them. Five of the children developed cognitive impairments. CONCLUSION: In children, as in adults, Hu-Abs can be a marker of PNS. However, in contrast to adults, Hu-Abs in children are also associated with an aggressive form of autoimmune nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis. Future studies should be conducted to determine the incidence of this syndrome and whether earlier diagnosis and T-cell-directed immunotherapies may improve its prognosis.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Antinucleares/biossíntese , Doenças Autoimunes/diagnóstico , Doenças Autoimunes/imunologia , Proteínas ELAV/imunologia , Encefalite Límbica/diagnóstico , Encefalite Límbica/imunologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Anticorpos Antinucleares/sangue , Doenças Autoimunes/epidemiologia , Biomarcadores/sangue , Criança , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Encefalite Límbica/epidemiologia , Masculino , Neoplasias/diagnóstico , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Neoplasias/imunologia , Estudos Retrospectivos
19.
J Med Genet ; 49(12): 731-6, 2012 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23099646

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: DYRK1A plays different functions during development, with an important role in controlling brain growth through neuronal proliferation and neurogenesis. It is expressed in a gene dosage dependent manner since dyrk1a haploinsufficiency induces a reduced brain size in mice, and DYRK1A overexpression is the candidate gene for intellectual disability (ID) and microcephaly in Down syndrome. We have identified a 69 kb deletion including the 5' region of the DYRK1A gene in a patient with growth retardation, primary microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, seizures, ataxic gait, absent speech and ID. Because four patients previously reported with intragenic DYRK1A rearrangements or 21q22 microdeletions including only DYRK1A presented with overlapping phenotypes, we hypothesised that DYRK1A mutations could be responsible for syndromic ID with severe microcephaly and epilepsy. METHODS: The DYRK1A gene was studied by direct sequencing and quantitative PCR in a cohort of 105 patients with ID and at least two symptoms from the Angelman syndrome spectrum (microcephaly < -2.5 SD, ataxic gait, seizures and speech delay). RESULTS: We identified a de novo frameshift mutation (c.290_291delCT; p.Ser97Cysfs*98) in a patient with growth retardation, primary severe microcephaly, delayed language, ID, and seizures. CONCLUSION: The identification of a truncating mutation in a patient with ID, severe microcephaly, epilepsy, and growth retardation, combined with its dual function in regulating the neural proliferation/neuronal differentiation, adds DYRK1A to the list of genes responsible for such a phenotype. ID, microcephaly, epilepsy, and language delay are the more specific features associated with DYRK1A abnormalities. DYRK1A studies should be discussed in patients presenting such a phenotype.


Assuntos
Epilepsia/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Microcefalia/genética , Mutação , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/genética , Proteínas Tirosina Quinases/genética , Adolescente , Sequência de Bases , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Eletroencefalografia , Epilepsia/diagnóstico , Facies , Feminino , Ordem dos Genes , Genótipo , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/diagnóstico , Masculino , Microcefalia/diagnóstico , Fenótipo , Síndrome
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA