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1.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 11410, 2019 Aug 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31388106

RESUMO

Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) burden differs by race/ethnicity. Although familial aggregation and heritability studies suggest a genetic basis, little is known about the genetic susceptibility to PAD, especially in non-European descent populations. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the ankle brachial index (ABI) and PAD (defined as an ABI < 0.90) have not been conducted in Hispanics/Latinos. We performed a GWAS of PAD and the ABI in 7,589 participants aged >45 years from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). We also performed GWAS for ABI stratified by Hispanic/Latino ethnic subgroups: Central American, Mexican, and South American (Mainland group), and Cuban, Dominican, and Puerto Rican (Caribbean group). We detected two genome-wide significant associations for the ABI in COMMD10 in Puerto Ricans, and at SYBU in the Caribbean group. The lead SNP rs4466200 in the COMMD10 gene had a replication p = 0.02 for the ABI in Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) African Americans, but it did not replicate in African Americans from the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). In a regional look-up, a nearby SNP rs12520838 had Bonferroni adjusted p = 0.05 (unadjusted p = 7.5 × 10-5) for PAD in MESA Hispanics. Among three suggestive associations (p < 10-7) in subgroup-specific analyses, DMD on chromosome X, identified in Central Americans, replicated in MESA Hispanics (p = 2.2 × 10-4). None of the previously reported ABI and PAD associations in whites generalized to Hispanics/Latinos.

2.
PLoS One ; 14(6): e0217796, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31251759

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographically quantified QRS duration measures ventricular depolarization and conduction. QRS prolongation has been associated with poor heart failure prognosis and cardiovascular mortality, including sudden death. While previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 32 QRS SNPs across 26 loci among European, African, and Asian-descent populations, the genetics of QRS among Hispanics/Latinos has not been previously explored. METHODS: We performed a GWAS of QRS duration among Hispanic/Latino ancestry populations (n = 15,124) from four studies using 1000 Genomes imputed genotype data (adjusted for age, sex, global ancestry, clinical and study-specific covariates). Study-specific results were combined using fixed-effects, inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis. RESULTS: We identified six loci associated with QRS (P<5x10-8), including two novel loci: MYOCD, a nuclear protein expressed in the heart, and SYT1, an integral membrane protein. The top SNP in the MYOCD locus, intronic SNP rs16946539, was found in Hispanics/Latinos with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 0.04, but is monomorphic in European and African descent populations. The most significant QRS duration association was with intronic SNP rs3922344 (P = 1.19x10-24) in SCN5A/SCN10A. Three other previously identified loci, CDKN1A, VTI1A, and HAND1, also exceeded the GWAS significance threshold among Hispanics/Latinos. A total of 27 of 32 previously identified QRS duration SNPs were shown to generalize in Hispanics/Latinos. CONCLUSIONS: Our QRS duration GWAS, the first in Hispanic/Latino populations, identified two new loci, underscoring the utility of extending large scale genomic studies to currently under-examined populations.

3.
PLoS Genet ; 15(4): e1007739, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30990817

RESUMO

Sleep disordered breathing (SDB)-related overnight hypoxemia is associated with cardiometabolic disease and other comorbidities. Understanding the genetic bases for variations in nocturnal hypoxemia may help understand mechanisms influencing oxygenation and SDB-related mortality. We conducted genome-wide association tests across 10 cohorts and 4 populations to identify genetic variants associated with three correlated measures of overnight oxyhemoglobin saturation: average and minimum oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep and the percent of sleep with oxyhemoglobin saturation under 90%. The discovery sample consisted of 8,326 individuals. Variants with p < 1 × 10(-6) were analyzed in a replication group of 14,410 individuals. We identified 3 significantly associated regions, including 2 regions in multi-ethnic analyses (2q12, 10q22). SNPs in the 2q12 region associated with minimum SpO2 (rs78136548 p = 2.70 × 10(-10)). SNPs at 10q22 were associated with all three traits including average SpO2 (rs72805692 p = 4.58 × 10(-8)). SNPs in both regions were associated in over 20,000 individuals and are supported by prior associations or functional evidence. Four additional significant regions were detected in secondary sex-stratified and combined discovery and replication analyses, including a region overlapping Reelin, a known marker of respiratory complex neurons.These are the first genome-wide significant findings reported for oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep, a phenotype of high clinical interest. Our replicated associations with HK1 and IL18R1 suggest that variants in inflammatory pathways, such as the biologically-plausible NLRP3 inflammasome, may contribute to nocturnal hypoxemia.


Assuntos
Hexoquinase/genética , Subunidade alfa de Receptor de Interleucina-18/genética , Oxiemoglobinas/metabolismo , Sono/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Moléculas de Adesão Celular Neuronais/genética , Biologia Computacional , Proteínas da Matriz Extracelular/genética , Feminino , Redes Reguladoras de Genes , Variação Genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Hipóxia/sangue , Hipóxia/genética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteína 3 que Contém Domínio de Pirina da Família NLR/genética , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Oxigênio/sangue , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Serina Endopeptidases/genética , Síndromes da Apneia do Sono/sangue , Síndromes da Apneia do Sono/genética , Adulto Jovem
4.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(2): 260-274, 2019 Feb 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30639324

RESUMO

With advances in whole-genome sequencing (WGS) technology, more advanced statistical methods for testing genetic association with rare variants are being developed. Methods in which variants are grouped for analysis are also known as variant-set, gene-based, and aggregate unit tests. The burden test and sequence kernel association test (SKAT) are two widely used variant-set tests, which were originally developed for samples of unrelated individuals and later have been extended to family data with known pedigree structures. However, computationally efficient and powerful variant-set tests are needed to make analyses tractable in large-scale WGS studies with complex study samples. In this paper, we propose the variant-set mixed model association tests (SMMAT) for continuous and binary traits using the generalized linear mixed model framework. These tests can be applied to large-scale WGS studies involving samples with population structure and relatedness, such as in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program. SMMATs share the same null model for different variant sets, and a virtue of this null model, which includes covariates only, is that it needs to be fit only once for all tests in each genome-wide analysis. Simulation studies show that all the proposed SMMATs correctly control type I error rates for both continuous and binary traits in the presence of population structure and relatedness. We also illustrate our tests in a real data example of analysis of plasma fibrinogen levels in the TOPMed program (n = 23,763), using the Analysis Commons, a cloud-based computing platform.

5.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 843, 2019 Jan 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30696834

RESUMO

Five sequence variants in SLC16A11 (rs117767867, rs13342692, rs13342232, rs75418188, and rs75493593), which occur in two non-reference haplotypes, were recently shown to be associated with diabetes in Mexicans from the SIGMA consortium. We aimed to determine whether these previous findings would replicate in the HCHS/SOL Mexican origin group and whether genotypic effects were similar in other HCHS/SOL groups. We analyzed these five variants in 2492 diabetes cases and 5236 controls from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), which includes U.S. participants from six diverse background groups (Mainland groups: Mexican, Central American, and South American; and Caribbean groups: Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican). We estimated the SNP-diabetes association in the six groups and in the combined sample. We found that the risk alleles occur in two non-reference haplotypes in HCHS/SOL, as in the SIGMA Mexicans. The haplotype frequencies were very similar between SIGMA Mexicans and the HCHS/SOL Mainland groups, but different in the Caribbean groups. The SLC16A11 sequence variants were significantly associated with risk for diabetes in the Mexican origin group (P = 0.025), replicating the SIGMA findings. However, these variants were not significantly associated with diabetes in a combined analysis of all groups, although the power to detect such effects was 85% (assuming homogeneity of effects among the groups). Additional analyses performed separately in each of the five non-Mexican origin groups were not significant. We also analyzed (1) exclusion of young controls and, (2) SNP by BMI interactions, but neither was significant in the HCHS/SOL data. The previously reported effects of SLC16A11 variants on diabetes in Mexican samples was replicated in a large Mexican-American sample, but these effects were not significant in five non-Mexican Hispanic/Latino groups sampled from U.S. populations. Lack of replication in the HCHS/SOL non-Mexicans, and in the entire HCHS/SOL sample combined may represent underlying genetic heterogeneity. These results indicate a need for future genetic research to consider heterogeneity of the Hispanic/Latino population in the assessment of disease risk, but add to the evidence suggesting SLC16A11 as a potential therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes.

6.
Genet Epidemiol ; 43(3): 263-275, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30653739

RESUMO

When testing genotype-phenotype associations using linear regression, departure of the trait distribution from normality can impact both Type I error rate control and statistical power, with worse consequences for rarer variants. Because genotypes are expected to have small effects (if any) investigators now routinely use a two-stage method, in which they first regress the trait on covariates, obtain residuals, rank-normalize them, and then use the rank-normalized residuals in association analysis with the genotypes. Potential confounding signals are assumed to be removed at the first stage, so in practice, no further adjustment is done in the second stage. Here, we show that this widely used approach can lead to tests with undesirable statistical properties, due to both combination of a mis-specified mean-variance relationship and remaining covariate associations between the rank-normalized residuals and genotypes. We demonstrate these properties theoretically, and also in applications to genome-wide and whole-genome sequencing association studies. We further propose and evaluate an alternative fully adjusted two-stage approach that adjusts for covariates both when residuals are obtained and in the subsequent association test. This method can reduce excess Type I errors and improve statistical power.


Assuntos
Estudos de Associação Genética , Modelos Genéticos , Simulação por Computador , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Hemoglobinas/metabolismo , Hispano-Americanos , Humanos , Modelos Lineares , Fenótipo
7.
Hum Mol Genet ; 2018 Nov 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30403821

RESUMO

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Its prevalence and severity vary across ancestral background. Although OSA traits are heritable, few genetic associations have been identified. To identify genetic regions associated with OSA and improve statistical power, we applied admixture mapping on three primary OSA traits (the apnea hypopnea index [AHI], overnight average oxyhemoglobin saturation [SaO2] and percentage time SaO2<90%) and a secondary trait (respiratory event duration) in a Hispanic/Latino American population study of 11,575 individuals with significant variation in ancestral background. Linear mixed models were performed using previously inferred African, European and Amerindian local genetic ancestry markers. Global African ancestry was associated with a lower AHI, higher oxyhemoglobin saturation and shorter event duration. Admixture mapping analysis of the primary OSA traits identified local African ancestry at the chromosomal region 2q37 as genome-wide significantly associated with AHI (P<5.7×10-5), and European and Amerindian ancestries at 18q21 suggestively associated with both AHI and percentage time SaO2<90% (P<10-3). Follow-up joint ancestry-SNP association analyses identified novel variants in ferrochelatase (FECH), significantly associated with AHI and percentage time SaO2<90% after adjusting for multiple tests (P<8×10-6). These signals contributed to the admixture mapping associations and were replicated in independent cohorts. In this first admixture mapping study of OSA, novel associations with variants in the iron/heme metabolism pathway suggest a role for iron in influencing respiratory traits underlying OSA.

8.
Pain ; 2018 Nov 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30431558

RESUMO

Painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is the leading cause of chronic orofacial pain, but its underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. While many environmental factors have been associated with higher risk of developing painful TMD, family and twin studies support a heritable genetic component as well. We performed a GWAS assuming an additive genetic model of TMD in a discovery cohort of 999 cases and 2031 TMD-free controls from the Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment (OPPERA) study. Using logistic models adjusted for sex, age, enrollment site, and race, we identified three distinct loci that were significant in combined or sex-segregated analyses. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on chromosome 3 (rs13078961) was significantly associated with TMD in males only (odds ratio [OR]=2.9, 95% CI: 2.02-4.27, P=2.2x10). This association was nominally replicated in a meta-analysis of seven independent orofacial pain cohorts including 160,194 participants (OR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.0-1.35, P = 2.3x10). Functional analysis in human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and blood indicated this variant is an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL), with the minor allele associated with decreased expression of the nearby muscle RAS oncogene homolog (MRAS) gene (beta = -0.51, P = 2.43x10). Male mice, but not female mice, with a null mutation of Mras displayed persistent mechanical allodynia in a model of inflammatory pain. Genetic and behavioral evidence support a novel mechanism by which genetically-determined MRAS expression moderates the resiliency to chronic pain. This effect is male-specific and may contribute to the lower rates of painful TMD in men.Written work prepared by employees of the Federal Government as part of their official duties is, under the U.S. Copyright Act, a "work of the United States Government" for which copyright protection under Title 17 of the United States Code is not available. As such, copyright does not extend to the contributions of employees of the Federal Government.

9.
Hum Mol Genet ; 2018 Nov 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30452639

RESUMO

Orofacial clefts are common developmental disorders that pose significant clinical, economic and psychological problems. We conducted genome-wide association analyses for isolated cleft palate (CPO) and cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P) with ~17 million markers in sub- Saharan Africans. After replication and combined analyses, we identified novel loci for CPO at or near genome-wide significance on chromosomes 2 (near CTNNA2) and 19 (near SULT2A1). In situ hybridization of Sult2a1 in mice shows expression of SULT2A1 in mesenchymal cells in palate, palatal rugae and palatal epithelium in the fused palate. The previously-reported 8q24 locus was the most significant for CL/P in our study and we replicated several previously reported loci including PAX7 and VAX1.

10.
BMC Obes ; 5: 26, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30305909

RESUMO

Background: Genome-wide association studies have implicated the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene in type 2 diabetes risk, and more recently, in decreased body mass index. Given the contrary direction of genetic effects on these two traits, it has been suggested that the observed association with body mass index may reflect either selection bias or a complex underlying biology at TCF7L2. Methods: Using 9031 Hispanic/Latino adults (21-76 years) with complete weight history and genetic data from the community-based Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL, Baseline 2008-2011), we estimated the multivariable association between the additive number of type 2 diabetes increasing-alleles at TCF7L2 (rs7903146-T) and body mass index. We then used structural equation models to simultaneously model the genetic association on changes in body mass index across the life course and estimate the odds of type 2 diabetes per TCF7L2 risk allele. Results: We observed both significant increases in type 2 diabetes prevalence at examination (independent of body mass index) and decreases in mean body mass index and waist circumference across genotypes at rs7903146. We observed a significant multivariable association between the additive number of type 2 diabetes-risk alleles and lower body mass index at examination. In our structured modeling, we observed non-significant inverse direct associations between rs7903146-T and body mass index at ages 21 and 45 years, and a significant positive association between rs7903146-T and type 2 diabetes onset in both middle and late adulthood. Conclusions: Herein, we replicated the protective effect of rs7930146-T on body mass index at multiple time points in the life course, and observed that these effects were not explained by past type 2 diabetes status in our structured modeling. The robust replication of the negative effects of TCF7L2 on body mass index in multiple samples, including in our diverse Hispanic/Latino community-based sample, supports a growing body of literature on the complex biologic mechanism underlying the functional consequences of TCF7L2 on obesity and type 2 diabetes across the life course.

11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30141273

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Orofacial clefts are the most common malformations of the head and neck region. Genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the etiology of these traits. METHODS: We recently conducted genotyping of individuals from the African population using the multiethnic genotyping array (MEGA) to identify common genetic variation associated with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts. The data cleaning of this dataset allowed for screening of annotated sex versus genetic sex, confirmation of identify by descent and identification of large chromosomal anomalies. RESULTS: We identified the first reported orofacial cleft case associated with paternal uniparental disomy (patUPD) on chromosome 22. We also identified a de novo deletion on chromosome 18. In addition to chromosomal anomalies, we identified cases with molecular karyotypes suggesting Klinefelter syndrome, Turner syndrome and Triple X syndrome. CONCLUSION: Observations from our study support the need for genetic testing when clinically indicated in order to exclude chromosomal anomalies associated with clefting. The identification of these chromosomal anomalies and sex aneuploidies is important in genetic counseling for families that are at risk. Clinicians should share any identified genetic findings and place them in context for the families during routine clinical visits and evaluations.

12.
EBioMedicine ; 32: 93-101, 2018 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29859855

RESUMO

Recent technological advancements have permitted high-throughput measurement of the human genome, epigenome, metabolome, transcriptome, and proteome at the population level. We hypothesized that subsets of genes identified from omic studies might have closely related biological functions and thus might interact directly at the network level. Therefore, we conducted an integrative analysis of multi-omic datasets of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to search for association patterns beyond the genome and transcriptome. A large, complex, and robust gene network containing well-known lung cancer-related genes, including EGFR and TERT, was identified from combined gene lists for lung adenocarcinoma. Members of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) gene family were at the center of this network. Subsequent sequencing of network hub genes within a subset of samples from the Transdisciplinary Research in Cancer of the Lung-International Lung Cancer Consortium (TRICL-ILCCO) consortium revealed a SNP (rs12614710) in EPAS1 associated with NSCLC that reached genome-wide significance (OR = 1.50; 95% CI: 1.31-1.72; p = 7.75 × 10-9). Using imputed data, we found that this SNP remained significant in the entire TRICL-ILCCO consortium (p = .03). Additional functional studies are warranted to better understand interrelationships among genetic polymorphisms, DNA methylation status, and EPAS1 expression.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/genética , Fatores de Transcrição Hélice-Alça-Hélice Básicos/genética , Carcinoma Pulmonar de Células não Pequenas/genética , Subunidade alfa do Fator 1 Induzível por Hipóxia/genética , Neoplasias Pulmonares/genética , Adenocarcinoma/patologia , Adenocarcinoma de Pulmão , Idoso , Carcinoma Pulmonar de Células não Pequenas/patologia , Metilação de DNA/genética , Feminino , Regulação Neoplásica da Expressão Gênica , Estudos de Associação Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/patologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
13.
PLoS Genet ; 14(5): e1007385, 2018 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29795556

RESUMO

Populations change in size over time due to factors such as population growth, migration, bottleneck events, natural disasters, and disease. The historical effective size of a population affects the power and resolution of genetic association studies. For admixed populations, it is not only the overall effective population size that is of interest, but also the effective sizes of the component ancestral populations. We use identity by descent and local ancestry inferred from genome-wide genetic data to estimate overall and ancestry-specific effective population size during the past hundred generations for nine admixed American populations from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, and for African-American and European-American populations from two US cities. In these populations, the estimated pre-admixture effective sizes of the ancestral populations vary by sampled population, suggesting that the ancestors of different sampled populations were drawn from different sub-populations. In addition, we estimate that overall effective population sizes dropped substantially in the generations immediately after the commencement of European and African immigration, reaching a minimum around 12 generations ago, but rebounded within a small number of generations afterwards. Of the populations that we considered, the population of individuals originating from Puerto Rico has the smallest bottleneck size of one thousand, while the Pittsburgh African-American population has the largest bottleneck size of two hundred thousand.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/genética , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Genoma Humano/genética , Hispano-Americanos/genética , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Américas , Simulação por Computador , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos de Associação Genética/métodos , Genética Populacional/métodos , Haplótipos , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Densidade Demográfica , Estados Unidos
14.
Sci Rep ; 8(1): 5675, 2018 Apr 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29618737

RESUMO

The genetic basis of supraventricular and ventricular ectopy (SVE, VE) remains largely uncharacterized, despite established genetic mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis. To identify novel genetic variants associated with SVE/VE in ancestrally diverse human populations, we conducted a genome-wide association study of electrocardiographically identified SVE and VE in five cohorts including approximately 43,000 participants of African, European and Hispanic/Latino ancestry. In thirteen ancestry-stratified subgroups, we tested multivariable-adjusted associations of SVE and VE with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) dosage. We combined subgroup-specific association estimates in inverse variance-weighted, fixed-effects and Bayesian meta-analyses. We also combined fixed-effects meta-analytic t-test statistics for SVE and VE in multi-trait SNP association analyses. No loci reached genome-wide significance in trans-ethnic meta-analyses. However, we found genome-wide significant SNPs intronic to an apoptosis-enhancing gene previously associated with QRS interval duration (FAF1; lead SNP rs7545860; effect allele frequency = 0.02; P = 2.0 × 10-8) in multi-trait analysis among European ancestry participants and near a locus encoding calcium-dependent glycoproteins (DSC3; lead SNP rs8086068; effect allele frequency = 0.17) in meta-analysis of SVE (P = 4.0 × 10-8) and multi-trait analysis (P = 2.9 × 10-9) among African ancestry participants. The novel findings suggest several mechanisms by which genetic variation may predispose to ectopy in humans and highlight the potential value of leveraging pleiotropy in future studies of ectopy-related phenotypes.

15.
PLoS Genet ; 14(3): e1007293, 2018 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29590102

RESUMO

Co-inheritance of α-thalassemia has a significant protective effect on the severity of complications of sickle cell disease (SCD), including stroke. However, little information exists on the association and interactions for the common African ancestral α-thalassemia mutation (-α3.7 deletion) and ß-globin traits (HbS trait [SCT] and HbC trait) on important clinical phenotypes such as red blood cell parameters, anemia, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In a community-based cohort of 2,916 African Americans from the Jackson Heart Study, we confirmed the expected associations between SCT, HbC trait, and the -α3.7 deletion with lower mean corpuscular volume/mean corpuscular hemoglobin and higher red blood cell count and red cell distribution width. In addition to the recently recognized association of SCT with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), we observed a novel association of the -α3.7 deletion with higher HbA1c levels. Co-inheritance of each additional copy of the -α3.7 deletion significantly lowered the risk of anemia and chronic kidney disease among individuals with SCT (P-interaction = 0.031 and 0.019, respectively). Furthermore, co-inheritance of a novel α-globin regulatory variant was associated with normalization of red cell parameters in individuals with the -α3.7 deletion and significantly negated the protective effect of α-thalassemia on stroke in 1,139 patients with sickle cell anemia from the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease (CSSCD) (P-interaction = 0.0049). Functional assays determined that rs11865131, located in the major alpha-globin enhancer MCS-R2, was the most likely causal variant. These findings suggest that common α- and ß-globin variants interact to influence hematologic and clinical phenotypes in African Americans, with potential implications for risk-stratification and counseling of individuals with SCD and SCT.


Assuntos
Anemia Falciforme/genética , Hemoglobina Falciforme/genética , Traço Falciforme , alfa-Globinas/genética , Adulto , Afro-Americanos , Anemia Falciforme/sangue , Anemia Falciforme/fisiopatologia , Estudos de Coortes , Variações do Número de Cópias de DNA , Eritrócitos Anormais , Taxa de Filtração Glomerular , Hemoglobina A Glicada/metabolismo , Humanos , Fenótipo , Adulto Jovem , Talassemia alfa/genética
16.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 198(2): 208-219, 2018 Jul 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29394082

RESUMO

RATIONALE: Lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heritable traits. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous pulmonary function and COPD loci, primarily in cohorts of European ancestry. OBJECTIVES: Perform a GWAS of COPD phenotypes in Hispanic/Latino populations to identify loci not previously detected in European populations. METHODS: GWAS of lung function and COPD in Hispanic/Latino participants from a population-based cohort. We performed replication studies of novel loci in independent studies. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Among 11,822 Hispanic/Latino participants, we identified eight novel signals; three replicated in independent populations of European Ancestry. A novel locus for FEV1 in ZSWIM7 (rs4791658; P = 4.99 × 10-9) replicated. A rare variant (minor allele frequency = 0.002) in HAL (rs145174011) was associated with FEV1/FVC (P = 9.59 × 10-9) in a region previously identified for COPD-related phenotypes; it remained significant in conditional analyses but did not replicate. Admixture mapping identified a novel region, with a variant in AGMO (rs41331850), associated with Amerindian ancestry and FEV1, which replicated. A novel locus for FEV1 identified among ever smokers (rs291231; P = 1.92 × 10-8) approached statistical significance for replication in admixed populations of African ancestry, and a novel SNP for COPD in PDZD2 (rs7709630; P = 1.56 × 10-8) regionally replicated. In addition, loci previously identified for lung function in European samples were associated in Hispanic/Latino participants in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos at the genome-wide significance level. CONCLUSIONS: We identified novel signals for lung function and COPD in a Hispanic/Latino cohort. Including admixed populations when performing genetic studies may identify variants contributing to genetic etiologies of COPD.

17.
Nicotine Tob Res ; 20(4): 448-457, 2018 Mar 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28520984

RESUMO

Introduction: Genetic variants associated with nicotine dependence have previously been identified, primarily in European-ancestry populations. No genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been reported for smoking behaviors in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States and Latin America, who are of mixed ancestry with European, African, and American Indigenous components. Methods: We examined genetic associations with smoking behaviors in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) (N = 12 741 with smoking data, 5119 ever-smokers), using ~2.3 million genotyped variants imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project phase 3. Mixed logistic regression models accounted for population structure, sampling, relatedness, sex, and age. Results: The known region of CHRNA5, which encodes the α5 cholinergic nicotinic receptor subunit, was associated with heavy smoking at genome-wide significance (p ≤ 5 × 10-8) in a comparison of 1929 ever-smokers reporting cigarettes per day (CPD) > 10 versus 3156 reporting CPD ≤ 10. The functional variant rs16969968 in CHRNA5 had a p value of 2.20 × 10-7 and odds ratio (OR) of 1.32 for the minor allele (A); its minor allele frequency was 0.22 overall and similar across Hispanic/Latino background groups (Central American = 0.17; South American = 0.19; Mexican = 0.18; Puerto Rican = 0.22; Cuban = 0.29; Dominican = 0.19). CHRNA4 on chromosome 20 attained p < 10-4, supporting prior findings in non-Hispanics. For nondaily smoking, which is prevalent in Hispanic/Latino smokers, compared to daily smoking, loci on chromosomes 2 and 4 achieved genome-wide significance; replication attempts were limited by small Hispanic/Latino sample sizes. Conclusions: Associations of nicotinic receptor gene variants with smoking, first reported in non-Hispanic European-ancestry populations, generalized to Hispanics/Latinos despite different patterns of smoking behavior. Implications: We conducted the first large-scale genome-wide association study (GWAS) of smoking behavior in a US Hispanic/Latino cohort, and the first GWAS of daily/nondaily smoking in any population. Results show that the region of the nicotinic receptor subunit gene CHRNA5, which in non-Hispanic European-ancestry smokers has been associated with heavy smoking as well as cessation and treatment efficacy, is also significantly associated with heavy smoking in this Hispanic/Latino cohort. The results are an important addition to understanding the impact of genetic variants in understudied Hispanic/Latino smokers.

18.
Heart ; 104(11): 904-911, 2018 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29127183

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: PR interval (PR) is a heritable electrocardiographic measure of atrial and atrioventricular nodal conduction. Changes in PR duration may be associated with atrial fibrillation, heart failure and all-cause mortality. Hispanic/Latino populations have high burdens of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, are highly admixed and represent exceptional opportunities for novel locus identification. However, they remain chronically understudied. We present the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of PR in 14 756 participants of Hispanic/Latino ancestry from three studies. METHODS: Study-specific summary results of the association between 1000 Genomes Phase 1 imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and PR assumed an additive genetic model and were adjusted for global ancestry, study centre/region and clinical covariates. Results were combined using fixed-effects, inverse variance weighted meta-analysis. Sequential conditional analyses were used to identify independent signals. Replication of novel loci was performed in populations of Asian, African and European descent. ENCODE and RoadMap data were used to annotate results. RESULTS: We identified a novel genome-wide association (P<5×10-8) with PR at ID2 (rs6730558), which replicated in Asian and European populations (P<0.017). Additionally, we generalised 10 previously identified PR loci to Hispanics/Latinos. Bioinformatics annotation provided evidence for regulatory function in cardiac tissue. Further, for six loci that generalised, the Hispanic/Latino index SNP was genome-wide significant and identical to (or in high linkage disequilibrium with) the previously identified GWAS lead SNP. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that genetic determinants of PR are consistent across race/ethnicity, but extending studies to admixed populations can identify novel associations, underscoring the importance of conducting genetic studies in diverse populations.

19.
Sci Rep ; 7(1): 17075, 2017 Dec 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29213071

RESUMO

QT interval prolongation is a heritable risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and can predispose to sudden death. Most genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of QT were performed in European ancestral populations, leaving other groups uncharacterized. Herein we present the first QT GWAS of Hispanic/Latinos using data on 15,997 participants from four studies. Study-specific summary results of the association between 1000 Genomes Project (1000G) imputed SNPs and electrocardiographically measured QT were combined using fixed-effects meta-analysis. We identified 41 genome-wide significant SNPs that mapped to 13 previously identified QT loci. Conditional analyses distinguished six secondary signals at NOS1AP (n = 2), ATP1B1 (n = 2), SCN5A (n = 1), and KCNQ1 (n = 1). Comparison of linkage disequilibrium patterns between the 13 lead SNPs and six secondary signals with previously reported index SNPs in 1000G super populations suggested that the SCN5A and KCNE1 lead SNPs were potentially novel and population-specific. Finally, of the 42 suggestively associated loci, AJAP1 was suggestively associated with QT in a prior East Asian GWAS; in contrast BVES and CAP2 murine knockouts caused cardiac conduction defects. Our results indicate that whereas the same loci influence QT across populations, population-specific variation exists, motivating future trans-ethnic and ancestrally diverse QT GWAS.

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