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1.
Int J Cancer ; 2020 Nov 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33210298

RESUMO

2,456 lung cancer cases and 5,342 controls were evaluated in this International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO) pooled analysis on estrogen-related hormonal factors and lung cancer in Asian women. Random effect of study site and fixed effect of age, smoking status, comprehensive smoking index, and family history of lung cancer were adjusted for in the multivariable logistic regression models. We found that late onset of menarche conferred elevated odds of lung cancer with adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.24 (95% confidence interval, CI=1.05 , 1.45) for 17 years or older, compared with 14 years or younger. Late onset of menopause at 55 years old or older was associated with lung cancer with OR=1.24 (95% CI=1.02 , 1.51). Non-natural menopause was associated with an OR of 1.39 (95%CI=1.13 , 1.71). More live births showed reversed association with lung cancer (ORs of 5 or more live births: 0.71 (95%CI=0.60 , 0.84), compared with 0-2 live births (Ptrend <0.001). A later first child delivery seemed associated with an increased susceptibility: OR of 21-25 years old: 1.23 (95% CI=1.06 , 1.40), 26 or older: 1.27 (95%CI=1.06, 1.52), Ptrend =0.010). Oral contraceptives use appeared to be protective with an OR of 0.69 (95% CI=0.57, 0.83). Stronger for adenocarcinoma than squamous cell carcinoma, these relationships were not clearly modified by smoking status, probably because of lower prevalence of smoking. This is a first and largest pooling study of lung cancer among Asian women and the results suggested potential roles of hormone-related pathways in the etiology of this disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

2.
Gastroenterology ; 2020 Oct 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33058866

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Susceptibility genes and the underlying mechanisms for the majority of risk loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for colorectal cancer (CRC) risk remain largely unknown. We conducted a transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) to identify putative susceptibility genes. METHODS: Gene-expression prediction models were built using transcriptome and genetic data from the 284 normal transverse colon tissues of European descendants from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx), and model performance was evaluated using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, n = 355). We applied the gene-expression prediction models and GWAS data to evaluate associations of genetically predicted gene-expression with CRC risk in 58,131 CRC cases and 67,347 controls of European ancestry. Dual-luciferase reporter assays and knockdown experiments in CRC cells and tumor xenografts were conducted. RESULTS: We identified 25 genes associated with CRC risk at a Bonferroni-corrected threshold of P < 9.1 × 10-6, including genes in four novel loci, PYGL (14q22.1), RPL28 (19q13.42), CAPN12 (19q13.2), MYH7B (20q11.22), and MAP1L3CA (20q11.22). In nine known GWAS-identified loci, we uncovered nine genes that have not been previously reported, whereas four genes remained statistically significant after adjusting for the lead risk variant of the locus. Through colocalization analysis in GWAS loci, we additionally identified 12 putative susceptibility genes that were supported by TWAS analysis at P < 0.01. We showed that risk allele of the lead risk variant rs1741640 affected the promoter activity of CABLES2. Knockdown experiments confirmed that CABLES2 plays a vital role in colorectal carcinogenesis. CONCLUSION: Our study reveals new putative susceptibility genes and provides new insight into the biological mechanisms underlying CRC development.

3.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 2020 Oct 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33128203

RESUMO

Associations between anthropometric factors and breast cancer (BC) risk have varied inconsistently by estrogen and/or progesterone receptor (ER/PR) status. Associations between prediagnostic anthropometric factors and risk of premenopausal and postmenopausal BC overall and ER/PR status subtypes were investigated in a pooled analysis of 20 prospective cohorts, including 36,297 BC cases among 1,061,915 women, using multivariable Cox regression analyses, controlling for reproductive factors, diet and other risk factors. We estimated dose-response relationships and tested for nonlinear associations using restricted cubic splines. Height showed positive, linear associations for premenopausal and postmenopausal BC risk (6-7% RR increase per 5 cm increment), with stronger associations for receptor-positive subtypes. Body mass index (BMI) at cohort baseline was strongly inversely associated with premenopausal BC risk, and strongly positively-and nonlinearly-associated with postmenopausal BC (especially among women who never used hormone replacement therapy). This was primarily observed for receptor-positive subtypes. Early adult BMI (at 18-20 years) showed inverse, linear associations for premenopausal and postmenopausal BC risk (21% and 11% RR decrease per 5 kg/m2, respectively) with stronger associations for receptor-negative subtypes. Adult weight gain since 18-20 years was positively associated with postmenopausal BC risk, stronger for receptor-positive subtypes, and among women who were leaner in early adulthood. Women heavier in early adulthood generally had reduced premenopausal BC risk, independent of later weight gain. Positive associations between height, baseline (adult) BMI, adult weight gain and postmenopausal BC risk were substantially stronger for hormone receptor-positive versus negative subtypes. Premenopausal BC risk was positively associated with height, but inversely with baseline BMI and weight gain (mostly in receptor-positive subtypes). Inverse associations with early adult BMI seemed stronger in receptor-negative subtypes of premenopausal and postmenopausal BC.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32972968

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Auto-antibodies to tumor suppressor p53 are found in a subset of patients with colorectal cancer. A recent prospective study in the United States has reported a significant 1.8-fold increased odds for colorectal cancer development with prediagnostic seropositivity to p53. In this study, we sought to examine this association in a U.S. colorectal cancer cohort consortium to evaluate the potential utility of p53 auto-antibodies as an early biomarker for colorectal cancer. METHODS: Auto-antibodies to p53 were measured in prediagnostic blood samples of 3,702 incident colorectal cancer cases and 3,702 controls, matched by age, race, and sex, from 9 U.S. prospective cohorts. The association of seropositivity to p53 with colorectal cancer risk, overall and by time between blood draw and diagnosis, was determined by conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall, 5% of controls and 7% of cases were seropositive to p53, resulting in a statistically significant 33% increased colorectal cancer risk [odds ratio (OR), 1.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.61]. By follow-up time, the association was only significant with colorectal cancer diagnoses within 4 years after blood draw (OR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.62-3.19), but not thereafter (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.76-1.24). CONCLUSIONS: In this large consortium of prospective cohorts, we found that prediagnostic seropositivity to tumor suppressor p53 was significantly associated with an over 2-fold increased odds of developing colorectal cancer within 4 years after blood draw. IMPACT: Our finding suggests that p53 seropositivity may not be a useful predictor of long-term colorectal cancer risk; however, it might be considered as a marker to aid in the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

5.
Nutrients ; 12(10)2020 Sep 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32977670

RESUMO

This study aims to evaluate whether incorporating gender differences in portion sizes as part of quantifying a food frequency questionnaire influences the association of total energy intake with mortality. The analysis included 156,434 participants (70,142 men and 86,292 women) in the Multiethnic Cohort Study, aged 45-75 years at baseline. A total of 49,728 deaths were identified during an average follow-up of 18.1 years. Total energy intake and percentage energy from macronutrients were calculated using original portion sizes (PSs) and gender specific (GS)-PS and were divided into quintiles for men and women. The associations of total energy intake and percentage energy from macronutrients with all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer mortality were examined using Cox regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Mean ± standard deviation daily total energy intake using original-PS was 2449 ± 1135 kcal for men and 1979 ± 962 kcal for women; using GS-PS was 1996 ± 884 kcal for men and 1595 ± 731 kcal for women. For men, the hazard ratios (HRs) (95% confidence intervals) for all-cause, CVD, and cancer comparing the highest to the lowest quintile of total energy intake were 1.05 (1.00-1.10), 1.07 (0.99-1.16), 1.03 (0.95-1.13) using original-PS and 1.07 (1.02-1.12), 1.11 (1.03-1.20), 1.02 (0.94-1.12) using GS-PS, respectively. For women, the corresponding HRs were 1.03 (0.98-1.09), 0.99 (0.91-1.08), 1.10 (1.00-1.21) using original-PS and 1.06 (1.01-1.12), 1.02 (0.94-1.12), 1.07 (0.97-1.18) using GS-PS. Both versions of percentage energy from total fat were associated with an increased risk of all-cause, CVD, and cancer mortality; on the other hand, both versions of percentage energy from carbohydrate showed inverse associations with all-cause, CVD, and cancer mortality in both men and women. When using original-PS and GS-PS, the estimated total energy intake differed, resulting in marginal differences in the associations of total energy intake with all-cause, CVD, and cancer mortality.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32958499

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer. No studies yet have attempted to replicate these SNPs in US minority populations. We aimed to replicate the associations of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs with pancreatic cancer and build and test a polygenic risk score (PRS) for pancreatic cancer in an ethnically diverse population. METHODS: We evaluated 31 risk variants in the Multiethnic Cohort and the Southern Community Cohort Study. We included 691 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cases and 13,778 controls from African-American, Japanese-American, Latino, Native Hawaiian, and white participants. We tested the association between each SNP and PDAC, established a PRS using the 31 SNPs, and tested the association between the score and PDAC risk. RESULTS: Eleven of the 31 SNPs were replicated in the multiethnic sample. The PRS was associated with PDAC risk [OR top vs. middle quintile = 2.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.73-2.92)]. Notably, the PRS was associated with PDAC risk in all ethnic groups except Native Hawaiian (OR per risk allele ranged from 1.33 in Native Hawaiians to 1.91 in African Americans; P heterogeneity = 0.12). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to replicate 11 of the 31 GWAS-identified risk variants for pancreatic cancer in multiethnic populations, including African Americans, Japanese Americans, and Latinos. Our results also suggest a potential utility of PRS with GWAS-identified risk variants for the identification of individuals at increased risk for PDAC across multiple ethnic groups. IMPACT: PRS can potentially be used to stratify pancreatic cancer risk across multiple ethnic groups.

7.
Front Med ; 2020 Sep 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32889700

RESUMO

Although genome-wide association studies have identified more than eighty genetic variants associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) risk, biological mechanisms of these variants remain largely unknown. By integrating a large-scale genotype data of 15 581 lung adenocarcinoma (AD) cases, 8350 squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) cases, and 27 355 controls, as well as multiple transcriptome and epigenomic databases, we conducted histology-specific meta-analyses and functional annotations of both reported and novel susceptibility variants. We identified 3064 credible risk variants for NSCLC, which were overrepresented in enhancer-like and promoter-like histone modification peaks as well as DNase I hypersensitive sites. Transcription factor enrichment analysis revealed that USF1 was AD-specific while CREB1 was SqCC-specific. Functional annotation and gene-based analysis implicated 894 target genes, including 274 specifics for AD and 123 for SqCC, which were overrepresented in somatic driver genes (ER = 1.95, P = 0.005). Pathway enrichment analysis and Gene-Set Enrichment Analysis revealed that AD genes were primarily involved in immune-related pathways, while SqCC genes were homologous recombination deficiency related. Our results illustrate the molecular basis of both well-studied and new susceptibility loci of NSCLC, providing not only novel insights into the genetic heterogeneity between AD and SqCC but also a set of plausible gene targets for post-GWAS functional experiments.

8.
Int J Cancer ; 2020 Sep 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32914876

RESUMO

At the time of cancer diagnosis, body mass index (BMI) is inversely correlated with lung cancer risk, which may reflect reverse causality and confounding due to smoking behavior. We used two-sample univariable and multivariable Mendelian randomization (MR) to estimate causal relationships of BMI and smoking behaviors on lung cancer and histological subtypes based on an aggregated genome-wide association studies (GWASs) analysis of lung cancer in 29 266 cases and 56 450 controls. We observed a positive causal effect for high BMI on occurrence of small-cell lung cancer (odds ratio (OR) = 1.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.24-2.06, P = 2.70 × 10-4 ). After adjustment of smoking behaviors using multivariable Mendelian randomization (MVMR), a direct causal effect on small cell lung cancer (ORMVMR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.06-1.55, PMVMR = .011), and an inverse effect on lung adenocarcinoma (ORMVMR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.77-0.96, PMVMR = .008) were observed. A weak increased risk of lung squamous cell carcinoma was observed for higher BMI in univariable Mendelian randomization (UVMR) analysis (ORUVMR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.01-1.40, PUVMR = .036), but this effect disappeared after adjustment of smoking (ORMVMR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.90-1.16, PMVMR = .746). These results highlight the histology-specific impact of BMI on lung carcinogenesis and imply mediator role of smoking behaviors in the association between BMI and lung cancer.

9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32985910

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess whether pre-diagnostic lipid levels are associated with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) risk. Methods: We conducted a matched case-control study nested in five large prospective US cohorts (the Nurses' Health Study, the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort, the Multiethnic Cohort Study, and the Women's Health Initiative), and identified 275 individuals who developed ALS during follow-up and had provided blood samples before disease diagnosis. For each ALS case, we randomly selected two controls who were alive at the time of the case diagnosis and matched on cohort, birth year (±1 year), sex, race/ethnicity, fasting status, and time of blood draw. We measured total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglyceride (TG) levels in the plasma samples, and used conditional logistic regression to estimate associations between lipid levels and ALS risk. Results: Higher levels of HDL-C were associated with higher ALS risk in an analysis adjusted for the matching factors (risk ratio [RR] Q4 vs. Q1: 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18-2.69, p trend: 0.007). The estimate remained similar in a multivariable analysis additionally adjusted for body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake, plasma urate levels, and use of cholesterol-lowering drugs (RR Q4 vs. Q1: 1.71, 95% CI: 1.07-2.73, p trend: 0.02). Plasma levels of TC, LDL-C, and TG were not associated with ALS risk. Conclusions: Higher pre-diagnostic HDL-C levels, but not levels of other lipids, were associated with a higher risk of ALS.

10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32967863

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Whether circulating polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels are associated with pancreatic cancer risk is uncertain. Mendelian randomization (MR) represents a study design using genetic instruments to better characterize the relationship between exposure and outcome. METHODS: We utilized data from genome-wide association studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, involving approximately 9,269 cases and 12,530 controls of European descent, to evaluate associations between pancreatic cancer risk and genetically predicted plasma n-6 PUFA levels. Conventional MR analyses were performed using individual-level and summary-level data. RESULTS: Using genetic instruments, we did not find evidence of associations between genetically predicted plasma n-6 PUFA levels and pancreatic cancer risk [estimates per one SD increase in each PUFA-specific weighted genetic score using summary statistics: linoleic acid odds ratio (OR) = 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.98-1.02; arachidonic acid OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.99-1.01; and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.87-1.02]. The OR estimates remained virtually unchanged after adjustment for covariates, using individual-level data or summary statistics, or stratification by age and sex. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that variations of genetically determined plasma n-6 PUFA levels are not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. IMPACT: These results suggest that modifying n-6 PUFA levels through food sources or supplementation may not influence risk of pancreatic cancer.

11.
Genet Epidemiol ; 2020 Sep 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32924180

RESUMO

Clinical trial results have recently demonstrated that inhibiting inflammation by targeting the interleukin-1ß pathway can offer a significant reduction in lung cancer incidence and mortality, highlighting a pressing and unmet need to understand the benefits of inflammation-focused lung cancer therapies at the genetic level. While numerous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have explored the genetic etiology of lung cancer, there remains a large gap between the type of information that may be gleaned from an association study and the depth of understanding necessary to explain and drive translational findings. Thus, in this study we jointly model and integrate extensive multiomics data sources, utilizing a total of 40 genome-wide functional annotations that augment previously published results from the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO) GWAS, to prioritize and characterize single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase risk of squamous cell lung cancer through the inflammatory and immune responses. Our work bridges the gap between correlative analysis and translational follow-up research, refining GWAS association measures in an interpretable and systematic manner. In particular, reanalysis of the ILCCO data highlights the impact of highly associated SNPs from nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway genes as well as major histocompatibility complex mediated variation in immune responses. One consequence of prioritizing likely functional SNPs is the pruning of variants that might be selected for follow-up work by over an order of magnitude, from potentially tens of thousands to hundreds. The strategies we introduce provide informative and interpretable approaches for incorporating extensive genome-wide annotation data in analysis of genetic association studies.

12.
JCO Precis Oncol ; 4: 32-43, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32832836

RESUMO

PURPOSE: In studies of men of European ancestry, rare pathogenic variants in DNA repair pathway genes have been shown to be associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. The contribution of rare coding variation to prostate cancer risk in men of African ancestry has not been established. METHODS: We sequenced a panel of 19 DNA repair and cancer predisposition genes in 2,453 African American and 1,151 Ugandan prostate cancer cases and controls. Rare variants were classified as pathogenic or putatively functionally disruptive and examined in association with prostate cancer risk and disease aggressiveness in gene and pathway-level association analyses. RESULTS: Pathogenic variants were found in 75 out of 2,098 cases (3.6%) and 31 out of 1,481 controls (2.1%) (OR=1.82, 95% CI=1.19 to 2.79, P=0.0044) with the association being stronger for more aggressive disease phenotypes (OR=3.10, 95% CI=1.54 to 6.23, P=0.0022). The highest risks for aggressive disease were observed with pathogenic variants in the ATM, BRCA2, PALB2 and NBN genes, with odds ratios ranging from ~4 to 15 in the combined study sample of African American and Ugandan men. Rare, non-pathogenic, non-synonymous variants did not have a major impact on risk of overall prostate cancer or disease aggressiveness. CONCLUSIONS: Rare pathogenic variants in DNA repair genes have appreciable effects on risk of aggressive prostate cancer in men of African ancestry. These findings have potential implications for panel testing and risk stratification in this high-risk population.

13.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(10): 2019-2025, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32732248

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Incidence rates of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) vary across racial/ethnic groups, yet little is known about the impact of hormone-related EOC risk factors in non-Whites. METHODS: Among 91,625 female Multiethnic Cohort Study participants, 155 incident EOC cases were diagnosed in Whites, 93 in African Americans, 57 in Native Hawaiians, 161 in Japanese Americans, and 141 in Latinas. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations between race/ethnicity and EOC risk and between hormone-related factors and EOC risk across racial/ethnic groups. RESULTS: Compared with Whites, African Americans and Japanese Americans had a lower multivariable-adjusted EOC risk; Native Hawaiians had a suggestive higher risk. Parity and oral contraceptive (OC) use were inversely associated with EOC risk (P int race/ethnicity ≥ 0.43); associations were strongest among Japanese Americans (e.g., ≥4 vs. 0 children; HR = 0.45; CI, 0.26-0.79). Age at natural menopause and postmenopausal hormone (PMH) use were not associated with EOC risk in the overall population, but were positively associated with risk in Latinas (e.g., ≥5 years vs. never PMH use; HR = 2.13; CI, 1.30-3.49). CONCLUSIONS: We observed strong associations with EOC risk for parity and OC use in Japanese Americans and PMH use and age at natural menopause in Latinas. However, differences in EOC risk among racial/ethnic groups were not fully explained by established hormone-related risk factors. IMPACT: Our study indicates there are racial/ethnic differences in EOC risk and risk factors, and could help improve prevention strategies for non-White women.

14.
Hepatol Commun ; 4(8): 1112-1123, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32766472

RESUMO

The global rise in fatty liver is a major public health problem. Thus, it is critical to identify both global and population-specific genetic variants associated with liver fat. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of percent liver fat and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) assessed by magnetic resonance imaging in 1,709 participants from the population-based Multiethnic Cohort Adiposity Phenotype Study. Our participants comprised older adults of five U.S. racial/ethnic groups: African Americans (n = 277), Japanese Americans (n = 424), Latinos (n = 348), Native Hawaiians (n = 274), and European Americans (n = 386). The established missense risk variant rs738409 located in patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3) at 22q13 was confirmed to be associated with percent liver fat (P = 3.52 × 10-15) but more strongly in women than men (P heterogeneity = 0.002). Its frequency correlated with the prevalence of NAFLD across the five ethnic/racial groups. Rs738409 was also associated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (beta = 0.028; P = 0.009) and circulating levels of insulin (beta = 0.022; P = 0.020) and alanine aminotransferase (beta = 0.016; P = 0.030). A novel association of percent liver fat with rs77249491 (located at 6q13 between limb region 1 domain containing 1 [LMBRD1] and collagen type XIX alpha 1 chain [COL19A1] (P = 1.42 × 10-8) was also observed. Rs7724941 was associated with HOMA-IR (beta = 0.12; P = 0.0005), insulin (beta = 0.11; P = 0.0003), triglycerides (beta = 0.059; P = 0.01), high-density lipoprotein (beta = -0.046; P = 0.04), and sex hormone binding globulin (beta = -0.084; P = 0.0012). This variant was present in Japanese Americans (minor allele frequency [MAF], 8%) and Native Hawaiians (MAF, 2%). Conclusion: We replicated the PNPLA3 rs738409 association in a multiethnic population and identified a novel liver fat risk variant in Japanese Americans and Native Hawaiians. GWASes of percent liver fat in East Asian and Oceanic populations are needed to replicate the rs77249491 association.

15.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(10): 2084-2092, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32856604

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, the main risk factor for gastric cancer, has been decreasing in the United States; however, there remains a substantial racial disparity. Moreover, the time-trends for prevalence of CagA-positive H. pylori infection, the most virulent form, are unknown in the U.S. POPULATION: We sought to assess prevalence of CagA-positive H. pylori infection over time by race in the United States. METHODS: We utilized multiplex serology to quantify antibody responses to H. pylori antigens in 4,476 participants across five cohorts that sampled adults from 1985 to 2009. Using log-binomial regression models, we calculated prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between H. pylori-CagA sero-prevalence and birth year by race. RESULTS: African Americans were three times more likely to be H. pylori-CagA sero-positive than Whites. After adjustment, H. pylori-CagA sero-prevalence was lower with increasing birth year among Whites (P trend = 0.001), but remained stable for African Americans. When stratified by sex and education separately, the decline in H. pylori-CagA sero-positivity among Whites remained only for females (P trend < 0.001) and was independent of educational attainment. Among African Americans, there was no difference by sex; furthermore, sero-prevalence increased with increasing birth year among those with a high school education or less (P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Among individuals in the United States born from the 1920s to 1960s, H. pylori-CagA sero-prevalence has declined among Whites, but not among African Americans. IMPACT: Our findings suggest a widening racial disparity in the prevalence of the most virulent form of H. pylori, the main cause of gastric cancer.

16.
Int J Cancer ; 2020 Jul 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32851660

RESUMO

Blood lipids have been associated with the development of a range of cancers, including breast, lung and colorectal cancer. For endometrial cancer, observational studies have reported inconsistent associations between blood lipids and cancer risk. To reduce biases from unmeasured confounding, we performed a bidirectional, two-sample Mendelian randomization analysis to investigate the relationship between levels of three blood lipids (low-density lipoprotein [LDL] and high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, and triglycerides) and endometrial cancer risk. Genetic variants associated with each of these blood lipid levels (P < 5 × 10-8 ) were identified as instrumental variables, and assessed using genome-wide association study data from the Endometrial Cancer Association Consortium (12 906 cases and 108 979 controls) and the Global Lipids Genetic Consortium (n = 188 578). Mendelian randomization analyses found genetically raised LDL cholesterol levels to be associated with lower risks of endometrial cancer of all histologies combined, and of endometrioid and non-endometrioid subtypes. Conversely, higher genetically predicted HDL cholesterol levels were associated with increased risk of non-endometrioid endometrial cancer. After accounting for the potential confounding role of obesity (as measured by genetic variants associated with body mass index), the association between genetically predicted increased LDL cholesterol levels and lower endometrial cancer risk remained significant, especially for non-endometrioid endometrial cancer. There was no evidence to support a role for triglycerides in endometrial cancer development. Our study supports a role for LDL and HDL cholesterol in the development of non-endometrioid endometrial cancer. Further studies are required to understand the mechanisms underlying these findings.

17.
Cancer Res ; 80(18): 4004-4013, 2020 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32641412

RESUMO

Registry-based epidemiologic studies suggest associations between chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). As genetic susceptibility contributes to a large proportion of chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases, we hypothesize that the genomic regions surrounding established genome-wide associated variants for these chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with PDAC. We examined the association between PDAC and genomic regions (±500 kb) surrounding established common susceptibility variants for ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, chronic pancreatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. We analyzed summary statistics from genome-wide association studies data for 8,384 cases and 11,955 controls of European descent from two large consortium studies using the summary data-based adaptive rank truncated product method to examine the overall association of combined genomic regions for each inflammatory disease group. Combined genomic susceptibility regions for ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and chronic pancreatitis were associated with PDAC at P values < 0.05 (0.0040, 0.0057, 0.011, and 3.4 × 10-6, respectively). After excluding the 20 PDAC susceptibility regions (±500 kb) previously identified by GWAS, the genomic regions for ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, and inflammatory bowel disease remained associated with PDAC (P = 0.0029, 0.0057, and 0.0098, respectively). Genomic regions for celiac disease (P = 0.22) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (P = 0.078) were not associated with PDAC. Our results support the hypothesis that genomic regions surrounding variants associated with inflammatory intestinal diseases, particularly, ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and chronic pancreatitis are associated with PDAC. SIGNIFICANCE: The joint effects of common variants in genomic regions containing susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and chronic pancreatitis are associated with PDAC and may provide insights to understanding pancreatic cancer etiology.

18.
Hum Mol Genet ; 29(13): 2275-2284, 2020 Aug 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32491157

RESUMO

Statistical imputation applied to genome-wide array data is the most cost-effective approach to complete the catalog of genetic variation in a study population. However, imputed genotypes in underrepresented populations incur greater inaccuracies due to ascertainment bias and a lack of representation among reference individuals, further contributing to the obstacles to study these populations. Here we examined the consequences due to the lack of representation by genotyping in a large number of self-reported Native Hawaiians (N = 3693) a functionally important, Polynesian-specific variant in the CREBRF gene, rs373863828. We found the derived allele was significantly associated with several adiposity traits with large effects (e.g. ~ 1.28 kg/m2 per allele in body mass index as the most significant; P = 7.5 × 10-5), consistent with the original findings in Samoans. Due to the current absence of Polynesian representation in publicly accessible reference sequences, rs373863828 or its proxies could not be tested through imputation using these existing resources. Moreover, the association signals at the entire CREBRF locus could not be captured by alternative approaches, such as admixture mapping. In contrast, highly accurate imputation can be achieved even if a small number (<200) of internally constructed Polynesian reference individuals were available; this would increase sample size and improve the statistical evidence of associations. Taken together, our results suggest the alarming possibility that lack of representation in reference panels could inhibit discovery of functionally important loci such as CREBRF. Yet, they could be easily detected and prioritized with improved representation of diverse populations in sequencing studies.

19.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(9): 1784-1791, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32546605

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Obesity and diabetes are major modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Interactions between genetic variants and diabetes/obesity have not previously been comprehensively investigated in pancreatic cancer at the genome-wide level. METHODS: We conducted a gene-environment interaction (GxE) analysis including 8,255 cases and 11,900 controls from four pancreatic cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets (Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium I-III and Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium). Obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2) and diabetes (duration ≥3 years) were the environmental variables of interest. Approximately 870,000 SNPs (minor allele frequency ≥0.005, genotyped in at least one dataset) were analyzed. Case-control (CC), case-only (CO), and joint-effect test methods were used for SNP-level GxE analysis. As a complementary approach, gene-based GxE analysis was also performed. Age, sex, study site, and principal components accounting for population substructure were included as covariates. Meta-analysis was applied to combine individual GWAS summary statistics. RESULTS: No genome-wide significant interactions (departures from a log-additive odds model) with diabetes or obesity were detected at the SNP level by the CC or CO approaches. The joint-effect test detected numerous genome-wide significant GxE signals in the GWAS main effects top hit regions, but the significance diminished after adjusting for the GWAS top hits. In the gene-based analysis, a significant interaction of diabetes with variants in the FAM63A (family with sequence similarity 63 member A) gene (significance threshold P < 1.25 × 10-6) was observed in the meta-analysis (P GxE = 1.2 ×10-6, P Joint = 4.2 ×10-7). CONCLUSIONS: This analysis did not find significant GxE interactions at the SNP level but found one significant interaction with diabetes at the gene level. A larger sample size might unveil additional genetic factors via GxE scans. IMPACT: This study may contribute to discovering the mechanism of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer.

20.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 2220, 2020 05 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32393777

RESUMO

Few germline mutations are known to affect lung cancer risk. We performed analyses of rare variants from 39,146 individuals of European ancestry and investigated gene expression levels in 7,773 samples. We find a large-effect association with an ATM L2307F (rs56009889) mutation in adenocarcinoma for discovery (adjusted Odds Ratio = 8.82, P = 1.18 × 10-15) and replication (adjusted OR = 2.93, P = 2.22 × 10-3) that is more pronounced in females (adjusted OR = 6.81 and 3.19 and for discovery and replication). We observe an excess loss of heterozygosity in lung tumors among ATM L2307F allele carriers. L2307F is more frequent (4%) among Ashkenazi Jewish populations. We also observe an association in discovery (adjusted OR = 2.61, P = 7.98 × 10-22) and replication datasets (adjusted OR = 1.55, P = 0.06) with a loss-of-function mutation, Q4X (rs150665432) of an uncharacterized gene, KIAA0930. Our findings implicate germline genetic variants in ATM with lung cancer susceptibility and suggest KIAA0930 as a novel candidate gene for lung cancer risk.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/genética , Proteínas Mutadas de Ataxia Telangiectasia/genética , Neoplasias Pulmonares/genética , Idoso , Alelos , Bases de Dados Genéticas , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Técnicas de Genotipagem , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Heterozigoto , Humanos , Judeus/genética , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Razão de Chances , Análise de Sequência com Séries de Oligonucleotídeos , Linhagem , RNA-Seq , Fatores de Risco
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