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1.
Diabetologia ; 2019 Oct 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31584131

RESUMO

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Metabolomics technologies have identified numerous blood biomarkers for type 2 diabetes risk in case-control studies of middle-aged and older individuals. We aimed to validate existing and identify novel metabolic biomarkers predictive of future diabetes in large cohorts of young adults. METHODS: NMR metabolomics was used to quantify 229 circulating metabolic measures in 11,896 individuals from four Finnish observational cohorts (baseline age 24-45 years). Associations between baseline metabolites and risk of developing diabetes during 8-15 years of follow-up (392 incident cases) were adjusted for sex, age, BMI and fasting glucose. Prospective metabolite associations were also tested with fasting glucose, 2 h glucose and HOMA-IR at follow-up. RESULTS: Out of 229 metabolic measures, 113 were associated with incident type 2 diabetes in meta-analysis of the four cohorts (ORs per 1 SD: 0.59-1.50; p< 0.0009). Among the strongest biomarkers of diabetes risk were branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (OR 1.31-1.33) and triacylglycerol within VLDL particles (OR 1.33-1.50), as well as linoleic n-6 fatty acid (OR 0.75) and non-esterified cholesterol in large HDL particles (OR 0.59). The metabolic biomarkers were more strongly associated with deterioration in post-load glucose and insulin resistance than with future fasting hyperglycaemia. A multi-metabolite score comprised of phenylalanine, non-esterified cholesterol in large HDL and the ratio of cholesteryl ester to total lipid in large VLDL was associated with future diabetes risk (OR 10.1 comparing individuals in upper vs lower fifth of the multi-metabolite score) in one of the cohorts (mean age 31 years). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Metabolic biomarkers across multiple molecular pathways are already predictive of the long-term risk of diabetes in young adults. Comprehensive metabolic profiling may help to target preventive interventions for young asymptomatic individuals at increased risk.

2.
Ann Med ; : 1-25, 2019 Oct 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31638839

RESUMO

Aims: We investigated the combination of low systolic blood pressure (SBP) response, low exercise capacity (EC) and slow heart rate recovery (HRR) during an exercise test in mortality prediction. Patients and Methods: Our population consisted of 3456 patients from the Finnish Cardiovascular Study. A failure of SBP to increase >42 mmHg was defined as a low response. Low EC was defined as <8 metabolic equivalents. 1-minute HRR ≤18 bpm from maximum was defined as slow HRR. Results: During a median follow up of 10.0 years, 537 participants died. Reduced SBP response, low EC and slow HRR were independent predictors of all-cause and CV mortality (p < 0.001 for all). Patients with reduced SBP response, low EC and slow HRR had a very high mortality rate of 42.1% during follow up compared to only 4.5% of the patients without any of these risk factors. The hazard ratios for all-cause mortality in patients with one, two or three of the studied risk factors were 3.2, 6.0, and 10.6, respectively (p < 0.001 for all). Conclusion: The combination of reduced SBP response, low exercise capacity, and reduced HRR in an exercise test is associated with very high mortality and can be used in risk stratification. Key messages The combination of low blood pressure response, low exercise capacity and slow heart rate recovery in an exercise test is able to identify a group of patients in a very high mortality risk. These parameters are easily derived from an exercise test. All parameters are commonly available in clinical practice.

5.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 110(5): 1079-1087, 2019 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31504107

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mendelian randomization studies in adults suggest that abdominal adiposity is causally associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease in adults, but its causal effect on cardiometabolic risk in children remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to study the causal relation of abdominal adiposity with cardiometabolic risk factors in children by applying Mendelian randomization. METHODS: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using variants previously associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRadjBMI) and examined its associations with cardiometabolic factors by linear regression and Mendelian randomization in a meta-analysis of 6 cohorts, including 9895 European children and adolescents aged 3-17 y. RESULTS: WHRadjBMI GRS was associated with higher WHRadjBMI (ß = 0.021 SD/allele; 95% CI: 0.016, 0.026 SD/allele; P = 3 × 10-15) and with unfavorable concentrations of blood lipids (higher LDL cholesterol: ß = 0.006 SD/allele; 95% CI: 0.001, 0.011 SD/allele; P = 0.025; lower HDL cholesterol: ß = -0.007 SD/allele; 95% CI: -0.012, -0.002 SD/allele; P = 0.009; higher triglycerides: ß = 0.007 SD/allele; 95% CI: 0.002, 0.012 SD/allele; P = 0.006). No differences were detected between prepubertal and pubertal/postpubertal children. The WHRadjBMI GRS had a stronger association with fasting insulin in children and adolescents with overweight/obesity (ß = 0.016 SD/allele; 95% CI: 0.001, 0.032 SD/allele; P = 0.037) than in those with normal weight (ß = -0.002 SD/allele; 95% CI: -0.010, 0.006 SD/allele; P = 0.605) (P for difference = 0.034). In a 2-stage least-squares regression analysis, each genetically instrumented 1-SD increase in WHRadjBMI increased circulating triglycerides by 0.17 mmol/L (0.35 SD, P = 0.040), suggesting that the relation between abdominal adiposity and circulating triglycerides may be causal. CONCLUSIONS: Abdominal adiposity may have a causal, unfavorable effect on plasma triglycerides and potentially other cardiometabolic risk factors starting in childhood. The results highlight the importance of early weight management through healthy dietary habits and physically active lifestyle among children with a tendency for abdominal adiposity.

6.
JAMA Netw Open ; 2(9): e1910915, 2019 Sep 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31539074

RESUMO

Importance: Observational studies have shown associations of birth weight with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and glycemic traits, but it remains unclear whether these associations represent causal associations. Objective: To test the association of birth weight with T2D and glycemic traits using a mendelian randomization analysis. Design, Setting, and Participants: This mendelian randomization study used a genetic risk score for birth weight that was constructed with 7 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The associations of this score with birth weight and T2D were tested in a mendelian randomization analysis using study-level data. The association of birth weight with T2D was tested using both study-level data (7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were used as an instrumental variable) and summary-level data from the consortia (43 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were used as an instrumental variable). Data from 180 056 participants from 49 studies were included. Main Outcomes and Measures: Type 2 diabetes and glycemic traits. Results: This mendelian randomization analysis included 49 studies with 41 155 patients with T2D and 80 008 control participants from study-level data and 34 840 patients with T2D and 114 981 control participants from summary-level data. Study-level data showed that a 1-SD decrease in birth weight due to the genetic risk score was associated with higher risk of T2D among all participants (odds ratio [OR], 2.10; 95% CI, 1.69-2.61; P = 4.03 × 10-5), among European participants (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.42-2.71; P = .04), and among East Asian participants (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.18-1.62; P = .04). Similar results were observed from summary-level analyses. In addition, each 1-SD lower birth weight was associated with 0.189 SD higher fasting glucose concentration (ß = 0.189; SE = 0.060; P = .002), but not with fasting insulin, 2-hour glucose, or hemoglobin A1c concentration. Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, a genetic predisposition to lower birth weight was associated with increased risk of T2D and higher fasting glucose concentration, suggesting genetic effects on retarded fetal growth and increased diabetes risk that either are independent of each other or operate through alterations of integrated biological mechanisms.

7.
BMJ Open ; 9(8): e031564, 2019 Aug 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31462488

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To examine whether exposure to heavy physical work from early to later adulthood is associated with primary healthcare visits due to cause-specific musculoskeletal diseases in midlife. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Nationally representative Young Finns Study cohort, Finland. PARTICIPANTS: 1056 participants of the Young Finns Study cohort. EXPOSURE MEASURE: Physical work exposure was surveyed in early (18-24 years old, 1986 or 1989) and later adulthood (2007 and 2011), and it was categorised as: 'no exposure', 'early exposure only', 'later exposure only' and 'early and later exposure'. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Visits due to any musculoskeletal disease and separately due to spine disorders, and upper extremity disorders were followed up from national primary healthcare register from the date of the third survey in 2011 until 2014. RESULTS: Prevalence of any musculoskeletal disease during the follow-up was 20%, that for spine disorders 10% and that for upper extremity disorders 5%. Those with physically heavy work in early adulthood only had an increased risk of any musculoskeletal disease (risk ratio (RR) 1.55, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.28) after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, body mass index, physical activity and parental occupational class. Later exposure only was associated with visits due to any musculoskeletal disease (RR 1.46, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.12) and spine disorders (RR 2.40, 95% CI 1.41 to 4.06). Early and later exposure was associated with all three outcomes: RR 1.99 (95% CI 1.44 to 2.77) for any musculoskeletal disease, RR 2.43 (95% CI 1.42 to 4.14) for spine disorders and RR 3.97 (95% CI 1.86 to 8.46) for upper extremity disorders. CONCLUSIONS: To reduce burden of musculoskeletal diseases, preventive actions to reduce exposure to or mitigate the consequences of physically heavy work throughout the work career are needed.

8.
Heart ; 2019 Aug 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31422363

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and heart rate recovery (HRR) associate with the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) independently of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). METHODS: The Finnish Cardiovascular Study is a prospective clinical study of patients referred to clinical exercise testing in 2001-2008 and follow-up until December 2013. Patients without pacemakers undergoing first maximal or submaximal exercise testing with cycle ergometer were included (n=3776). CRF in metabolic equivalents (METs) was estimated by achieving maximal work level. HRR was defined as the reduction in heart rate 1 min after maximal exertion. Adjudication of SCD was based on death certificates. LVEF was measured for clinical indications in 71.4% of the patients (n=2697). RESULTS: Population mean age was 55.7 years (SD 13.1; 61% men). 98 SCDs were recorded during a median follow-up of 9.1 years (6.9-10.7). Mean CRF and HRR were 7.7 (SD 2.9) METs and 25 (SD 12) beats/min/min. Both CRF and HRR were associated with the risk of SCD in the entire study population (HRCRF0.47 (0.37-0.59), p<0.001 and HRHRR0.57 (0.48-0.67), p<0.001 with HR estimates corresponding to one SD increase in the exposure variables) and with CRF, HRR and LVEF in the same model (HRCRF0.60 (0.45-0.79), p<0.001, HRHRR0.65 (0.51-0.82), p<0.001) or adjusting additionally for all significant risk factors for SCD (LVEF, sex, creatinine level, history of myocardial infarction and atrial fibrillation, corrected QT interval) (HRCRF0.69 (0.52-0.93), p<0.01, HRHRR0.74 (0.58-0.95) p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS: CRF and HRR are significantly associated with the risk of SCD regardless of LVEF.

9.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 3669, 2019 Aug 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31413261

RESUMO

Human longevity is heritable, but genome-wide association (GWA) studies have had limited success. Here, we perform two meta-analyses of GWA studies of a rigorous longevity phenotype definition including 11,262/3484 cases surviving at or beyond the age corresponding to the 90th/99th survival percentile, respectively, and 25,483 controls whose age at death or at last contact was at or below the age corresponding to the 60th survival percentile. Consistent with previous reports, rs429358 (apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4) is associated with lower odds of surviving to the 90th and 99th percentile age, while rs7412 (ApoE ε2) shows the opposite. Moreover, rs7676745, located near GPR78, associates with lower odds of surviving to the 90th percentile age. Gene-level association analysis reveals a role for tissue-specific expression of multiple genes in longevity. Finally, genetic correlation of the longevity GWA results with that of several disease-related phenotypes points to a shared genetic architecture between health and longevity.

10.
J Neuroimmunol ; 335: 577020, 2019 Oct 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31445379

RESUMO

TL1A/DR3/DcR3 pathway is an important mediator of inflammatory responses and contributes to the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we analysed PBMC gene expression of these molecules in 30 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients, 8 secondary progressive MS (SPMS), 9 primary progressive MS (PPMS), 11 clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) patients, and 16 healthy controls (HCs), to evaluate their biomarker potential in MS. The results showed significant decrease in TL1A expression in RRMS compared to other study groups. TL1A as a marker of inflammation, we found its higher expression among treatment näive RRMS patients as compared to HCs and among patients who were treated with DMTs. Moreover, TL1A expression was found to be associated with the clinical and MRI findings of MS patients suggesting its possible involvement in the establishment or preservation of immune system homeostasis or in the regulation of inflammatory activity. Taken together, these findings suggest the TL1A should be evaluated further for its potential as a candidate biomarker of inflammatory activity and the marker of therapeutic response to immunomodulatory treatments in MS.

11.
PLoS One ; 14(8): e0221345, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31437200

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The gut microbiome is thought to remain stable into old age. Gut bacteria and their translocation may play a role in the development of coronary heart disease (CHD) by modulating cholesterol levels and immune responses, as well as by producing toxic metabolites and bacterial endotoxins. The association of changes in the gut microbiome with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis and the ability of gut bacteria themselves to translocate into coronary plaques has not been studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As a part of the Tampere Sudden Death Study, we measured age-dependent changes in the relative ratios of major intestinal bacterial communities (Bacteroides species [spp.], the Clostridium leptum group, the Clostridium coccoides group, Bifidobacterium spp., Enterobactericeae, Lactobacillus spp.) and Streptococcus spp. in both feces and coronary plaques of the same male autopsy cases (n = 67, age range 44-95) using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The area of coronary atherosclerotic lesions were measured by computer-assisted morphometry. Fecal bacterial DNA measurements from healthy volunteers served as a control for gut bacterial analyses of autopsy cases. The relative amount of bacterial DNA in a sample was determined with the comparative Cq method. RESULTS: The relative ratios of fecal Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., the Clostridium coccoides group, and Bacteroides spp. did not differ between controls and autopsy cases and showed no age-dependence. In contrast, the ratios of the Clostridium leptum group, Enterobactericeae, and Streptococcus spp. increased with age. Elevated relative ratios of fecal Enterobactericeae associated with a larger coronary plaque fibrotic area (p = 0.001), and the Clostridium leptum group with a larger calcification area (p = 0.015). Intestinal bacterial DNA could be amplified in 67.6% of the coronary plaques, the most common being Streptococcus spp. (41.0%), followed by Enterobactericeae (12.1%), Clostridium leptum (2.4%), and Lactobacillus spp. (2.4%). The percentages of Streptococcus spp. DNA decreased, and those of Enterobactericeae increased in coronary plaques along with age. CONCLUSIONS: DNA of the Clostridium leptum group and pathogenic Enterobactericeae increase in the gut microbiome with age and can be detected in the same individual's coronary plaques along with pathogenic Streptococcus spp., associating with more severe coronary atherosclerosis.

12.
Mol Nutr Food Res ; : e1900226, 2019 Aug 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31432628

RESUMO

SCOPE: Insulin resistance (IR) and inflammation are hallmarks of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The nod-like receptor pyrin domain containing-3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a metabolic sensor activated by saturated fatty acids (SFA) initiating IL-1ß inflammation and IR. Interactions between SFA intake and NLRP3-related genetic variants may alter T2D risk factors. METHODS: Meta-analyses of six Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium (n = 19 005) tested interactions between SFA and NLRP3-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and modulation of fasting insulin, fasting glucose, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. RESULTS: SFA interacted with rs12143966, wherein each 1% increase in SFA intake increased insulin by 0.0063 IU mL-1 (SE ± 0.002, p = 0.001) per each major (G) allele copy. rs4925663, interacted with SFA (ß ± SE = -0.0058 ± 0.002, p = 0.004) to increase insulin by 0.0058 IU mL-1 , per additional copy of the major (C) allele. Both associations are close to the significance threshold (p < 0.0001). rs4925663 causes a missense mutation affecting NLRP3 expression. CONCLUSION: Two NLRP3-related SNPs showed potential interaction with SFA to modulate fasting insulin. Greater dietary SFA intake accentuates T2D risk, which, subject to functional validation, may be further elaborated depending on NLRP3-related genetic variants.

13.
Scand J Public Health ; : 1403494819869816, 2019 Aug 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31464561

RESUMO

Aims: Disparity in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and risk factor levels between urban and rural regions has been confirmed worldwide. The aim of this study was to examine how living in different community types (urban-rural) in childhood and adulthood are related to cardiovascular risk factors and surrogate markers of CVD such as carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass (LVM). Methods: The study population comprised 2903 participants (54.1% female, mean age 10.5 years in 1980) of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study who had been clinically examined in 1980 (age 3-18 years) and had participated in at least one adult follow-up (2001-2011). Results: In adulthood, urban residents had lower systolic blood pressure (-1 mmHg), LDL-cholesterol (-0.05 mmol/l), lower body mass index (-1.0 kg/m2) and glycosylated haemoglobin levels (-0.05 mmol/mol), and lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome (19.9 v. 23.7%) than their rural counterparts. In addition, participants continuously living in urban areas had significantly lower IMT (-0.01 mm), LVM (1.59 g/m2.7) and pulse wave velocity (-0.22 m/s) and higher carotid artery compliance (0.07%/10 mmHg) compared to persistently rural residents. The differences in surrogate markers of CVD were only partially attenuated when adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions: Participants living in urban communities had a more favourable cardiovascular risk factor profile than rural residents. Furthermore, participants continuously living in urban areas had less subclinical markers related to CVD compared with participants living in rural areas. Urban-rural differences in cardiovascular health might provide important opportunities for optimizing prevention by targeting areas of highest need.

14.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 43(10): 2007-2016, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31332278

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Most obese children show cardiometabolic impairments, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Yet some obese children retain a normal cardiometabolic profile. The mechanisms underlying this variability remain largely unknown. We examined whether genetic loci associated with increased insulin sensitivity and relatively higher fat storage on the hip than on the waist in adults are associated with a normal cardiometabolic profile despite higher adiposity in children. METHODS: We constructed a genetic score using variants previously linked to increased insulin sensitivity and/or decreased waist-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and examined the associations of this genetic score with adiposity and cardiometabolic impairments in a meta-analysis of six cohorts, including 7391 European children aged 3-18 years. RESULTS: The genetic score was significantly associated with increased degree of obesity (higher BMI-SDS beta = 0.009 SD/allele, SE = 0.003, P = 0.003; higher body fat mass beta = 0.009, SE = 0.004, P = 0.031), yet improved body fat distribution (lower WHRadjBMI beta = -0.014 SD/allele, SE = 0.006, P = 0.016), and favorable concentrations of blood lipids (higher HDL cholesterol: beta = 0.010 SD/allele, SE = 0.003, P = 0.002; lower triglycerides: beta = -0.011 SD/allele, SE = 0.003, P = 0.001) adjusted for age, sex, and puberty. No differences were detected between prepubertal and pubertal/postpubertal children. The genetic score predicted a normal cardiometabolic profile, defined by the presence of normal glucose and lipid concentrations, among obese children (OR = 1.07 CI 95% 1.01-1.13, P = 0.012, n = 536). CONCLUSIONS: Genetic predisposition to higher body fat yet lower cardiometabolic risk exerts its influence before puberty.

15.
J Lipid Res ; 60(9): 1622-1629, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31270131

RESUMO

apoE, a key regulator of plasma lipids, mediates altered functionalities in lipoprotein metabolism and thus affects the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). The significance of different apoE polymorphisms remains unclear; although the ε4 allele is clearly associated with increased cholesterol levels (which inform CAD risk), direct studies about apoE polymorphisms on CAD risk and development have yielded controversial results. Furthermore, certain species of ceramides-complex lipids abundant in plasma LDL-are markers of increased risk of myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death. Using a high-throughput MS approach, we quantified 30 molecular plasma ceramide species from a cohort of 2,160 apoE-genotyped (rs7412, rs429358) young adults enrolled in the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. We then searched this lipidome data set to identify new indications of pathways influenced by apoE polymorphisms and possibly related to CAD risk. This approach revealed a previously unreported association between apoE polymorphism and a consistently documented high-risk CAD marker, Cer(d18:1/16:0). Compared with the apoE ε3/3 reference group, plasma levels of apoE ε4 were elevated and those of apoE ε2 were lowered in all subjects without evidence of apoE-by-sex interactions. apoE associated with seven ceramides that are connected to atherogenically potent macrophages and/or lipoprotein particles; these associations could indicate a plausible linkage between apoE polymorphism and ceramide metabolism, leading to adverse plasma LDL metabolism and atherogenesis. In conclusion, new evidence from plasma ceramides links apoE polymorphism with an increased risk of CAD and extends our understanding of the role of apoE in health and disease.

16.
J Med Genet ; 56(9): 607-616, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31217265

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Inflammatory processes contribute to the pathophysiology of multiple chronic conditions. Genetic factors play a crucial role in modulating the inflammatory load, but the exact mechanisms are incompletely understood. OBJECTIVE: To assess genetic determinants of 16 circulating cytokines and cell adhesion molecules (inflammatory phenotypes) in Finns. METHODS: Genome-wide associations of the inflammatory phenotypes were studied in Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (N=5284). A subsequent meta-analysis was completed for 10 phenotypes available in a previous genome-wide association study, adding up to 13 577 individuals in the study. Complementary association tests were performed to study the effect of the ABO blood types on soluble adhesion molecule levels. RESULTS: We identified seven novel and six previously reported genetic associations (p<3.1×10-9). Three loci were associated with soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) level, one of which was the ABO locus that has been previously associated with soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) levels. Our findings suggest that the blood type B associates primarily with sVCAM-1 level, while the A1 subtype shows a robust effect on sE-selectin and sICAM-1 levels. The genotypes in the ABO locus associating with higher soluble adhesion molecule levels tend to associate with lower circulating cholesterol levels and lower cardiovascular disease risk. CONCLUSION: The present results extend the knowledge about genetic factors contributing to the inflammatory load. Our findings suggest that two distinct mechanisms contribute to the soluble adhesion molecule levels in the ABO locus and that elevated soluble adhesion molecule levels per se may not increase risk for cardiovascular disease.

17.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 110(2): 437-450, 2019 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31165884

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Folate and vitamin B-12 are essential micronutrients involved in the donation of methyl groups in cellular metabolism. However, associations between intake of these nutrients and genome-wide DNA methylation levels have not been studied comprehensively in humans. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess whether folate and/or vitamin B-12 intake are asssociated with genome-wide changes in DNA methylation in leukocytes. METHODS: A large-scale epigenome-wide association study of folate and vitamin B-12 intake was performed on DNA from 5841 participants from 10 cohorts using Illumina 450k arrays. Folate and vitamin B-12 intakes were calculated from food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs). Continuous and categorical (low compared with high intake) linear regression mixed models were applied per cohort, controlling for confounders. A meta-analysis was performed to identify significant differentially methylated positions (DMPs) and regions (DMRs), and a pathway analysis was performed on the DMR annotated genes. RESULTS: The categorical model resulted in 6 DMPs, which are all negatively associated with folate intake, annotated to FAM64A, WRAP73, FRMD8, CUX1, and LCN8 genes, which have a role in cellular processes including centrosome localization, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. Regional analysis showed 74 folate-associated DMRs, of which 73 were negatively associated with folate intake. The most significant folate-associated DMR was a 400-base pair (bp) spanning region annotated to the LGALS3BP gene. In the categorical model, vitamin B-12 intake was associated with 29 DMRs annotated to 48 genes, of which the most significant was a 1100-bp spanning region annotated to the calcium-binding tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated gene (CABYR). Vitamin B-12 intake was not associated with DMPs. CONCLUSIONS: We identified novel epigenetic loci that are associated with folate and vitamin B-12 intake. Interestingly, we found a negative association between folate and DNA methylation. Replication of these methylation loci is necessary in future studies.

18.
Am J Hum Genet ; 105(1): 15-28, 2019 Jul 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31178129

RESUMO

Circulating levels of adiponectin, an adipocyte-secreted protein associated with cardiovascular and metabolic risk, are highly heritable. To gain insights into the biology that regulates adiponectin levels, we performed an exome array meta-analysis of 265,780 genetic variants in 67,739 individuals of European, Hispanic, African American, and East Asian ancestry. We identified 20 loci associated with adiponectin, including 11 that had been reported previously (p < 2 × 10-7). Comparison of exome array variants to regional linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns and prior genome-wide association study (GWAS) results detected candidate variants (r2 > .60) spanning as much as 900 kb. To identify potential genes and mechanisms through which the previously unreported association signals act to affect adiponectin levels, we assessed cross-trait associations, expression quantitative trait loci in subcutaneous adipose, and biological pathways of nearby genes. Eight of the nine loci were also associated (p < 1 × 10-4) with at least one obesity or lipid trait. Candidate genes include PRKAR2A, PTH1R, and HDAC9, which have been suggested to play roles in adipocyte differentiation or bone marrow adipose tissue. Taken together, these findings provide further insights into the processes that influence circulating adiponectin levels.

19.
Horm Behav ; 114: 104540, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31202819

RESUMO

Parenting qualities are known to transmit across generations, but less is known about genetic processes that may modify how strongly parenting quality carries across generations. We examined in prospective data whether oxytocinergic genes of offspring moderate the intergenerational transmission of warm and accepting parent-child relationship qualities. The sample comprised 1167 Finnish parents (G2, 62% female) and their mothers (G1). At the study baseline, G1 mothers (Mage = 38) reported parent-child relationship qualities towards G2 children (age range 3-18). After 28-34 years, G2 offspring reported parent-child relationship qualities towards their own children using the same questionnaire. A cumulative genetic score was computed for G2 by summing up previously identified four alleles associated with non-optimal parenting or social impairments across OXTR (rs1042778, rs2254298, rs53576) and CD38 (rs3796863) genes. Results indicated no interaction effects of G2 cumulative genetic score on the transmission of parent-child relationship qualities. Among single polymorphisms in OXTR, the interaction effects of rs53576 and rs1042778 were found. G1 maternal emotional warmth was associated with higher G2 emotional warmth among G2 participants with the OXTR rs53576 AA/AG genotype, but not among those with the GG genotype. G1 maternal acceptance was associated with higher G2 acceptance among those G2 participants with the OXTR rs1042778 GG/GT genotype, but not among those with the TT genotype. Oxytocinergic genes may influence sensitivity to quality of parent-child relationship, although this needs replication in future studies.

20.
Hepatology ; 2019 Jun 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31169929

RESUMO

Fatty liver is a preventable cause of liver failure, but early risk factors for adulthood fatty liver are poorly understood. We examined the association of childhood socioeconomic disadvantage with adulthood fatty liver and tested adulthood risk factors of fatty liver as possible mediators of this link. The study population comprised 2,042 participants aged 3-18 years at baseline (1980) from the longitudinal Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Follow-up with repeated clinical examinations was 31 years. Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was assessed using data from parents' socioeconomic position and socioeconomic circumstances in participants' residential neighborhoods, categorized as high versus low socioeconomic disadvantage. Fatty liver was determined by ultrasound during the last follow up (2011) at ages 34-49 years. Childhood and adulthood risk factors, including metabolic biomarkers and life-style variables, were assessed in clinical examinations. 18.9% of the participants had fatty liver in adulthood. High childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with an increased risk of fatty liver (risk ratio[95% confidence interval] 1.42[1.18-1.70],P=0.0002). This association was robust to adjustment for age, sex, and childhood risk factors of fatty liver, including high body mass index, elevated insulin, and low birth weight (1.33[1.09-1.62],P=0.005). High childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was also associated with the development of risk factors of fatty liver in adulthood. Adulthood risk factors linking childhood socioeconomic disadvantage with fatty liver included waist circumference (proportion mediated of the total effect of childhood socioeconomic disadvantage 45%), body mass index (40%), systolic blood pressure (29%), insulin (20%), physical activity (15%), triglycerides (14%), and red meat consumption (7%). CONCLUSION: Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with multiple risk factors of fatty liver and increased likelihood of fatty liver in adulthood. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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