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2.
Eur Heart J ; 40(26): 2142-2151, 2019 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31098611

RESUMO

AIMS: We aimed to evaluate the frequency, clinical features, and prognostic implications of cardiac arrest (CA) in takotsubo syndrome (TTS). METHODS AND RESULTS: We reviewed the records of patients with CA and known heart rhythm from the International Takotsubo Registry. The main outcomes were 60-day and 5-year mortality. In addition, predictors of mortality and predictors of CA during the acute TTS phase were assessed. Of 2098 patients, 103 patients with CA and known heart rhythm during CA were included. Compared with patients without CA, CA patients were more likely to be younger, male, and have apical TTS, atrial fibrillation (AF), neurologic comorbidities, physical triggers, and longer corrected QT-interval and lower left ventricular ejection fraction on admission. In all, 57.1% of patients with CA at admission had ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia, while 73.7% of patients with CA in the acute phase had asystole/pulseless electrical activity. Patients with CA showed higher 60-day (40.3% vs. 4.0%, P < 0.001) and 5-year mortality (68.9% vs. 16.7%, P < 0.001) than patients without CA. T-wave inversion and intracranial haemorrhage were independently associated with higher 60-day mortality after CA, whereas female gender was associated with lower 60-day mortality. In the acute phase, CA occurred less frequently in females and more frequently in patients with AF, ST-segment elevation, and higher C-reactive protein on admission. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiac arrest is relatively frequent in TTS and is associated with higher short- and long-term mortality. Clinical and electrocardiographic parameters independently predicted mortality after CA.

3.
Eur Heart J ; 40(15): 1183-1187, 2019 Apr 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30831580

RESUMO

AIMS: Takotsubo syndrome (TTS) is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction often triggered by emotional or physical stress. Severe activation of the sympathetic nervous system with catecholamine release caused by a dysfunctional limbic system has been proposed as a potential mechanism. We hypothesize that brain regions responsible for autonomic integration and/or limbic processing might be involved in the development of TTS. Here, we investigated alterations in resting state functional connectivity in TTS patients compared with healthy controls. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), resting state functional connectivity has been assessed in 15 subjects with TTS and 39 healthy controls. Network-based statistical analyses were conducted to identify subnetworks with altered resting state functional connectivity. Sympathetic and parasympathetic networks have been constructed in addition to the default mode network and whole-brain network. We found parasympathetic- and sympathetic-associated subnetworks both showing reduced resting state functional connectivity in TTS patients compared with controls. Important brain regions constituting parasympathetic- and sympathetic-associated subnetworks included the amygdala, hippocampus, and insula as well as cingulate, parietal, temporal, and cerebellar regions. Additionally, the default mode network as well as limbic regions in the whole-brain analysis demonstrated reduced resting state functional connectivity in TTS, including the hippocampus, parahippocampal, and medial prefrontal regions. CONCLUSION: For the first time, we demonstrate hypoconnectivity of central brain regions associated with autonomic functions and regulation of the limbic system in patients with TTS. These findings suggest that autonomic-limbic integration might play an important role in the pathophysiology and contribute to the understanding of TTS.

4.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 72(8): 874-882, 2018 Aug 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30115226

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Prognosis of Takotsubo syndrome (TTS) remains controversial due to scarcity of available data. Additionally, the effect of the triggering factors remains elusive. OBJECTIVES: This study compared prognosis between TTS and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients and investigated short- and long-term outcomes in TTS based on different triggers. METHODS: Patients with TTS were enrolled from the International Takotsubo Registry. Long-term mortality of patients with TTS was compared to an age- and sex-matched cohort of patients with ACS. In addition, short- and long-term outcomes were compared between different groups according to triggering conditions. RESULTS: Overall, TTS patients had a comparable long-term mortality risk with ACS patients. Of 1,613 TTS patients, an emotional trigger was detected in 485 patients (30%). Of 630 patients (39%) related to physical triggers, 98 patients (6%) had acute neurologic disorders, while in the other 532 patients (33%), physical activities, medical conditions, or procedures were the triggering conditions. The remaining 498 patients (31%) had no identifiable trigger. TTS patients related to physical stress showed higher mortality rates than ACS patients during long-term follow-up, whereas patients related to emotional stress had better outcomes compared with ACS patients. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, TTS patients had long-term outcomes comparable to age- and sex-matched ACS patients. Also, we demonstrated that TTS can either be benign or a life-threating condition depending on the inciting stress factor. We propose a new classification based on triggers, which can serve as a clinical tool to predict short- and long-term outcomes of TTS. (International Takotsubo Registry [InterTAK Registry]; NCT01947621).

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