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1.
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr ; : 1-22, 2021 Oct 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34698575

RESUMO

Increased intake of Western diets and ultra-processed foods is accompanied by increased intake of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs can be generated exogenously in the thermal processing of food and endogenously in the human body, which associated with various chronic diseases. In food, AGEs can be divided into free and bound forms, which differ in their bioavailability, digestion, absorption, gut microbial interactions and untargeted metabolites. We summarized the measurements and contents of free and bound AGE in foods. Moreover, the ingestion, digestion, absorption, excretion, gut microbiota interactions, and metabolites and metabolic pathways between free and bound AGEs based on animal and human studies were compared. Bound AGEs were predominant in most of the selected foods, while beer and soy sauce were rich in free AGEs. Only 10%-30% of AGEs were absorbed into the systemic circulation when orally administered. The excretion of ingested free and bound AGEs was approximately 90% and 60%, respectively. Dietary free CML has a detrimental effect on gut microbiota composition, while bound AGEs have both detrimental and beneficial impacts. Free and bound dietary AGEs changed amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism and carbohydrate metabolism. And besides, bound dietary AGEs altered vitamin metabolism, and glycerolipid metabolism.

2.
J Agric Food Chem ; 69(32): 9287-9298, 2021 Aug 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34347479

RESUMO

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by marked imbalances in lipid storage and metabolism. Because the beneficial health effects of cereal ß-glucan (BG) include lowering cholesterol and regulating lipid metabolism, BG may alleviate the imbalances in lipid metabolism observed during NAFLD. The aim of our study was to investigate whether BG from highland barley has an effect on western diet-induced NAFLD in mice. Using lipidomics, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of BG intervention, and identified potential lipid biomarkers. The results reveal that BG (300 mg/kg body weight) significantly alleviated liver steatosis. Lipidomics analysis demonstrated that BG also altered lipid metabolic patterns. We were able to identify 13 differentially regulated lipid species that may be useful as lipid biomarkers. Several genes in the hepatic lipid and cholesterol metabolism pathways were also modulated. These findings provide evidence that BG ameliorates NAFLD by altering liver lipid metabolites and regulating lipid metabolism-related genes.


Assuntos
Hordeum , Hepatopatia Gordurosa não Alcoólica , beta-Glucanas , Animais , Dieta Hiperlipídica/efeitos adversos , Dieta Ocidental , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Hordeum/genética , Metabolismo dos Lipídeos , Lipidômica , Fígado/metabolismo , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Hepatopatia Gordurosa não Alcoólica/etiologia , Hepatopatia Gordurosa não Alcoólica/genética , beta-Glucanas/metabolismo
3.
Anal Methods ; 13(33): 3649-3658, 2021 09 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34368826

RESUMO

The development of sensitive, facile, cost-effective and eco-friendly sensors is essential for monitoring imidacloprid (IDP) residue on a large scale. Compared with popular modification of electrodes with advanced materials, electrochemical activation is promising at this point. In this paper, we found that strongly basic electrolytes (e.g. KOH and K3PO4) and applying cyclic potential during the activating process are beneficial to greatly amplify the electro-reduction response of IDP by nearly 16 times. Combining the characterization of activated electrodes with electrochemical behavior analysis of IDP, it is speculated that specific oxygen-contained functional groups were formed to bond with IDP molecules, leading to fast electron transfer kinetics. Then a sensitive IDP sensor has been developed with a low limit of detection (LOD) of 0.03 µM in the range of 0.1-100 µM. The methodological evaluation including reproducibility, stability and recovery has been also carefully studied, verifying the potential of proposed activated electrodes for application in rice samples.


Assuntos
Oryza , Eletrodos , Neonicotinoides , Nitrocompostos , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
4.
Food Funct ; 12(15): 7092, 2021 Aug 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34195733

RESUMO

Correction for 'Anthocyanins from the fruits of Lycium ruthenicum Murray improve high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance by ameliorating inflammation and oxidative stress in mice' by Baoming Tian et al., Food Funct., 2021, 12, 3855-3871, DOI: 10.1039/D0FO02936J.

5.
Food Funct ; 12(9): 3855-3871, 2021 May 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33704297

RESUMO

A high-fat diet (HFD) promotes tissue inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance (IR), thereby contributing to the development of obesity and diabetes. Anthocyanins from Lycium ruthenicum (AC) have demonstrated anti-obesity effects and modulated IR. To investigate the mechanism by which AC attenuates the adverse effects of consuming a HFD, C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFD supplemented with AC or a control diet without AC for 12 weeks. AC supplementation decreased the amount of weight gain, hepatic lipid, and sequentially improved dyslipidemia, inflammation, oxidative stress, and IR in HFD-fed mice. Molecular data revealed that AC inhibited hepatic inflammation by reducing TLR4/NF-κB/JNK in the liver tissues and ameliorated oxidative stress by activating the Nrf2/HO-1/NQO1 pathway. Thus, AC might activate IRS-1/AKT and prevent HFD-induced gluconeogenesis and IR by ameliorating inflammation and oxidative stress. Modulation of inflammation and oxidative stress with AC may represent a promising target for the treatment of IR and provide insight into the mechanism by which AC protects against obesity.


Assuntos
Antocianinas/administração & dosagem , Dieta Hiperlipídica/efeitos adversos , Suplementos Nutricionais , Resistência à Insulina , Lycium , Animais , Glicemia/metabolismo , Frutas/química , Gluconeogênese , Homeostase , Inflamação , Proteínas Substratos do Receptor de Insulina/metabolismo , Metabolismo dos Lipídeos , Fígado/metabolismo , Fígado/patologia , Masculino , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , NF-kappa B/metabolismo , Obesidade/prevenção & controle , Estresse Oxidativo , Transdução de Sinais , Receptor 4 Toll-Like/metabolismo
6.
Mol Nutr Food Res ; 65(8): e2000745, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33629483

RESUMO

SCOPE: Gut barrier dysfunction and inflammation originating from a dysbiotic gut microbiota (GM) are strongly associated with a high-fat diet (HFD). Anthocyanins from Lycium ruthenicum (ACs) show antiobesity effects through modulating the GM. However, the mechanism linking the antiobesity effects of ACs and GM modulation remains obscure. METHODS AND RESULTS: To investigate the ameliorative effects of ACs on colonic barrier dysfunction and inflammation, mice are fed an HFD with or without ACs at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg kg-1 for 12 weeks. AC supplementation reduced weight gain, enriched short-chain fatty acid (SCFA)-producing bacteria (e.g., Ruminococcaceae, Muribaculaceae, Akkermansia, Ruminococcaceae_UCG-014, and Bacteroides) and SCFA content, depleted endotoxin-producing bacteria (e.g., Helicobacter and Desulfovibrionaceae), and decreased endotoxin (i.e., lipopolysaccharide) levels. SCFAs substantially activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPRs), inhibited histone deacetylases (HDAC), increased intestinal tight junction mRNA and protein expression levels, reduced intestinal permeability, and protected intestinal barrier integrity in HFD-induced mice. These effects mitigate intestinal inflammation by inhibiting the LPS/NF-κB/TLR4 pathway. CONCLUSION: These data indicates that ACs can mitigate colonic barrier dysfunction and inflammation, induce SCFA production and inhibit endotoxin production by modulating the GM in HFD-fed mice. This finding provides a clue for understanding the antiobesity effects of ACs.


Assuntos
Antocianinas/farmacologia , Colite/tratamento farmacológico , Dieta Hiperlipídica/efeitos adversos , Microbioma Gastrointestinal/efeitos dos fármacos , Lycium/química , Animais , Antocianinas/análise , Antocianinas/química , Colite/etiologia , Colite/microbiologia , Ácidos Graxos Voláteis/metabolismo , Fezes/microbiologia , Microbioma Gastrointestinal/fisiologia , Mucosa Intestinal/efeitos dos fármacos , Mucosa Intestinal/metabolismo , Intestinos/efeitos dos fármacos , Masculino , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , NF-kappa B/metabolismo , Obesidade/etiologia , Obesidade/prevenção & controle , Receptor 4 Toll-Like/metabolismo
7.
Food Funct ; 11(7): 5749-5767, 2020 Jul 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32602874

RESUMO

Resistant starch (RS) is well known to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity. Recently, attention has been paid to gut microbiota which mediates the RS's impact on T2DM and obesity, while a mechanistic understanding of how RS prevents T2DM and obesity through gut microbiota is not clear yet. Therefore, this review aims at exploring the underlying mechanisms of it. RS prevents T2DM and obesity through gut microbiota by modifying selective microbial composition to produce starch-degrading enzymes, promoting the production of intestinal metabolites, and improving gut barrier function. Therefore, RS possessing good functional features can be used to increase the fiber content of healthier food. Furthermore, achieving highly selective effects on gut microbiota based on the slight differences of RS's chemical structure and focusing on the effects of RS on strain-levels are essential to manipulate the microbiota for human health.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/prevenção & controle , Obesidade/prevenção & controle , Amido Resistente/administração & dosagem , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/microbiologia , Ácidos Graxos Voláteis/metabolismo , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Humanos , Inflamação/microbiologia , Inflamação/prevenção & controle , Resistência à Insulina , Obesidade/microbiologia
8.
J Agric Food Chem ; 66(33): 8864-8875, 2018 Aug 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30037223

RESUMO

Thermally processed diets are widely consumed, although advanced-glycation end products (AGEs) are unavoidably formed. AGEs, clusters of protein-cross-linking products, become less digestible because they impair intestinal peptidase proteolysis. We characterized the impacts of dietary AGEs on gut microbiota through a microbiome-to-metabolome association study. C57BL/6 mice were fed a heat-treated diet (high-AGE diet, H-AGE) or a standard AIN-93G diet (low-AGE diet, L-AGE) for 8 months. Fecal-microbiota composition was examined by 16S rDNA sequencing, and fecal-metabolome profile was evaluated by gas chromatography-tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS). Reduced α-diversity and altered microbiota composition with elevated Helicobacter levels were found in the H-AGE group, and among the 57 perturbed metabolites, protein-fermentation products (i.e., p-cresol and putrescine) were increased. Major dysfunctional metabolic pathways were associated with carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism in two groups. Moreover, high correlations were found between fluctuant gut microbiota and metabolites. These findings might reveal the underlying mechanisms of the detrimental impacts of dietary AGEs on host health.


Assuntos
Fezes/microbiologia , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Produtos Finais de Glicação Avançada/metabolismo , Animais , Bactérias/classificação , Bactérias/genética , Bactérias/isolamento & purificação , Bactérias/metabolismo , Dieta , Cromatografia Gasosa-Espectrometria de Massas , Produtos Finais de Glicação Avançada/efeitos adversos , Mucosa Intestinal/metabolismo , Intestinos/microbiologia , Masculino , Metaboloma , Metabolômica , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL
9.
Mol Nutr Food Res ; 61(10)2017 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28621836

RESUMO

SCOPE: The adverse impacts of dietary advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on health are currently of interest. These compounds are inevitably formed during thermal food processing and make foods less digestible because of protein cross-linking. This study examined not only whether dietary AGEs alter cecal microbiota and their metabolites but also their effects on colon permeability. METHODS AND RESULTS: Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a high-AGEs diet (AGEs content was increased by heating food at 125°C/3 h) for 6, 12, or 18 weeks. Cecal microbiota was analyzed by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Colon permeability was assessed through histopathology, immunohistochemistry and endotoxin testing. Microbial metabolites (e.g. ammonia and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs)) were also measured. AGEs treatment reduced the diversity and richness of the microbiota, especially saccharolytic bacteria such as Ruminococcaceae and Alloprevotella, which can produce SCFAs, whereas some putatively harmful bacteria (Desulfovibrio and Bacteroides) were increased. Protein fermentation was enhanced, supported by elevated ammonia and branched-chain fatty acid levels (p < 0.05). Additionally, the colonocytes structure changed and the expression of tight junction proteins in colon were decreased. CONCLUSION: Dietary AGEs detrimentally modulate gut microbial ecology and may partially increase colon permeability, which can adversely impact host health.


Assuntos
Colo/efeitos dos fármacos , Dieta , Microbioma Gastrointestinal/efeitos dos fármacos , Produtos Finais de Glicação Avançada/farmacologia , Amônia/metabolismo , Animais , Bacteroidetes/efeitos dos fármacos , Bacteroidetes/isolamento & purificação , Colo/metabolismo , Colo/microbiologia , Cianobactérias/efeitos dos fármacos , Cianobactérias/isolamento & purificação , DNA Bacteriano/genética , Ácidos Graxos Voláteis/metabolismo , Fermentação , Firmicutes/efeitos dos fármacos , Firmicutes/isolamento & purificação , Masculino , Ocludina/genética , Ocludina/metabolismo , Permeabilidade , Proteobactérias/efeitos dos fármacos , Proteobactérias/isolamento & purificação , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Ratos , Ratos Sprague-Dawley , Análise de Sequência de DNA , Verrucomicrobia/efeitos dos fármacos , Verrucomicrobia/isolamento & purificação , Proteína da Zônula de Oclusão-1/genética , Proteína da Zônula de Oclusão-1/metabolismo
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