Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 64
Filtrar
1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33555325

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Vitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency and metabolic syndrome (MetS) may both contribute to increased cardiovascular risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to examine the association of demographic factors, SLE phenotype, therapy and vitamin D levels with MetS and insulin resistance. METHODS: The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) enrolled patients recently diagnosed with SLE (<15 months) from 33 centres across 11 countries from 2000. Clinical, laboratory and therapeutic data were collected. Vitamin D level was defined according to tertiles based on distribution across this cohort, which were set at T1 (10-36 nmol/l), T2 (37-60 nmol/l) and T3 (61-174 nmol/l). MetS was defined according to the 2009 consensus statement from the International Diabetes Federation. Insulin resistance was determined using the HOMA-IR model. Linear and logistic regressions were used to assess the association of variables with vitamin D levels. RESULTS: Of the 1847 patients, 1163 (63%) had vitamin D measured and 398 (34.2%) subjects were in the lowest 25(OH)D tertile. MetS was present in 286 of 860 (33%) patients whose status could be determined. Patients with lower 25(OH)D were more likely to have MetS and higher HOMA-IR. The MetS components, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia and decreased HDL were all significantly associated with lower 25(OH)D. Increased average glucocorticoid exposure was associated with higher insulin resistance. CONCLUSIONS: MetS and insulin resistance are associated with lower vitamin D in patients with SLE. Further studies could determine whether vitamin D repletion confers better control of these cardiovascular risk factors and improve long-term outcomes in SLE.

2.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 2021 Jan 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33474834

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Epidemiologic data for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is limited, particularly for racial/ethnic subpopulations in the United States (U.S.). Leveraging data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Lupus Registry network of population-based SLE registries, a meta-analysis estimating U.S. SLE prevalence was performed. METHODS: The CDC National Lupus Registry network included four registries in unique states and a fifth in the Indian Health Service (IHS). All registries used the 1997 revised American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria for the SLE case definition. Case finding spanned either 2002-2004 or 2007-2009. A random effects model was employed given heterogeneity across sites. Applying sex/race-stratified estimates to the 2018 Census population, an estimate for the number of SLE cases in the U.S. was generated. RESULTS: 5,417 cases fulfilled the ACR SLE classification criteria. Pooled prevalence from the four state-specific registries was 72.8/100,000 (95%CI:65.3,81.0), 9 times higher for females than males (128.7 vs 14.6), and highest among Black females (230.9), followed by Hispanic (120.7), white (84.7) and Asian/Pacific Islander females (84.4). Male prevalence was highest in Black males (26.7) followed by Hispanic (18.0), Asian/Pacific Islander (11.2), and white males (8.9). The American Indian/Alaska Native had the highest race-specific SLE estimates for females (270.6/100,000) and males (53.8/100,000). In 2018, 204,295 persons (95% CI:160,902,261,725) in the U.S. fulfilled ACR SLE classification criteria. CONCLUSIONS: A coordinated network of population-based SLE registries provided more accurate estimates for SLE prevalence and numbers affected in the U.S.

3.
J Rheumatol ; 2020 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33262298

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To define biopsychosocial mechanisms of pain that go above and beyond disease activity and organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of patient-reported data in a population-based registry of 766 people with SLE. Predictors of pain intensity and interference were examined using hierarchical linear regression. We built two main hierarchical regression models: pain intensity regressed on disease activity and organ damage; and pain interference regressed on disease activity and organ damage. For each model, we sought to establish the relationship between pain outcomes and the primary exposures using sequential steps comprising the inclusion of each construct in six stages: demographic, socioeconomic, physical, psychological, behavioral and social factors. We also conducted sensivity analyses eliminating all overt aspects of pain in the disease activity measure and reestimated the models. RESULTS: Disease activity and organ damage explained 32-33% of the variance in pain intensity and interference. Sociodemographic factors accounted for an additional 4-9% of variance in pain outcomes, while psychosocial/behavioral factors accounted for the final 4% of variance. In the sensitivity analyses, we found that disease activity and organ damage explained 25% of the variance in pain outcomes. CONCLUSION: Disease activity only explained 33% of the variance of pain outcomes. However, there was an attenuation in these associations after accounting for psychosocial/behavioral factors, highlighting their roles in modifying the relationship between disease activity and pain. These findings suggest that multilevel interventions may be needed to tackle the negative impact of pain in SLE.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33152181

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) frailty index (FI) predicts mortality and damage accrual in SLE, but its association with hospitalizations has not been described. We estimated the association of baseline SLICC-FI values with future hospitalizations in the SLICC inception cohort. METHODS: Baseline SLICC-FI scores were calculated. The number and duration of inpatient hospitalizations during follow-up were recorded. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate the association between baseline SLICC-FI values and the rate of hospitalizations per patient-year of follow-up. Linear regression was used to estimate the association of baseline SLICC-FI scores with the proportion of follow-up time spent in hospital. Multivariable models were adjusted for relevant baseline characteristics. RESULTS: The 1549 SLE patients eligible for this analysis were mostly female (88.7%) with mean (SD) age 35.7 (13.3) years and median (IQR) disease duration 1.2 (0.9-1.5) years at baseline. Mean (SD) baseline SLICC-FI was 0.17 (0.08). During mean (SD) follow-up of 7.2 (3.7) years, 614 patients (39.6%) experienced 1570 hospitalizations. Higher baseline SLICC-FI values (per 0.05 increment) were associated with more frequent hospitalizations during follow-up (Incidence Rate Ratio 1.21; 95%CI 1.13-1.30), adjusting for baseline age, sex, corticosteroid use, immunosuppressive use, ethnicity/location, SLE disease activity index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K), SLICC/ACR damage index (SDI), and disease duration. Among patients with ≥1 hospitalization, higher baseline SLICC-FI values predicted a greater proportion of follow-up time spent hospitalized (Relative Rate 1.09; 95%CI 1.02-1.16). CONCLUSION: The SLICC-FI predicts future hospitalizations among incident SLE patients, further supporting the SLICC-FI as a valid health measure in SLE.

5.
Lupus Sci Med ; 7(1)2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33132225

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Women with SLE may experience ovarian insufficiency or dysfunction due to treatment or disease effects. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), a marker of ovarian reserve, has been examined in small populations of women with SLE with conflicting results. To date, these studies have included very few African-American women, the racial/ethnic group at greatest risk of SLE. METHODS: We enrolled African-American women aged 22-40 years diagnosed with SLE after age 17 from the Atlanta Metropolitan area. Women without SLE from the same area were recruited from a marketing list for comparison. AMH was measured in serum using the Ansh Labs assay (Webster, Texas, USA). We considered AMH levels <1.0 ng/mL and AMH <25th percentile of comparison women as separate dichotomous outcomes. Log-binomial regression models estimating prevalence ratios were adjusted for age, body mass index and hormonal contraception use in the previous year. RESULTS: Our sample included 83 comparison women without SLE, 68 women with SLE and no history of cyclophosphamide (SLE/CYC-) and 11 women with SLE and a history of cyclophosphamide treatment (SLE/CYC+). SLE/CYC+ women had a greater prevalence of AMH <1.0 ng/mL compared with women without SLE (prevalence ratio (PR): 2.90, 95% CI: 1.29 to 6.51). SLE/CYC- women were also slightly more likely to have AMH <1.0 ng/mL (PR: 1.62, 95% CI: 0.93 to 2.82) than comparison women. Results were similar when considering AMH <25th percentile by age of comparison women. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with CYC is associated with low AMH in African-American women with SLE. SLE itself may also be associated with reduced AMH, but to a lesser extent.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33026693

RESUMO

Non-white people are more likely to develop systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), yet are underrepresented in SLE clinical trials. The efficacy and safety of drugs may be influenced by ancestry, and ancestrally diverse study populations are necessary to optimize treatments across the full spectrum of patients. However, barriers to entry into clinical trials are amplified in non-white populations. To address these issues, a conference was held in Bethesda, Maryland from October 15th -16th , 2019 entitled "Increasing Ancestral Diversity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Clinical Studies: Overcoming the Barriers." Participants included people with lupus, lupus physicians, lupus clinical trialists, treatment developers from biotechnology, social scientists, patient advocacy groups, and United States government representatives (the Office of Minority Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health, and the Food and Drug Administration). For all of these groups, the organizers purposefully included people of non-white ancestry. Decreased participation of non-white SLE patients in clinical research was evaluated through historical, societal, experiential, and pragmatic perspectives, and several interventional programs to increase non-white patient participation in SLE and non-SLE research were described and discussed. The presentations and discussions highlighted the need for changes at the societal, institutional, research team, referring physician, and patient education levels to achieve equitable ancestral representation in SLE clinical studies.

7.
Rheum Dis Clin North Am ; 46(4): 613-621, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32981639

RESUMO

Limitations in the ability to assemble large cohorts of patients with lupus from previously underrepresented groups have inhibited better understanding of many unanswered questions. The Georgians Organized Against Lupus (GOAL) Research Cohort is designed to overcome many of these limitations and is a rich and diverse repository of clinical, biological, sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health services data, and biologic material. Studies with the GOAL cohort will improve the understanding of how various factors interact and may lead to interventions on an individual and systems and societal level and help to mitigate the significant disparities that continue to exist in lupus.

8.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32813314

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess cancer risk factors in incident SLE. METHODS: Clinical variables and cancer outcomes were assessed annually among incident SLE patients. Multivariate hazard regression models (over-all risk, and most common cancers) included demographics and time-dependent medications (corticosteroids, antimalarial drugs, immunosuppressants), smoking, and adjusted mean SLE Disease Activity Index-2K. RESULTS: Among 1668 patients (average 9 years follow-up), 65 cancers occurred: 15 breast, 10 non-melanoma skin, seven lung, six hematological, six prostate, five melanoma, three cervical, three renal, two each gastric, head and neck, and thyroid, and one each rectal, sarcoma, thymoma, and uterine cancers. Half of cancers (including all lung cancers) occurred in past/current smokers, versus one-third of patients without cancer. Multivariate analyses indicated over-all cancer risk was related primarily to male sex and older age at SLE diagnosis. In addition, smoking was associated with lung cancer. For breast cancer risk, age was positively and anti-malarial drugs were negatively associated. Anti-malarial drugs and higher disease activity were also negatively associated with non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) risk, whereas age and cyclophosphamide were positively associated. Disease activity was associated positively with hematologic and negatively with NMSC risk. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking is a key modifiable risk factor, especially for lung cancer, in SLE. Immunosuppressive medications were not clearly associated with higher risk except for cyclophosphamide and NMSC. Antimalarials were negatively associated with breast cancer and NMSC risk. SLE activity was associated positively with hematologic cancer and negatively with NMSC. Since the absolute number of cancers was small, additional follow-up will help consolidate these findings.

9.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 72(10): 1734-1740, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32515554

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: In previous studies, atherosclerotic vascular events (AVEs) were shown to occur in ~10% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We undertook this study to investigate the annual occurrence and potential risk factors for AVEs in a multinational, multiethnic inception cohort of patients with SLE. METHODS: A large 33-center cohort of SLE patients was followed up yearly between 1999 and 2017. AVEs were attributed to atherosclerosis based on SLE being inactive at the time of the AVE as well as typical atherosclerotic changes observed on imaging or pathology reports and/or evidence of atherosclerosis elsewhere. Analyses included descriptive statistics, rate of AVEs per 1,000 patient-years, and univariable and multivariable relative risk regression models. RESULTS: Of the 1,848 patients enrolled in the cohort, 1,710 had ≥1 follow-up visit after enrollment, for a total of 13,666 patient-years. Of these 1,710 patients, 3.6% had ≥1 AVEs attributed to atherosclerosis, for an event rate of 4.6 per 1,000 patient-years. In multivariable analyses, lower AVE rates were associated with antimalarial treatment (hazard ratio [HR] 0.54 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.32-0.91]), while higher AVE rates were associated with any prior vascular event (HR 4.00 [95% CI 1.55-10.30]) and a body mass index of >40 kg/m2 (HR 2.74 [95% CI 1.04-7.18]). A prior AVE increased the risk of subsequent AVEs (HR 5.42 [95% CI 3.17-9.27], P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of AVEs and the rate of AVE accrual demonstrated in the present study is much lower than that seen in previously published data. This may be related to better control of both the disease activity and classic risk factors.

10.
Lupus Sci Med ; 7(1)2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32532797

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: African-Americans are historically under-represented in SLE studies and engaging them in behavioural interventions is challenging. The Women Empowered to Live with Lupus (WELL) study is a trial conducted to examine the effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) among African-American women with SLE. We describe enrolment and retention challenges and successful strategies of the WELL study. METHODS: The Georgians Organized Against Lupus (GOAL) cohort, a population-based cohort established in Atlanta, Georgia, was used to enrol a sample of 168 African-American women with SLE into the CDSMP. The CDSMP is a 6-week, group-based programme led by peers to enhance self-management skills in people with chronic conditions. Study performance standards were predefined and close monitoring of recruitment and retention progress was conducted by culturally competent staff members. Continuous contact with participants, research coordinators' notes and regular research team meetings served to assess barriers and define strategies needed to meet the desired recruitment and retention outcomes. RESULTS: While no substantial barriers were identified to enrol GOAL participants into the WELL study, WELL participants faced difficulties registering for and/or completing (attending ≥4 sessions) a CDSMP workshop. Major barriers were unpredicted personal and health-related issues, misunderstanding of the scope and benefits of the intervention, and transportation problems. Early implementation of tailored strategies (eg, CDSMP scheduled on Saturdays, CDSMP delivered at convenient/familiar facilities, transportation services) helped to reduce participant barriers and achieve a CDSMP registration of 168 participants, with 126 (75%) completers. Frequent contact with participants and compensation helped to reach 92.3% retention for the 6-month survey. CONCLUSIONS: Predefined standards and monitoring of participant barriers by a culturally competent research team and proactive solutions were critical to implementing successful strategies and achieving the desired recruitment and retention outcomes of a behavioural trial involving African-American women with SLE. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02988661.

11.
J Health Psychol ; : 1359105320913085, 2020 Mar 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32228184

RESUMO

Disparate health consequences in African American women with systemic lupus erythematosus include greater severity of physical and psychological distress. Racism-related stress is also related to psychological distress correlates in this population. This study examined the relationships between racism-related experiences, psychological distress, and systemic lupus erythematosus activity in 430 African American women from the Black Women's Experiences Living with Lupus study. The structural equation model suggests that psychological distress mediates the relationship between racism-related stress and systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity. The impact of racism-related stress on systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity may occur primarily through their impact on psychological health variables. Implications for clinical care and future directions are explored.

12.
J Rheumatol ; 47(7): 983-990, 2020 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32115428

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of income relative to the poverty threshold [poverty income ratio (PIR)] with self-reported physical functioning (PF) in a cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. METHODS: We used cross-sectional data on 744 participants from Georgians Organized Against Lupus (GOAL), and secondary analyses used data on 56 participants from a nested pilot study. Primary analyses used multivariable linear regression to estimate the association between PIR (categorized as < 1.00, 1.00-1.99, 2.00-3.99, and ≥ 4.00; lower PIR indicate higher poverty) and PF (scaled subscore from the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12 survey; range 0-100, higher scores indicate better functioning). Secondary analyses summarized complementary measures of PF as means or percentages by PIR (categorized as < 1.00, 1.00-1.99, and ≥ 2.00). RESULTS: The mean age of participants was 48.0 years; 6.7% were male; 80.9% were black; and 37.5%, 21.0%, 29.6%, and 12.0% had PIR of < 1.00, 1.00-1.99, 2.00-3.99, and ≥ 4.00, respectively. The overall mean PF score was 45.8 (36.2, 40.7, 55.5, and 61.2 for PIR of < 1.00, 1.00-1.99, 2.00-3.99, and ≥ 4.00). With adjustment, higher PIR remained associated with higher PF scores [2.00-3.99 vs 1.00-1.99: ß = 10.9 (95% CI 3.3-18.6); ≥ 4.00 vs 1.00-1.99: ß = 16.2 (95% CI 6.4-26.0)]. In secondary analyses, higher PIR was also associated with higher scores for objective physical performance. CONCLUSION: Our results show that higher income relative to the poverty threshold is associated with better PF across multiple domains, warranting further research into multicomponent functional assessments to develop individual treatment plans and potentially improve socioeconomic disparities in outcomes.

14.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 72(1): 67-77, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31390162

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency, clinical characteristics, associations, and outcomes of different types of peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease in a multiethnic/multiracial, prospective inception cohort of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. METHODS: Patients were evaluated annually for 19 neuropsychiatric (NP) events including 7 types of PNS disease. SLE disease activity, organ damage, autoantibodies, and patient and physician assessment of outcome were measured. Time to event and linear regressions were used as appropriate. RESULTS: Of 1,827 SLE patients, 88.8% were female, and 48.8% were white. The mean ± SD age was 35.1 ± 13.3 years, disease duration at enrollment was 5.6 ± 4.2 months, and follow-up was 7.6 ± 4.6 years. There were 161 PNS events in 139 (7.6%) of 1,827 patients. The predominant events were peripheral neuropathy (66 of 161 [41.0%]), mononeuropathy (44 of 161 [27.3%]), and cranial neuropathy (39 of 161 [24.2%]), and the majority were attributed to SLE. Multivariate Cox regressions suggested longer time to resolution in patients with a history of neuropathy, older age at SLE diagnosis, higher SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 scores, and for peripheral neuropathy versus other neuropathies. Neuropathy was associated with significantly lower Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical and mental component summary scores versus no NP events. According to physician assessment, the majority of neuropathies resolved or improved over time, which was associated with improvements in SF-36 summary scores for peripheral neuropathy and mononeuropathy. CONCLUSION: PNS disease is an important component of total NPSLE and has a significant negative impact on health-related quality of life. The outcome is favorable for most patients, but our findings indicate that several factors are associated with longer time to resolution.


Assuntos
Doenças dos Nervos Cranianos/fisiopatologia , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/fisiopatologia , Vasculite Associada ao Lúpus do Sistema Nervoso Central/fisiopatologia , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso Periférico/fisiopatologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Estudos de Coortes , Doenças dos Nervos Cranianos/etiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/complicações , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mononeuropatias/etiologia , Mononeuropatias/fisiopatologia , Análise Multivariada , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso Periférico/etiologia , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Adulto Jovem
15.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) ; 72(9): 1275-1281, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31282105

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Some treatments for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can cause infertility, but the effect of SLE itself on fertility, particularly in African American women, is less clear. We undertook this study to examine infertility experiences in African American women with SLE compared to healthy women. METHODS: We enrolled women ages 22-40 years living in the Atlanta metropolitan area who were diagnosed with SLE after age 17 years. Women who had ever been treated with cyclophosphamide or who had a hysterectomy were excluded. African American women ages 22-40 years who were from the same area and recruited from a marketing list were used for comparison. Women were interviewed about their reproductive histories and goals. Periods of infertility were identified as times when women had regular, unprotected sex for ≥12 months without conceiving after 20 years of age. We separately considered any period of infertility and periods of infertility when attempting pregnancy. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to examine the association between SLE and time to infertility. Models were adjusted for age, nulliparity, and smoking. An age-matched analysis was also conducted to examine periods of infertility occurring after SLE diagnosis. RESULTS: Our sample included 75 women with SLE and 154 women without SLE. SLE was associated with any infertility (adjusted hazard ratio [HRadj ] 2.08 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.38-3.15]), but less so with infertility when attempting pregnancy (HRadj 1.30 [95% CI 0.62-2.71]). The matched analysis generated similar point estimates. CONCLUSION: Women with SLE may be more likely to experience episodes of infertility, but this may not translate to an inability to meet reproductive goals.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos , Infertilidade Feminina/complicações , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/complicações , Saúde da Mulher , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Projetos Piloto , Adulto Jovem
16.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 72(4): 658-666, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31631584

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) frailty index (FI) has been shown to predict mortality, but its association with other important outcomes is unknown. We examined the association of baseline SLICC FI values with damage accrual in the SLICC inception cohort. METHODS: The baseline visit was defined as the first visit at which both organ damage (SLICC/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index [SDI]) and health-related quality of life (Short Form 36) were assessed. Baseline SLICC FI scores were calculated. Damage accrual was measured by the increase in SDI between the baseline assessment and the last study visit. Multivariable negative binomial regression was used to estimate the association between baseline SLICC FI values and the rate of increase in the SDI during follow-up, adjusting for relevant demographic and clinical characteristics. RESULTS: The 1,549 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients eligible for this analysis were mostly female (88.7%) with a mean ± SD age of 35.7 ± 13.3 years and a median disease duration of 1.2 years (interquartile range 0.9-1.5 years) at baseline. The mean ± SD baseline SLICC FI was 0.17 ± 0.08. Over a mean ± SD follow-up of 7.2 ± 3.7 years, 653 patients (42.2%) had an increase in SDI. Higher baseline SLICC FI values (per 0.05 increase) were associated with higher rates of increase in the SDI during follow-up (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1.19 [95% confidence interval 1.13-1.25]), after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity/region, education, baseline SLE Disease Activity Index 2000, baseline SDI, and baseline use of glucocorticoids, antimalarials, and immunosuppressive agents. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the SLICC FI predicts damage accrual in incident SLE, which further supports the SLICC FI as a valid health measure in SLE.


Assuntos
Fragilidade/diagnóstico , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/diagnóstico , Qualidade de Vida , Adulto , Progressão da Doença , Feminino , Humanos , Imunossupressores/uso terapêutico , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/tratamento farmacológico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Adulto Jovem
17.
J Autoimmun ; 106: 102340, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31629628

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has potential as a prognosis and severity biomarker in several inflammatory and infectious diseases. In a previous cross-sectional study, suPAR levels were shown to reflect damage accrual in cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Herein, we evaluated suPAR as a predictor of future organ damage in recent-onset SLE. METHODS: Included were 344 patients from the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) Inception Cohort who met the 1997 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria with 5-years of follow-up data available. Baseline sera from patients and age- and sex-matched controls were assayed for suPAR. Organ damage was assessed annually using the SLICC/ACR damage index (SDI). RESULTS: The levels of suPAR were higher in patients who accrued damage, particularly those with SDI≥2 at 5 years (N = 32, 46.8% increase, p = 0.004), as compared to patients without damage. Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant impact of suPAR on SDI outcome (SDI≥2; OR = 1.14; 95% CI 1.03-1.26), also after adjustment for confounding factors. In an optimized logistic regression to predict damage, suPAR persisted as a predictor, together with baseline disease activity (SLEDAI-2K), age, and non-Caucasian ethnicity (model AUC = 0.77). Dissecting SDI into organ systems revealed higher suPAR levels in patients who developed musculoskeletal damage (SDI≥1; p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: Prognostic biomarkers identify patients who are at risk of acquiring early damage and therefore need careful observation and targeted treatment strategies. Overall, suPAR constitutes an interesting biomarker for patient stratification and for identifying SLE patients who are at risk of acquiring organ damage during the first 5 years of disease.

18.
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) ; 72(12): 1800-1808, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31609532

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: There is a paucity of data regarding health care costs associated with damage accrual in systemic lupus erythematosus. The present study was undertaken to describe costs associated with damage states across the disease course using multistate modeling. METHODS: Patients from 33 centers in 11 countries were enrolled in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) inception cohort within 15 months of diagnosis. Annual data on demographics, disease activity, damage (SLICC/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index [SDI]), hospitalizations, medications, dialysis, and selected procedures were collected. Ten-year cumulative costs (Canadian dollars) were estimated by multiplying annual costs associated with each SDI state by the expected state duration using a multistate model. RESULTS: A total of 1,687 patients participated; 88.7% were female, 49.0% were white, mean ± SD age at diagnosis was 34.6 ± 13.3 years, and mean time to follow-up was 8.9 years (range 0.6-18.5 years). Mean annual costs were higher for those with higher SDI scores as follows: $22,006 (Canadian) (95% confidence interval [95% CI] $16,662, $27,350) for SDI scores ≥5 versus $1,833 (95% CI $1,134, $2,532) for SDI scores of 0. Similarly, 10-year cumulative costs were higher for those with higher SDI scores at the beginning of the 10-year interval as follows: $189,073 (Canadian) (95% CI $142,318, $235,827) for SDI scores ≥5 versus $21,713 (95% CI $13,639, $29,788) for SDI scores of 0. CONCLUSION: Patients with the highest SDI scores incur 10-year cumulative costs that are ~9-fold higher than those with the lowest SDI scores. By estimating the damage trajectory and incorporating annual costs, data on damage can be used to estimate future costs, which is critical knowledge for evaluating the cost-effectiveness of novel therapies.

19.
J Rheumatol ; 47(1): 72-81, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30988130

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To construct a Frailty Index (FI) as a measure of vulnerability to adverse outcomes among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), using data from the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) inception cohort. METHODS: The SLICC inception cohort consists of recently diagnosed patients with SLE followed annually with clinical and laboratory assessments. For this analysis, the baseline visit was defined as the first study visit at which sufficient information was available for construction of an FI. Following a standard procedure, variables from the SLICC database were evaluated as potential health deficits. Selected health deficits were then used to generate a SLICC-FI. The prevalence of frailty in the baseline dataset was evaluated using established cutpoints for FI values. RESULTS: The 1683 patients with SLE (92.1% of the overall cohort) eligible for inclusion in the baseline dataset were mostly female (89%) with mean (SD) age 35.7 (13.4) years and mean (SD) disease duration 18.8 (15.7) months at baseline. Of 222 variables, 48 met criteria for inclusion in the SLICC-FI. Mean (SD) SLICC-FI was 0.17 (0.08) with a range from 0 to 0.51. At baseline, 27.1% (95% CI 25.0-29.2) of patients were classified as frail, based on SLICC-FI values > 0.21. CONCLUSION: The SLICC inception cohort permits feasible construction of an FI for use in patients with SLE. Even in a relatively young cohort of patients with SLE, frailty was common. The SLICC-FI may be a useful tool for identifying patients with SLE who are most vulnerable to adverse outcomes, but validation of this index is required prior to its use.

20.
Lupus Sci Med ; 6(1): e000322, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31478010

RESUMO

Objective: To evaluate patient perceptions of biologic therapies from a large, population-based cohort of patients with SLE with significant numbers of blacks and whites and across the full spectrum of socioeconomic strata and disease severity. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of validated patients with SLE enrolled in the Georgians Organized Against Lupus Cohort between September 2014 and August 2015. The survey instrument was developed ad hoc by the authors and contained an introduction on biologics. Results: A total of 676 participants were on average 48.4 years old with 15.9 years of disease; 93.2% were female and 80.6% were black; 34.2% had private health insurance and 9.8% had no insurance; and 26.8% and 27.5% had Medicare or Medicaid, respectively. Of all respondents, 30.8% had heard of biologics, with a significant difference between blacks and whites (25.2% vs 53.4%, respectively). There were no significant differences, however, between blacks and whites with respect to ever having been on biologics (7.6% and 11.5%, respectively) or where they got their information about biologics. Out of 202 individuals who had heard of biologics, 102 (51.3%) were familiar with potential benefits or side effects, and most (n=129, 66.5%) had a neutral perception to risks associated with biologic use. There was no perception of biologics working differently between races/ethnicities. More (n=76, 62.8%) blacks preferred intravenous over subcutaneous modalities compared with whites (n=12, 37.5%) but were not as willing to pay as much out of pocket for it. Individuals with Medicare were significantly more likely to have been on biologics. Conclusions: There are important similarities and differences between blacks and whites with lupus with respect to their perceptions of biologic therapies and their impact. There are opportunities to increase patient exposure to information about biologics and improve their understanding in order for them to make the best informed decision possible.

SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA