Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 161
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
J Natl Compr Canc Netw ; 18(6): 689-699, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32502984

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: National guidelines recommend chemotherapy as the mainstay of treatment for stage IV colon cancer, with primary tumor resection (PTR) reserved for patients with symptomatic primary or curable disease. The aims of this study were to characterize the treatment modalities received by patients with stage IV colon cancer and to determine the patient-, tumor-, and hospital-level factors associated with those treatments. METHODS: Patients diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer in 2014 were extracted from the SEER Patterns of Care initiative. Treatments were categorized into chemotherapy only, PTR only, PTR + chemotherapy, and none/unknown. RESULTS: The total weighted number of cases was 3,336; 17% of patients received PTR only, 23% received chemotherapy only, 41% received PTR + chemotherapy, and 17% received no treatment. In multivariable analyses, compared with chemotherapy only, PTR + chemotherapy was associated with being married (odds ratio [OR], 1.9), having bowel obstruction (OR, 2.55), and having perforation (OR, 2.29), whereas older age (OR, 5.95), Medicaid coverage (OR, 2.46), higher T stage (OR, 3.51), and higher N stage (OR, 6.77) were associated with PTR only. Patients who received no treatment did not have more comorbidities or more severe disease burden but were more likely to be older (OR, 3.91) and non-Hispanic African American (OR, 2.92; all P<.05). Treatment at smaller, nonacademic hospitals was associated with PTR (± chemotherapy). CONCLUSIONS: PTR was included in the treatment regimen for most patients with stage IV colon cancer and was associated with smaller, nonacademic hospitals. Efforts to improve guideline implementation may be beneficial in these hospitals and also in non-Hispanic African American and older populations.

3.
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol ; 31(7): 1579-1584, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32400079

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Moderate sedation (MS) during cryoballoon ablation (CBA) avoids risks of general anesthesia (GA) and improves electrophysiology (EP) lab throughput. However, one barrier to the use of MS is the potential for patient discomfort. The objective of this study was to compare patient-reported outcome measures following CBA for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (pAF) under MS and GA. METHODS AND RESULTS: Consecutive patients undergoing a first CBA for pAF under GA or MS were prospectively enrolled. The sedation method was assigned based on patient and provider preference, and perceived airway risk. The primary outcomes were quality of recovery (measured using a validated 40 question survey; QoR-40) and likelihood to recommend (LTR) the procedure and sedation method (measured by Likert scale). Secondary outcomes were acute pulmonary vein (PV) isolation rate, procedure, fluoroscopy and ablation times, and complication rates. Forty-seven GA and 53 MS patients were included. The mean age was 64.9 ± 9.4 years and mean CHA2 DS2 -VASc score was 2.0 ± 1.4. QoR-40 scores were 184.6 ± 16.4 for GA and 187.6 ± 10.2 for MS (P = .28). LTR responses were similar between groups. Mean procedure times were 148.2 ± 56.0 minutes for GA and 129.4 ± 31.4 minutes for MS (P = .038). Fluoroscopy and ablation times were similar between groups. A total of 100% (409/409) of PVs were acutely isolated. One hemopericardium occurred in the MS group requiring pericardiocentesis. CONCLUSION: MS for CBA offers an alternative to GA that is safe and well-tolerated by patients with comparable success rates and improved EP lab throughput.

4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32415554

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Patients with chronic kidney disease are predisposed to heart rhythm disorders including atrial fibrillation (AF). Several studies have suggested that radiofrequency catheter ablation of AF improves renal function. However, little data exists for pulmonary vein isolation with cryoballoon ablation (CBA). The purpose of this study is to assess change in renal function following CBA for AF. METHOD: This is a single-center retrospective study that included patients who underwent CBA for AF between 2011 and 2016. Patients were grouped by baseline-estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): ≥ 90 (Stage G1), 60-89.9 (Stage G2), and 30-59.9 mL/min/1.73 m2 (Stage G3). Change in eGFR was assessed > 3 months post-ablation. RESULTS: A total of 306 patients with both pre- and post-ablation serum creatinine measurements available were included. Baseline eGFRs for Stages G1, G2, and G3 patients were 103.5 ± 12.9 (n = 82), 74.7 ± 8.2 (n = 184), and 52.6 ± 6.6 mL/min/1.73 m2 (n = 40), respectively. Renal function was assessed 310.8 ± 104.2 days post-ablation. Average intra-procedural contrast use was 58.4 ± 23.8 mL. There was no significant change in eGFR following CBA in Stage G1 patients (p = 0.10). For those with Stages G2 and G3 renal function, eGFR improved by 6.1% (4.2 mL/min/1.73 m2, p < 0.01) and 13.8% (7.2 mL/min/1.73 m2, p < 0.01), respectively. This improvement was seen regardless of the presence or absence of recurrent atrial arrhythmias. CONCLUSIONS: CBA for AF may be associated with an improvement in renal function, particularly among those with a reduced baseline eGFR despite recurrence of atrial arrhythmias and intra-procedural contrast use.

5.
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol ; 31(5): 1031-1037, 2020 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32115794

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Focal impulse and rotor modulation (FIRM) ablation can be used to target nonpulmonary vein (PV) sources of atrial fibrillation (AF). No published studies have compared freedom from atrial fibrillation (FFAF) after pulmonary vein reisolation (PVRI) plus FIRM to PVRI alone in patients with reconnected PVs undergoing repeat ablation. METHODS: A 3:1 matched retrospective cohort study was performed on 21 patients with recurrent AF and PV reconnection who underwent PVRI plus FIRM-guided ablation and 63 patients with recurrent AF treated with PVRI alone at a single institution. All patients in the PVRI-alone cohort had cryoballoon PVRI at the time of repeat ablation without additional lesion sets for AF. Cases were matched based on the type of AF (paroxysmal vs nonparoxysmal), left atrial diameter (±4 mm), left ventricular ejection fraction (±10%), duration of AF (±18 months), and age (±5 years). The primary endpoint was FFAF after a 3-month blanking period. RESULTS: Out of 53 total FIRM cases performed at Northwestern Memorial Hospital between 2015 and 2017, 21 patients had PVRI plus FIRM for recurrent AF with PV reconnection. These patients had an average of 3.3 ± 2.1 rotors (60% left atrial) ablated. Over a median follow-up time of 24.7 months (interquartile range, 13-36 months), patients in the PVRI-alone cohort demonstrated a higher rate of FFAF (n = 35; 55.6%) than patients in the PVRI plus FIRM-guided ablation cohort (n = 7; 33.3%) (logrank P = .049). CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing repeat ablation for AF with PV reconnection, PVRI plus FIRM did not increase FFAF compared to PVRI alone.

6.
Instr Course Lect ; 69: 525-550, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32017750

RESUMO

Rotator cuff pathology is one of the most common reasons for patients to seek orthopaedic consultation. Although in many cases these issues can be resolved with proper conservative management, many of these patients benefit from surgical treatment. The goal of this instructional course lecture is to identify factors that can potentially lead to worse outcomes following repair, describe the history and techniques behind transosseous anchorless repairs, discuss subscapularis tears and their management, and to analyze the most current data regarding double-row rotator cuff repairs. Rotator cuff tears managed surgically have been proven to provide significant pain relief and improved function; however, surgical intervention in patients with significant risk factors for failure can lead to substantial disability for the patient.


Assuntos
Lesões do Manguito Rotador/terapia , Manguito Rotador , Artroplastia , Artroscopia , Humanos , Técnicas de Sutura , Resultado do Tratamento
7.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 28(3): 113-120, 2020 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977611

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to compare complication rates between arthroscopic versus open biceps tenodesis in the setting of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and to determine the effect of fellowship training on complication rates. METHODS: The American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery database was used to identify cases of arthroscopic and open biceps tenodesis in the setting of rotator cuff repair between 2012 and 2016. Surgical, medical, and anesthetic complications, location, fellowship training, surgery year, and patient demographic data were recorded. Overall and specific complication rates were calculated and analyzed. Chi-square or Fisher exact tests were used to determine statistical significance. RESULTS: Altogether, 1,725 cases of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis and 1,637 cases of open biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were analyzed. No significant difference was found between overall complication rates between arthroscopic (11.4%) versus open (13.1%) biceps tenodesis (P = 0.14). Although open tenodesis had statistically significant higher rates of wound healing issues (0.7% versus 0.2%, P = 0.02), hematoma/seroma formation (0.5% versus 0.1%, P = 0.02), nerve injury (1.5% versus 0.4%, P < 0.01), deep vein thrombosis (0.49% versus 0.12%, P ≤ 0.05), and general anesthetic complications (0.75% versus 0.06%, P = 0.03), these rates remain comparably low. Shoulder arthroscopy fellowship-trained surgeons were more likely to use arthroscopic techniques than non-fellowship-trained surgeons (P < 0.01) but had a higher complication rate (P = 0.01). DISCUSSION: No differences were found in overall complication rates between open and arthroscopic biceps tenodesis in the setting of rotator cuff repairs. Although open techniques had statistically significant higher rates of nerve injury, wound complications, and hematoma/seroma formation, this may not reflect clinical significance because these complication rates remained <2% in both techniques. Higher complication rates were seen among fellowship-trained surgeons, which may reflect greater case complexity. Both open and arthroscopic biceps tenodesis in the setting of rotator cuff repair show low complication rates, and the technique should be based on surgeon preference and patient factors. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, case series.

8.
J Interv Card Electrophysiol ; 57(2): 233-240, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31102114

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) by cryoballoon ablation (CBA) has emerged as a commonly used technique for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. We sought to explore the incidence, risk factors for, and characterization of post-CBA-PVI atrial flutter. METHODS: We analyzed a prospective registry of patients who underwent CBA-PVI at a single institution. We included patients with more than 3 months of follow-up data and excluded those with a history of cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) ablation. Locations of post-CBA-PVI atrial flutters were determined by analysis of intracardiac electrograms and electroanatomic maps. RESULTS: There were 556 patients included in the analysis. The mean age was 61.0 ± 10.6 years, 67.4% were male, the number of failed anti-arrhythmic medication trials was 1.2 ± 0.8, and the duration of atrial fibrillation pre-CBA was 54.3 ± 69.1 months. The 28-mm second-generation cryoballoon was used almost exclusively. Over a median follow-up time of 22.7 ± 17.9 months, 25 (4.5%) patients developed post-CBA-PVI atrial flutter after the 3-month blanking period. Of those 25 patients, 15 (60%) underwent subsequent ablation to eliminate the atrial flutter circuit, with 60% being CTI-dependent and the remainder left-sided (p value not significant). Risk factors for the development of atrial flutter included NYHA class ≥ 2 (OR 5.02, p < 0.001), presence of baseline bundle branch block (OR 4.33, p = 0.006), and left ventricular ejection fraction < 50% (OR 3.36, p = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of post-CBA-PVI atrial flutter is low after the blanking period even with medium-term follow-up. The origin of atrial flutter is equally divided between the right and left atria.

9.
Arthroscopy ; 36(4): 993-999, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31785391

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To develop a method to measure capsule and labral volume on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging to predict surgical failure after primary Bankart repair. METHODS: A retrospective case-control study was conducted on patients undergoing primary anterior arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Surgical failure was defined as a recurrent dislocation event. Cases were matched to controls based on age and sex in a 1:2 ratio. Preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) arthrograms were analyzed by 2 trained reviewers using Vitrea software to measure labral and capsular volume with a 3-dimensional model. Labral size was also qualitatively measured on axial images. A "diffusely small" labrum was defined as labral height less than the width of the glenoid tidemark cartilage. RESULTS: Of the 289 patients who had an arthroscopic Bankart repair from 2006 to 2015, 33 who had a postoperative dislocation met the inclusion criteria and were matched to 62 control patients who did not. There was no difference between groups with regard to age (P = .88), sex (P = .82), contact sport participation (P = .79), proportion of overhead athletes (P = .33), proportion of throwers (P = 1), surgical positioning in lateral decubitus (P = .18), or number of repair anchors used (P = .91). The average number of preoperative dislocations was significantly higher in the failure group (3.2 vs. 2.0, P < .0001). In patients with normal labrum morphology, the odds of having surgical failure increased by 26% for a 1-unit increase in the number of prior dislocations (odds ratio [OR] 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02 to 1.55). The case and control groups had similar labral and capsular volume as measured in Vitrea. The failure group had a significantly higher proportion of patients with a diffusely small labral morphology (47% vs. 17%, P = .03). Controlling for number of preoperative dislocations, the odds of having a diffusely small labral morphology was 3.2 times more likely in the case group than the control group (95% CI 1.259 to 8.188). Interrater reliability between 2 independent reviewers was excellent for measurement of capsule volume (r = 0.91) and good for measurement of labral volume (r = 0.74). CONCLUSIONS: This study presents a novel method of measuring labral and capsule volume with high interrater reliability. An increased number of recurrent dislocations prior to primary Bankart repair was associated with increased odds of recurrent instability after surgery. The OR for failure also increased with increasing number of preoperative dislocations. Diffusely small labral morphology was associated with having a postoperative redislocation. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III (case-control study).

10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31693528

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to compare complication rates between arthroscopic versus open biceps tenodesis in the setting of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and to determine the effect of fellowship training on complication rates. METHODS: The American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery database was used to identify cases of arthroscopic and open biceps tenodesis in the setting of rotator cuff repair between 2012 and 2016. Surgical, medical, and anesthetic complications, location, fellowship training, surgery year, and patient demographic data were recorded. Overall and specific complication rates were calculated and analyzed. Chi-square or Fisher exact tests were used to determine statistical significance. RESULTS: Altogether, 1,725 cases of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis and 1,637 cases of open biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were analyzed. No significant difference was found between overall complication rates between arthroscopic (11.4%) versus open (13.1%) biceps tenodesis (P = 0.14). Although open tenodesis had statistically significant higher rates of wound healing issues (0.7% versus 0.2%, P = 0.02), hematoma/seroma formation (0.5% versus 0.1%, P = 0.02), nerve injury (1.5% versus 0.4%, P < 0.01), deep vein thrombosis (0.49% versus 0.12%, P ≤ 0.05), and general anesthetic complications (0.75% versus 0.06%, P = 0.03), these rates remain comparably low. Shoulder arthroscopy fellowship-trained surgeons were more likely to use arthroscopic techniques than non-fellowship-trained surgeons (P < 0.01) but had a higher complication rate (P = 0.01). DISCUSSION: No differences were found in overall complication rates between open and arthroscopic biceps tenodesis in the setting of rotator cuff repairs. Although open techniques had statistically significant higher rates of nerve injury, wound complications, and hematoma/seroma formation, this may not reflect clinical significance because these complication rates remained <2% in both techniques. Higher complication rates were seen among fellowship-trained surgeons, which may reflect greater case complexity. Both open and arthroscopic biceps tenodesis in the setting of rotator cuff repair show low complication rates, and the technique should be based on surgeon preference and patient factors. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, case series.

11.
Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon) ; 70: 131-136, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31491738

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Many active individuals undergo multiple dislocations during the course of a season before surgical treatment without considering the implications of each successive injury. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a multiple dislocation model for the glenohumeral joint and evaluate the resulting changes in joint function. METHODS: Eight cadaveric shoulders were evaluated using a robotic testing system. A simulated clinical exam was performed by applying a 50 N anterior load to the humerus at 60° of glenohumeral abduction and external rotation. Each joint was then dislocated. The same loads were applied again and the resulting kinematics were recorded following each of 10 dislocations. The force required to achieve dislocation was recorded and capsulolabral status was assessed. FINDINGS: A reproducible Bankart lesion was repeatedly created following the dislocation protocol. The force required for all dislocations significantly decreased following the 1st dislocation. In addition, even lower forces were required to achieve the 5th and subsequent dislocations (p < 0.05). Anterior translation in response to an anterior load during the simulated clinical exam increased between the intact and injured joints (p < 0.05). However, anterior translation reached a plateau following the 3rd to 10th dislocations and was increased compared with the 1st dislocation (p < 0.05). INTERPRETATION: A repeatable Bankart lesion was not surgically made, but created by our new dislocation model. Joint function appeared to reach a constant level after the 3rd to 5th dislocations. Thus, multiple dislocations result in a deleterious dose dependent effect suggesting additional damage is not sustained after the fifth dislocation. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Controlled laboratory study.

12.
PLoS One ; 14(8): e0220607, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31408473

RESUMO

While there have been many studies using machine learning (ML) algorithms to predict process outcomes and device performance in semiconductor manufacturing, the extensively developed technology computer-aided design (TCAD) physical models should play a more significant role in conjunction with ML. While TCAD models have been effective in predicting the trends of experiments, a machine learning statistical model is more capable of predicting the anomalous effects that can be dependent on the chambers, machines, fabrication environment, and specific layouts. In this paper, we use an analytics-statistics mixed training (ASMT) approach using TCAD. Under this method, the TCAD models are incorporated into the machine learning training procedure. The mixed dataset with the experimental and TCAD results improved the prediction in terms of accuracy. With the application of ASMT to the BOSCH process, we show that the mean square error (MSE) can be effectively decreased when the analytics-statistics mixed training (ASMT) scheme is used instead of the classic neural network (NN) used in the baseline study. In this method, statistical induction and analytical deduction can be combined to increase the prediction accuracy of future intelligent semiconductor manufacturing.

13.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 48(4): 623-628, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31317300

RESUMO

Certain patient populations (pregnancy, cancer, renal impairment, and obesity) may be at higher risk of adverse events during low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) therapy and may benefit from anti-Xa monitoring. Yet, evidence supporting a standardized approach to anti-Xa monitoring correlated to clinical outcomes is lacking. Patients with at least one documented anti-Xa level and receiving LMWH within a 6-month period were identified. In a 6-month period, 224 adult LMWH patients with 359 anti-Xa levels were identified. Anti-Xa monitoring was most commonly performed in patients with active cancer receiving venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment doses (57.4%) or obese patients receiving VTE prophylaxis (48.1%). Anti-Xa monitoring during renal impairment and pregnancy were infrequent (0.9% and 1.8%, respectively). Most (71.9%) anti-Xa levels were therapeutic, but only 45% were drawn correctly in relation to LMWH administration time. Compared to those with therapeutic anti-Xa levels, patients with out-of-range levels were four times as likely to receive a LMWH therapy change (odds ratio, 4.16; 95% confidence interval, 2.53-6.84). However, when levels were supratherapeutic or subtherapeutic, the LMWH doses remained unchanged in one-third to one-half of patients, respectively. Anti-Xa monitoring was most commonly performed in patients with cancer or obesity and was more common with VTE prophylaxis dosing. The majority of levels were therapeutic, indicating that anti-Xa monitoring may be unnecessary even in high-risk patient populations. Many out-of-range anti-Xa levels did not prompt a change in LMWH therapy. Further research is still needed to determine if anti-Xa- guided LMWH dosing improves clinical outcomes.


Assuntos
Inibidores do Fator Xa/sangue , Heparina de Baixo Peso Molecular/administração & dosagem , Adulto , Idoso , Anticoagulantes/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias/tratamento farmacológico , Obesidade/tratamento farmacológico , Gravidez , Tromboembolia Venosa/tratamento farmacológico , Tromboembolia Venosa/prevenção & controle
14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31327104

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Cryoballoon ablation (CBA) is an effective technique for pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). To date, there are no risk models to predict very late recurrence of atrial fibrillation (VLRAF) after CBA. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of a single-center database was performed. Inclusion criteria included PVI using CBA for atrial fibrillation (AF) without additional ablation targets, follow-up > 365 days, and no recurrent AF between 90 and 365 days after procedure. The primary endpoint was recurrent AF > 30 s > 12 months post-CBA. A risk model was created using clinical variables. RESULTS: Of 674 CBA performed from 2011 to 2016, 300 patients (200 male, 62.0 ± 9.9 years) met inclusion criteria. Of these, 159 (53.0%) patients had paroxysmal AF. Patients had an average of 9.5 ± 2.7 cryoballoon freezes, and no patients required additional radiofrequency ablation lesion sets. Over a follow-up of 995 ± 490 days, 77/300 (25.7%) patients exhibited VLRAF. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that Structural heart disease (1 point), Coronary artery disease (3 points), left Atrial diameter > 43 mm (1 point), Left bundle branch block (3 points), Early return of AF (4 points), and non-paroxysmal AF (3 points) were risk factors for VLRAF. Combining these variables into a risk model, SCALE-CryoAF, (min 0; max 15) predicted VLRAF with an area under the curve of 0.73. CONCLUSION: SCALE-CryoAF is the first risk model to specifically predict first recurrence of AF beyond 1 year, VLRAF, after CBA. Model discrimination demonstrates that SCALE-CryoAF predicts VLRAF after CBA significantly better than other risk models for AF recurrence.

15.
Am J Clin Oncol ; 42(7): 573-580, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31166206

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Randomized control trials and population-based studies do not demonstrate a definitive benefit for adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) in stage II colon cancer (CC). Tumor sidedness and microsatellite instability (MSI) status may predict response to ACT, but previous studies have limited microsatellite data. We assessed the efficacy of ACT and possible interaction with MSI status and tumor sidedness in patients with resected stage II CC diagnosed between 2010 and 2013 using the National Cancer Database. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Overall survival was evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate and propensity score matched Cox proportional hazards models. The interaction between receipt of ACT, MSI status, and tumor sidedness was evaluated. The efficacy of ACT was assessed in patient subgroups by MSI status and tumor sidedness. RESULTS: Among 6964 stage II CC patients with known MSI status, 1497 (21.5%) received ACT, 843 had MSI tumors, and 6121 had microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. In multivariate and propensity score matched analyses, ACT was associated with improved survival after adjusting for factors including high-risk features, MSI status, and tumor sidedness (multivariate hazard ratio, 0.52; P<0.001). There was no interaction between receipt of ACT and MSI status (P=0.25). Patients with MSS tumors benefitted from ACT (multivariate hazard ratio, 0.47; P<0.001), even without other high-risk features. Patients with MSI tumors did not (P=0.671). ACT was associated with improved survival regardless of tumor sidedness. CONCLUSIONS: MSS alone may warrant ACT in stage II CC while patients with MSI tumors may not derive significant benefit from ACT.


Assuntos
Colo/patologia , Neoplasias do Colo/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias do Colo/genética , Instabilidade de Microssatélites , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Quimioterapia Adjuvante , Neoplasias do Colo/patologia , Bases de Dados Factuais , Feminino , Humanos , Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Pontuação de Propensão , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Retrospectivos , Taxa de Sobrevida , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
16.
Arthroscopy ; 35(6): 1927-1938, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31053457

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To examine the outcomes of SLAP repair versus biceps tenodesis (BT) for the index treatment of isolated type II SLAP tears. METHODS: A search of PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE was performed in April 2018 for English-language studies that presented outcomes data on patients with isolated type II SLAP tears treated with either SLAP repair or BT at the primary surgical time point. RESULTS: Twenty-three studies (i.e., 2 randomized control trials, 7 retrospective cohort, 3 prospective cohort, 4 case-control, and 7 case series) were included. Isolated type II SLAP tears were treated via SLAP repair in 781 patients with a mean age of 35 years (range, 22-58 years) and a mean postoperative follow-up of 35 months (range, 3-63 months). BT was performed in 100 patients with a mean age of 44 years (range, 18-64 years) and a mean postoperative follow-up of 32 months (range, 24-75 months). Similar postoperative scores were noted in both the SLAP repair and BT groups for American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Constant, University of California, Los Angeles, and visual analog scale pain scores. The rate of return to sports was 20% to 95% for SLAP repair and 73% to 100% for BT. Reoperation rates for SLAP repair and BT were 2.9% to 40% and 0% to 15.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that SLAP repair and BT are both acceptable as index treatment for isolated type II SLAP tears. SLAP repair remains the most commonly performed index procedure; however, BT appears equally efficacious and may represent an attractive alternative. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, systematic review of Level I through IV studies.


Assuntos
Músculo Esquelético/cirurgia , Lesões do Ombro/cirurgia , Articulação do Ombro/cirurgia , Tenodese/métodos , Braço/cirurgia , Artroscopia/métodos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Estudos de Coortes , Humanos , Estudos Prospectivos , Reoperação/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Retrospectivos
17.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 27(12): 3813-3820, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31115607

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study aims to investigate the superior clavicle cortex drilling points and fluoroscopic inclination angles for anatomic tunnel drilling in coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction. METHODS: Twelve cadaveric shoulders with a mean age of 55.9 ± 6.2 years were investigated. Two 2.0 mm Kirschner wires were inserted penetrating the footprint centers of conoid and trapezoid both on the clavicle and coracoid. The location of the Kirschner wires on the superior clavicle cortex was measured. Fluoroscopy was used to obtain three views of shoulder: an anteroposterior, lateral, and cortical ring sign view. Reproducible angles were then recorded. RESULTS: The Kirschner wire penetrating the conoid was located 40.0 ± 3.9 mm from the distal end and 18.1 ± 3.0 mm from the anterior edge of the clavicle. For the trapezoid, the Kirschner wire was located 19.1 ± 3.6 mm from the distal end and 9.9 ± 3.9 mm from the anterior edge. On the anteroposterior view, the conoid was 11.1° ± 10.1° medially and trapezoid was 26.8° ± 11.8° laterally tilted to the glenohumeral joint line. On the lateral view, the conoid was 42.8° ± 15.1° and trapezoid was 15.5° ± 12.0° superiorly tilted to the scapular spine. On the cortical ring sign view, the conoid was 50.8° ± 12.9° and trapezoid was 14.2 °± 11.0° superiorly tilted to the scapular spine. CONCLUSIONS: The superior clavicle cortex drilling points and fluoroscopic inclination angles for anatomic tunnel drilling in coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction were demonstrated. Arthroscopy-assisted anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction has increased in popularity, and these findings may facilitate a more anatomic approach to coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction.


Assuntos
Clavícula/cirurgia , Ligamentos Articulares/cirurgia , Fios Ortopédicos , Cadáver , Clavícula/diagnóstico por imagem , Processo Coracoide/diagnóstico por imagem , Feminino , Fluoroscopia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
19.
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol ; 42(6): 694-704, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30912155

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: While several studies have evaluated predictors for atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence following catheter ablation, there are limited data specific to cryoballoon ablation (CBA). METHODS: We analyzed a prospective registry of patients at a single institution who underwent CBA. Recurrence of AF (RAF) was defined as recurrence of AF by 12-month follow-up, excluding the 3-month blanking period. Univariate analysis was performed to evaluate predictors of RAF. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to compare and evaluate the performance of various risk scores for discriminating risk of RAF. RESULTS: There were 542 patients included in the analysis with mean age 61.3 ± 10.6 years, 67.9% male, and 51.6% paroxysmal AF (PAF). Overall, only left atrial diameter (LAD) > 40 mm and ERAF (early recurrence of AF within 0-3 month blanking period) were significant predictors of RAF. In the PAF specific subgroup, LAD > 40 mm, AF duration > 12 months, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack, ERAF, and having previously failed an antiarrhythmic drug were significant predictors of RAF. In persistent AF (PeAF) subgroup, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and ERAF were significant predictors of RAF. Out of clinical risk scores tested, BASEAF2 had the highest performance with area under the curve of 0.646 (95% confidence interval [0.548, 0.708]; P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: In this single-center retrospective study of CBA, we found only LAD > 40 mm and ERAF to be predictors of RAF. We identified OSA as a potential targetable risk factor in PeAF patients undergoing CBA. Out of risk scores tested for discriminating risk of RAF, BASEAF2 had the best performance.


Assuntos
Fibrilação Atrial/cirurgia , Criocirurgia/métodos , Idoso , Antiarrítmicos/administração & dosagem , Fibrilação Atrial/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Ataque Isquêmico Transitório/complicações , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recidiva , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/complicações , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/complicações , Fatores de Tempo
20.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 27(10): 3203-3211, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30915512

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Humeral head resurfacing (HHR) is a less invasive, anatomic alternative to the conventional stemmed hemiarthroplasty in patients in whom isolated humeral head replacement is preferred. It was hypothesized that, in a mid-term cross-sectional subjective outcome analysis, HHR would have equivalent patient-reported and functional outcomes to stemmed hemiarthroplasty (HA). METHODS: A total of 213 HHR and 153 HA procedures were performed at a single academic institution from 2000 to 2014. Of these, 106 HHR and 47 HA patients corresponding with 120 HHR and 55 HA shoulders responded to a survey that collected patient demographics, surgical outcomes, patient satisfaction, and self-reported range of motion scores using both bespoke and validated metrics. RESULTS: Follow-up was longer in the HA group (9.4 ± 3.4 vs. 5.2 ± 1.8 years, p < 0.0001). Self-reported range of motion was equivalent between groups. Surgery was perceived as helpful following 76.7% of HHRs and 78.2% of HAs (p > 0.99). The ASES pain subscore was significantly worse in the HA group (25.2 ± 29.5 vs. 38.5 ± 12.7 after HHR, p < 0.0001), which translated into worse ASES total scores (45.1 ± 14.8 HA vs. 52.2 ± 23.7 HHR, p < 0.05). These findings were equivocal in responses received 2-8 years vs. ≥ 8 years after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Indications should be equivocal; humeral head resurfacing is a viable alternative to hemiarthroplasty, with equivalent patient satisfaction and reduced pain in the mid-term post-operative period. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III.


Assuntos
Cabeça do Úmero/cirurgia , Osteoartrite/cirurgia , Articulação do Ombro/cirurgia , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Seguimentos , Hemiartroplastia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Satisfação do Paciente , Amplitude de Movimento Articular , Resultado do Tratamento
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA