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1.
Blood ; 2019 Aug 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31420334

RESUMO

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality. To advance our understanding of the biology contributing to VTE, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of VTE and a transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) based on imputed gene expression from whole blood and liver. We meta-analyzed GWAS data from 18 studies for 30,234 VTE cases and 172,122 controls and assessed the association between 12,923,718 genetic variants and VTE. We generated variant prediction scores of gene expression from whole blood and liver tissue and assessed them for association with VTE. Mendelian randomization analyses were conducted for traits genetically associated with novel VTE loci. We identified 34 independent genetic signals for VTE risk from GWAS meta-analysis of which 14 are newly reported associations. This included 11 newly associated genetic loci (C1orf198, PLEK, OSMR-AS1, NUGGC/SCARA5, GRK5, MPHOSPH9, ARID4A, PLCG2, SMG6, EIF5A, and STX10) of which 6 replicated, and 3 new, independent signals in 3 known genes. Further, TWAS identified 5 additional genetic loci with imputed gene expression levels differing between cases and controls in whole blood (SH2B3, SPSB1, RP11-747H7.3, RP4-737E23.2) and in liver (ERAP1). At some GWAS loci, we found suggestive evidence that the VTE association signal for both novel and previously known regions co-localized with eQTL signals. Mendelian randomization analyses suggested that blood traits may contribute to the underlying risk of VTE. To conclude, we identified 16 novel susceptibility loci for VTE; for some loci, the association signals are likely mediated through gene expression of nearby genes.

2.
Int J Epidemiol ; 48(3): 822-830, 2019 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31211375

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine disorder with an estimated prevalence of 4-21% in reproductive aged women. Recently, the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) reported a decreased risk of invasive ovarian cancer among women with self-reported PCOS. However, given the limitations of self-reported PCOS, the validity of these observed associations remains uncertain. Therefore, we sought to use Mendelian randomization with genetic markers as a proxy for PCOS, to examine the association between PCOS and ovarian cancer. METHODS: Utilizing 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with PCOS we assessed the association between genetically predicted PCOS and ovarian cancer risk, overall and by histotype, using summary statistics from a previously conducted genome-wide association study (GWAS) of ovarian cancer among European ancestry women within the OCAC (22 406 with invasive disease, 3103 with borderline disease and 40 941 controls). RESULTS: An inverse association was observed between genetically predicted PCOS and invasive ovarian cancer risk: odds ratio (OR)=0.92 [95% confidence interval (CI)=0.85-0.99; P = 0.03]. When results were examined by histotype, the strongest inverse association was observed between genetically predicted PCOS and endometrioid tumors (OR = 0.77; 95% CI = 0.65-0.92; P = 0.003). Adjustment for individual-level body mass index, oral contraceptive use and parity did not materially change the associations. CONCLUSION: Our study provides evidence for a relationship between PCOS and reduced ovarian cancer risk, overall and among specific histotypes of invasive ovarian cancer. These results lend support to our previous observational study results. Future studies are needed to understand mechanisms underlying this association.

3.
Hum Genet ; 138(10): 1091-1104, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31230194

RESUMO

Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of risk loci for breast and prostate cancer, only a few studies have characterized the GWAS association signals across functional genomic annotations with a particular focus on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in DNA regulatory elements. In this study, we investigated the enrichment pattern of GWAS signals for breast and prostate cancer in genomic functional regions located in normal tissue and cancer cell lines. We quantified the overall enrichment of SNPs with breast and prostate cancer association p values < 1 × 10-8 across regulatory categories. We then obtained annotations for DNaseI hypersensitive sites (DHS), typical enhancers, and super enhancers across multiple tissue types, to assess if significant GWAS signals were selectively enriched in annotations found in disease-related tissue. Finally, we quantified the enrichment of breast and prostate cancer SNP heritability in regulatory regions, and compared the enrichment pattern of SNP heritability with GWAS signals. DHS, typical enhancers, and super enhancers identified in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 were observed with the highest enrichment of genome-wide significant variants for breast cancer. For prostate cancer, GWAS signals were mostly enriched in DHS and typical enhancers identified in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. With progressively stringent GWAS p value thresholds, an increasing trend of enrichment was observed for both diseases in DHS, typical enhancers, and super enhancers located in disease-related tissue. Results from heritability enrichment analysis supported the selective enrichment pattern of functional genomic regions in disease-related cell lines for both breast and prostate cancer. Our results suggest the importance of studying functional annotations identified in disease-related tissues when characterizing GWAS results, and further demonstrate the role of germline DNA regulatory elements from disease-related tissue in breast and prostate carcinogenesis.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Variação Genética , Neoplasias da Próstata/genética , Sequências Reguladoras de Ácido Nucleico , Biomarcadores Tumorais , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Biologia Computacional/métodos , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Masculino , Anotação de Sequência Molecular , Especificidade de Órgãos
4.
PLoS One ; 14(5): e0216997, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31125336

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Genome-wide-association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Most of these studies were conducted primarily in postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Therefore, we set out to assess whether or not these breast cancer variants are also associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer in young premenopausal patients. METHODS: In 451 women of European ancestry who had prospectively enrolled in a longitudinal cohort study for women diagnosed with breast cancer at or under age 40, we genotyped 44 SNPs that were previously associated with breast cancer risk. A control group was comprised of 1142 postmenopausal healthy women from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS). We assessed if the frequencies of the adequately genotyped SNPs differed significantly (p≤0.05) between the cohort of young breast cancer patients and postmenopausal controls, and then we corrected for multiple testing. RESULTS: Genotyping of the controls or cases was inadequate for comparisons between the groups for seven of the 44 SNPs. 9 of the remaining 37 were associated with breast cancer risk in young women with a p-value <0.05: rs10510102, rs1219648, rs13387042, rs1876206, rs2936870, rs2981579, rs3734805, rs3803662 and rs4973768. The directions of these associations were consistent with those in postmenopausal women. However, after correction for multiple testing (Benjamini Hochberg) none of the results remained statistically significant. CONCLUSION: After correction for multiple testing, none of the alleles for postmenopausal breast cancer were clearly associated with risk of premenopausal breast cancer in this relatively small study.

5.
Breast Cancer Res ; 21(1): 68, 2019 05 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31118087

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mammographic breast density, adjusted for age and body mass index, and a polygenic risk score (PRS), comprised of common genetic variation, are both strong risk factors for breast cancer and increase discrimination of risk models. Understanding their joint contribution will be important to more accurately predict risk. METHODS: Using 3628 breast cancer cases and 5126 controls of European ancestry from eight case-control studies, we evaluated joint associations of a 77-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) PRS and quantitative mammographic density measures with breast cancer. Mammographic percent density and absolute dense area were evaluated using thresholding software and examined as residuals after adjusting for age, 1/BMI, and study. PRS and adjusted density phenotypes were modeled both continuously (per 1 standard deviation, SD) and categorically. We fit logistic regression models and tested the null hypothesis of multiplicative joint associations for PRS and adjusted density measures using likelihood ratio and global and tail-based goodness of fit tests within the subset of six cohort or population-based studies. RESULTS: Adjusted percent density (odds ratio (OR) = 1.45 per SD, 95% CI 1.38-1.52), adjusted absolute dense area (OR = 1.34 per SD, 95% CI 1.28-1.41), and the 77-SNP PRS (OR = 1.52 per SD, 95% CI 1.45-1.59) were associated with breast cancer risk. There was no evidence of interaction of the PRS with adjusted percent density or dense area on risk of breast cancer by either the likelihood ratio (P > 0.21) or goodness of fit tests (P > 0.09), whether assessed continuously or categorically. The joint association (OR) was 2.60 in the highest categories of adjusted PD and PRS and 0.34 in the lowest categories, relative to women in the second density quartile and middle PRS quintile. CONCLUSIONS: The combined associations of the 77-SNP PRS and adjusted density measures are generally well described by multiplicative models, and both risk factors provide independent information on breast cancer risk.

6.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 569, 2019 02 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30718517

RESUMO

We introduce cross-trait penalized regression (CTPR), a powerful and practical approach for multi-trait polygenic risk prediction in large cohorts. Specifically, we propose a novel cross-trait penalty function with the Lasso and the minimax concave penalty (MCP) to incorporate the shared genetic effects across multiple traits for large-sample GWAS data. Our approach extracts information from the secondary traits that is beneficial for predicting the primary trait based on individual-level genotypes and/or summary statistics. Our novel implementation of a parallel computing algorithm makes it feasible to apply our method to biobank-scale GWAS data. We illustrate our method using large-scale GWAS data (~1M SNPs) from the UK Biobank (N = 456,837). We show that our multi-trait method outperforms the recently proposed multi-trait analysis of GWAS (MTAG) for predictive performance. The prediction accuracy for height by the aid of BMI improves from R2 = 35.8% (MTAG) to 42.5% (MCP + CTPR) or 42.8% (Lasso + CTPR) with UK Biobank data.


Assuntos
Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Modelos Genéticos , Algoritmos , Genótipo , Humanos , Fenótipo , Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética
7.
Genet Epidemiol ; 43(4): 449-457, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30659681

RESUMO

Although recent Genome-Wide Association Studies have identified novel associations for common variants, there has been no comprehensive exome-wide search for low-frequency variants that affect the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). We conducted a meta-analysis of 11 studies comprising 8,332 cases and 16,087 controls of European ancestry and 382 cases and 1,476 controls of African American ancestry genotyped with the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We used the seqMeta package in R to conduct single variant and gene-based rare variant tests. In the single variant analysis, we limited our analysis to the 64,794 variants with at least 40 minor alleles across studies (minor allele frequency [MAF] ~0.08%). We confirmed associations with previously identified VTE loci, including ABO, F5, F11, and FGA. After adjusting for multiple testing, we observed no novel significant findings in single variant or gene-based analysis. Given our sample size, we had greater than 80% power to detect minimum odds ratios greater than 1.5 and 1.8 for a single variant with MAF of 0.01 and 0.005, respectively. Larger studies and sequence data may be needed to identify novel low-frequency and rare variants associated with VTE risk.


Assuntos
Exoma/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala , Análise em Microsséries/métodos , Tromboembolia Venosa/genética , Afro-Americanos/genética , Alelos , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Frequência do Gene , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Genótipo , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/métodos , Sequenciamento de Nucleotídeos em Larga Escala/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Análise em Microsséries/estatística & dados numéricos , Razão de Chances , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Tamanho da Amostra , Tromboembolia Venosa/etnologia
8.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 7(22): e010317, 2018 11 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30571496

RESUMO

Background Venous thromboembolism ( VTE ) is a complex thrombotic disorder that constitutes a major source of mortality and morbidity. To improve understanding of the cause of VTE , we conducted a metabolomic analysis in a case-control study including 240 incident VTE cases and 6963 controls nested within 3 large prospective population-based cohorts, the Nurses' Health Study, the Nurses' Health Study II , and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Methods and Results For each individual, we measured 211 metabolites and collected detailed information on lifestyle factors. We performed logistic regression and enrichment analysis to identify metabolites and biological categories associated with incident VTE risk, accounting for key confounders, such as age, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, and comorbid diseases (eg, cancers). We performed analyses of all VTEs and separate analyses of pulmonary embolism. Using the basic model controlling for age, sex, and primary disease, we identified 60 nominally significant VTE - or pulmonary embolism-associated metabolites ( P<0.05). These metabolites were enriched for diacylglycerols ( Ppermutation<0.05). However, after controlling for multiple testing, only 1 metabolite (C5 carnitine; odds ratio, 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.41; Pcorrected=0.03) remained significantly associated with VTE . After further adjustment for body mass index, no metabolites were significantly associated with disease after accounting for multiple testing, and no metabolite classes were enriched for nominally significant associations. Conclusions Although our findings suggest that circulating metabolites may influence the risk of incident VTE , the associations we observed were confounded by body mass index. Larger studies involving additional individuals and with broader metabolomics coverage are needed to confirm our findings.

9.
Schizophr Bull ; 2018 Nov 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30452727

RESUMO

Observational epidemiological studies have found an association between schizophrenia and breast cancer, but it is not known if the relationship is a causal one. We used summary statistics from very large genome-wide association studies of schizophrenia (n = 40675 cases and 64643 controls) and breast cancer (n = 122977 cases and 105974 controls) to investigate whether there is evidence that the association is partly due to shared genetic risk factors and whether there is evidence of a causal relationship. Using LD-score regression, we found that there is a small but significant genetic correlation (rG) between the 2 disorders (rG = 0.14, SE = 0.03, P = 4.75 × 10-8), indicating shared genetic risk factors. Using 142 genetic variants associated with schizophrenia as instrumental variables that are a proxy for having schizophrenia, we estimated a causal effect of schizophrenia on breast cancer on the observed scale as bxy = 0.032 (SE = 0.009, P = 2.3 × 10-4). A 1 SD increase in liability to schizophrenia increases risk of breast cancer 1.09-fold. In contrast, the estimated causal effect of breast cancer on schizophrenia from 191 instruments was not significantly different from zero (bxy = -0.005, SE = 0.012, P = .67). No evidence for pleiotropy was found and adjusting for the effects of smoking or parity did not alter the results. These results provide evidence that the previously observed association is due to schizophrenia causally increasing risk for breast cancer. Genetic variants may provide an avenue to elucidating the mechanism underpinning this relationship.

10.
Thromb Res ; 172: 67-73, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30384037

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Adult body mass index (BMI) is strongly associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE), however whether earlier-life adiposity or other measures of adult adiposity are associated with VTE risk remains largely unknown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We evaluated associations of childhood somatotype, BMI in early adulthood, adult adiposity, and change in weight since early adulthood with incident VTE risk over ≥20 years of follow-up among 205,935 participants from Nurses' Health Studies (NHS/NHS II) and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS), ages 29-76 at baseline. We estimated multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for VTE using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Somatotype in childhood and young adulthood BMI were not significantly associated with VTE risk, after accounting for adult BMI. Adult BMI was strongly associated with VTE in all three cohorts (e.g., multivariable-adjusted HRs comparing ≥35 kg/m2 vs. <22.5 kg/m2: NHS:3.03[95% CI: 2.58, 3.56], NHS II:3.82[95% CI: 3.24, 4.51], HPFS:2.81 [95% CI: 2.08, 3.80]; all p-trends < 0.01). Adult waist circumference was associated with greater VTE risk, even after adjusting for adult BMI (all p-trends < 0.01). Increasing weight gain from young adulthood was significantly associated with VTE after adjusting for current BMI among women (HR comparing gain ≥20 kg vs. no change: NHS:1.36[95% CI: 1.13, 1.65], NHS II:1.48[95% CI: 1.17, 1.87]) and not men (HPFS:1.20[95% CI: 0.97, 1.50]). These results indicate that BMI and adiposity are likely more important acutely than cumulatively over time in the etiology and prevention of VTE. Clinically, encouraging weight loss in individuals who are overweight or obese could help reduce VTE risk.

11.
PLoS Med ; 15(9): e1002644, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30180161

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: No prior study to our knowledge has examined the joint contribution of a polygenic risk score (PRS), mammographic density (MD), and postmenopausal endogenous hormone levels-all well-confirmed risk factors for invasive breast cancer-to existing breast cancer risk prediction models. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a nested case-control study within the prospective Nurses' Health Study and Nurses' Health Study II including 4,006 cases and 7,874 controls ages 34-70 years up to 1 June 2010. We added a breast cancer PRS using 67 single nucleotide polymorphisms, MD, and circulating testosterone, estrone sulfate, and prolactin levels to existing risk models. We calculated area under the curve (AUC), controlling for age and stratified by menopausal status, for the 5-year absolute risk of invasive breast cancer. We estimated the population distribution of 5-year predicted risks for models with and without biomarkers. For the Gail model, the AUC improved (p-values < 0.001) from 55.9 to 64.1 (8.2 units) in premenopausal women (Gail + PRS + MD), from 55.5 to 66.0 (10.5 units) in postmenopausal women not using hormone therapy (HT) (Gail + PRS + MD + all hormones), and from 58.0 to 64.9 (6.9 units) in postmenopausal women using HT (Gail + PRS + MD + prolactin). For the Rosner-Colditz model, the corresponding AUCs improved (p-values < 0.001) by 5.7, 6.2, and 6.5 units. For estrogen-receptor-positive tumors, among postmenopausal women not using HT, the AUCs improved (p-values < 0.001) by 14.3 units for the Gail model and 7.3 units for the Rosner-Colditz model. Additionally, the percentage of 50-year-old women predicted to be at more than twice 5-year average risk (≥2.27%) was 0.2% for the Gail model alone and 6.6% for the Gail + PRS + MD + all hormones model. Limitations of our study included the limited racial/ethnic diversity of our cohort, and that general population exposure distributions were unavailable for some risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the addition of PRS, MD, and endogenous hormones substantially improved existing breast cancer risk prediction models. Further studies will be needed to confirm these findings and to determine whether improved risk prediction models have practical value in identifying women at higher risk who would most benefit from chemoprevention, screening, and other risk-reducing strategies.

13.
Int J Cancer ; 142(6): 1182-1188, 2018 03 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29114882

RESUMO

We assessed the association between 1,414 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in synthesis and metabolism of steroid hormones and insulin-like growth factor 1, and risk of breast cancer in situ (BCIS), with the aim of determining whether any of these were disease specific. This was carried out using 1,062 BCIS cases and 10,126 controls as well as 6,113 invasive breast cancer cases from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Three SNPs showed at least one nominally significant association in homozygous minor versus homozygous major models. ACVR2A-rs2382112 (ORhom = 3.05, 95%CI = 1.72-5.44, Phom = 1.47 × 10-4 ), MAST2-rs12124649 (ORhom = 1.73, 95% CI =1.18-2.54, Phom = 5.24 × 10-3 ), and INSR-rs10500204 (ORhom = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.44-2.67, Phom =1.68 × 10-5 ) were associated with increased risk of BCIS; however, only the latter association was significant after correcting for multiple testing. Furthermore, INSR-rs10500204 was more strongly associated with the risk of BCIS than invasive disease in case-only analyses using the homozygous minor versus homozygous major model (ORhom = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.30-2.44, Phom = 3.23 × 10-4 ). The SNP INSR-rs10500204 is located in an intron of the INSR gene and is likely to affect binding of the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein. The PML gene is known as a tumor suppressor and growth regulator in cancer. However, it is not clear on what pathway the A-allele of rs10500204 could operate to influence the binding of the protein. Hence, functional studies are warranted to investigate this further.


Assuntos
Receptores de Activinas Tipo II/genética , Antígenos CD/genética , Carcinoma de Mama in situ/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Proteínas Associadas aos Microtúbulos/genética , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/genética , Receptor de Insulina/genética , Receptores de Activinas Tipo II/metabolismo , Idoso , Antígenos CD/metabolismo , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Hormônios Esteroides Gonadais/metabolismo , Humanos , Fator de Crescimento Insulin-Like I/metabolismo , Íntrons/genética , Proteínas Associadas aos Microtúbulos/metabolismo , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Proteína da Leucemia Promielocítica/metabolismo , Estudos Prospectivos , Proteínas Serina-Treonina Quinases/metabolismo , Receptor de Insulina/metabolismo
14.
BMJ ; 359: j4761, 2017 10 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29089348

RESUMO

Objective To determine if circulating concentrations of vitamin D are causally associated with risk of cancer.Design Mendelian randomisation study.Setting Large genetic epidemiology networks (the Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON), the Genetic and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO), and the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortiums, and the MR-Base platform).Participants 70 563 cases of cancer (22 898 prostate cancer, 15 748 breast cancer, 12 537 lung cancer, 11 488 colorectal cancer, 4369 ovarian cancer, 1896 pancreatic cancer, and 1627 neuroblastoma) and 84 418 controls.Exposures Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2282679, rs10741657, rs12785878 and rs6013897) associated with vitamin D were used to define a multi-polymorphism score for circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations.Main outcomes measures The primary outcomes were the risk of incident colorectal, breast, prostate, ovarian, lung, and pancreatic cancer and neuroblastoma, which was evaluated with an inverse variance weighted average of the associations with specific polymorphisms and a likelihood based approach. Secondary outcomes based on cancer subtypes by sex, anatomic location, stage, and histology were also examined.Results There was little evidence that the multi-polymorphism score of 25(OH)D was associated with risk of any of the seven cancers or their subtypes. Specifically, the odds ratios per 25 nmol/L increase in genetically determined 25(OH)D concentrations were 0.92 (95% confidence interval 0.76 to 1.10) for colorectal cancer, 1.05 (0.89 to 1.24) for breast cancer, 0.89 (0.77 to 1.02) for prostate cancer, and 1.03 (0.87 to 1.23) for lung cancer. The results were consistent with the two different analytical approaches, and the study was powered to detect relative effect sizes of moderate magnitude (for example, 1.20-1.50 per 25 nmol/L decrease in 25(OH)D for most primary cancer outcomes. The Mendelian randomisation assumptions did not seem to be violated.Conclusions There is little evidence for a linear causal association between circulating vitamin D concentration and risk of various types of cancer, though the existence of causal clinically relevant effects of low magnitude cannot be ruled out. These results, in combination with previous literature, provide evidence that population-wide screening for vitamin D deficiency and subsequent widespread vitamin D supplementation should not currently be recommended as a strategy for primary cancer prevention.


Assuntos
Neoplasias/sangue , Vitamina D/análogos & derivados , Neoplasias da Mama/sangue , Neoplasias da Mama/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Neoplasias Colorretais/sangue , Neoplasias Colorretais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Colorretais/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Variação Genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Incidência , Neoplasias Pulmonares/sangue , Neoplasias Pulmonares/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Pulmonares/genética , Masculino , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Neoplasias/genética , Neuroblastoma/sangue , Neuroblastoma/epidemiologia , Neuroblastoma/genética , Neoplasias Ovarianas/sangue , Neoplasias Ovarianas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/sangue , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Neoplasias da Próstata/sangue , Neoplasias da Próstata/epidemiologia , Neoplasias da Próstata/genética , Medição de Risco/métodos , Vitamina D/sangue , Deficiência de Vitamina D/sangue , Deficiência de Vitamina D/epidemiologia , Deficiência de Vitamina D/genética
15.
Nat Genet ; 49(12): 1767-1778, 2017 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29058716

RESUMO

Most common breast cancer susceptibility variants have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of predominantly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We conducted a GWAS using 21,468 ER-negative cases and 100,594 controls combined with 18,908 BRCA1 mutation carriers (9,414 with breast cancer), all of European origin. We identified independent associations at P < 5 × 10-8 with ten variants at nine new loci. At P < 0.05, we replicated associations with 10 of 11 variants previously reported in ER-negative disease or BRCA1 mutation carrier GWAS and observed consistent associations with ER-negative disease for 105 susceptibility variants identified by other studies. These 125 variants explain approximately 16% of the familial risk of this breast cancer subtype. There was high genetic correlation (0.72) between risk of ER-negative breast cancer and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers. These findings may lead to improved risk prediction and inform further fine-mapping and functional work to better understand the biological basis of ER-negative breast cancer.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Mutação , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Neoplasias da Mama/etnologia , Neoplasias da Mama/metabolismo , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença/etnologia , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Heterozigoto , Humanos , Receptores Estrogênicos/metabolismo , Fatores de Risco
16.
Nature ; 551(7678): 92-94, 2017 11 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29059683

RESUMO

Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast cancer in 122,977 cases and 105,974 controls of European ancestry and 14,068 cases and 13,104 controls of East Asian ancestry. We identified 65 new loci that are associated with overall breast cancer risk at P < 5 × 10-8. The majority of credible risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms in these loci fall in distal regulatory elements, and by integrating in silico data to predict target genes in breast cells at each locus, we demonstrate a strong overlap between candidate target genes and somatic driver genes in breast tumours. We also find that heritability of breast cancer due to all single-nucleotide polymorphisms in regulatory features was 2-5-fold enriched relative to the genome-wide average, with strong enrichment for particular transcription factor binding sites. These results provide further insight into genetic susceptibility to breast cancer and will improve the use of genetic risk scores for individualized screening and prevention.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Loci Gênicos , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Ásia/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/genética , Sítios de Ligação/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/diagnóstico , Simulação por Computador , Europa (Continente)/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Humanos , Herança Multifatorial/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Sequências Reguladoras de Ácido Nucleico , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Transcrição/metabolismo
18.
Hum Genet ; 136(10): 1341-1351, 2017 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28780673

RESUMO

Growing evidence from both epidemiology and basic science suggest an inverse association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. We examined the genetic relationship between AD and various cancer types using GWAS summary statistics from the IGAP and GAME-ON consortia. Sample size ranged from 9931 to 54,162; SNPs were imputed to the 1000 Genomes European panel. Our results based on cross-trait LD Score regression showed a significant positive genetic correlation between AD and five cancers combined (colon, breast, prostate, ovarian, lung; r g = 0.17, P = 0.04), and specifically with breast cancer (ER-negative and overall; r g = 0.21 and 0.18, P = 0.035 and 0.034) and lung cancer (adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and overall; r g = 0.31, 0.38 and 0.30, P = 0.029, 0.016, and 0.006). Estimating the genetic correlation in specific functional categories revealed mixed positive and negative signals, notably stronger at annotations associated with increased enhancer activity. This suggests a role of gene expression regulators in the shared genetic etiology between AD and cancer, and that some shared variants modulate disease risk concordantly while others have effects in opposite directions. Due to power issues, we did not detect cross-phenotype associations at individual SNPs. This genetic overlap is not likely driven by a handful of major loci. Our study is the first to examine the co-heritability of AD and cancer leveraging large-scale GWAS results. The functional categories highlighted in this study need further investigation to illustrate the details of the genetic sharing and to bridge between different levels of associations.


Assuntos
Doença de Alzheimer/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Neoplasias/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Doença de Alzheimer/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Neoplasias/epidemiologia
19.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 26(9): 1427-1435, 2017 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28637796

RESUMO

Background: Many cancers share specific genetic risk factors, including both rare high-penetrance mutations and common SNPs identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, little is known about the overall shared heritability across cancers. Quantifying the extent to which two distinct cancers share genetic origin will give insights to shared biological mechanisms underlying cancer and inform design for future genetic association studies.Methods: In this study, we estimated the pair-wise genetic correlation between six cancer types (breast, colorectal, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate) using cancer-specific GWAS summary statistics data based on 66,958 case and 70,665 control subjects of European ancestry. We also estimated genetic correlations between cancers and 14 noncancer diseases and traits.Results: After adjusting for 15 pair-wise genetic correlation tests between cancers, we found significant (P < 0.003) genetic correlations between pancreatic and colorectal cancer (rg = 0.55, P = 0.003), lung and colorectal cancer (rg = 0.31, P = 0.001). We also found suggestive genetic correlations between lung and breast cancer (rg = 0.27, P = 0.009), and colorectal and breast cancer (rg = 0.22, P = 0.01). In contrast, we found no evidence that prostate cancer shared an appreciable proportion of heritability with other cancers. After adjusting for 84 tests studying genetic correlations between cancer types and other traits (Bonferroni-corrected P value: 0.0006), only the genetic correlation between lung cancer and smoking remained significant (rg = 0.41, P = 1.03 × 10-6). We also observed nominally significant genetic correlations between body mass index and all cancers except ovarian cancer.Conclusions: Our results highlight novel genetic correlations and lend support to previous observational studies that have observed links between cancers and risk factors.Impact: This study demonstrates modest genetic correlations between cancers; in particular, breast, colorectal, and lung cancer share some degree of genetic basis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1427-35. ©2017 AACR.


Assuntos
Variação Genética/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Neoplasias/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores de Risco
20.
Hum Genet ; 136(7): 897-902, 2017 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28528403

RESUMO

Observational studies have shown an association between obesity and venous thromboembolism (VTE) but it is not known if observed associations are causal, due to reverse causation or confounding bias. We conducted a Mendelian Randomization study of body mass index (BMI) and VTE. We identified 95 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have been previously associated with BMI and assessed the association between genetically predicted high BMI and VTE leveraging data from a previously conducted GWAS within the INVENT consortium comprising a total of 7507 VTE cases and 52,632 controls of European ancestry. Five BMI SNPs were associated with VTE at P < 0.05, with the strongest association seen for the FTO SNP rs1558902 (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02-1.12, P = 0.005). In addition, we observed a significant association between genetically predicted BMI and VTE (OR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.30-1.93 per standard deviation increase in BMI, P = 5.8 × 10-6). Our study provides evidence for a causal relationship between high BMI and risk of VTE. Reducing obesity levels will likely result in lower incidence in VTE.


Assuntos
Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Obesidade/genética , Tromboembolia Venosa/genética , Adulto , Índice de Massa Corporal , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Incidência , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Obesidade/complicações , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Tromboembolia Venosa/complicações
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