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1.
Genet Med ; 2019 Oct 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31578471

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Lamb-Shaffer syndrome (LAMSHF) is a neurodevelopmental disorder described in just over two dozen patients with heterozygous genetic alterations involving SOX5, a gene encoding a transcription factor regulating cell fate and differentiation in neurogenesis and other discrete developmental processes. The genetic alterations described so far are mainly microdeletions. The present study was aimed at increasing our understanding of LAMSHF, its clinical and genetic spectrum, and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved. METHODS: Clinical and genetic data were collected through GeneMatcher and clinical or genetic networks for 41 novel patients harboring various types of SOX5 alterations. Functional consequences of selected substitutions were investigated. RESULTS: Microdeletions and truncating variants occurred throughout SOX5. In contrast, most missense variants clustered in the pivotal SOX-specific high-mobility-group domain. The latter variants prevented SOX5 from binding DNA and promoting transactivation in vitro, whereas missense variants located outside the high-mobility-group domain did not. Clinical manifestations and severity varied among patients. No clear genotype-phenotype correlations were found, except that missense variants outside the high-mobility-group domain were generally better tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: This study extends the clinical and genetic spectrum associated with LAMSHF and consolidates evidence that SOX5 haploinsufficiency leads to variable degrees of intellectual disability, language delay, and other clinical features.

2.
Kidney Int ; 95(6): 1494-1504, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31005274

RESUMO

Although genetic testing is increasingly used in clinical nephrology, a large number of patients with congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) remain undiagnosed with current gene panels. Therefore, careful curation of novel genetic findings is key to improving diagnostic yields. We recently described a novel intellectual disability syndrome caused by de novo heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the splicing factor SON. Here, we show that many of these patients, including two previously unreported, exhibit a wide array of kidney abnormalities. Detailed phenotyping of 14 patients with SON haploinsufficiency identified kidney anomalies in 8 patients, including horseshoe kidney, unilateral renal hypoplasia, and renal cysts. Recurrent urinary tract infections, electrolyte disturbances, and hypertension were also observed in some patients. SON knockdown in kidney cell lines leads to abnormal pre-mRNA splicing, resulting in decreased expression of several established CAKUT genes. Furthermore, these molecular events were observed in patient-derived cells with SON haploinsufficiency. Taken together, our data suggest that the wide spectrum of phenotypes in patients with a pathogenic SON mutation is a consequence of impaired pre-mRNA splicing of several CAKUT genes. We propose that genetic testing panels designed to diagnose children with a kidney phenotype should include the SON gene.

4.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(3): 542-552, 2019 Mar 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30827498

RESUMO

Polyglutamine expansions in the transcriptional co-repressor Atrophin-1, encoded by ATN1, cause the neurodegenerative condition dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) via a proposed novel toxic gain of function. We present detailed phenotypic information on eight unrelated individuals who have de novo missense and insertion variants within a conserved 16-amino-acid "HX repeat" motif of ATN1. Each of the affected individuals has severe cognitive impairment and hypotonia, a recognizable facial gestalt, and variable congenital anomalies. However, they lack the progressive symptoms typical of DRPLA neurodegeneration. To distinguish this subset of affected individuals from the DRPLA diagnosis, we suggest using the term CHEDDA (congenital hypotonia, epilepsy, developmental delay, digit abnormalities) to classify the condition. CHEDDA-related variants alter the particular structural features of the HX repeat motif, suggesting that CHEDDA results from perturbation of the structural and functional integrity of the HX repeat. We found several non-homologous human genes containing similar motifs of eight to 10 HX repeat sequences, including RERE, where disruptive variants in this motif have also been linked to a separate condition that causes neurocognitive and congenital anomalies. These findings suggest that perturbation of the HX motif might explain other Mendelian human conditions.

6.
BMC Endocr Disord ; 18(1): 83, 2018 Nov 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30419879

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) results in significant disease burden and early treatment is important for optimal outcomes. Recognition of short stature and growth failure as symptoms of MPS I among pediatric endocrinologists may lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. CASE PRESENTATION: A male patient first began experiencing hip pain at 5 years of age and was referred to an endocrinologist for short stature at age 7. Clinical history included recurrent respiratory infections, sleep apnea, moderate joint contractures, mild facial dysmorphic features, scoliosis, and umbilical hernia. Height was more than - 2 SD below the median at all time points. Growth velocity was below the 3rd percentile. Treatment for short stature included leuprolide acetate and recombinant human growth hormone. The patient was diagnosed with MPS I and began enzyme replacement therapy with laronidase at age 18. CONCLUSIONS: The case study patient had many symptoms of MPS I yet remained undiagnosed for 11 years after presenting with short stature. The appropriate path to MPS I diagnosis when patients present with short stature and/or growth failure plus one or more of the common signs of attenuated disease is described. Improved awareness regarding association of short stature and growth failure with attenuated MPS I is needed since early identification and treatment significantly decreases disease burden.

7.
Am J Hum Genet ; 103(5): 666-678, 2018 Nov 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30343943

RESUMO

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEEs) are severe neurodevelopmental disorders often beginning in infancy or early childhood that are characterized by intractable seizures, abundant epileptiform activity on EEG, and developmental impairment or regression. CACNA1E is highly expressed in the central nervous system and encodes the α1-subunit of the voltage-gated CaV2.3 channel, which conducts high voltage-activated R-type calcium currents that initiate synaptic transmission. Using next-generation sequencing techniques, we identified de novo CACNA1E variants in 30 individuals with DEE, characterized by refractory infantile-onset seizures, severe hypotonia, and profound developmental impairment, often with congenital contractures, macrocephaly, hyperkinetic movement disorders, and early death. Most of the 14, partially recurring, variants cluster within the cytoplasmic ends of all four S6 segments, which form the presumed CaV2.3 channel activation gate. Functional analysis of several S6 variants revealed consistent gain-of-function effects comprising facilitated voltage-dependent activation and slowed inactivation. Another variant located in the domain II S4-S5 linker results in facilitated activation and increased current density. Five participants achieved seizure freedom on the anti-epileptic drug topiramate, which blocks R-type calcium channels. We establish pathogenic variants in CACNA1E as a cause of DEEs and suggest facilitated R-type calcium currents as a disease mechanism for human epilepsy and developmental disorders.

8.
J Med Genet ; 2018 Oct 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30323019

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Early infantile epileptic encephalopathies are severe disorders consisting of early-onset refractory seizures accompanied often by significant developmental delay. The increasing availability of next-generation sequencing has facilitated the recognition of single gene mutations as an underlying aetiology of some forms of early infantile epileptic encephalopathies. OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to identify candidate genes as a potential cause of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, and then to provide genetic and functional evidence supporting patient variants as causative. METHODS: We used whole exome sequencing to identify candidate genes. To model the disease and assess the functional effects of patient variants on candidate protein function, we used in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing and protein overexpression in frog tadpoles. RESULTS: We identified novel de novo variants in neuronal differentiation factor 2 (NEUROD2) in two unrelated children with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy. Depleting neurod2 with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing induced spontaneous seizures in tadpoles, mimicking the patients' condition. Overexpression of wild-type NEUROD2 induced ectopic neurons in tadpoles; however, patient variants were markedly less effective, suggesting that both variants are dysfunctional and likely pathogenic. CONCLUSION: This study provides clinical and functional support for NEUROD2 variants as a cause of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, the first evidence of human disease caused by NEUROD2 variants.

9.
Nat Genet ; 50(10): 1442-1451, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30224647

RESUMO

The etiological spectrum of ultra-rare developmental disorders remains to be fully defined. Chromatin regulatory mechanisms maintain cellular identity and function, where misregulation may lead to developmental defects. Here, we report pathogenic variations in MSL3, which encodes a member of the chromatin-associated male-specific lethal (MSL) complex responsible for bulk histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation (H4K16ac) in flies and mammals. These variants cause an X-linked syndrome affecting both sexes. Clinical features of the syndrome include global developmental delay, progressive gait disturbance, and recognizable facial dysmorphism. MSL3 mutations affect MSL complex assembly and activity, accompanied by a pronounced loss of H4K16ac levels in vivo. Patient-derived cells display global transcriptome alterations of pathways involved in morphogenesis and cell migration. Finally, we use histone deacetylase inhibitors to rebalance acetylation levels, alleviating some of the molecular and cellular phenotypes of patient cells. Taken together, we characterize a syndrome that allowed us to decipher the developmental importance of MSL3 in humans.

10.
Hum Genet ; 135(12): 1399-1409, 2016 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27681385

RESUMO

Intellectual disabilities are genetically heterogeneous and can be associated with congenital anomalies. Using whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified five different de novo missense variants in the protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit beta (PPP1CB) gene in eight unrelated individuals who share an overlapping phenotype of dysmorphic features, macrocephaly, developmental delay or intellectual disability (ID), congenital heart disease, short stature, and skeletal and connective tissue abnormalities. Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase involved in the dephosphorylation of a variety of proteins. The PPP1CB gene encodes a PP1 subunit that regulates the level of protein phosphorylation. All five altered amino acids we observed are highly conserved among the PP1 subunit family, and all are predicted to disrupt PP1 subunit binding and impair dephosphorylation. Our data suggest that our heterozygous de novo PPP1CB pathogenic variants are associated with syndromic intellectual disability.


Assuntos
Estudos de Associação Genética , Cardiopatias Congênitas/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Proteína Fosfatase 1/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Exoma/genética , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Cardiopatias Congênitas/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Fosforilação/genética
11.
Am J Hum Genet ; 99(3): 711-719, 2016 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27545680

RESUMO

The overall understanding of the molecular etiologies of intellectual disability (ID) and developmental delay (DD) is increasing as next-generation sequencing technologies identify genetic variants in individuals with such disorders. However, detailed analyses conclusively confirming these variants, as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms explaining the diseases, are often lacking. Here, we report on an ID syndrome caused by de novo heterozygous loss-of-function (LoF) mutations in SON. The syndrome is characterized by ID and/or DD, malformations of the cerebral cortex, epilepsy, vision problems, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and congenital malformations. Knockdown of son in zebrafish resulted in severe malformation of the spine, brain, and eyes. Importantly, analyses of RNA from affected individuals revealed that genes critical for neuronal migration and cortex organization (TUBG1, FLNA, PNKP, WDR62, PSMD3, and HDAC6) and metabolism (PCK2, PFKL, IDH2, ACY1, and ADA) are significantly downregulated because of the accumulation of mis-spliced transcripts resulting from erroneous SON-mediated RNA splicing. Our data highlight SON as a master regulator governing neurodevelopment and demonstrate the importance of SON-mediated RNA splicing in human development.


Assuntos
Encéfalo/embriologia , Encéfalo/metabolismo , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Genes Essenciais/genética , Deficiência Intelectual/genética , Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Menor/genética , Mutação/genética , Processamento de RNA/genética , Animais , Encéfalo/anormalidades , Encéfalo/patologia , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/análise , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/metabolismo , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/patologia , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/fisiopatologia , Anormalidades do Olho/genética , Feminino , Haploinsuficiência/genética , Cabeça/anormalidades , Heterozigoto , Humanos , Deficiência Intelectual/patologia , Deficiência Intelectual/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Doenças Metabólicas/genética , Doenças Metabólicas/metabolismo , Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Menor/análise , Antígenos de Histocompatibilidade Menor/metabolismo , Linhagem , RNA Mensageiro/análise , Coluna Vertebral/anormalidades , Síndrome , Peixe-Zebra/anormalidades , Peixe-Zebra/embriologia , Peixe-Zebra/genética
12.
Epileptic Disord ; 18(3): 324-8, 2016 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27502353

RESUMO

TBC1D24 is a newly recognized gene in which variations lead to variable clinical phenotypes including drug-resistant epilepsy. We report four patients with novel variants of TBC1D24 demonstrating drug-resistant focal epilepsy, developmental delays, and head growth deceleration. All patients had seizure semiologies consisting of prolonged, unilateral, focal clonic activity of the arm, leg or face, in addition to generalized clonic or myoclonic seizures. Ictal EEG characteristics included epilepsia partialis continua, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, and other focal seizures with indiscrete interictal-ictal transitions. Two seemingly unrelated Navajo patients with identical variations experienced super-refractory status epilepticus at 9 months of age, with one achieving resolution with ketogenic diet therapy. Our series suggests that TBC1D24-related epilepsy can manifest with hypotonia, developmental delays, and a variety of focal-onset seizures prone to electroclinical dissociation.


Assuntos
Proteínas de Transporte/genética , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/fisiopatologia , Epilepsia Resistente a Medicamentos/fisiopatologia , Epilepsia Parcial Contínua/fisiopatologia , Epilepsias Parciais/fisiopatologia , Convulsões/fisiopatologia , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/genética , Epilepsia Resistente a Medicamentos/genética , Eletroencefalografia , Epilepsia Parcial Contínua/genética , Epilepsias Parciais/genética , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Fenótipo , Convulsões/genética
13.
Am J Hum Genet ; 98(5): 963-970, 2016 May 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27087320

RESUMO

Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and defects involving the brain, eye, ear, heart, and kidney. Arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide repeats (RERE) is located in the proximal 1p36 critical region. RERE is a widely-expressed nuclear receptor coregulator that positively regulates retinoic acid signaling. Animal models suggest that RERE deficiency might contribute to many of the structural and developmental birth defects and medical problems seen in individuals with 1p36 deletion syndrome, although human evidence supporting this role has been lacking. In this report, we describe ten individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay, and/or autism spectrum disorder who carry rare and putatively damaging changes in RERE. In all cases in which both parental DNA samples were available, these changes were found to be de novo. Associated features that were recurrently seen in these individuals included hypotonia, seizures, behavioral problems, structural CNS anomalies, ophthalmologic anomalies, congenital heart defects, and genitourinary abnormalities. The spectrum of defects documented in these individuals is similar to that of a cohort of 31 individuals with isolated 1p36 deletions that include RERE and are recapitulated in RERE-deficient zebrafish and mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that mutations in RERE cause a genetic syndrome and that haploinsufficiency of RERE might be sufficient to cause many of the phenotypes associated with proximal 1p36 deletions.


Assuntos
Anormalidades Múltiplas/etiologia , Proteínas de Transporte/genética , Transtornos Cromossômicos/etiologia , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/etiologia , Haploinsuficiência/genética , Mutação/genética , Animais , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Deleção Cromossômica , Cromossomos Humanos Par 1 , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Camundongos , Fenótipo , Prognóstico
14.
J Biol Chem ; 291(24): 12432-43, 2016 Jun 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27129271

RESUMO

Pannexin1 (PANX1) is probably best understood as an ATP release channel involved in paracrine signaling. Given its ubiquitous expression, PANX1 pathogenic variants would be expected to lead to disorders involving multiple organ systems. Using whole exome sequencing, we discovered the first patient with a homozygous PANX1 variant (c.650G→A) resulting in an arginine to histidine substitution at position 217 (p.Arg217His). The 17-year-old female has intellectual disability, sensorineural hearing loss requiring bilateral cochlear implants, skeletal defects, including kyphoscoliosis, and primary ovarian failure. Her consanguineous parents are each heterozygous for this variant but are not affected by the multiorgan syndromes noted in the proband. Expression of the p.Arg217His mutant in HeLa, N2A, HEK293T, and Ad293 cells revealed normal PANX1 glycosylation and cell surface trafficking. Dye uptake, ATP release, and electrophysiological measurements revealed p.Arg217His to be a loss-of-function variant. Co-expression of the mutant with wild-type PANX1 suggested the mutant was not dominant-negative to PANX1 channel function. Collectively, we demonstrate a PANX1 missense change associated with human disease in the first report of a "PANX1-related disorder."


Assuntos
Anormalidades Múltiplas/genética , Conexinas/genética , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Anormalidades Múltiplas/metabolismo , Anormalidades Múltiplas/patologia , Trifosfato de Adenosina/metabolismo , Adolescente , Animais , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Conexinas/metabolismo , Consanguinidade , Saúde da Família , Feminino , Células HEK293 , Células HeLa , Perda Auditiva Neurossensorial/patologia , Heterozigoto , Homozigoto , Humanos , Cifose/patologia , Masculino , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/metabolismo , Linhagem , Insuficiência Ovariana Primária/patologia , Escoliose/patologia , Síndrome
15.
Mol Genet Metab ; 117(3): 351-4, 2016 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26689745

RESUMO

Homocystinuria (HCU) due to deficiency of cystathionine beta-synthetase is associated with increased plasma levels of homocysteine and methionine and is characterized by developmental delay, intellectual impairment, ocular defects, thromboembolism and skeletal abnormalities. HCU has been associated with increased risk for osteoporosis in some studies, but the natural history of HCU-related bone disease is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to characterize bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a multi-center, retrospective cohort of children and adults with HCU. We identified 19 subjects (9 males) aged 3.5 to 49.2 years who had DXA scans performed as a part of routine clinical care from 2002-2010. The mean lumbar spine (LS) BMD Z-score at the time of first DXA scan in this cohort was -1.2 (± SD of 1.3); 38% of participants had low BMD for age (as defined by a Z-score ≤-2). Homocysteine and methionine were positively associated with LS BMD Z-score in multiple linear regression models. Our findings suggest that low BMD is common in both children and adults with HCU and that routine assessment of bone health in this patient population is warranted. Future studies are needed to clarify the relationship between HCU and BMD.


Assuntos
Densidade Óssea , Homocistinúria/fisiopatologia , Osteoporose/etiologia , Absorciometria de Fóton , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Homocisteína/sangue , Homocistinúria/complicações , Humanos , Vértebras Lombares/diagnóstico por imagem , Masculino , Metionina/sangue , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Osteoporose/diagnóstico por imagem , Estudos Retrospectivos , Adulto Jovem
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