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1.
Nicotine Tob Res ; 2019 Jul 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31294817

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: FTND (FagerstrÓ§m test for nicotine dependence) and TTFC (time to smoke first cigarette in the morning) are common measures of nicotine dependence (ND). However, genome-wide meta-analysis for these phenotypes has not been reported. METHODS: Genome-wide meta-analyses for FTND (N = 19,431) and TTFC (N = 18,567) phenotypes were conducted for adult smokers of European ancestry from 14 independent cohorts. RESULTS: We found that SORBS2 on 4q35 (p = 4.05 × 10-8), BG182718 on 11q22 (p = 1.02 × 10-8), and AA333164 on 14q21 (p = 4.11 × 10-9) were associated with TTFC phenotype. We attempted replication of leading candidates with independent samples (FTND, N = 7010 and TTFC, N = 10 061), however, due to limited power of the replication samples, the replication of these new loci did not reach significance. In gene-based analyses, COPB2 was found associated with FTND phenotype, and TFCP2L1, RELN, and INO80C were associated with TTFC phenotype. In pathway and network analyses, we found that the interconnected interactions among the endocytosis, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, axon guidance, MAPK signaling, and chemokine signaling pathways were involved in ND. CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses identified several promising candidates for both FTND and TTFC phenotypes, and further verification of these candidates was necessary. Candidates supported by both FTND and TTFC (CHRNA4, THSD7B, RBFOX1, and ZNF804A) were associated with addiction to alcohol, cocaine, and heroin, and were associated with autism and schizophrenia. We also identified novel pathways involved in cigarette smoking. The pathway interactions highlighted the importance of receptor recycling and internalization in ND. IMPLICATIONS: Understanding the genetic architecture of cigarette smoking and ND is critical to develop effective prevention and treatment. Our study identified novel candidates and biological pathways involved in FTND and TTFC phenotypes, and this will facilitate further investigation of these candidates and pathways.

2.
Biol Psychiatry ; 85(11): 946-955, 2019 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30679032

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Smoking and alcohol use have been associated with common genetic variants in multiple loci. Rare variants within these loci hold promise in the identification of biological mechanisms in substance use. Exome arrays and genotype imputation can now efficiently genotype rare nonsynonymous and loss of function variants. Such variants are expected to have deleterious functional consequences and to contribute to disease risk. METHODS: We analyzed ∼250,000 rare variants from 16 independent studies genotyped with exome arrays and augmented this dataset with imputed data from the UK Biobank. Associations were tested for five phenotypes: cigarettes per day, pack-years, smoking initiation, age of smoking initiation, and alcoholic drinks per week. We conducted stratified heritability analyses, single-variant tests, and gene-based burden tests of nonsynonymous/loss-of-function coding variants. We performed a novel fine-mapping analysis to winnow the number of putative causal variants within associated loci. RESULTS: Meta-analytic sample sizes ranged from 152,348 to 433,216, depending on the phenotype. Rare coding variation explained 1.1% to 2.2% of phenotypic variance, reflecting 11% to 18% of the total single nucleotide polymorphism heritability of these phenotypes. We identified 171 genome-wide associated loci across all phenotypes. Fine mapping identified putative causal variants with double base-pair resolution at 24 of these loci, and between three and 10 variants for 65 loci. Twenty loci contained rare coding variants in the 95% credible intervals. CONCLUSIONS: Rare coding variation significantly contributes to the heritability of smoking and alcohol use. Fine-mapping genome-wide association study loci identifies specific variants contributing to the biological etiology of substance use behavior.

3.
Clin Epigenetics ; 11(1): 1, 2019 01 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30611298

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: DNA methylation alteration extensively associates with smoking and is a plausible link between smoking and adverse health. We examined the association between epigenome-wide DNA methylation and serum cotinine levels as a proxy of nicotine exposure and smoking quantity, assessed the role of SNPs in these associations, and evaluated molecular mediation by methylation in a sample of biochemically verified current smokers (N = 310). RESULTS: DNA methylation at 50 CpG sites was associated (FDR < 0.05) with cotinine levels, 17 of which are novel associations. As cotinine levels are influenced not only by nicotine intake but also by CYP2A6-mediated nicotine metabolism rate, we performed secondary analyses adjusting for genetic risk score of nicotine metabolism rate and identified five additional novel associations. We further assessed the potential role of genetic variants in the detected association between methylation and cotinine levels observing 124 cis and 3898 trans methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs). Nineteen of these SNPs were also associated with cotinine levels (FDR < 0.05). Further, at seven CpG sites, we observed a trend (P < 0.05) that altered DNA methylation mediates the effect of SNPs on nicotine exposure rather than a direct consequence of smoking. Finally, we performed replication of our findings in two independent cohorts of biochemically verified smokers (N = 450 and N = 79). CONCLUSIONS: Using cotinine, a biomarker of nicotine exposure, we replicated and extended identification of novel epigenetic associations in smoking-related genes. We also demonstrated that DNA methylation in some of the identified loci is driven by the underlying genotype and may mediate the causal effect of genotype on cotinine levels.


Assuntos
Cotinina/sangue , Metilação de DNA , Epigenômica/métodos , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fumar/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Ilhas de CpG , Citocromo P-450 CYP2A6/genética , Feminino , Estudos de Associação Genética , Genótipo , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fumar/sangue , Adulto Jovem
4.
Hum Mol Genet ; 28(8): 1322-1330, 2019 04 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30561638

RESUMO

Given clear evidence that smoking lowers weight, it is possible that individuals with higher body mass index (BMI) smoke in order to lose or maintain their weight. We performed Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses of the effects of BMI on smoking behaviour in UK Biobank and the Tobacco and Genetics Consortium genome-wide association study (GWAS), on cotinine levels and nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) in published GWAS and on DNA methylation in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Our results indicate that higher BMI causally influences lifetime smoking, smoking initiation, smoking heaviness and also DNA methylation at the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) locus, but we do not see evidence for an effect on smoking cessation. While there is no strong evidence that BMI causally influences cotinine levels, suggestive evidence for a negative causal influence on NMR may explain this. There is a causal effect of BMI on smoking, but the relationship is likely to be complex due to opposing effects on behaviour and metabolism.


Assuntos
Nicotina/metabolismo , Fumar/genética , Fumar/metabolismo , Adulto , Índice de Massa Corporal , Peso Corporal/genética , Estudos de Coortes , Metilação de DNA/genética , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana/métodos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nicotina/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Fatores de Risco , Fumar/fisiopatologia , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar
5.
Nat Neurosci ; 21(12): 1656-1669, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30482948

RESUMO

Liability to alcohol dependence (AD) is heritable, but little is known about its complex polygenic architecture or its genetic relationship with other disorders. To discover loci associated with AD and characterize the relationship between AD and other psychiatric and behavioral outcomes, we carried out the largest genome-wide association study to date of DSM-IV-diagnosed AD. Genome-wide data on 14,904 individuals with AD and 37,944 controls from 28 case-control and family-based studies were meta-analyzed, stratified by genetic ancestry (European, n = 46,568; African, n = 6,280). Independent, genome-wide significant effects of different ADH1B variants were identified in European (rs1229984; P = 9.8 × 10-13) and African ancestries (rs2066702; P = 2.2 × 10-9). Significant genetic correlations were observed with 17 phenotypes, including schizophrenia, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, depression, and use of cigarettes and cannabis. The genetic underpinnings of AD only partially overlap with those for alcohol consumption, underscoring the genetic distinction between pathological and nonpathological drinking behaviors.

6.
Nicotine Tob Res ; 2018 Oct 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30329132

RESUMO

Introduction: Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a growth factor in the central nervous system. There is evidence for the involvement of BDNF in addictions and mental disorders. We aimed to replicate the earlier reported association of a functional genetic variant of BDNF with smoking initiation (SI) using a large population-based sample, and to test whether the association is independent of depression. Methods: Our sample was drawn from the Finnish population-based FINRISK Surveys conducted in 1992, 1997, 2002 and 2007. We had non-missing data on the genotype BDNF Val66Met (G/A) variant (rs6265) and self-reported never (n=10,619) versus ever (n=16,028) smoking among 26,647 adults aged 25-74 years. The association between BDNF Val66Met and SI was modeled using logistic regression adjusted for age and sex, and in secondary analyses also for depression. Depression was defined as self-reported depression diagnosed or treated by physician during the past year. Results: The sex and age adjusted analysis confirmed that the major (Val) allele increased the risk of being a lifetime ever smoker (per allele OR=1.07; 95%CI 1.01, 1.12; p=0.01). When depression, which itself was significantly associated with SI (OR=1.58; 95%CI 1.37, 1.82; p<0.001), was added to the model, the association of the gene with SI remained significant (per allele OR=1.06; 95%CI 1.01, 1.12; p=0.01). Exclusion of depressed individuals did not change the results (OR=1.06; 95%CI 1.01, 1.12; p=0.02). Conclusions: In a Finnish population sample we replicated the earlier reported association of BDNF Val66Met with smoking initiation. Our data further suggest that this association is independent of depression.

7.
Wellcome Open Res ; 3: 4, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30175238

RESUMO

Background: Over 90 regions of the genome have been associated with lung function to date, many of which have also been implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods: We carried out meta-analyses of exome array data and three lung function measures: forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and the ratio of FEV 1 to FVC (FEV 1/FVC). These analyses by the SpiroMeta and CHARGE consortia included 60,749 individuals of European ancestry from 23 studies, and 7,721 individuals of African Ancestry from 5 studies in the discovery stage, with follow-up in up to 111,556 independent individuals. Results: We identified significant (P<2·8x10 -7) associations with six SNPs: a nonsynonymous variant in RPAP1, which is predicted to be damaging, three intronic SNPs ( SEC24C, CASC17 and UQCC1) and two intergenic SNPs near to LY86 and FGF10. Expression quantitative trait loci analyses found evidence for regulation of gene expression at three signals and implicated several genes, including TYRO3 and PLAU. Conclusions: Further interrogation of these loci could provide greater understanding of the determinants of lung function and pulmonary disease.

8.
Addict Biol ; 2018 Mar 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29532581

RESUMO

The heritability of nicotine dependence based on family studies is substantial. Nevertheless, knowledge of the underlying genetic architecture remains meager. Our aim was to identify novel genetic variants responsible for interindividual differences in smoking behavior. We performed a genome-wide association study on 1715 ever smokers ascertained from the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort enriched for heavy smoking. Data imputation used the 1000 Genomes Phase I reference panel together with a whole genome sequence-based Finnish reference panel. We analyzed three measures of nicotine addiction-smoking quantity, nicotine dependence and nicotine withdrawal. We annotated all genome-wide significant SNPs for their functional potential. First, we detected genome-wide significant association on 16p12 with smoking quantity (P = 8.5 × 10-9 ), near CLEC19A. The lead-SNP stands 22 kb from a binding site for NF-κB transcription factors, which play a role in the neurotrophin signaling pathway. However, the signal was not replicated in an independent Finnish population-based sample, FINRISK (n = 6763). Second, nicotine withdrawal showed association on 2q21 in an intron of TMEM163 (P = 2.1 × 10-9 ), and on 11p15 (P = 6.6 × 10-8 ) in an intron of AP2A2, and P = 4.2 × 10-7 for a missense variant in MUC6, both involved in the neurotrophin signaling pathway). Third, association was detected on 3p22.3 for maximum number of cigarettes smoked per day (P = 3.1 × 10-8 ) near STAC. Associating CLEC19A and TMEM163 SNPs were annotated to influence gene expression or methylation. The neurotrophin signaling pathway has previously been associated with smoking behavior. Our findings further support the role in nicotine addiction.

9.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res ; 42(3): 520-530, 2018 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29405378

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite consistent evidence of the heritability of alcohol use disorders (AUDs), few specific genes with an etiological role have been identified. It is likely that AUDs are highly polygenic; however, the etiological pathways and genetic variants involved may differ between populations. The aim of this study was thus to evaluate whether aggregate genetic risk for AUDs differed between clinically ascertained and population-based epidemiological samples. METHODS: Four independent samples were obtained: 2 from unselected birth cohorts (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children [ALSPAC], N = 4,304; FinnTwin12 [FT12], N = 1,135) and 2 from families densely affected with AUDs, identified from treatment-seeking patients (Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism, N = 2,097; Irish Affected Sib Pair Study of Alcohol Dependence, N = 706). AUD symptoms were assessed with clinical interviews, and participants of European ancestry were genotyped. Genomewide association was conducted separately in each sample, and the resulting association weights were used to create polygenic risk scores in each of the other samples (12 total discovery-validation pairs), and from meta-analyses within sample type. We then tested how well these aggregate genetic scores predicted AUD outcomes within and across sample types. RESULTS: Polygenic scores derived from 1 population-based sample (ALSPAC) significantly predicted AUD symptoms in another population-based sample (FT12), but not in either clinically ascertained sample. Trend-level associations (uncorrected p < 0.05) were found for polygenic score predictions within sample types but no or negative predictions across sample types. Polygenic scores accounted for 0 to 1% of the variance in AUD symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Though preliminary, these results provide suggestive evidence of differences in the genetic etiology of AUDs based on sample characteristics such as treatment-seeking status, which may index other important clinical or demographic factors that moderate genetic influences. Although the variance accounted for by genomewide polygenic scores remains low, future studies could improve gene identification efforts by amassing very large samples, or reducing genetic heterogeneity by informing analyses with other phenotypic information such as sample characteristics. Multiple complementary approaches may be needed to make progress in gene identification for this complex disorder.

10.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 113(50): 14372-14377, 2016 12 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27911795

RESUMO

Excessive alcohol consumption is a major public health problem worldwide. Although drinking habits are known to be inherited, few genes have been identified that are robustly linked to alcohol drinking. We conducted a genome-wide association metaanalysis and replication study among >105,000 individuals of European ancestry and identified ß-Klotho (KLB) as a locus associated with alcohol consumption (rs11940694; P = 9.2 × 10-12). ß-Klotho is an obligate coreceptor for the hormone FGF21, which is secreted from the liver and implicated in macronutrient preference in humans. We show that brain-specific ß-Klotho KO mice have an increased alcohol preference and that FGF21 inhibits alcohol drinking by acting on the brain. These data suggest that a liver-brain endocrine axis may play an important role in the regulation of alcohol drinking behavior and provide a unique pharmacologic target for reducing alcohol consumption.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/genética , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/fisiopatologia , Fatores de Crescimento de Fibroblastos/fisiologia , Proteínas de Membrana/genética , Animais , Comportamento Animal/fisiologia , Encéfalo/fisiopatologia , Emoções/fisiologia , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Fígado/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Proteínas de Membrana/deficiência , Proteínas de Membrana/fisiologia , Camundongos , Camundongos da Linhagem 129 , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Camundongos Knockout , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
11.
Brain Behav ; 6(5): e00462, 2016 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27134767

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Various pivotal stages in smoking behavior can be identified, including initiation, conversion from experimenting to established use, development of tolerance, and cessation. Previous studies have shown high heritability for age of smoking initiation and cessation; however, time-to-event genome-wide association studies aiming to identify underpinning genes that accelerate or delay these transitions are missing to date. METHODS: We investigated which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the whole genome contribute to the hazard ratio of transition between different stages of smoking behavior by performing time-to-event analyses within a large Finnish twin family cohort (N = 1962), and further conducted mediation analyses of plausible intermediate traits for significant SNPs. RESULTS: Genome-wide significant signals were detected for three of the four transitions: (1) for smoking cessation on 10p14 (P = 4.47e-08 for rs72779075 flanked by RP11-575N15 and GATA3), (2) for tolerance on 11p13 (P = 1.29e-08 for rs11031684 in RP1-65P5.1), mediated by smoking quantity, and on 9q34.12 (P = 3.81e-08 for rs2304808 in FUBP3), independent of smoking quantity, and (3) for smoking initiation on 19q13.33 (P = 3.37e-08 for rs73050610 flanked by TRPM4 and SLC6A16) in analysis adjusted for first time sensations. Although our top SNPs did not replicate, another SNP in the TRPM4-SLC6A16 gene region showed statistically significant association after region-based multiple testing correction in an independent Australian twin family sample. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the functional effect of the TRPM4-SLC6A16 gene region deserves further investigation, and that complex neurotransmitter networks including dopamine and glutamate may play a critical role in smoking initiation. Moreover, comparison of these results implies that genetic contributions to the complex smoking behavioral phenotypes vary among the transitions.


Assuntos
Progressão da Doença , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Fumar/genética , Idoso , Austrália , Feminino , Finlândia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Linhagem , Proteínas da Membrana Plasmática de Transporte de Neurotransmissores/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Canais de Cátion TRPM/genética
12.
Sci Rep ; 6: 20092, 2016 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26833182

RESUMO

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of complex behavioural phenotypes such as cigarette smoking typically employ self-report phenotypes. However, precise biomarker phenotypes may afford greater statistical power and identify novel variants. Here we report the results of a GWAS meta-analysis of levels of cotinine, the primary metabolite of nicotine, in 4,548 daily smokers of European ancestry. We identified a locus close to UGT2B10 at 4q13.2 (minimum p = 5.89 × 10(-10) for rs114612145), which was consequently replicated. This variant is in high linkage disequilibrium with a known functional variant in the UGT2B10 gene which is associated with reduced nicotine and cotinine glucuronidation activity, but intriguingly is not associated with nicotine intake. Additionally, we observed association between multiple variants within the 15q25.1 region and cotinine levels, all located within the CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene cluster or adjacent genes, consistent with previous much larger GWAS using self-report measures of smoking quantity. These results clearly illustrate the increase in power afforded by using precise biomarker measures in GWAS. Perhaps more importantly however, they also highlight that biomarkers do not always mark the phenotype of interest. The use of metabolite data as a proxy for environmental exposures should be carefully considered in the context of individual differences in metabolic pathways.


Assuntos
Cromossomos Humanos Par 4/genética , Cotinina , Loci Gênicos , Desequilíbrio de Ligação , Fumar/genética , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Glucuronosiltransferase/genética , Humanos , Masculino
13.
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet ; 171(5): 697-707, 2016 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26786601

RESUMO

The genetic and environmental contributions to the variation and longitudinal stability in childhood aggressive behavior were assessed in two large twin cohorts, the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR), and the Twins Early Development Study (TEDS; United Kingdom). In NTR, maternal ratings on aggression from the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) were available for 10,765 twin pairs at age 7, for 8,557 twin pairs at age 9/10, and for 7,176 twin pairs at age 12. In TEDS, parental ratings of conduct disorder from the Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire (SDQ) were available for 6,897 twin pairs at age 7, for 3,028 twin pairs at age 9 and for 5,716 twin pairs at age 12. In both studies, stability and heritability of aggressive behavioral problems was high. Heritability was on average somewhat, but significantly, lower in TEDS (around 60%) than in NTR (between 50% and 80%) and sex differences were slightly larger in the NTR sample. In both studies, the influence of shared environment was similar: in boys shared environment explained around 20% of the variation in aggression across all ages while in girls its influence was absent around age 7 and only came into play at later ages. Longitudinal genetic correlations were the main reason for stability of aggressive behavior. Individual differences in CBCL-Aggressive Behavior and SDQ-Conduct disorder throughout childhood are driven by a comparable but significantly different genetic architecture. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Assuntos
Agressão/fisiologia , Agressão/psicologia , Doenças em Gêmeos/genética , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Criança , Doenças em Gêmeos/psicologia , Meio Ambiente , Feminino , Interação Gene-Ambiente , Estudos de Associação Genética/métodos , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Países Baixos , Pais , Inventário de Personalidade , Fatores Sexuais , Reino Unido
14.
Int Rev Neurobiol ; 124: 113-31, 2015.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26472527

RESUMO

Smoking is currently the leading cause of preventable death in the United States and is responsible for over four million deaths annually worldwide. Therefore, there is a vast clinical unmet need with regards to therapeutics targeting smoking cessation. This is even more apparent when examining smokers co-morbid with psychiatric illness, as rates of smoking in this population are ~4× higher than in the general population. Examining common genetic and molecular signaling pathways impinging upon both smoking behavior and psychiatric illness will lead to a better understanding of co-morbid disorders and potential development of novel therapeutics. Studies have implicated the Neuregulin Signaling Pathway in the pathophysiology of a number of psychiatric illnesses. Additionally, recent studies have also shown an association between the Neuregulin Signaling Pathway and smoking behaviors. This review outlines basic mechanisms of the Neuregulin Signaling Pathway and how it may be exploited for precision medicine approaches in treating nicotine dependence and mental illness.


Assuntos
Neurregulinas/metabolismo , Transdução de Sinais/fisiologia , Tabagismo/epidemiologia , Tabagismo/metabolismo , Animais , Comorbidade , Humanos , Transtornos do Humor/epidemiologia , Mutação/genética , Neurregulinas/genética , Esquizofrenia/epidemiologia , Transdução de Sinais/genética , Tabagismo/genética
15.
PLoS Genet ; 11(9): e1005498, 2015.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26407342

RESUMO

Individuals with fast nicotine metabolism typically smoke more and thus have a greater risk for smoking-induced diseases. Further, the efficacy of smoking cessation pharmacotherapy is dependent on the rate of nicotine metabolism. Our objective was to use nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR), an established biomarker of nicotine metabolism rate, in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify novel genetic variants influencing nicotine metabolism. A heritability estimate of 0.81 (95% CI 0.70-0.88) was obtained for NMR using monozygotic and dizygotic twins of the FinnTwin cohort. We performed a GWAS in cotinine-verified current smokers of three Finnish cohorts (FinnTwin, Young Finns Study, FINRISK2007), followed by a meta-analysis of 1518 subjects, and annotated the genome-wide significant SNPs with methylation quantitative loci (meQTL) analyses. We detected association on 19q13 with 719 SNPs exceeding genome-wide significance within a 4.2 Mb region. The strongest evidence for association emerged for CYP2A6 (min p = 5.77E-86, in intron 4), the main metabolic enzyme for nicotine. Other interesting genes with genome-wide significant signals included CYP2B6, CYP2A7, EGLN2, and NUMBL. Conditional analyses revealed three independent signals on 19q13, all located within or in the immediate vicinity of CYP2A6. A genetic risk score constructed using the independent signals showed association with smoking quantity (p = 0.0019) in two independent Finnish samples. Our meQTL results showed that methylation values of 16 CpG sites within the region are affected by genotypes of the genome-wide significant SNPs, and according to causal inference test, for some of the SNPs the effect on NMR is mediated through methylation. To our knowledge, this is the first GWAS on NMR. Our results enclose three independent novel signals on 19q13.2. The detected CYP2A6 variants explain a strikingly large fraction of variance (up to 31%) in NMR in these study samples. Further, we provide evidence for plausible epigenetic mechanisms influencing NMR.


Assuntos
Citocromo P-450 CYP2A6/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Nicotina/genética , Tabagismo/genética , Epigênese Genética , Feminino , Genótipo , Humanos , Masculino , Nicotina/metabolismo , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Fumar/genética , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar , Tabagismo/tratamento farmacológico , Tabagismo/patologia , Gêmeos Dizigóticos
16.
Hum Mol Genet ; 24(19): 5655-64, 2015 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26188009

RESUMO

Hearing loss and individual differences in normal hearing both have a substantial genetic basis. Although many new genes contributing to deafness have been identified, very little is known about genes/variants modulating the normal range of hearing ability. To fill this gap, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis on hearing thresholds (tested at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 kHz) and on pure-tone averages (low-, medium- and high-frequency thresholds grouped) in several isolated populations from Italy and Central Asia (total N = 2636). Here, we detected two genome-wide significant loci close to PCDH20 and SLC28A3 (top hits: rs78043697, P = 4.71E-10 and rs7032430, P = 2.39E-09, respectively). For both loci, we sought replication in two independent cohorts: B58C from the UK (N = 5892) and FITSA from Finland (N = 270). Both loci were successfully replicated at a nominal level of significance (P < 0.05). In order to confirm our quantitative findings, we carried out RT-PCR and reported RNA-Seq data, which showed that both genes are expressed in mouse inner ear, especially in hair cells, further suggesting them as good candidates for modulatory genes in the auditory system. Sequencing data revealed no functional variants in the coding region of PCDH20 or SLC28A3, suggesting that variation in regulatory sequences may affect expression. Overall, these results contribute to a better understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying human hearing function.


Assuntos
Caderinas/genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla/métodos , Audição/fisiologia , Proteínas de Membrana Transportadoras/genética , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Animais , Ásia Central , Caderinas/metabolismo , Surdez/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Células Ciliadas Auditivas Internas/metabolismo , Audição/genética , Humanos , Itália , Proteínas de Membrana Transportadoras/metabolismo , Camundongos , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/metabolismo , Análise de Sequência de RNA/métodos
17.
BMJ Open ; 4(10): e006141, 2014 Oct 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25293386

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether associations of smoking with depression and anxiety are likely to be causal, using a Mendelian randomisation approach. DESIGN: Mendelian randomisation meta-analyses using a genetic variant (rs16969968/rs1051730) as a proxy for smoking heaviness, and observational meta-analyses of the associations of smoking status and smoking heaviness with depression, anxiety and psychological distress. PARTICIPANTS: Current, former and never smokers of European ancestry aged ≥16 years from 25 studies in the Consortium for Causal Analysis Research in Tobacco and Alcohol (CARTA). PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Binary definitions of depression, anxiety and psychological distress assessed by clinical interview, symptom scales or self-reported recall of clinician diagnosis. RESULTS: The analytic sample included up to 58 176 never smokers, 37 428 former smokers and 32 028 current smokers (total N=127 632). In observational analyses, current smokers had 1.85 times greater odds of depression (95% CI 1.65 to 2.07), 1.71 times greater odds of anxiety (95% CI 1.54 to 1.90) and 1.69 times greater odds of psychological distress (95% CI 1.56 to 1.83) than never smokers. Former smokers also had greater odds of depression, anxiety and psychological distress than never smokers. There was evidence for positive associations of smoking heaviness with depression, anxiety and psychological distress (ORs per cigarette per day: 1.03 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.04), 1.03 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.04) and 1.02 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.03) respectively). In Mendelian randomisation analyses, there was no strong evidence that the minor allele of rs16969968/rs1051730 was associated with depression (OR=1.00, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.05), anxiety (OR=1.02, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.07) or psychological distress (OR=1.02, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.06) in current smokers. Results were similar for former smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from Mendelian randomisation analyses do not support a causal role of smoking heaviness in the development of depression and anxiety.


Assuntos
Transtornos de Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Transtorno Depressivo/epidemiologia , Fumar/epidemiologia , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Causalidade , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Receptores Nicotínicos/genética , Fumar/genética , Adulto Jovem
18.
PLoS One ; 9(6): e98199, 2014.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24927283

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The aims of this study were to analyze associations of dopamine receptor genes (DRD1-5) with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and nicotine dependence (ND), and to investigate whether ND moderates genetic influences on MDD. METHODS: The sample was ascertained from the Finnish Twin Cohort. Twin pairs concordant for smoking history were recruited along with their family members, as part of the multisite Nicotine Addiction Genetics consortium. Genetic association analyses were based on 1428 adults. Total of 70 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms within the dopamine receptor genes were genotyped and analyzed for association with MDD, ND, and MD-ND co-morbidity. Individual level logistic regression analyses were based on 1296 adults with data on ND and MDD diagnoses, as well as on dopamine receptor genotypes adjusted for sex, age, and alcohol use. Four independent samples, such as population-based and case-control samples, were used for replication. RESULTS: Rs2399496, located 1.5 kb downstream of DRD3, showed suggestive association for MDD (p = 0.00076) and significant association for MDD-ND co-morbidity (p = 0.000079). Suggestive gene-(rs2399496) by-ND-interaction justified analyses by genetic risk variant and ND status. Individuals with ND and two minor alleles (AA) of rs2399496 had almost six-fold risk for MDD (OR 5.74, 95%CI 3.12-10.5, p = 9.010e-09) compared to individuals without ND and with two major alleles (TT). CONCLUSIONS: Significant association between a variant downstream of DRD3 and a co-morbid MDD-ND phenotype was detected. Our results further suggest that nicotine dependence may potentiate the influence of the DRD3 genetic variant on MDD.


Assuntos
Transtorno Depressivo Maior/epidemiologia , Transtorno Depressivo Maior/genética , Receptores de Dopamina D3/genética , Tabagismo/epidemiologia , Tabagismo/genética , Adulto , Alcoolismo/genética , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Estudos de Coortes , Comorbidade , Finlândia , Estudos de Associação Genética , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Gêmeos
19.
Genes (Basel) ; 5(2): 330-46, 2014 Apr 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24727307

RESUMO

Alcohol problems represent a classic example of a complex behavioral outcome that is likely influenced by many genes of small effect. A polygenic approach, which examines aggregate measured genetic effects, can have predictive power in cases where individual genes or genetic variants do not. In the current study, we first tested whether polygenic risk for alcohol problems-derived from genome-wide association estimates of an alcohol problems factor score from the age 18 assessment of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC; n = 4304 individuals of European descent; 57% female)-predicted alcohol problems earlier in development (age 14) in an independent sample (FinnTwin12; n = 1162; 53% female). We then tested whether environmental factors (parental knowledge and peer deviance) moderated polygenic risk to predict alcohol problems in the FinnTwin12 sample. We found evidence for both polygenic association and for additive polygene-environment interaction. Higher polygenic scores predicted a greater number of alcohol problems (range of Pearson partial correlations 0.07-0.08, all p-values ≤ 0.01). Moreover, genetic influences were significantly more pronounced under conditions of low parental knowledge or high peer deviance (unstandardized regression coefficients (b), p-values (p), and percent of variance (R2) accounted for by interaction terms: b = 1.54, p = 0.02, R2 = 0.33%; b = 0.94, p = 0.04, R2 = 0.30%, respectively). Supplementary set-based analyses indicated that the individual top single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contributing to the polygenic scores were not individually enriched for gene-environment interaction. Although the magnitude of the observed effects are small, this study illustrates the usefulness of polygenic approaches for understanding the pathways by which measured genetic predispositions come together with environmental factors to predict complex behavioral outcomes.

20.
Curr Addict Rep ; 1(1): 75-82, 2014 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24778978

RESUMO

Regular smoking is the major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and cancers, and thus is one of the most preventable causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Intake of nicotine, its central nervous system effects, and its metabolism are regulated by biological pathways; some of these are well known, but others are not. Genetic studies offer a method for developing insights into the genes contributing to those pathways. In recent years, large genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses have consistently revealed that the strongest genetic contribution to smoking-related traits comes from variation in the nicotinic receptor subunit genes. Many other genes, including those coding for enzymes involved in nicotine metabolism, also have been implicated. However, the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by the identified genetic variants is very modest. This review intends to cover progress made in genetics and genetic epidemiology of smoking behavior in recent years, and focuses on studies revealing the nicotinic receptor gene cluster on chromosome 15q25. Evidence supporting the involvement of a novel pathway in the shared pathophysiology of nicotine dependence and schizophrenia is also briefly reviewed. A summary of the current knowledge on gene-environment interactions involved in smoking behavior is included.

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