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1.
Br J Cancer ; 121(1): 15-21, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30971774

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation face high risks of breast and ovarian cancer. In the current study, we report on uptake of cancer screening and risk-reduction options in a cohort of BRCA mutation carriers from ten countries over two time periods (1995 to 2008 and 2009 to 2017). METHODS: Eligible subjects were identified from an international database of female BRCA mutation carriers and included women from 59 centres from ten countries. Subjects completed a questionnaire at the time of genetic testing, which included past use of cancer prevention options and screening tests. Biennial follow-up questionnaires were administered. RESULTS: Six-thousand two-hundred and twenty-three women were followed for a mean of 7.5 years. The mean age at last follow-up was 52.1 years (27-96 years) and 42.3% of the women had a prior diagnosis of breast cancer. In all, 27.8% had a prophylactic bilateral mastectomy and  64.7% had a BSO. Screening with breast MRI increased from 70% before 2009 to 81% at or after 2009. There were significant differences in uptake of all options by country. CONCLUSION: For women who received genetic testing more recently, uptake of prophylactic mastectomy and breast MRI is significantly higher than those who received genetic testing more than 10 years ago. However, uptake of both BSO and breast MRI is not optimal, and interventions to increase uptake are needed.

2.
Genet Med ; 21(10): 2390-2400, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30918358

RESUMO

PURPOSE: There are no internationally agreed upon clinical guidelines as to which women with gynecological cancer would benefit from Lynch syndrome screening or how best to manage the risk of gynecological cancer in women with Lynch syndrome. The Manchester International Consensus Group was convened in April 2017 to address this unmet need. The aim of the Group was to develop clear and comprehensive clinical guidance regarding the management of the gynecological sequelae of Lynch syndrome based on existing evidence and expert opinion from medical professionals and patients. METHODS: Stakeholders from Europe and North America worked together over a two-day workshop to achieve consensus on best practice. RESULTS: Guidance was developed in four key areas: (1) whether women with gynecological cancer should be screened for Lynch syndrome and (2) how this should be done, (3) whether there was a role for gynecological surveillance in women at risk of Lynch syndrome, and (4) what preventive measures should be recommended for women with Lynch syndrome to reduce their risk of gynecological cancer. CONCLUSION: This document provides comprehensive clinical guidance that can be referenced by both patients and clinicians so that women with Lynch syndrome can expect and receive appropriate standards of care.

3.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 28(6): 1010-1014, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30824524

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: PMS2-associated Lynch syndrome is characterized by a relatively low colorectal cancer penetrance compared with other Lynch syndromes. However, age at colorectal cancer diagnosis varies widely, and a strong genetic anticipation effect has been suggested for PMS2 families. In this study, we examined proposed genetic anticipation in a sample of 152 European PMS2 families. METHODS: The 152 families (637 family members) that were eligible for analysis were mainly clinically ascertained via clinical genetics centers. We used weighted Cox-type random effects model, adjusted by birth cohort and sex, to estimate the generational effect on the age of onset of colorectal cancer. Probands and young birth cohorts were excluded from the analyses. Weights represented mutation probabilities based on kinship coefficients, thus avoiding testing bias. RESULTS: Family data across three generations, including 123 colorectal cancers, were analyzed. When compared with the first generation, the crude HR for anticipation was 2.242 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.162-4.328] for the second generation and 2.644 (95% CI, 1.082-6.464) for the third generation. However, after correction for birth cohort and sex, the effect vanished [HR = 1.302 (95% CI, 0.648-2.619) and HR = 1.074 (95% CI, 0.406-2.842) for second and third generations, respectively]. CONCLUSIONS: Our study did not confirm previous reports of genetic anticipation in PMS2-associated Lynch syndrome. Birth-cohort effect seems the most likely explanation for observed younger colorectal cancer diagnosis in subsequent generations, particularly because there is currently no commonly accepted biological mechanism that could explain genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome. IMPACT: This new model for studying genetic anticipation provides a standard for rigorous analysis of families with dominantly inherited cancer predisposition.

4.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 175(2): 443-449, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30756284

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Following a diagnosis of breast cancer, BRCA mutation carriers face an increased risk of developing a second (contralateral) cancer in the unaffected breast. It is important to identify predictors of contralateral cancer in order to make informed decisions about bilateral mastectomy. The impact of bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (i.e., oophorectomy) on the risk of developing contralateral breast cancer is unclear. Thus, we conducted a prospective study of the relationship between oophorectomy and the risk of contralateral breast cancer in 1781 BRCA1 and 503 BRCA2 mutation carriers with breast cancer. METHODS: Women were followed from the date of diagnosis of their first breast cancer until the date of diagnosis of a contralateral breast cancer, bilateral mastectomy, date of death, or date of last follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of contralateral breast cancer associated with oophorectomy. Oophorectomy was included as a time-dependent covariate. We performed a left-censored analysis for those women who reported a primary breast cancer prior to study entry (i.e., from completion of baseline questionnaire). RESULTS: After an average of 9.8 years of follow-up, there were 179 (7.8%) contralateral breast cancers diagnosed. Oophorectomy was not associated with the risk of developing a second breast cancer (HR 0.92; 95% CI 0.68-1.25). The relationship did not vary by BRCA mutation type or by age at diagnosis of the first breast cancer. There was some evidence for a decreased risk of contralateral breast cancer among women with an ER-positive primary breast cancer, but this was based on a small number of events (n = 240). CONCLUSION: Overall, our findings suggest that oophorectomy has little impact on the risk of contralateral breast cancer.

5.
J Clin Oncol ; 36(29): 2961-2968, 2018 Oct 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30161022

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Lynch syndrome due to pathogenic variants in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 is predominantly associated with colorectal and endometrial cancer, although extracolonic cancers have been described within the Lynch tumor spectrum. However, the age-specific cumulative risk (penetrance) of these cancers is still poorly defined for PMS2-associated Lynch syndrome. Using a large data set from a worldwide collaboration, our aim was to determine accurate penetrance measures of cancers for carriers of heterozygous pathogenic PMS2 variants. METHODS: A modified segregation analysis was conducted that incorporated both genotyped and nongenotyped relatives, with conditioning for ascertainment to estimates corrected for bias. Hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% CIs were estimated for each cancer site for mutation carriers compared with the general population, followed by estimation of penetrance. RESULTS: In total, 284 families consisting of 4,878 first- and second-degree family members were included in the analysis. PMS2 mutation carriers were at increased risk for colorectal cancer (cumulative risk to age 80 years of 13% [95% CI, 7.9% to 22%] for males and 12% [95% CI, 6.7% to 21%] for females) and endometrial cancer (13% [95% CI, 7.0%-24%]), compared with the general population (6.6%, 4.7%, and 2.4%, respectively). There was no clear evidence of an increased risk of ovarian, gastric, hepatobiliary, bladder, renal, brain, breast, prostate, or small bowel cancer. CONCLUSION: Heterozygous PMS2 mutation carriers were at small increased risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer but not for any other Lynch syndrome-associated cancer. This finding justifies that PMS2-specific screening protocols could be restricted to colonoscopies. The role of risk-reducing hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for PMS2 mutation carriers needs further discussion.

6.
Science ; 360(6392): 1028-1032, 2018 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29853688

RESUMO

Opportunities to directly study the founding of a human population and its subsequent evolutionary history are rare. Using genome sequence data from 27 ancient Icelanders, we demonstrate that they are a combination of Norse, Gaelic, and admixed individuals. We further show that these ancient Icelanders are markedly more similar to their source populations in Scandinavia and the British-Irish Isles than to contemporary Icelanders, who have been shaped by 1100 years of extensive genetic drift. Finally, we report evidence of unequal contributions from the ancient founders to the contemporary Icelandic gene pool. These results provide detailed insights into the making of a human population that has proven extraordinarily useful for the discovery of genotype-phenotype associations.


Assuntos
Evolução Biológica , Deriva Genética , Genoma Humano , População/genética , DNA Antigo , Feminino , Efeito Fundador , Pool Gênico , Genótipo , Humanos , Islândia , Masculino , Fenótipo
7.
JAMA Oncol ; 4(8): 1059-1065, 2018 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29710224

RESUMO

Importance: Prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is recommended for BRCA1 mutation carriers to prevent ovarian cancer. Whether or not hormone replacement therapy (HRT) initiated after oophorectomy is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer has not been evaluated in a prospective study. Objective: To determine the association between HRT use and BRCA1-associated breast cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective, longitudinal cohort study of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 80 participating centers in 17 countries was conducted between 1995 and 2017 with a mean follow-up of 7.6 years. Participants had sought genetic testing for a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation because of a personal or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Carriers of BRCA1 mutation with no personal medical history of cancer who underwent bilateral oophorectomy following enrollment were eligible for the cohort study. Exposures: A follow-up questionnaire was administered every 2 years to obtain detailed information on HRT use. A left-truncated Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs associated with the initiation of HRT use postoophorectomy. Main Outcomes and Measures: Incident breast cancer. Results: A total of 872 BRCA1 mutation carriers with a mean postoophorectomy follow-up period of 7.6 years (range, 0.4-22.1) were included in this study. Mean (SD) age of participants was 43.4 (8.5) years. Among these, 92 (10.6%) incident breast cancers were diagnosed. Overall, HRT use after oophorectomy was not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. The HR was 0.97 (95% CI, 0.62-1.52; P = .89) for ever use of any type of HRT vs no use; however, the effects of estrogen alone and combination hormonal therapy were different. After 10 years of follow-up, the cumulative incidence of breast cancer among women who used estrogen-alone HRT was 12% compared with 22% among women who used estrogen plus progesterone HRT (absolute difference, 10%; log rank P = .04). Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that use of estrogen after oophorectomy does not increase the risk of breast cancer among women with a BRCA1 mutation and should reassure BRCA1 mutation carriers considering preventive surgery that HRT is safe. The possible adverse effect of progesterone-containing HRT warrants further study.

8.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29745381

RESUMO

[This retracts the article DOI: 10.1186/s13053-017-0080-y.].

9.
Gynecol Oncol ; 150(1): 85-91, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29793803

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: For women at high risk of developing ovarian cancer, it is important to provide an accurate recommendation for the optimal age for preventive surgery in order to maximize the preventative effect while delaying symptoms associated with early surgical menopause. The goal of the current study was to estimate age-specific incidence rates of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. METHODS: From our international registry, we identified 5689 women with no previous diagnosis of ovarian or fallopian tube cancer or preventive oophorectomy. Women were followed from the date of completion of the baseline questionnaire until either a diagnosis of ovarian or fallopian tube cancer, prophylactic oophorectomy, death or last follow-up. The annual and cumulative incidence rates of ovarian cancer were estimated. RESULTS: Over a mean follow-up period of 4.7 years (ranges 0-22.6), 195 incident ovarian or fallopian tube cancers were diagnosed (169 [86%] ovarian cancers, 22 [11%] fallopian tube cancers and four [2%] cancers that involved both the ovaries and fallopian tubes). Of these, 45 (23%) cancers were diagnosed at preventive surgery (occult cancers). The cumulative risk of ovarian cancer to age 80 was 49% for BRCA1 and 21% for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The mean age at diagnosis was 51.3 years (ranges 33-84) among women with a BRCA1 mutation and 61.4 years (ranges 44-80) among women with a BRCA2 mutation. CONCLUSION: Based on a cumulative risk of 0.55% to age 35 for BRCA1 mutation carriers and of 0.56% to age 45 for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we recommend bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy before age 40, but ideally by age 35, for women with a BRCA1 mutation and by age 45 for those with a BRCA2 mutation to maximize prevention and to minimize adverse effects.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Proteína BRCA2/genética , Mutação , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Proteína BRCA1/metabolismo , Proteína BRCA2/metabolismo , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias Ovarianas/patologia , Neoplasias Ovarianas/cirurgia , Adulto Jovem
10.
Int J Epidemiol ; 2018 Mar 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29547931

RESUMO

Background: Although evidence suggests that larger body size in early life confers lifelong protection from developing breast cancer, few studies have investigated the relationship between body size and breast cancer risk among BRCA mutation carriers. Therefore, we conducted a prospective evaluation of body size and the risk of breast cancer among BRCA mutation carriers. Methods: Current height and body mass index (BMI) at age 18 were determined from baseline questionnaires. Current BMI and weight change since age 18 were calculated from updated biennial follow-up questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: Among 3734 BRCA mutation carriers, there were 338 incident breast cancers over a mean follow-up of 5.5 years. There was no association between height, current BMI or weight change and breast cancer risk. Women with BMI at age 18 ≥22.1 kg/m2 had a decreased risk of developing post-menopausal breast cancer compared with women with a BMI at age 18 between 18.8 and 20.3 kg/m2 (HR 0.49; 95% CI 0.30-0.82; P = 0.006). BMI at age 18 was not associated with risk of pre-menopausal breast cancer. Conclusions: There was no observed association between height, current BMI and weight change and risk of breast cancer. The inverse relationship between greater BMI at age 18 and post-menopausal breast cancer further supports a role of early rather than current or adulthood exposures for BRCA-associated breast cancer development. Future studies with longer follow-up and additional measures of adiposity are necessary to confirm these findings.

11.
BMC Med Genet ; 19(1): 26, 2018 02 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29458332

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The genetic mechanisms for families who meet the clinical criteria for Lynch syndrome (LS) but do not carry pathogenic variants in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes are still undetermined. We aimed to study the potential contribution of genes other than MMR genes to the biological and clinical characteristics of Norwegian families fulfilling Amsterdam (AMS) criteria or revised Bethesda guidelines. METHODS: The Hereditary Cancer Biobank of the Norwegian Radium Hospital was interrogated to identify individuals with a high risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) for whom no pathogenic variants in MMR genes had been found in routine diagnostic DNA sequencing. Forty-four cancer susceptibility genes were selected and analyzed by using our in-house designed TruSeq amplicon-based assay for targeted sequencing. RNA splicing- and protein-dedicated in silico analyses were performed for all variants of unknown significance (VUS). Variants predicted as likely to affect splicing were experimentally analyzed by resorting to minigene assays. RESULTS: We identified a patient who met the revised Bethesda guidelines and carried a likely pathogenic variant in CHEK2 (c.470 T > C, p.I157T). In addition, 25 unique VUS were identified in 18 individuals, of which 2 exonic variants (MAP3K1 c.764A > G and NOTCH3 c.5854G >A) were analyzed in the minigene splicing assay and found not to have an effect on RNA splicing. CONCLUSIONS: Among high-risk CRC patients that fulfill the AMS criteria or revised Bethesda guidelines, targeted gene sequencing identified likely pathogenic variant and VUS in other genes than the MMR genes (CHEK2, NOTCH3 and MAP3K1). Our study suggests that the analysis of genes currently excluded from routine molecular diagnostic screens may confer cancer susceptibility.

12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29371908

RESUMO

Background: In kindreds carrying path_BRCA1/2 variants, some women in these families will develop cancer despite testing negative for the family's pathogenic variant. These families may have additional genetic variants, which not only may increase the susceptibility of the families' path_BRCA1/2, but also be capable of causing cancer in the absence of the path_BRCA1/2 variants. We aimed to identify novel genetic variants in prospectively detected breast cancer (BC) or gynecological cancer cases tested negative for their families' pathogenic BRCA1/2 variant (path_BRCA1 or path_BRCA2). Methods: Women with BC or gynecological cancer who had tested negative for path_BRCA1 or path_BRCA2 variants were included. Forty-four cancer susceptibility genes were screened for genetic variation through a targeted amplicon-based sequencing assay. Protein- and RNA splicing-dedicated in silico analyses were performed for all variants of unknown significance (VUS). Variants predicted as the ones most likely affecting pre-mRNA splicing were experimentally analyzed in a minigene assay. Results: We identified 48 women who were tested negative for their family's path_BRCA1 (n = 13) or path_BRCA2 (n = 35) variants. Pathogenic variants in the ATM, BRCA2, MSH6 and MUTYH genes were found in 10% (5/48) of the cases, of whom 15% (2/13) were from path_BRCA1 and 9% (3/35) from path_BRCA2 families. Out of the 26 unique VUS, 3 (12%) were predicted to affect RNA splicing (APC c.721G > A, MAP3K1 c.764A > G and MSH2 c.815C > T). However, by using a minigene, assay we here show that APC c.721G > A does not cause a splicing defect, similarly to what has been recently reported for the MAP3K1 c.764A > G. The MSH2 c.815C > T was previously described as causing partial exon skipping and it was identified in this work together with the path_BRCA2 c.9382C > T (p.R3128X). Conclusion: All women in breast or breast/ovarian cancer kindreds would benefit from being offered genetic testing irrespective of which causative genetic variants have been demonstrated in their relatives.

13.
Gut ; 67(7): 1306-1316, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28754778

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Most patients with path_MMR gene variants (Lynch syndrome (LS)) now survive both their first and subsequent cancers, resulting in a growing number of older patients with LS for whom limited information exists with respect to cancer risk and survival. OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: This observational, international, multicentre study aimed to determine prospectively observed incidences of cancers and survival in path_MMR carriers up to 75 years of age. RESULTS: 3119 patients were followed for a total of 24 475 years. Cumulative incidences at 75 years (risks) for colorectal cancer were 46%, 43% and 15% in path_MLH1, path_MSH2 and path_MSH6 carriers; for endometrial cancer 43%, 57% and 46%; for ovarian cancer 10%, 17% and 13%; for upper gastrointestinal (gastric, duodenal, bile duct or pancreatic) cancers 21%, 10% and 7%; for urinary tract cancers 8%, 25% and 11%; for prostate cancer 17%, 32% and 18%; and for brain tumours 1%, 5% and 1%, respectively. Ovarian cancer occurred mainly premenopausally. By contrast, upper gastrointestinal, urinary tract and prostate cancers occurred predominantly at older ages. Overall 5-year survival for prostate cancer was 100%, urinary bladder 93%, ureter 85%, duodenum 67%, stomach 61%, bile duct 29%, brain 22% and pancreas 0%. Path_PMS2 carriers had lower risk for cancer. CONCLUSION: Carriers of different path_MMR variants exhibit distinct patterns of cancer risk and survival as they age. Risk estimates for counselling and planning of surveillance and treatment should be tailored to each patient's age, gender and path_MMR variant. We have updated our open-access website www.lscarisk.org to facilitate this.


Assuntos
Neoplasias do Colo/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/complicações , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/mortalidade , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Urogenitais/epidemiologia , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/patologia , Bases de Dados Factuais , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Estudos Prospectivos
14.
Fam Cancer ; 17(1): 141-153, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28608266

RESUMO

To study the potential contribution of genes other than BRCA1/2, PTEN, and TP53 to the biological and clinical characteristics of multiple early-onset cancers in Norwegian families, including early-onset breast cancer, Cowden-like and Li-Fraumeni-like syndromes (BC, CSL and LFL, respectively). The Hereditary Cancer Biobank from the Norwegian Radium Hospital was used to identify early-onset BC, CSL or LFL for whom no pathogenic variants in BRCA1/2, PTEN, or TP53 had been found in routine diagnostic DNA sequencing. Forty-four cancer susceptibility genes were selected and analyzed by our in-house designed TruSeq amplicon-based assay for targeted sequencing. Protein- and RNA splicing-dedicated in silico analyses were performed for all variants of unknown significance (VUS). Variants predicted as the more likely to affect splicing were experimentally analyzed by minigene assay. We identified a CSL individual carrying a variant in CHEK2 (c.319+2T>A, IVS2), here considered as likely pathogenic. Out of the five VUS (BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, MAP3K1, NOTCH3) tested in the minigene splicing assay, only NOTCH3 c.14090C>T (p.Ser497Leu) showed a significant effect on RNA splicing, notably by inducing partial skipping of exon 9. Among 13 early-onset BC, CSL and LFL patients, gene panel sequencing identified a potentially pathogenic variant in CHEK2 that affects a canonical RNA splicing signal. Our study provides new information on genetic loci that may affect the risk of developing cancer in these patients and their families, demonstrating that genes presently not routinely tested in molecular diagnostic settings may be important for capturing cancer predisposition in these families.

15.
Med Health Care Philos ; 21(2): 239-242, 2018 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28939999

RESUMO

The concept 'hereditary breast cancer' is commonly used to delineate a group of people genetically at risk for breast cancer-all of whom also having risk for other cancers. People carrying pathogenic variants of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are often referred to as those having predisposition for 'hereditary breast cancer'. The two genes, however, are when altered, associated with different risks for and dying from breast cancer. The main risk for dying for carriers of both genes is from ovarian cancer. These biological facts are of philosophical interest, because they are the facts underlying the public debate on BRCA1/2 genetic testing as a model for the discussion of how to implement genetic knowledge and technologies in personalized medicine. A contribution to this public debate describing inherited breast cancer as 'biological citizenship' recently printed in Med Health Care and Philos illustrated how fragmented and detached from the biological and socio-political facts this debate sometimes is. We here briefly summarize some of the biological facts and how they are implemented in today's healthcare based on agreed philosophical, ethical and moral principles. The suggestion of a 'biological citizenship' defined by hereditary breast cancer is incorrect and ill-advised. 'Identity politics' focusing hereditary breast cancer patients as a group based on a bundle of ill-defined negative arguments is well known, but is supported neither by scientific nor philosophical arguments. To those born with the genetic variants described, the philosophical rule of not doing harm is violated by unbalanced negative arguments.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Sobreviventes de Câncer/psicologia , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Autoimagem , Fatores Etários , Neoplasias da Mama/psicologia , Feminino , Genes BRCA1 , Genes BRCA2 , Predisposição Genética para Doença/psicologia , Testes Genéticos/métodos , Humanos , Noruega
16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29158857

RESUMO

Background: BRCA2 c.68-7T>A has been demonstrated to cause aberrant splicing and is possibly pathogenic. The population prevalence of the variant is 0.2%, which higher than usual for pathogenic BRCA2 variants. The pathogenicity of the variant is discussed. Methods: The outpatient genetic clinic at The Norwegian Radium Hospital, part of Oslo University Hospital, has invited breast cancer kindreds for genetic examinations and prospective follow-up of high risk patients since 1988. We have complete files of all activities and results, and we examined the files for association between BRCA2 c.68-7T>A and breast cancer. Results: Seventeen out of 714 (2.4%) breast cancer kindreds sequenced for BRCA2 carried the variant BRCA2 c.68-7T>A (p < 0.0001 compared to population controls). Segregation analysis was inconclusive (likelihood ratio 0.36) for pathogenicity. Two breast cancers were prospectively observed during 134 observation years (annual incidence rate 1.5% (95% CI 0.15% to 5.4%) and one additional breast cancer was diagnosed at first (prevalence) round. Conclusion: BRCA2 c.68-7T>A is associated with breast cancer. In the families selected due to aggregation of breast cancer, carriers of the BRCA2 c.68-7T>A variant have increased risk for breast cancer. It is, however, possible that the variant has lower penetrance than the average pathogenic BRCA2 variants, and that in the families selected for having known aggregation of breast cancer other (modifying) factors contributed to the observed results.

17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29046738

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenic MLH1 variants (path_MLH1) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy. METHODS: The cohort included Finnish carriers enrolled in 3-yearly colonoscopy (n = 505; 4625 observation years) and carriers from other countries enrolled in colonoscopy 2-yearly or more frequently (n = 439; 3299 observation years). We examined whether the longer interval between colonoscopies in Finland could explain the high incidence of CRC and whether disease expression correlated with differences in population CRC incidence. RESULTS: Cumulative CRC incidences in carriers of path_MLH1 at 70-years of age were 41% for males and 36% for females in the Finnish series and 58% and 55% in the non-Finnish series, respectively (p > 0.05). Mean time from last colonoscopy to CRC was 32.7 months in the Finnish compared to 31.0 months in the non-Finnish (p > 0.05) and was therefore unaffected by the recommended colonoscopy interval. Differences in population incidence of CRC could not explain the lower point estimates for CRC in the Finnish series. Ten-year overall survival after CRC was similar for the Finnish and non-Finnish series (88% and 91%, respectively; p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The hypothesis that the high incidence of CRC in path_MLH1 carriers was caused by a higher incidence in the Finnish series was not valid. We discuss whether the results were influenced by methodological shortcomings in our study or whether the assumption that a shorter interval between colonoscopies leads to a lower CRC incidence may be wrong. This second possibility is intriguing, because it suggests the dogma that CRC in path_MLH1 carriers develops from polyps that can be detected at colonoscopy and removed to prevent CRC may be erroneous. In view of the excellent 10-year overall survival in the Finnish and non-Finnish series we remain strong advocates of current surveillance practices for those with LS pending studies that will inform new recommendations on the best surveillance interval.

18.
BMC Cancer ; 17(1): 623, 2017 Sep 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28874130

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome (LS) have recently been introduced in several Latin America countries. We aimed to characterize the clinical, molecular and mismatch repair (MMR) variants spectrum of patients with suspected LS in Latin America. METHODS: Eleven LS hereditary cancer registries and 34 published LS databases were used to identify unrelated families that fulfilled the Amsterdam II (AMSII) criteria and/or the Bethesda guidelines or suggestive of a dominant colorectal (CRC) inheritance syndrome. RESULTS: We performed a thorough investigation of 15 countries and identified 6 countries where germline genetic testing for LS is available and 3 countries where tumor testing is used in the LS diagnosis. The spectrum of pathogenic MMR variants included MLH1 up to 54%, MSH2 up to 43%, MSH6 up to 10%, PMS2 up to 3% and EPCAM up to 0.8%. The Latin America MMR spectrum is broad with a total of 220 different variants which 80% were private and 20% were recurrent. Frequent regions included exons 11 of MLH1 (15%), exon 3 and 7 of MSH2 (17 and 15%, respectively), exon 4 of MSH6 (65%), exons 11 and 13 of PMS2 (31% and 23%, respectively). Sixteen international founder variants in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 were identified and 41 (19%) variants have not previously been reported, thus representing novel genetic variants in the MMR genes. The AMSII criteria was the most used clinical criteria to identify pathogenic MMR carriers although microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry and family history are still the primary methods in several countries where no genetic testing for LS is available yet. CONCLUSION: The Latin America LS pathogenic MMR variants spectrum included new variants, frequently altered genetic regions and potential founder effects, emphasizing the relevance implementing Lynch syndrome genetic testing and counseling in all of Latin America countries.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/epidemiologia , Adulto , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/genética , Biologia Computacional/métodos , Reparo de Erro de Pareamento de DNA , Feminino , Efeito Fundador , Aconselhamento Genético , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Testes Genéticos , Variação Genética , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Humanos , América Latina/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Vigilância da População , Processamento de RNA , Sistema de Registros , Fatores de Risco
19.
Gut ; 66(3): 464-472, 2017 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26657901

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Estimates of cancer risk and the effects of surveillance in Lynch syndrome have been subject to bias, partly through reliance on retrospective studies. We sought to establish more robust estimates in patients undergoing prospective cancer surveillance. DESIGN: We undertook a multicentre study of patients carrying Lynch syndrome-associated mutations affecting MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Standardised information on surveillance, cancers and outcomes were collated in an Oracle relational database and analysed by age, sex and mutated gene. RESULTS: 1942 mutation carriers without previous cancer had follow-up including colonoscopic surveillance for 13 782 observation years. 314 patients developed cancer, mostly colorectal (n=151), endometrial (n=72) and ovarian (n=19). Cancers were detected from 25 years onwards in MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers, and from about 40 years in MSH6 and PMS2 carriers. Among first cancer detected in each patient the colorectal cancer cumulative incidences at 70 years by gene were 46%, 35%, 20% and 10% for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers, respectively. The equivalent cumulative incidences for endometrial cancer were 34%, 51%, 49% and 24%; and for ovarian cancer 11%, 15%, 0% and 0%. Ten-year crude survival was 87% after any cancer, 91% if the first cancer was colorectal, 98% if endometrial and 89% if ovarian. CONCLUSIONS: The four Lynch syndrome-associated genes had different penetrance and expression. Colorectal cancer occurred frequently despite colonoscopic surveillance but resulted in few deaths. Using our data, a website has been established at http://LScarisk.org enabling calculation of cumulative cancer risks as an aid to genetic counselling in Lynch syndrome.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/genética , Neoplasias do Endométrio/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Ovarianas/epidemiologia , Vigilância da População , Adolescente , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , Colonoscopia , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/mortalidade , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Bases de Dados Factuais , Neoplasias do Endométrio/mortalidade , Feminino , Expressão Gênica , Heterozigoto , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Endonuclease PMS2 de Reparo de Erro de Pareamento/genética , Proteína 1 Homóloga a MutL/genética , Proteína 2 Homóloga a MutS/genética , Neoplasias Ovarianas/mortalidade , Estudos Prospectivos , Taxa de Sobrevida , Adulto Jovem
20.
Gut ; 66(9): 1657-1664, 2017 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27261338

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Today most patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) survive their first cancer. There is limited information on the incidences and outcome of subsequent cancers. The present study addresses three questions: (i) what is the cumulative incidence of a subsequent cancer; (ii) in which organs do subsequent cancers occur; and (iii) what is the survival following these cancers? DESIGN: Information was collated on prospectively organised surveillance and prospectively observed outcomes in patients with LS who had cancer prior to inclusion and analysed by age, gender and genetic variants. RESULTS: 1273 patients with LS from 10 countries were followed up for 7753 observation years. 318 patients (25.7%) developed 341 first subsequent cancers, including colorectal (n=147, 43%), upper GI, pancreas or bile duct (n=37, 11%) and urinary tract (n=32, 10%). The cumulative incidences for any subsequent cancer from age 40 to age 70 years were 73% for pathogenic MLH1 (path_MLH1), 76% for path_MSH2 carriers and 52% for path_MSH6 carriers, and for colorectal cancer (CRC) the cumulative incidences were 46%, 48% and 23%, respectively. Crude survival after any subsequent cancer was 82% (95% CI 76% to 87%) and 10-year crude survival after CRC was 91% (95% CI 83% to 95%). CONCLUSIONS: Relative incidence of subsequent cancer compared with incidence of first cancer was slightly but insignificantly higher than cancer incidence in patients with LS without previous cancer (range 0.94-1.49). The favourable survival after subsequent cancers validated continued follow-up to prevent death from cancer. The interactive website http://lscarisk.org was expanded to calculate the risks by gender, genetic variant and age for subsequent cancer for any patient with LS with previous cancer.


Assuntos
Neoplasias do Colo , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Proteína 1 Homóloga a MutL/genética , Proteína 2 Homóloga a MutS/genética , Adulto , Idoso , Neoplasias do Colo/genética , Neoplasias do Colo/patologia , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/genética , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/patologia , Reparo de Erro de Pareamento de DNA/genética , Progressão da Doença , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Variação Genética , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Medição de Risco/métodos , Medição de Risco/estatística & dados numéricos , Análise de Sobrevida
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