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1.
J Crit Care ; 57: 5-12, 2020 Jan 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32004778

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To assess the predictive value of a single abnormal shock index reading (SI ≥0.9; heart rate/systolic blood pressure [SBP]) for mortality, and association between cumulative abnormal SI exposure and mortality/morbidity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cohort comprised of adult patients with an intensive care unit (ICU) stay ≥24-h (years 2010-2018). SI ≥0.9 exposure was evaluated via cumulative minutes or time-weighted average; SBP ≤100-mmHg was analyzed. Outcomes were in-hospital mortality, acute kidney injury (AKI), and myocardial injury. RESULTS: 18,197 patients from 82 hospitals were analyzed. Any single SI ≥0.9 within the ICU predicted mortality with 90.8% sensitivity and 36.8% specificity. Every 0.1-unit increase in maximum-SI during the first 24-h increased the odds of mortality by 4.8% [95%CI; 2.6-7.0%; p < .001]. Every 4-h exposure to SI ≥0.9 increased the odds of death by 5.8% [95%CI; 4.6-7.0%; p < .001], AKI by 4.3% [95%CI; 3.7-4.9%; p < .001] and myocardial injury by 2.1% [95%CI; 1.2-3.1%; p < .001]. ≥2-h exposure to SBP ≤100-mmHg was significantly associated with mortality. CONCLUSIONS: A single SI reading ≥0.9 is a poor predictor of mortality; cumulative SI exposure is associated with greater risk of mortality/morbidity. The associations with in-hospital mortality were comparable for SI ≥0.9 or SBP ≤100-mmHg exposure. Dynamic interactions between hemodynamic variables need further evaluation among critically ill patients.

2.
Crit Care Med ; 48(2): e157-e158, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31939821
3.
Anesthesiology ; 132(2): 291-306, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31939844

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Arterial pressure is a complex signal that can be characterized by systolic, mean, and diastolic components, along with pulse pressure (difference between systolic and diastolic pressures). The authors separately evaluated the strength of associations among intraoperative pressure components with myocardial and kidney injury after noncardiac surgery. METHODS: The authors included 23,140 noncardiac surgery patients at Cleveland Clinic who had blood pressure recorded at 1-min intervals from radial arterial catheters. The authors used univariable smoothing and multivariable logistic regression to estimate probabilities of each outcome as function of patients' lowest pressure for a cumulative 5 min for each component, comparing discriminative ability using C-statistics. The authors further assessed the association between outcomes and both area and minutes under derived thresholds corresponding to the beginning of increased risk for the average patient. RESULTS: Out of 23,140 patients analyzed, myocardial injury occurred in 6.1% and acute kidney injury in 8.2%. Based on the lowest patient blood pressure experienced for greater than or equal to 5 min, estimated thresholds below which the odds of myocardial or kidney injury progressively increased (slope P < 0.001) were 90 mmHg for systolic, 65 mmHg for mean, 50 mmHg for diastolic, and 35 mmHg for pulse pressure. Weak discriminative ability was noted between the pressure components, with univariable C-statistics ranging from 0.55 to 0.59. Area under the curve in the highest (deepest) quartile of exposure below the respective thresholds had significantly higher odds of myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery and acute kidney injury compared to no exposure for systolic, mean, and pulse pressure (all P < 0.001), but not diastolic, after adjusting for confounding. CONCLUSIONS: Systolic, mean, and pulse pressure hypotension were comparable in their strength of association with myocardial and renal injury. In contrast, the relationship with diastolic pressure was poor. Baseline factors were much more strongly associated with myocardial and renal injury than intraoperative blood pressure, but pressure differs in being modifiable.

4.
J Clin Monit Comput ; 2020 Jan 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31989416

RESUMO

An algorithm derived from machine learning uses the arterial waveform to predict intraoperative hypotension some minutes before episodes, possibly giving clinician's time to intervene and prevent hypotension. Whether the Hypotension Prediction Index works well with noninvasive arterial pressure waveforms remains unknown. We therefore evaluated sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of the Index based on non-invasive arterial waveform estimates. We used continuous hemodynamic data measured from ClearSight (formerly Nexfin) noninvasive finger blood pressure monitors in surgical patients. We re-evaluated data from a trial that included 320 adults ≥ 45 years old designated ASA physical status 3 or 4 who had moderate-to-high-risk non-cardiac surgery with general anesthesia. We calculated sensitivity and specificity for predicting hypotension, defined as mean arterial pressure ≤ 65 mmHg for at least 1 min, and characterized the relationship with receiver operating characteristics curves. We also evaluated the number of hypotensive events at various ranges of the Hypotension Prediction Index. And finally, we calculated the positive predictive value for hypotension episodes when the Prediction Index threshold was 85. The algorithm predicted hypotension 5 min in advance, with a sensitivity of 0.86 [95% confidence interval 0.82, 0.89] and specificity 0.86 [0.82, 0.89]. At 10 min, the sensitivity was 0.83 [0.79, 0.86] and the specificity was 0.83 [0.79, 0.86]. And at 15 min, the sensitivity was 0.75 [0.71, 0.80] and the specificity was 0.75 [0.71, 0.80]. The positive predictive value of the algorithm prediction at an Index threshold of 85 was 0.83 [0.79, 0.87]. A Hypotension Prediction Index of 80-89 provided a median of 6.0 [95% confidence interval 5.3, 6.7] minutes warning before mean arterial pressure decreased to < 65 mmHg. The Hypotension Prediction Index, which was developed and validated with invasive arterial waveforms, predicts intraoperative hypotension reasonably well from non-invasive estimates of the arterial waveform. Hypotension prediction, along with appropriate management, can potentially reduce intraoperative hypotension. Being able to use the non-invasive pressure waveform will widen the range of patients who might benefit.Clinical Trial Number: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02872896.

5.
Anesthesiology ; 2020 Jan 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977517

RESUMO

WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THIS TOPIC: Infusion of large volumes of saline causes hyperchloremic metabolic acidosisA recent Cochrane review based on 18 small trials reported that major morbidity and mortality were comparable with perioperative saline or lactated Ringer's use WHAT THIS ARTICLE TELLS US THAT IS NEW: In a large single-center alternating cohort trial of patients having elective colorectal or orthopedic surgery, there was no clinically meaningful difference in the risk of a composite of in-hospital mortality and major postoperative complications including renal, respiratory, infectious, and hemorrhagic complications BACKGROUND:: Both saline and lactated Ringer's solutions are commonly given to surgical patients. However, hyperchloremic acidosis consequent to saline administration may provoke complications. The authors therefore tested the primary hypothesis that a composite of in-hospital mortality and major postoperative complications is less common in patients given lactated Ringer's solution than normal saline. METHODS: The authors conducted an alternating cohort controlled trial in which adults having colorectal and orthopedic surgery were given either lactated Ringer's solution or normal saline in 2-week blocks between September 2015 and August 2018. The primary outcome was a composite of in-hospital mortality and major postoperative renal, respiratory, infectious, and hemorrhagic complications. The secondary outcome was postoperative acute kidney injury. RESULTS: Among 8,616 qualifying patients, 4,187 (49%) were assigned to lactated Ringer's solution, and 4,429 (51%) were assigned to saline. Each group received a median 1.9 l of fluid. The primary composite of major complications was observed in 5.8% of lactated Ringer's versus 6.1% of normal saline patients, with estimated average relative risk across the components of the composite of 1.16 (95% CI, 0.89 to 1.52; P = 0.261). The secondary outcome, postoperative acute kidney injury, Acute Kidney Injury Network stage I-III versus 0, occurred in 6.6% of lactated Ringer's patients versus 6.2% of normal saline patients, with an estimated relative risk of 1.18 (99.3% CI, 0.99 to 1.41; P = 0.009, significance criterion of 0.007). Absolute differences between the treatment groups for each outcome were less than 0.5%, an amount that is not clinically meaningful. CONCLUSIONS: In elective orthopedic and colorectal surgery patients, there was no clinically meaningful difference in postoperative complications with lactated Ringer's or saline volume replacement. Clinicians can reasonably use either solution intraoperatively.

7.
Anesth Analg ; 130(2): 360-366, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30882520

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We previously reported that the duration of hospitalization was not different between isoflurane and sevoflurane. But more plausible consequences of using soluble volatile anesthetics are delayed emergence from anesthesia and prolonged stays in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). We therefore compared isoflurane and sevoflurane on emergence time and PACU duration. METHODS: We reanalyzed data from 1498 adults who participated in a previous alternating intervention trial comparing isoflurane and sevoflurane. Patients, mostly having colorectal surgery, were assigned to either volatile anesthetic in 2-week blocks that alternated for half a year. Emergence time was defined as the time from minimum alveolar concentration fraction reaching 0.3 at the end of the procedure until patients left the operating room. PACU duration was defined from admission to the end of phase 1 recovery. Treatment effect was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusted for imbalanced baseline variables. RESULTS: A total of 674 patients were given isoflurane, and 824 sevoflurane. Emergence time was slightly longer for isoflurane with a median (quartiles) of 16 minutes (12-22 minutes) vs 14 minutes (11-19 minutes) for sevoflurane, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.81 (97.5% CI, 0.71-0.92; P < .001). Duration in the PACU did not differ, with a median (quartiles) of 2.6 hours (2.0-3.6 hours) for isoflurane and 2.6 hours (2.0-3.7 hours) hours for sevoflurane. The adjusted hazard ratio for PACU discharge time was 1.04 (97.5% CI, 0.91-1.18; P = .56). CONCLUSIONS: Isoflurane prolonged emergence by only 2 minutes, which is not a clinically important amount, and did not prolong length of stay in the PACU. The more soluble and much less-expensive anesthetic isoflurane thus seems to be a reasonable alternative to sevoflurane.

8.
Anesthesiology ; 132(1): 121-130, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31651439

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with cardiovascular, renal, and infectious risks. Postsurgical patients are susceptible to similar complications, but whether vitamin D deficiency contributes to postoperative complications remains unclear. We tested whether low preoperative vitamin D is associated with cardiovascular events within 30 days after noncardiac surgery. METHODS: We evaluated a subset of patients enrolled in the biobank substudy of the Vascular events In noncardiac Surgery patIents cOhort evaluatioN (VISION) study, who were at least 45 yr with at least an overnight hospitalization. Blood was collected preoperatively, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured in stored samples. The primary outcome was the composite of cardiovascular events (death, myocardial injury, nonfatal cardiac arrest, stroke, congestive heart failure) within 30 postoperative days. Secondary outcomes were kidney injury and infectious complications. RESULTS: A total of 3,851 participants were eligible for analysis. Preoperative 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was 70 ± 30 nmol/l, and 62% of patients were vitamin D deficient. Overall, 26 (0.7%) patients died, 41 (1.1%) had congestive heart failure or nonfatal cardiac arrest, 540 (14%) had myocardial injury, and 15 (0.4%) had strokes. Preoperative vitamin D concentration was not associated with the primary outcome (average relative effect odds ratio [95% CI]: 0.93 [0.85, 1.01] per 10 nmol/l increase in preoperative vitamin D, P = 0.095). However, it was associated with postoperative infection (average relative effect odds ratio [95% CI]: 0.94 [0.90, 0.98] per 10 nmol/l increase in preoperative vitamin D, P adjusted value = 0.005) and kidney function (estimated mean change in postoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate [95% CI]: 0.29 [0.11, 0.48] ml min 1.73 m per 10 nmol/l increase in preoperative vitamin D, P adjusted value = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative vitamin D was not associated with a composite of postoperative 30-day cardiac outcomes. However, there was a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and a composite of infectious complications and decreased kidney function. While renal effects were not clinically meaningful, the effect of vitamin D supplementation on infectious complications requires further study.

9.
Anesthesiology ; 2019 Nov 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31789639

RESUMO

WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THIS TOPIC: Arterial pressure is a complex signal that is characterized by three primary components - systolic, diastolic, and mean pressure, along with a derived component, pulse pressure (systolic minus diastolic pressure)Each blood pressure component reflects distinct hemodynamic variables, and therefore presumably differently influences perfusion of various organsPrevious work identifies associations between intraoperative systolic and mean hypotension with myocardial and kidney injury WHAT THIS ARTICLE TELLS US THAT IS NEW: For each blood pressure component, the authors report significant and clinically meaningful associations between the lowest pressure sustained for 5 min and myocardial and kidney injuryAbsolute population risk thresholds were similar for myocardial and kidney injury, being roughly 90 mmHg for systolic, 65 mmHg for mean, 50 mmHg for diastolic, and 35 mmHg for pulse pressuresThe odds for myocardial and kidney injury progressively increased with duration and severity of hypotension below each threshold, even after adjusting for potential baseline confounding factors BACKGROUND:: Arterial pressure is a complex signal that can be characterized by systolic, mean, and diastolic components, along with pulse pressure (difference between systolic and diastolic pressures). The authors separately evaluated the strength of associations among intraoperative pressure components with myocardial and kidney injury after noncardiac surgery. METHODS: The authors included 23,140 noncardiac surgery patients at Cleveland Clinic who had blood pressure recorded at 1-min intervals from radial arterial catheters. The authors used univariable smoothing and multivariable logistic regression to estimate probabilities of each outcome as function of patients' lowest pressure for a cumulative 5 min for each component, comparing discriminative ability using C-statistics. The authors further assessed the association between outcomes and both area and minutes under derived thresholds corresponding to the beginning of increased risk for the average patient. RESULTS: Out of 23,140 patients analyzed, myocardial injury occurred in 6.1% and acute kidney injury in 8.2%. Based on the lowest patient blood pressure experienced for greater than or equal to 5 min, estimated thresholds below which the odds of myocardial or kidney injury progressively increased (slope P < 0.001) were 90 mmHg for systolic, 65 mmHg for mean, 50 mmHg for diastolic, and 35 mmHg for pulse pressure. Weak discriminative ability was noted between the pressure components, with univariable C-statistics ranging from 0.55 to 0.59. Area under the curve in the highest (deepest) quartile of exposure below the respective thresholds had significantly higher odds of myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery and acute kidney injury compared to no exposure for systolic, mean, and pulse pressure (all P < 0.001), but not diastolic, after adjusting for confounding. CONCLUSIONS: Systolic, mean, and pulse pressure hypotension were comparable in their strength of association with myocardial and renal injury. In contrast, the relationship with diastolic pressure was poor. Baseline factors were much more strongly associated with myocardial and renal injury than intraoperative blood pressure, but pressure differs in being modifiable.

10.
Anesth Analg ; 2019 Nov 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31725024

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Postoperative delirium is common in critically ill patients, with a reported incidence of 11%-43%, and is associated with significant morbidity and cost. Perioperative hypotension and consequent brain hypoperfusion may contribute. We, therefore, tested the hypotheses that intraoperative and postoperative hypotension are associated with critical care delirium. METHODS: We included 1083 postoperative patients who were admitted directly from an operating room to the surgical intensive care unit. Delirium was assessed with the Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care Unit patients at 12-hour intervals. We used a confounder-adjusted Cox proportional hazard survival model to assess the association between the amount of intraoperative hypotension, which was measured as the time-weighted average of mean arterial pressure <65 mm Hg, and delirium while in critical care. Thereafter, we used a Cox model with the lowest mean arterial pressure on each intensive care day as a time-varying covariate to assess the relationship between critical care hypotension and delirium, adjusted for confounders and amount of intraoperative hypotension. RESULTS: Three hundred seventy-seven (35%) patients had delirium within the first 5 postoperative days in the surgical intensive care unit. Intraoperative hypotension was moderately associated with higher odds of postoperative delirium. The adjusted hazard ratio associated with 1 mm Hg increase in time-weighted average of mean arterial pressure <65 mm Hg was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.20; P = .008). Postoperatively, a 10 mm Hg reduction in the lowest mean pressure on each day in the critical care unit was significantly associated with a higher hazard of delirium, with an adjusted hazard ratio 1.12 (95% CI, 1.04-1.20; P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: Both intraoperative and postoperative hypotension are associated with delirium in postoperative critical care patients. The extent to which these relationships are causal remains unknown, but to the extent that they are, hypotension prevention may help reduce delirium and should be studied in prospective clinical trials.

11.
Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol ; 33(2): 189-197, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31582098

RESUMO

Blood pressure is the main determinant of organ perfusion. Hypotension is common in patients having surgery and in critically ill patients. The severity and duration of hypotension are associated with hypoperfusion and organ dysfunction. Hypotension is mostly treated reactively after low blood pressure values have already occurred. However, prediction of hypotension before it becomes clinically apparent would allow the clinician to treat hypotension pre-emptively, thereby reducing the severity and duration of hypotension. Hypotension can now be predicted minutes before it actually occurs from the blood pressure waveform using machine-learning algorithms that can be trained to detect subtle changes in cardiovascular dynamics preceding clinically apparent hypotension. However, analyzing the complex cardiovascular system is a challenge because cardiovascular physiology is highly interdependent, works within complicated networks, and is influenced by compensatory mechanisms. Improved hemodynamic data collection and integration will be a key to improve current models and develop new hypotension prediction models.

12.
Anesth Analg ; 2019 Sep 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31490816

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Continuous blood pressure monitoring may facilitate early detection and prompt treatment of hypotension. We tested the hypothesis that area under the curve (AUC) mean arterial pressure (MAP) <65 mm Hg is reduced by continuous invasive arterial pressure monitoring. METHODS: Adults having noncardiac surgery were randomly assigned to continuous invasive arterial pressure or intermittent oscillometric blood pressure monitoring. Arterial catheter pressures were recorded at 1-minute intervals; oscillometric pressures were typically recorded at 5-minute intervals. We estimated the arterial catheter effect on AUC-MAP <65 mm Hg using a multivariable proportional odds model adjusting for imbalanced baseline variables and duration of surgery. Pressures <65 mm Hg were categorized as 0, 1-17, 18-91, and >91 mm Hg × minutes of AUC-MAP <65 mm Hg (ie, no hypotension and 3 equally sized groups of increasing hypotension). RESULTS: One hundred fifty-two patients were randomly assigned to arterial catheter use and 154 to oscillometric monitoring. For various clinical reasons, 143 patients received an arterial catheter, while 163 were monitored oscillometrically. There were a median [Q1, Q3] of 246 [187, 308] pressure measurements in patients with arterial catheters versus 55 (46, 75) measurements in patients monitored oscillometrically. In the primary intent-to-treat analysis, catheter-based monitoring increased detection of AUC-MAP <65 mm Hg, with an estimated proportional odds ratio (ie, odds of being in a worse hypotension category) of 1.78 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-2.70; P = .006). The result was robust over an as-treated analysis and for sensitivity analyses with thresholds of 60 and 70 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Intraoperative blood pressure monitoring with arterial catheters detected nearly twice as much hypotension as oscillometric measurements.

15.
Trials ; 20(1): 255, 2019 May 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31053082

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hypotension is associated with serious complications, including myocardial infarction, acute kidney injury, and mortality. Consequently, predicting and preventing hypotension may improve outcomes. We will therefore determine if use of a novel hypotension prediction tool reduces the duration and severity of hypotension in patients having non-cardiac surgery. METHODS/DESIGN: We will conduct a two-center, pragmatic, randomized controlled trial (N = 213) in noncardiac surgical patients > 45 years old who require intra-arterial blood pressure monitoring. All participating patients will be connected to a Flortrac IQ sensor and EV1000 platform (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine). They will be randomly assigned to blinded or unblinded arms. The Hypotension Prediction Index (HPI) and advanced hemodynamic information will be universally recorded, but will only be available to clinicians when patients are assigned to unblinded monitoring. The primary outcome will be the effect of HPI software guidance on intraoperative time-weighted average mean arterial pressure under a threshold of 65 mmHg, which will be assessed with a Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney 2-sample, two-tailed test. DISCUSSION: Our trial will determine whether the Hypotension Prediction Index and associated hemodynamic information substantively reduces hypotension during non-cardiac surgery. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03610165 . Registered on 1 August 2018.


Assuntos
Pressão Arterial , Determinação da Pressão Arterial , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Cardíacos/efeitos adversos , Hipotensão/prevenção & controle , Monitorização Intraoperatória/métodos , Software , Feminino , Humanos , Hipotensão/diagnóstico , Hipotensão/etiologia , Hipotensão/fisiopatologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Multicêntricos como Assunto , Ohio , Ensaios Clínicos Pragmáticos como Assunto , Fatores de Risco , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento
16.
Anesth Analg ; 128(6): 1160-1166, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31094783

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Postoperative pain is common and promotes opioid use. Surgical wounds are hypoxic because normal perfusion is impaired. Local wound ischemia and acidosis promote incisional pain. Some evidence suggests that improving oxygen supply to surgical wounds might reduce pain. We therefore tested the hypothesis that supplemental (80% inspired) intraoperative oxygen reduces postoperative pain and opioid consumption. METHODS: We conducted a post hoc analysis of a large, single-center alternating cohort trial allocating surgical patients having general anesthesia for colorectal surgery to either 30% or 80% intraoperative oxygen concentration in 2-week blocks for a total of 39 months. Irrespective of allocation, patients were given sufficient oxygen to maintain saturation ≥95%. Patients who had regional anesthesia or nerve blocks were excluded. The primary outcome was pain and opioid consumption during the initial 2 postoperative hours, analyzed jointly. The secondary outcome was pain and opioid consumption over the subsequent 24 postoperative hours. Subgroup analyses of the primary outcome were conducted for open versus laparoscopic procedures and for patients with versus without chronic pain. RESULTS: A total of 4702 cases were eligible for analysis: 2415 were assigned to 80% oxygen and 2287 to 30% oxygen. The groups were well balanced on potential confounding factors. Average pain scores and opioid consumption were similar between the groups (mean difference in pain scores, -0.01 [97.5% CI, -0.16 to 0.14; P = .45], median difference in opioid consumption, 0.0 [97.5% CI, 0 to 0] mg morphine equivalents; P = .82). There were also no significant differences in the secondary outcome or subgroup analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Supplemental intraoperative oxygen does not reduce acute postoperative pain or reduce opioid consumption.


Assuntos
Hiperóxia , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Dor Pós-Operatória/terapia , Acidose , Adulto , Idoso , Analgésicos Opioides/efeitos adversos , Anestesia/métodos , Estudos de Coortes , Cirurgia Colorretal/métodos , Interpretação Estatística de Dados , Feminino , Humanos , Hipóxia , Laparoscopia/métodos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Oxigênio/uso terapêutico , Medição da Dor , Resultado do Tratamento
17.
Crit Care Med ; 47(7): 910-917, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30985388

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Hypotension thresholds that provoke renal injury, myocardial injury, and mortality in critical care patients remain unknown. We primarily sought to determine the relationship between hypotension and a composite of myocardial injury (troponin T ≥ 0.03 ng/mL without nonischemic cause) and death up to 7 postoperative days. Secondarily, we considered acute kidney injury (creatinine concentration ≥ 0.3 mg/dL or 1.5 times baseline). DESIGN: Retrospective cohort. SETTING: Surgical ICU at an academic medical center. PATIENTS: Two-thousand eight-hundred thirty-three postoperative patients admitted to the surgical ICU. INTERVENTIONS: A Cox proportional hazard survival model was used to assess the association between lowest mean arterial pressure on each intensive care day, considered as a time-varying covariate, and outcomes. In sensitivity analyses hypotension defined as pressures less than 80 mm Hg and 70 mm Hg were also considered. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: There was a strong nonlinear (quadratic) association between the lowest mean arterial pressure and the primary outcome of myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery or mortality, with estimated risk increasing at lower pressures. The risk of myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery or mortality was an estimated 23% higher at the 25th percentile (78 mm Hg) of lowest mean arterial pressure compared with at the median of 87 mm Hg, with adjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) of 1.23 (1.12-1.355; p < 0.001). Overall results were generally similar in sensitivity analyses based on every hour of mean arterial pressure less than 80 mm Hg and any mean arterial pressure less than 70 mm Hg. Post hoc analyses showed that the relationship between ICU hypotension and outcomes depended on the amount of intraoperative hypotension. The risk of acute kidney injury increased over a range of minimum daily pressures from 110 mm Hg to 50 mm Hg, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.27 (95% CI, 1.18-1.37; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Increasing amounts of hypotension (defined by lowest mean arterial pressures per day) were strongly associated with myocardial injury, mortality, and renal injury in postoperative critical care patients.

19.
Can J Anaesth ; 66(8): 894-906, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30953311

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The local anesthetic injectate spread with fascial plane blocks and corresponding clinical outcomes may vary depending on the site of injection. We developed and evaluated a supra-iliac approach to the anterior quadratus lumborum (QL) block and hypothesized that this single injection might successfully block the lumbar and sacral plexus in cadavers and provide analgesia for patients undergoing hip surgery. METHODS: Ultrasound-guided bilateral supra-iliac anterior QL blocks were performed with 30 mL of India ink dye in six fresh adult cadavers. Cadavers were subsequently dissected to determine distribution of the dye. In five patients undergoing hip surgery, a unilateral supra-iliac anterior QL block with 25 mL ropivacaine 0.5% followed by a continuous catheter infusion was performed. Patients were clinically assessed daily for block efficacy. RESULTS: The cadaveric injections showed consistent dye involvement of the majority of the branches of the lumbar plexus, including the femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, ilioinguinal nerve, and iliohypogastric nerve. The majority of cadaveric specimens (83%) also exhibited thoracic paravertebral spread of dye to the T10 level. No specimens showed L5 or sacral nerve root staining or caudal spread below L5. All patients had effective analgesia for total hip surgery and a T11-L3 sensory level following the initial bolus of local anesthetic as well as during the period of continuous catheter infusion. CONCLUSION: This cadaveric study and case series show that a supra-iliac approach to the anterior QL block involved T10--L3 nerve territories and dermatomal coverage with no sacral plexus spread. This technique may have clinical utility for analgesia in hip surgery.

20.
Anesthesiology ; 130(4): 550-559, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30875354

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Intraoperative and postoperative hypotension are associated with myocardial and kidney injury and 30-day mortality. Intraoperative blood pressure is measured frequently, but blood pressure on surgical wards is usually measured only every 4 to 6 h, leaving long intervals during which hypotension and hypertension may be undetected. This study evaluated the incidence and severity of postoperative hypotension and hypertension in adults recovering from abdominal surgery and the extent to which serious perturbations were missed by routine vital-sign assessments. METHODS: Blood pressure was recorded at 1-min intervals during the initial 48 h in adults recovering from abdominal surgery using a continuous noninvasive monitor. Caregivers were blinded to these measurements and depended on routine vital-sign assessments. Hypotension and hypertension were characterized as time under and above various mean arterial pressure thresholds. RESULTS: Of 502 available patients, 312 patients with high-quality records were analyzed, with a median measurement time of 48 [interquartile range: 41, 48] postoperative hours. Nearly a quarter experienced an episode of mean arterial pressure of less than 70 mm Hg lasting at least 30 min (24%; 95% CI, 20%, 29%), and 18% had an episode of mean arterial pressure of less than 65 mm Hg lasting at least 15 min. Nearly half the patients who had mean arterial pressure of less than 65 mm Hg for at least 15 min (47%; 95% CI, 34%, 61%) were undetected by routine vital-sign assessments. Episodes of mean arterial pressure greater than 110 mm Hg lasting at least 30 min were observed in 42% (95% CI, 37%, 48%) of patients; 7% had mean arterial pressure greater than 130 mm Hg for at least 30 min, 96% of which were missed by routine assessments. Episodes of mean arterial pressure less than 65 mm Hg and mean arterial pressure greater than 110 mm Hg captured by routine vital-sign assessments but not by continuous monitoring occurred in 34 and 8 patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative hypotension and hypertension were common, prolonged, profound, and largely undetected by routine vital-sign assessments in a cohort of adults recovering from abdominal surgery. Frequent or continuous blood pressure monitoring may detect hemodynamic perturbations more effectively and potentially facilitate treatment.

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