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1.
Front Genet ; 13: 805709, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35480324

RESUMO

Background: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the single most important genetic cause of childhood mortality globally. Newborn screening (NBS) is the recommended intervention aimed at early identification of babies with SCD and their linkage to care. To ensure success of NBS, pregnant women need to have the required knowledge on SCD and therefore motivation to screen their babies. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hemoglobin-S and assess the baseline level of knowledge on SCD among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in urban settings in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted between August 2020 and February 2021, involving 600 pregnant women at 20-28 weeks of gestation attending antenatal clinics at Buguruni Health Center, Mbagala Hospital, and Sinza Hospital in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. We administered a structured questionnaire to all participants to assess socio-demographic characteristics and baseline level of knowledge on SCD, where those scoring 7 or higher out of 10 questions were considered to have good knowledge. We screened for SCD a total of 300 participants from two centers (Buguruni Health Center and Mbagala Hospital) by using Sickle SCAN point-of-care test (BioMedomics Inc., United States). We used SPSS version 23 to analyze the data. On determining the association between level of knowledge and socio-demographic factors, we used Pearson's Chi-square and multivariate logistic regression in ascertaining the strength of associations. Results: Of the 600 participants, the majority were of the age between 26 and 35 years (51%), with the parity of 1-3 children (55.8%) and secondary level of education (43%), while 56% were self-employed. Only 14.7% had good knowledge on SCD. The majority of the participants had ever heard of SCD (81.3%), most of them heard from the streets (42.4%), and only 2.4% heard from hospitals. Of all 600 study participants, only 2 (0.3%) knew their SCD status while 7.7% declared having a family history of SCD. A proficient level of knowledge on SCD is associated with a high level of education, occupation, and knowing personal status of SCD. Among 300 participants who were screened for SCD, 252 were Hb-AA (84%), 47 were Hb-AS (15.7%), and 1 (0.3%) was Hb-SS. Conclusion: Despite the high prevalence of hemoglobin-S among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in urban settings in Tanzania, there is a poor level of knowledge on SCD and personal knowledge of SCD status. Maternal screening and health education on SCD should be included as part of the comprehensive package for health promotion at antenatal clinics.

2.
Cell ; 185(8): 1261-1265, 2022 Apr 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35385685

RESUMO

Through studies in mice and in humans, Stuart Orkin showed that GATA-1 is a master transcriptional regulator of hematopoiesis. He has highlighted the role of BCL11A in the fetal-adult hemoglobin switch. The Gairdner Foundation Award recognizes Orkin's contribution to the development of gene therapy of sickle cell disease.


Assuntos
Anemia Falciforme , Distinções e Prêmios , Terapia Genética , Anemia Falciforme/genética , Anemia Falciforme/terapia , Animais , Modelos Animais de Doenças , Hemoglobina Fetal/genética , Hematopoese/genética , Humanos , Camundongos , Proteínas Repressoras/genética
3.
Front Genet ; 13: 802355, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35281803

RESUMO

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common clinically significant hemoglobinopathy, characterized by painful episodes, anemia, high risk of infection, and other acute and chronic complications. In Africa, where the disease is most prevalent, large longitudinal data on patients and their outcomes are lacking. This article describes the experiences of the Kumasi Center for SCD at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KCSCD-KATH), a Sickle Pan-African Research Consortium (SPARCO) site and a SickleInAfrica Consortium member, in establishing a SCD registry for the evaluation of the outcomes of patients. It also provides a report of a preliminary analysis of the data. The process of developing the registry database involved comprehensive review of the center's SCD patient medical records, incorporating data elements developed by the SickleInAfrica Consortium and obtaining ethical clearance from the local Institutional Review Board. From December 2017 to March 2020, 3,148 SCD patients were enrolled into the SCD registry. Enrollment was during the SCD outpatient clinic visits or through home visits. A significant proportion of the patients was from the newborn screening cohort (50.3%) and was males (52.9%). SCD-SS, SCD-SC, and Sß +thalassemia were seen in 67.2, 32.5, and 0.3% patients, respectively. The majority of the patients were in a steady state at enrollment; however, some were enrolled after discharge for an acute illness admission. The top two clinical diagnoses for SCD-SS patients were sickle cell painful events and acute anemia secondary to hyperhemolysis with incidence rates of 141.86 per 10,000 person months of observation (PMO) and 32.74 per 10,000 PMO, respectively. In SCD-SC patients, the top two diagnoses were sickle cell painful events and avascular necrosis with incidence rates of 203.09 per 10,000 PMO and 21.19 per 10,000 PMO, respectively. The SPARCO Kumasi site has developed skills and infrastructure to design, manage, and analyze data in the SCD registry. The newborn screening program and alternative recruitment methods such as radio announcement and home visits for defaulting patients were the key steps taken in enrolling patients into the registry. The registry will provide longitudinal data that will help improve knowledge of SCD in Ghana and Africa through research.

4.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e057623, 2022 03 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35264367

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Given the fundamental role of newborn bloodspot screening (NBS) to enable prompt diagnosis and optimal clinical management of individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD), we sought to systematically assess enablers and barriers to implementation of NBS programmes for SCD in Africa using established qualitative research methods. SETTING: Childbirth centres and NBS laboratories from six countries in East, West and Southern Africa. PARTICIPANTS: Eight programme leaders involved with establishing and operating NBS programmes for SCD in Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria and Tanzania. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Data obtained through a structured, phased interview approach were analysed using a combination of inductive and deductive codes and used to determine primary themes related to the implementation and sustainability of SCD NBS programmes. RESULTS: Four primary themes emerged from the analysis relating to governance (eg, pragmatic considerations when deploying overcommitted clinical staff to perform NBS), technical (eg, design and execution of operational processes), cultural (eg, variability of knowledge and perceptions of community-based staff) and financial (eg, issues that can arise when external funding may effectively preclude government inputs) aspects. Key learnings included perceived factors that contribute to long-term NBS programme sustainability. CONCLUSIONS: The establishment of enduring NBS programmes is a proven approach to improving the health of populations with SCD. Organising such programmes in Africa is feasible, but initial implementation does not assure sustainability. Our analysis suggests that future programmes should prioritise government partner participation and funding from the earliest stages of programme development.


Assuntos
Anemia Falciforme , Triagem Neonatal , Anemia Falciforme/diagnóstico , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Nigéria , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Pesquisa Qualitativa
5.
Eur J Paediatr Neurol ; 37: 105-113, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35182942

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Developmental difficulties in many cognitive domains are common in children with sickle cell anaemia (SCA). Children with stroke are most affected but delayed or atypical cognitive function has been reported in children with SCA and silent infarcts (SCI), vasculopathy, and normal brain MRI. However, very few studies of cognition have been conducted in Africa, a continent with 75% of the SCA burden. We therefore investigated cognitive profiles in Tanzanian children with SCA and examined the impact of age, SCI, vasculopathy, and haemoglobin concentration (Hb). METHODS: Children aged 6-16 years with and without SCA were eligible for this cross-sectional study. Cognitive assessment was performed using Raven's Matrices, assessing fluid, non-verbal intelligence and subtests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children (WISC-IV), assessing processing speed (PS), perceptual reasoning (PR), and working memory (WM) as these tests are less culture-bound. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography (MRA) were also completed to assess the presence of SCI and vasculopathy. Hb was collected in both SCA children and their non-SCA siblings. RESULTS: Seventy-three children with SCA and 71 healthy siblings (Meanages 11.9, SD = 2.8 and 11.1, SD = 2.9 years respectively) were recruited. Compared with healthy siblings, children with SCA had lower PS (Meandiff 7.35 points; p = .002). Older children had higher performance scores on all tests in relation to their ages. Lowest cognitive scores were observed on the PS subtest, where patients with SCI (SCI+) had lowest mean values as compared to children with no SCI (SCI-) and healthy siblings (i.e., SCI+ < SCI- < healthy siblings, p = .028). On post-hoc analysis the difference was between SCI+ and healthy siblings SCI+ < non-SCA siblings (p = .015); there was no difference between SCI+ and SCI- patient groups. PS was significantly lower in SCA patients with no vasculopathy as compared to healthy siblings. The mean difference from healthy siblings was -8.352 and -0.752 points for VASC- and VASC + respectively (p = .004). There was a significant positive effect of Hb on PSI (p = .001) in both patients and controls and a trend level significant positive effect of Hb on PR (p = .050) and WM (p = .051). CONCLUSION: In this Tanzanian study, cognitive performance was reduced in children with SCA with or without SCI on MRI or vasculopathy. Cognitive performance improved with increasing age. Lower Hb was associated with lower cognitive performance in both patients with SCA and their non-SCA siblings. SCI and vasculopathy do not appear to have an impact on cognitive function.


Assuntos
Anemia Falciforme , Adolescente , Anemia Falciforme/complicações , Anemia Falciforme/diagnóstico por imagem , Infarto Cerebral/complicações , Infarto Cerebral/etiologia , Criança , Cognição , Estudos Transversais , Hemoglobinas , Humanos , Tanzânia
6.
BMC Genomics ; 22(1): 902, 2021 Dec 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34915846

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an important cause of under-five mortality. Tanzania is the 5th country in the world with the highest births prevalence of SCD individuals. Significant advances in the neonatal diagnosis of SCD using rapid point-of-care testing have been made. However genetic confirmation is still required for positive cases, in uncertain cases, in multiply transfused patients, to resolve compound heterozygosity (Hb S/ ß0 Thal or Hb S/ ß+ thal) not uncommon in the coastal regions of East Africa and increasingly also for pre-marital counselling and potentially for future curative approaches such as gene therapy. The currently available DNA tests are prohibitively expensive. Here, we describe an easy-to-use, affordable and accurate ß-globin sequencing approach that can be easily integrated within existing NBS for SCD and other haemoglobinopathies especially in Low- and Middle-income Countries. AIM: To evaluate an affordable DNA technology for the diagnosis of Sickle cell disease and other haemoglobinopathies in a resource-limited setting. METHODS: Laboratory-based validation study was conducted by Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences and the University of Oxford involving sequencing of the entire ß -haemoglobin locus using the Oxford Nanopore MinION platform. A total number of 36 Dried blood spots and whole blood samples were subjected to conventional protein-based methods (isoelectric focusing, HPLC), and/or sequenced by the Sanger method as comparators. RESULTS: Sequencing results for SCD using the MinION were 100% concordant with those from the Sanger method. In addition, the long-read DNA sequencing method enabled the resolution of cases with unusual phenotypes which make up 1% of all children in Tanzania. The cost is £11/ sample for consumables, which is cheaper compared to other sequencing platforms. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of a comprehensive single DNA assay as a definitive diagnostic test for SCD and other haemoglobinopathies. The test is fast, precise, accurate and affordable.


Assuntos
Anemia Falciforme , Hemoglobinopatias , Anemia Falciforme/diagnóstico , Anemia Falciforme/genética , DNA , Testes Diagnósticos de Rotina , Hemoglobinopatias/diagnóstico , Hemoglobinopatias/genética , Humanos , Tanzânia
7.
Glob Health Sci Pract ; 9(3): 626-639, 2021 09 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34593586

RESUMO

Health sector priorities and interventions to prevent and manage noncommunicable diseases and injuries (NCDIs) in low- and lower-middle-income countries (LLMICs) have primarily adopted elements of the World Health Organization Global Action Plan for NCDs 2013-2020. However, there have been limited efforts in LLMICs to prioritize among conditions and health-sector interventions for NCDIs based on local epidemiology and contextually relevant risk factors or that incorporate the equitable distribution of health outcomes. The Lancet Commission on Reframing Noncommunicable Diseases and Injuries for the Poorest Billion supported national NCDI Poverty Commissions to define local NCDI epidemiology, determine an expanded set of priority NCDI conditions, and recommend cost-effective, equitable health-sector interventions. Fifteen national commissions and 1 state-level commission were established from 2016-2019. Six commissions completed the prioritization exercise and selected an average of 25 NCDI conditions; 15 conditions were selected by all commissions, including asthma, breast cancer, cervical cancer, diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2, epilepsy, hypertensive heart disease, intracerebral hemorrhage, ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, major depressive disorder, motor vehicle road injuries, rheumatic heart disease, sickle cell disorders, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The commissions prioritized an average of 35 health-sector interventions based on cost-effectiveness, financial risk protection, and equity-enhancing rankings. The prioritized interventions were estimated to cost an additional US$4.70-US$13.70 per capita or approximately 9.7%-35.6% of current total health expenditure (0.6%-4.0% of current gross domestic product). Semistructured surveys and qualitative interviews of commission representatives demonstrated positive outcomes in several thematic areas, including understanding NCDIs of poverty, informing national planning and implementation of NCDI health-sector interventions, and improving governance and coordination for NCDIs. Overall, national NCDI Poverty Commissions provided a platform for evidence-based, locally driven determination of priorities within NCDIs.


Assuntos
Transtorno Depressivo Maior , Doenças não Transmissíveis , Países em Desenvolvimento , Gastos em Saúde , Humanos , Doenças não Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Doenças não Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , Pobreza
11.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0253073, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34398896

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The health of populations living in extreme poverty has been a long-standing focus of global development efforts, and continues to be a priority during the Sustainable Development Goal era. However, there has not been a systematic attempt to quantify the magnitude and causes of the burden in this specific population for almost two decades. We estimated disease rates by cause for the world's poorest billion and compared these rates to those in high-income populations. METHODS: We defined the population in extreme poverty using a multidimensional poverty index. We used national-level disease burden estimates from the 2017 Global Burden of Disease Study and adjusted these to account for within-country variation in rates. To adjust for within-country variation, we looked to the relationship between rates of extreme poverty and disease rates across countries. In our main modeling approach, we used these relationships when there was consistency with expert opinion from a survey we conducted of disease experts regarding the associations between household poverty and the incidence and fatality of conditions. Otherwise, no within-country variation was assumed. We compared results across multiple approaches for estimating the burden in the poorest billion, including aggregating national-level burden from the countries with the highest poverty rates. We examined the composition of the estimated disease burden among the poorest billion and made comparisons with estimates for high-income countries. RESULTS: The composition of disease burden among the poorest billion, as measured by disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), was 65% communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional (CMNN) diseases, 29% non-communicable diseases (NCDs), and 6% injuries. Age-standardized DALY rates from NCDs were 44% higher in the poorest billion (23,583 DALYs per 100,000) compared to high-income regions (16,344 DALYs per 100,000). Age-standardized DALY rates were 2,147% higher for CMNN conditions (32,334 DALYs per 100,000) and 86% higher for injuries (4,182 DALYs per 100,000) in the poorest billion, compared to high-income regions. CONCLUSION: The disease burden among the poorest people globally compared to that in high income countries is highly influenced by demographics as well as large disparities in burden from many conditions. The comparisons show that the largest disparities remain in communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional diseases, though NCDs and injuries are an important part of the "unfinished agenda" of poor health among those living in extreme poverty.


Assuntos
Efeitos Psicossociais da Doença , Carga Global da Doença/economia , Doenças não Transmissíveis , Transtornos Nutricionais , Pobreza/economia , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Doenças não Transmissíveis/economia , Doenças não Transmissíveis/mortalidade , Transtornos Nutricionais/economia , Transtornos Nutricionais/metabolismo
12.
Hemoglobin ; 45(3): 163-170, 2021 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34355623

RESUMO

Sickle cell disease is a genetic disease with a predisposition to infections caused by encapsulated organisms, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae. Pneumococcal vaccines and prophylactic penicillin have reduced the rate of this infection and mortality in sickle cell disease. However, implementation of these interventions is limited in Africa. The objectives of the study were to assess health care providers' behaviors with the implementation of pneumococcal vaccination and penicillin prophylaxis and to identify barriers to their use. A 25-item online questionnaire was administered through SickleinAfrica: a network of researchers, and healthcare providers, in Ghana, Nigeria, and Tanzania, working to improve health outcomes of sickle cell disease in Africa. Data was collected and managed using the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap), tools and data analysis was done using STATA version 13 and R statistical software. Eighty-two medical practitioners responded to the questionnaire. Only 54.0 and 48.7% of respondents indicated the availability of published guidelines on sickle cell disease management and pneumococcal vaccine use, respectively, at their facilities. The majority (54.0%) perceived that the vaccines are effective but over 20.0% were uncertain of their usefulness. All respondents from Ghana and Tanzania affirmed the availability of guidelines for penicillin prophylaxis in contrast to 44.1% in Nigeria. Eighty-five percent of respondents affirmed the need for penicillin prophylaxis but 15.0% had a contrary opinion for reasons including the rarity of isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae in African studies, and therefore, the uncertainty of its benefit. Lack of published guidelines on the management of sickle cell disease and doubts about the necessity of prophylactic measures are potential barriers to the implementation of effective interventions.


Assuntos
Anemia Falciforme , Penicilinas , Infecções Pneumocócicas , Vacinas Pneumocócicas/uso terapêutico , Anemia Falciforme/complicações , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Nigéria , Penicilinas/uso terapêutico , Infecções Pneumocócicas/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções Pneumocócicas/etiologia , Infecções Pneumocócicas/prevenção & controle , Streptococcus pneumoniae
13.
J Cancer Educ ; 36(Suppl 1): 101-108, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34128212

RESUMO

Research productivity and outcomes of junior researchers are usually correlated with the degree and quality of mentorship they receive. A bottom-up approach was followed to develop a research group at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI), the major cancer center in Tanzania, to build upon the existing clinical and research resources and institutional global collaborations. The ORCI is a clinical center focused on radio- and chemo-therapy treatment of cancer patients from all over Tanzania. In addition, ORCI has a long-standing early detection program for educating women and screening them for cervical cancer. The ORCI physicians have been exposed to cancer research for the past 20 years through non-degree and degree training in the USA and Europe. In addition, US and European groups have been conducting collaborative research and training of oncologists and graduate students at ORCI. The exposure to research through the above-listed venues motivated the clinicians at ORCI to develop their own Research Club (RC) to learn about research methods, seek independent funding, and outline a research agenda for cancer research in Tanzania. However, it seems that mentorship is needed to help the RC members apply the lessons learned from didactic teaching. Mentorship is also needed to enable the RC members to utilize the enormous clinical and epidemiologic data generated by the institutional programs for prevention, treatment, and follow up of patients. This manuscript describes the inception of the program and its achievements, limitations, and suggested opportunities for improvement as a possible model for other LMICs.


Assuntos
Detecção Precoce de Câncer , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero , Escolaridade , Feminino , Humanos , Programas de Rastreamento , Tanzânia
14.
Mediterr J Hematol Infect Dis ; 13(1): e2021036, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34007424

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Malaria morbidity and mortality, almost entirely from Plasmodium falciparum, are still rampant in Africa: therefore, it is important to study the biology of the parasite and the parasite-host cell interactions. In vitro cultivation of Plasmodium falciparum is most useful for this purpose, as well as for investigating drug resistance and possible new therapies. Here we report that the Trager & Jensen continuous culture of P. falciparum can be established in a laboratory in Tanzania with minimal facilities and with modest expenditure. METHODOLOGY: This was an in-vitro set up of continuous culture of Plasmodium falciparum study, carried out in 2016-2020 at Muhimbili university of health and allied sciences, Dar-es salaam. Parasite samples were obtained from patients with acute malaria, frozen parasites, and live cultures. Data was collected and analyzed using GraphPad Prism version 8. RESULTS: We have successfully achieved exponential growth of existing strains that are used worldwide, as well as of parasites in clinical samples from patients with acute malaria. In the aim to optimize growth we have compared human serum and bovine serum albumin as components of the culture media. Additionally, culture synchronization has been achieved using sorbitol. CONCLUSION: This experimental system is now available to our institution and to researchers aiming at investigating drug sensitivity and mechanisms of protection against Plasmodium falciparum that accrue from various genes expressed in red cells.

16.
Int J Neonatal Screen ; 7(1)2021 Feb 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33652550

RESUMO

The prevalence of sickle cell disease is high in Africa, with significant public health effects on the affected countries. Many of the countries with the highest prevalence of the disease also have poor health care systems and a high burden of infectious diseases with many other competing health care priorities. Although considerable efforts have been made to implement newborn screening for sickle cell disease programs in Africa, coverage is still low. Tanzania has one of the highest birth prevalence of children with sickle cell disease in Africa. In 2015, the country implemented a pilot project for Newborn Screening for Sickle Cell Disease to assess feasibility. Several efforts have been made afterwards to continue providing the screening services as well as related comprehensive care services. Using qualitative methods, we conducted in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with policy makers (n = 4), health care providers (n = 21) and families (n = 15) to provide an analysis of their experiences and perspectives on efforts to expand and sustain newborn screening for sickle cell disease and related comprehensive care services in the country. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze the data through the framework analysis method. The findings have demonstrated both the opportunities and areas that need addressing in the implementation and sustainability of the services in low resource settings. A key area of strengthening is full integration of the services in countries' health care systems to facilitate the coverage, accessibility and affordability of the services. Although the coverage of newborn screening services for sickle cell disease is still low, efforts at the local level to sustain the implementation of the programs and related comprehensive care services are encouraging and can be used as a model for other programs implemented in low resources settings.

17.
J Community Genet ; 12(1): 143-154, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32789668

RESUMO

Introducing newborn screening (NBS) services for sickle cell disease (SCD) in Africa has been proven to be one of the most cost-effective approach to reducing morbidity and mortality associated with this condition. In view of this evidence, efforts have been made by countries in Africa where SCD prevalence is high to pilot NBS programmes and to strengthen comprehensive care services for SCD. While it is important to reap the benefits of NBS for SCD in Africa in terms of overall quantitative measures, it is also important to understand how certain social and cultural conditions may disproportionately influence the outcomes of screening for some groups. The aim of this study was to analyse the role of gender norms before and after NBS for SCD in Tanzania, and to assess how they influence the quality of care of diagnosed children. Using qualitative methods, we did in-depth interviews with families of children with SCD identified through the NBS services and focus group sessions with nurses working in neonatal and postnatal sections of regional referral hospitals in Dar es Salaam. By analysing the experiences of both the families and nurses, we were able to provide evidence on, firstly, the gendered relations that undergird childcare and, secondly, how those relations influence the quality of care the child may potentially receive. The results emphasize the importance of studying the social implications of SCD in Africa, especially with regard to improving the quality of care for patients with SCD in the region. We propose simple interventions, including gender-conscious health education and genetic counselling, which can help to improve the community understanding of genetic diseases while also reducing gender-related inequalities related to SCD care in Africa.

20.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e049979, 2021 12 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34972761

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The paucity of data describing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in pregnancy in many parts of Africa including Tanzania has given rise to challenges in proper management by the healthcare providers. This study is set out to (1) determine the prevalence of a range of CVDs during pregnancy in women attending antenatal clinics in Tanzania and (2) determine the impact of these CVDs on maternal and fetal outcomes at delivery. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a cross-sectional study with a prospective component to be conducted in two referral hospitals in Tanzania. Pregnant women aged ≥18 years diagnosed with a CVD during the antenatal period are being identified and extensively characterised by performing clinical assessment, modified WHO staging, electrocardiography, echocardiography and laboratory tests. Patients identified with CVDs (exposed) and a subset without (unexposed) will be followed up to determine maternal and fetal outcomes at delivery. A minimum sample of 1560 will be sufficient to estimate the prevalence of CVDs with a 95% CI of 2.75% to 5.25%. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study is being conducted in accordance with the Helsinki declaration on studies involving human subjects. Ethical approvals have been obtained from Muhimbili University (reference number DA.282/298/01.C/) and Bugando Medical Centre (reference number CREC/330/2019) Ethics Committees. Informed consent is sought from all potential participants before any interview or investigations are performed. Study findings will be disseminated to the scientific community through different methods. Results will also be communicated to policymakers and to the public, as appropriate.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares , Adolescente , Adulto , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Cuidado Pré-Natal , Prognóstico , Estudos Prospectivos , Tanzânia/epidemiologia
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